• How does one test for 'Low Latent Inhibition'?

    From arrawnraniari@gmail.com@21:1/5 to All on Thu Jun 1 02:54:08 2017
    Le samedi 11 février 2006 13:38:51 UTC-4, Chris Ianson a écrit :
    Thanks Paul.

    "The baseline test battery consisted of two neuropsychologicaltests from the CANTAB system (SWM and TOL), three eyemovement tests (reflexive saccades, anti-saccades and smoothpursuit); and a 16-item VARS."

    I had rather hoped for something simpler I could do at home with my
    partner - e.g. have her flash the light on and off repeatedly and have me count the number of times or something, and if I notice it more than x number, then I have Low LI.

    Anyone able to boil this down to a home test? Despite the invitation Paul, I don't think I have the time to develop such a thing, and it may well already exist.

    Thanks :)

    "Paul Campbell" <primaryresearch@ix.netcom.com> wrote in message news:I1pHf.13929$rH5.4297@newsread2.news.atl.earthlink.net...
    Chris,

    First let me say, I know comparatively little about this subject. However, there does appear to be substantial amounts of information on the internet about the testing procedures used for Low Latent Inhibition. One rather technical paper is available at http://homepages.gold.ac.uk/aphome/belfastli.pdf and despite the elaborate title does explain their procedures for the testing within the paper.

    I went to the trouble to actually try and find such a "self" test for you, but was unsuccessful. While at first blush this may seem like bad news, you might actually consider this the opportunity of a lifetime! Your question, or rather the fact that there is no readily available answer to it, means you have the opportunity to DEVELOP such a self-test! If such a self-test does not exist, and it is possible to do, then you can singlehandly change the world, at least in a small way. I admit the idea is a daunting task, but may well be worth the effort. Certainly give it some consideration.

    Warmest regards,

    Paul Campbell, President
    Applied Primary Research
    http://www.appliedprimaryresearch.com


    "Chris Ianson" <notme@hotmail.com> wrote in message news:Ds2Hf.18085$wl.6876@text.news.blueyonder.co.uk...
    Hi, does anyone know where to find preferably a self-test kit or other
    diagnosis information to determine whether someone has low or reduced
    levels of Latent Inhibition?

    http://www.news.harvard.edu/gazette/2003/10.23/01-creativity.html --
    "They put 182 Harvard graduate and undergraduate students through a
    series of tests involving 1) listening to repeated strings of nonsense
    syllables, 2) hearing background noise, and 3) watching yellow lights on >> a video screen. (The researchers do not want to reveal details of how
    latent inhibition was scored because such tests are still going on with >> other subjects.)
    The students also 4) filled out questionnaires about their creative
    achievements on a new type of form developed by Carson, and they 5) took >> standard intelligence tests. When all the scores and test results were
    compared, the most creative students had lower scores for latent
    inhibition than the less creative."

    Sadly it doesn't explain how the tests were done.

    Thanks in advance :)





    hi, i havent found any online test at the time being, i am still looking (just found this post looking for one myself) but i can tell you one thing for sure that should help you find out if you have it or not.

    The simple fact that you require such a simple test for such a complex thing is (in my opinion) the answer to your question.
    If you understand the condition you are trying to diagnose, you also understand that it cannot be diagnosed with something as simple as counting flashes on a flashlight.

    If you do not understand the condition itself or do not understand why it cannot be diagnosed so simply, then your brain isnt working the way it should be working if you were affected by the said condition.

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Of course here im assuming youre a person of a certain IQ as you are smart enuff to be self-aware of such condition and trying to find answers.

    But there is still the possibility of your being affected by it and not having a IQ high enuff to understand the statements above, in wich cases, only a professional will be able to help you finding answers to your question.

    I hope this helps you :)

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  • From djkrayzk@gmail.com@21:1/5 to arrawn...@gmail.com on Thu Oct 5 01:16:58 2017
    On Thursday, June 1, 2017 at 2:54:09 AM UTC-7, arrawn...@gmail.com wrote:
    Le samedi 11 février 2006 13:38:51 UTC-4, Chris Ianson a écrit :
    Thanks Paul.

    "The baseline test battery consisted of two neuropsychologicaltests from the
    CANTAB system (SWM and TOL), three eyemovement tests (reflexive saccades, anti-saccades and smoothpursuit); and a 16-item VARS."

    I had rather hoped for something simpler I could do at home with my partner - e.g. have her flash the light on and off repeatedly and have me count the number of times or something, and if I notice it more than x number, then I have Low LI.

    Anyone able to boil this down to a home test? Despite the invitation Paul,
    I don't think I have the time to develop such a thing, and it may well already exist.

    Thanks :)

    "Paul Campbell" <primaryresearch@ix.netcom.com> wrote in message news:I1pHf.13929$rH5.4297@newsread2.news.atl.earthlink.net...
    Chris,

    First let me say, I know comparatively little about this subject. However,
    there does appear to be substantial amounts of information on the internet
    about the testing procedures used for Low Latent Inhibition. One rather technical paper is available at http://homepages.gold.ac.uk/aphome/belfastli.pdf and despite the elaborate
    title does explain their procedures for the testing within the paper.

    I went to the trouble to actually try and find such a "self" test for you,
    but was unsuccessful. While at first blush this may seem like bad news, you might actually consider this the opportunity of a lifetime! Your question, or rather the fact that there is no readily available answer to
    it, means you have the opportunity to DEVELOP such a self-test! If such a
    self-test does not exist, and it is possible to do, then you can singlehandly change the world, at least in a small way. I admit the idea is a daunting task, but may well be worth the effort. Certainly give it some consideration.

    Warmest regards,

    Paul Campbell, President
    Applied Primary Research
    http://www.appliedprimaryresearch.com


    "Chris Ianson" <notme@hotmail.com> wrote in message news:Ds2Hf.18085$wl.6876@text.news.blueyonder.co.uk...
    Hi, does anyone know where to find preferably a self-test kit or other >> diagnosis information to determine whether someone has low or reduced >> levels of Latent Inhibition?

    http://www.news.harvard.edu/gazette/2003/10.23/01-creativity.html --
    "They put 182 Harvard graduate and undergraduate students through a
    series of tests involving 1) listening to repeated strings of nonsense >> syllables, 2) hearing background noise, and 3) watching yellow lights on
    a video screen. (The researchers do not want to reveal details of how >> latent inhibition was scored because such tests are still going on with >> other subjects.)
    The students also 4) filled out questionnaires about their creative
    achievements on a new type of form developed by Carson, and they 5) took
    standard intelligence tests. When all the scores and test results were >> compared, the most creative students had lower scores for latent
    inhibition than the less creative."

    Sadly it doesn't explain how the tests were done.

    Thanks in advance :)





    hi, i havent found any online test at the time being, i am still looking (just found this post looking for one myself) but i can tell you one thing for sure that should help you find out if you have it or not.

    The simple fact that you require such a simple test for such a complex thing is (in my opinion) the answer to your question.
    If you understand the condition you are trying to diagnose, you also understand that it cannot be diagnosed with something as simple as counting flashes on a flashlight.

    If you do not understand the condition itself or do not understand why it cannot be diagnosed so simply, then your brain isnt working the way it should be working if you were affected by the said condition.

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Of course here im assuming youre a person of a certain IQ as you are smart enuff to be self-aware of such condition and trying to find answers.

    But there is still the possibility of your being affected by it and not having a IQ high enuff to understand the statements above, in wich cases, only a professional will be able to help you finding answers to your question.

    I hope this helps you :)




    Has anyone found any more info on this or have information on how to get diagnosed for LLI or not? Reading about it I can surely say "Thats Me" but getting a professional to concur is another story.

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  • From jena.fire@gmail.com@21:1/5 to All on Tue Oct 17 18:50:22 2017
    I would like information on the test you took

    jena_fire@yahoo.com

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  • From Gliceria Gumuercindo do capital@21:1/5 to All on Wed Sep 30 21:12:14 2020
    How do I join this group? I have probably the most accurate ideas for tests, they are based on aestheticism.

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