• QUORA: Were Native Americans really as peaceful & innocent (not hostile

    From (David P.)@21:1/5 to All on Mon Oct 25 13:29:15 2021
    QUORA: Were Native Americans really as peaceful & innocent
    (not hostile), during 17th-19th c., towards colonists &
    each other as often claimed?
    by Ernest W. Adams, Lived in The USA (1966–99), 10 months ago

    Some tribes were fairly peaceful farmers: the Pueblo, Hopi,
    & Zuni, for example. Others were extremely warlike &
    considered killing enemies an important rite of passage
    for young men. They raided other tribes for property &
    slaves, & ritually tortured prisoners to death.

    The peaceful tree-hugging native American is an invention
    of the 60s counterculture, which some of the native
    Americans lost no time in taking advantage of.

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  • From El Castor@21:1/5 to imbibe@mindspring.com on Mon Oct 25 22:48:20 2021
    On Mon, 25 Oct 2021 13:29:15 -0700 (PDT), "(David P.)"
    <imbibe@mindspring.com> wrote:

    QUORA: Were Native Americans really as peaceful & innocent
    (not hostile), during 17th-19th c., towards colonists &
    each other as often claimed?
    by Ernest W. Adams, Lived in The USA (196699), 10 months ago

    Some tribes were fairly peaceful farmers: the Pueblo, Hopi,
    & Zuni, for example. Others were extremely warlike &
    considered killing enemies an important rite of passage
    for young men. They raided other tribes for property &
    slaves, & ritually tortured prisoners to death.

    The peaceful tree-hugging native American is an invention
    of the 60s counterculture, which some of the native
    Americans lost no time in taking advantage of.

    Little known fact about Sam Houston. As a boy in Tennessee he ran away
    from home and went to live with the Cherokees. They welcomed him into
    the tribe, and gave him a Cherokee name which translates to Raven. He
    was a life long friend of the Cherokees.

    I had an ancestor who was elected to the Michigan state legislature in
    1842. A few weeks into his first session he wrote home to his wife and described his new life and meeting the governor. The letter was handed
    down in the family and I donated it to an historical society a few
    years ago. He seemed annoyed and frustrated by one thing in
    particular, thieving raids on the local people. The raiders were not
    Indians, they were Canadians. (-8

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