• Unregistered deaths 1859 Shipwreck South Australia-Victoria

    From sascar70@gmail.com@21:1/5 to All on Tue Aug 29 01:29:12 2017
    Hi all,
    While browsing through some old emails, I saw this and thought I might repost it - it comes from genforum via Debbie who gave me permission to post it back in May 2003. Hope it helps someone.
    Cheers,
    Di
    Quote
    While researching the death of my family members who died in a shipwreck I came to realise that many of the victims of the "Admella" shipwreck in 1859 had not had their deaths registered.

    Perhaps it will help someone find out what happened to that missing family member.

    Survivors and Victims were;

    Twenty four individuals- 11 passengers and 13 crew members survived.
    Crew that survived
    Hugh McEwen, master
    James Hutcheson, first mate
    G B McNair, purser
    George Hills, fore cabin steward
    George Ward, cabin boy
    John McDermott, second cook
    David Peters, fireman
    Robert Wright, trimmer
    Robinson Duckering, lamp trimmer
    Charles Locke, able seaman
    John Welch, able seaman
    Robert Knapman, able seaman
    John Leach, able seaman

    Passengers that survived
    Cabin
    Miss Ledwith, Adelaide
    Benjamin Rockfort, Adelaide
    Hurtle Fisher, Adelaide
    James Miller, Victoria

    Fore-cabin
    Thomas O’Halloran
    Thomas Richarson
    Patrick Carrick
    Michael Forrester
    Hugh McInnes
    Andrew, servant to Mr Rochfort
    James Webb


    Seventy seven people perished – 64 passengers and 13 crew perished
    Crew that perished
    Miss Clendinning, stewardess
    Margaret Meagher, fore-cabin stewardess
    Soren Holm, able seaman
    J Johnson, second mate
    James Hare, cabin steward
    Simon Munro, first engineer
    Walter Brown, second engineer
    J Orr, first cook
    Two assistant stewards
    Three seaman

    Passengers that perished
    Cabin
    James Margarey, Geelong
    ? Holbrook, Adelaide
    Dr Vaux, Ship Norfork
    ? Whittaker, Adelaide
    George Fisher, Adelaide
    Miss Nugent, Adelaide
    ? Harris, master mariner, Adelaide

    fore-cabin
    Mrs Goode
    Patrick Lennan
    Mrs Lennan
    John Watson
    Mrs Watson and two children
    Mrs Ramsay
    Frenando Bade
    George Watkins
    Hester Watkins (Hester Watkins Williamson)
    Charlotte Short and four children
    Benjamin Baker
    Mrs Coxell and child
    John Battrick
    Mrw Bowie
    Mrs Keith and four children
    Edwin Chambers
    George Forrester(Foster)
    Mrs Forrester(Foster)
    Eliza Paul
    John Tregeagle
    Patrick Arthur
    J Carmichael
    James Davidson
    J Davis
    Wilhelm
    Alfred French
    Mrs Gold
    Henry Grosse
    Edward Haynes
    Wilhelm Hermann
    Edwin Jackson
    Mrs Kerwin and three children
    Richard King
    Thomas Mensforth
    Mr Murray
    Mrs Murray
    John O’Brien
    William Rosewell
    William Taylor
    Walter Underwood, a youth
    Mrs Weatherall
    Mr Williamson
    Mr Wood

    As the book suggests, names are as reported and may be mis-spelt. Where names are in brackets I have made a correction as they were my family members and were in the SA BDM's as died Admella Shipwreck August 1859.


    This book is located in South Australia at the Flinders University Central Library in their special collections area and is in quite good condition.

    Mossman, Samuel (1859) Narrative of the shipwreck of the ‘Admella’, intercolonial steamer, on the southern coast of Australia/ drawn up from authentic statements furnished by the rescuers and survivors. Printed and published for the Committee of the
    Admella’ Fund by J.H. Moulines and Co.Melbourne.Appendix A (pp103-104). Unquote

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  • From Valerie And George@21:1/5 to All on Wed Aug 30 22:09:03 2017
    Copy: genanz@rootsweb.com

    I had an ancestor, Dr Robert Rogers, who drowned crossing the Lachlan River in 1849 near Eugowra NSW and his death was not registered even though The Bathurst Advocate wrote up details of his death, the finding of his body and the so-called temporary
    burial on the riverbank near Nanami Falls and then the impossibility of returning his body to Carcoar where he lived for a proper burial. I contacted the NSW Reg. BDM and they said even before official registrations of death there was no church record
    without a proper burial where a doctor had seen the body. I imagine this is the same situation with these unregistered burials/deaths of people shipwrecked as their bodies were not recovered. I am aware that when people actually died at sea on a ship (
    recorded by ship's surgeon and captain) their deaths were registered at the next port of call. I hope this is helpful.
    Lists which Di has published are a wonderful source for genealogists.
    Valerie Wotton


    Sent from my iPad

    On 29 Aug 2017, at 6:29 PM, sascar70@gmail.com wrote:

    Hi all,
    While browsing through some old emails, I saw this and thought I might repost it - it comes from genforum via Debbie who gave me permission to post it back in May 2003. Hope it helps someone.
    Cheers,
    Di
    Quote
    While researching the death of my family members who died in a shipwreck I came to realise that many of the victims of the "Admella" shipwreck in 1859 had not had their deaths registered.

    Perhaps it will help someone find out what happened to that missing family member.

    Survivors and Victims were;

    Twenty four individuals- 11 passengers and 13 crew members survived.
    Crew that survived
    Hugh McEwen, master
    James Hutcheson, first mate
    G B McNair, purser
    George Hills, fore cabin steward
    George Ward, cabin boy
    John McDermott, second cook
    David Peters, fireman
    Robert Wright, trimmer
    Robinson Duckering, lamp trimmer
    Charles Locke, able seaman
    John Welch, able seaman
    Robert Knapman, able seaman
    John Leach, able seaman

    Passengers that survived
    Cabin
    Miss Ledwith, Adelaide
    Benjamin Rockfort, Adelaide
    Hurtle Fisher, Adelaide
    James Miller, Victoria

    Fore-cabin
    Thomas O’Halloran
    Thomas Richarson
    Patrick Carrick
    Michael Forrester
    Hugh McInnes
    Andrew, servant to Mr Rochfort
    James Webb


    Seventy seven people perished – 64 passengers and 13 crew perished
    Crew that perished
    Miss Clendinning, stewardess
    Margaret Meagher, fore-cabin stewardess
    Soren Holm, able seaman
    J Johnson, second mate
    James Hare, cabin steward
    Simon Munro, first engineer
    Walter Brown, second engineer
    J Orr, first cook
    Two assistant stewards
    Three seaman

    Passengers that perished
    Cabin
    James Margarey, Geelong
    ? Holbrook, Adelaide
    Dr Vaux, Ship Norfork
    ? Whittaker, Adelaide
    George Fisher, Adelaide
    Miss Nugent, Adelaide
    ? Harris, master mariner, Adelaide

    fore-cabin
    Mrs Goode
    Patrick Lennan
    Mrs Lennan
    John Watson
    Mrs Watson and two children
    Mrs Ramsay
    Frenando Bade
    George Watkins
    Hester Watkins (Hester Watkins Williamson)
    Charlotte Short and four children
    Benjamin Baker
    Mrs Coxell and child
    John Battrick
    Mrw Bowie
    Mrs Keith and four children
    Edwin Chambers
    George Forrester(Foster)
    Mrs Forrester(Foster)
    Eliza Paul
    John Tregeagle
    Patrick Arthur
    J Carmichael
    James Davidson
    J Davis
    Wilhelm
    Alfred French
    Mrs Gold
    Henry Grosse
    Edward Haynes
    Wilhelm Hermann
    Edwin Jackson
    Mrs Kerwin and three children
    Richard King
    Thomas Mensforth
    Mr Murray
    Mrs Murray
    John O’Brien
    William Rosewell
    William Taylor
    Walter Underwood, a youth
    Mrs Weatherall
    Mr Williamson
    Mr Wood

    As the book suggests, names are as reported and may be mis-spelt. Where names are in brackets I have made a correction as they were my family members and were in the SA BDM's as died Admella Shipwreck August 1859.


    This book is located in South Australia at the Flinders University Central Library in their special collections area and is in quite good condition.

    Mossman, Samuel (1859) Narrative of the shipwreck of the ‘Admella’, intercolonial steamer, on the southern coast of Australia/ drawn up from authentic statements furnished by the rescuers and survivors. Printed and published for the Committee of
    the ‘Admella’ Fund by J.H. Moulines and Co.Melbourne.Appendix A (pp103-104).
    Unquote


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  • From Doug Laidlaw@21:1/5 to Valerie And George on Wed Aug 30 23:19:32 2017
    On 30/08/17 22:09, Valerie And George wrote:
    I contacted the NSW Reg. BDM and they said even before official registrations of death there was no church record without a proper burial where a doctor had seen the body.

    The rule was that a coroner's finding quoted an inquest on the body of
    the person "then and there lying dead," or similar. Coroners had
    juries. If there was no body, there could be no inquest. Without a
    doctor's certificate or a coronial inquest, there could be no
    registration of the death. This was the rule in Victoria when Harold
    Holt drowned. One of my contemporaries became State Coroner for
    Victoria, and wrote his own Coroners Act for the modern age.

    An inquest wasn't required in every case. In one of my files, the
    husband walked into the home of his ex, sat on the sofa and just died.
    The autopsy showed that he was suffering from a heart condition that had
    never been diagnosed. [It is well known that men avoid going to a
    doctor.] The Coroner ruled that an inquest was not needed.

    Doug.

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  • From Doug Laidlaw@21:1/5 to Doug Laidlaw on Wed Aug 30 23:25:51 2017
    On 30/08/17 23:19, Doug Laidlaw wrote:
    On 30/08/17 22:09, Valerie And George wrote:
    I contacted the NSW Reg. BDM and they said even before official
    registrations of death there was no church record without a proper
    burial where a doctor had seen the body.

    The rule was that a coroner's finding quoted an inquest on the body of
    the person "then and there lying dead," or similar.  Coroners had
    juries.  If there was no body, there could be no inquest.  Without a doctor's certificate or a coronial inquest, there could be no
    registration of the death.  This was the rule in Victoria when Harold
    Holt drowned.  One of my contemporaries became State Coroner for
    Victoria, and wrote his own Coroners Act for the modern age.

    An inquest wasn't required in every case.  In one of my files, the
    husband walked into the home of his ex, sat on the sofa and just died.
    The autopsy showed that he was suffering from a heart condition that had never been diagnosed.  [It is well known that men avoid going to a doctor.]  The Coroner ruled that an inquest was not needed.

    Doug.

    Having a body is a good precaution. I index deaths for the Ryerson
    Index. In my early days, my paper had death notices for one individual
    for several days. I indexed them all. Then the paper advised that the
    man hadn't died at all! Nowadays, the paper won't publish any death
    notices until they have heard from the funeral director.

    Doug.

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