• [SR] The travelor of Tau Ceti in sci.physics.relativity

    From Richard Hachel@21:1/5 to All on Fri Sep 29 15:04:41 2023
    The Traveler of Tau Ceti.

    Those who post regularly on the usenet physics forums are familiar with
    this problem, which I imagined many years ago.

    The terms are very simple and very precise.

    We are going to send into space, thanks to new technologies,
    a rocket with a single traveler on board which will leave in accelerated
    mode towards Tau Ceti (12 al).

    The acceleration is constant and about 10 meters per second per second to obtain artificial gravity. .

    We set a=1.052m/s²

    We will then line the route with thirteen fixed clocks, each one a light
    year apart from the other.

    Before departure, we bring in two good specialists in theoretical
    relativistic physics and we ask them the question about the duration of
    the trip.

    Paul B. Andersen, it seems, proposed the equation:
    To=(x/c).sqrt(1+2c²/ax) and predicted a journey (in terrestrial time) of 12,915 years.

    Doctor Hachel proposes the same equation, and the same temporal
    prediction.

    It is on proper tenses that we no longer agree.

    By mutual agreement, Paul B. Andersen and Richard Hachel then proposed
    baby steps.

    You have to go slowly, to avoid any error of concept or mathematical correspondence.

    The first question is therefore how to synchronize the thirteen watches to obtain the instant of passage of the rocket in front of each one.

    Who sets the watches? By what process?

    It is obvious that their chronotropy will be constant and equal between
    them (that is to say that they will all beat at the same speed). Even for
    other observers in motion, if it is true that the chronotropy will differ
    from its own chronotropy, at least the chronotropy of the watches among themselves will remain identical. However, it is much less obvious that
    they all mark the same time for all observers of the universe, fixed or in various movements.

    Can anyone provide details on how we will initially attempt to tune the thirteen watches?

    R.H.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Maciej Wozniak@21:1/5 to Richard Hachel on Fri Sep 29 08:28:13 2023
    On Friday, 29 September 2023 at 17:04:45 UTC+2, Richard Hachel wrote:
    The Traveler of Tau Ceti.

    Those who post regularly on the usenet physics forums are familiar with
    this problem, which I imagined many years ago.

    The terms are very simple and very precise.

    We are going to send into space, thanks to new technologies,
    a rocket with a single traveler on board which will leave in accelerated mode towards Tau Ceti (12 al).

    The acceleration is constant and about 10 meters per second per second to obtain artificial gravity. .

    We set a=1.052m/s²

    We will then line the route with thirteen fixed clocks, each one a light year apart from the other.

    Before departure, we bring in two good specialists in theoretical relativistic physics and we ask them the question about the duration of
    the trip.

    Paul B. Andersen, it seems, proposed the equation:
    To=(x/c).sqrt(1+2c²/ax) and predicted a journey (in terrestrial time) of 12,915 years.

    Doctor Hachel proposes the same equation, and the same temporal
    prediction.

    It is on proper tenses that we no longer agree.

    By mutual agreement, Paul B. Andersen and Richard Hachel then proposed
    baby steps.

    You have to go slowly, to avoid any error of concept or mathematical correspondence.

    The first question is therefore how to synchronize the thirteen watches to obtain the instant of passage of the rocket in front of each one.

    Who sets the watches? By what process?

    It is obvious that their chronotropy will be constant and equal between
    them (that is to say that they will all beat at the same speed). Even for other observers in motion, if it is true that the chronotropy will differ from its own chronotropy, at least the chronotropy of the watches among themselves will remain identical. However, it is much less obvious that
    they all mark the same time for all observers of the universe, fixed or in various movements.

    Can anyone provide details on how we will initially attempt to tune the thirteen watches?

    It's your fantasy delusion, if you can't provide details
    about it - who could?

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Python@21:1/5 to All on Fri Sep 29 17:34:09 2023
    Le 29/09/2023 à 17:04, Richard Hachel a écrit :
    [snip idiociees]
    It is on proper tenses that we no longer agree.

    https://dictionary.cambridge.org/fr/dictionnaire/anglais/tense

    tense, noun

    any of the forms of a verb which show the time at which an action happened:

    "I sing" is in the present tense and "I sang" is in the past tense.



    [snip more idiocies]

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Gary Harnagel@21:1/5 to Richard Hachel on Sun Oct 1 07:20:33 2023
    On Friday, September 29, 2023 at 9:04:45 AM UTC-6, Richard Hachel wrote:
    The Traveler of Tau Ceti.

    Those who post regularly on the usenet physics forums are familiar with
    this problem, which I imagined many years ago.

    The terms are very simple and very precise.

    We are going to send into space, thanks to new technologies,
    a rocket with a single traveler on board which will leave in accelerated mode towards Tau Ceti (12 al).

    The acceleration is constant and about 10 meters per second per second to obtain artificial gravity. .

    We set a=1.052m/s²

    We will then line the route with thirteen fixed clocks, each one a light year apart from the other.

    Before departure, we bring in two good specialists in theoretical relativistic physics and we ask them the question about the duration of
    the trip.

    Paul B. Andersen, it seems, proposed the equation:
    To=(x/c).sqrt(1+2c²/ax) and predicted a journey (in terrestrial time) of 12,915 years.

    Doctor Hachel proposes the same equation, and the same temporal
    prediction.

    It is on proper tenses that we no longer agree.

    By mutual agreement, Paul B. Andersen and Richard Hachel then proposed
    baby steps.

    You have to go slowly, to avoid any error of concept or mathematical correspondence.

    The first question is therefore how to synchronize the thirteen watches to obtain the instant of passage of the rocket in front of each one.

    Who sets the watches? By what process?

    It is obvious that their chronotropy will be constant and equal between
    them (that is to say that they will all beat at the same speed). Even for other observers in motion, if it is true that the chronotropy will differ from its own chronotropy, at least the chronotropy of the watches among themselves will remain identical. However, it is much less obvious that
    they all mark the same time for all observers of the universe, fixed or in various movements.

    Can anyone provide details on how we will initially attempt to tune the thirteen watches?

    R.H.

    Einstein synchronization is the classical method, but that will take much longer
    to synchronize clocks than the actual journey. Of course, positioning the clocks
    in the first place will take at least as long as the journey, which will have to be
    done first. So fahgettaboutit!

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Gary Harnagel@21:1/5 to Gary Harnagel on Mon Oct 2 04:53:35 2023
    On Sunday, October 1, 2023 at 8:20:35 AM UTC-6, Gary Harnagel wrote:

    On Friday, September 29, 2023 at 9:04:45 AM UTC-6, Richard Hachel wrote:

    The Traveler of Tau Ceti.

    Those who post regularly on the usenet physics forums are familiar with this problem, which I imagined many years ago.

    The terms are very simple and very precise.

    We are going to send into space, thanks to new technologies,
    a rocket with a single traveler on board which will leave in accelerated mode towards Tau Ceti (12 al).

    The acceleration is constant and about 10 meters per second per second to obtain artificial gravity. .

    We set a=1.052m/s²

    We will then line the route with thirteen fixed clocks, each one a light year apart from the other.

    Before departure, we bring in two good specialists in theoretical relativistic physics and we ask them the question about the duration of the trip.

    Paul B. Andersen, it seems, proposed the equation: To=(x/c).sqrt(1+2c²/ax) and predicted a journey (in terrestrial time) of 12,915 years.

    Doctor Hachel proposes the same equation, and the same temporal prediction.

    It is on proper tenses that we no longer agree.

    By mutual agreement, Paul B. Andersen and Richard Hachel then proposed baby steps.

    You have to go slowly, to avoid any error of concept or mathematical correspondence.

    The first question is therefore how to synchronize the thirteen watches to obtain the instant of passage of the rocket in front of each one.

    Who sets the watches? By what process?

    It is obvious that their chronotropy will be constant and equal between them (that is to say that they will all beat at the same speed). Even for other observers in motion, if it is true that the chronotropy will differ from its own chronotropy, at least the chronotropy of the watches among themselves will remain identical. However, it is much less obvious that they all mark the same time for all observers of the universe, fixed or in various movements.

    Can anyone provide details on how we will initially attempt to tune the thirteen watches?

    R.H.

    Einstein synchronization is the classical method, but that will take much longer
    to synchronize clocks than the actual journey. Of course, positioning the clocks
    in the first place will take at least as long as the journey, which will have to be
    done first. So fahgettaboutit!

    Of course, this is only a thought experiment now, but perhaps we can go to tau ceti
    in a century or two. By then we might have practical tachyon physics and can use tachyons to synchronize the clocks (Any particle can be used for synchronization
    if we know that its speed doesn't change). We could send out a ship to drop off
    satellites a little in front of the ship that checks time dilation. But why would we bother
    if we could manipulate tachyons?

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)