• The Einstein Relative Velocity Undecidability Theorem

    From patdolan@21:1/5 to All on Sun Sep 3 14:04:50 2023
    Consider two clocks approaching (or separating) at relative velocity |v|. According to the Tom Roberts (and Legion?) interpretation of the relativistic doppler, observers riding on those clocks will always measure the other's clock to be at rest, even
    as v approaches c, each clock will appear to tic a the same rate as the other. Consequently, for any observer and any clock, no distinction can be made between a moving clock and a clock at rest--even as the clock's velocity approaches c.

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  • From Richard Hachel@21:1/5 to All on Sun Sep 3 21:50:39 2023
    Le 03/09/2023 à 23:04, patdolan a écrit :
    Consider two clocks approaching (or separating) at relative velocity |v|. According to the Tom Roberts (and Legion?) interpretation of the relativistic doppler, observers riding on those clocks will always measure the other's clock to
    be at rest, even as v approaches c, each clock will appear to tic a the same rate
    as the other. Consequently, for any observer and any clock, no distinction can be
    made between a moving clock and a clock at rest--even as the clock's velocity approaches c.

    "There is no absolute frame of reference. The laws of physics are always
    the same when there is a change of frame of reference,
    and the effects of this physics are always reciprocal by permutation of
    frame of reference"

    Several observers evolving at very different relative speeds will never be
    able to agree on the fact that one of them
    moves faster or slower than the other in a possible ether.

    If we take an terrestrial observer, and an observer moving almost at the
    speed of light (0.9999c): for the other observer, there is no doubt that
    it is the earth which is moving at 0.9999c.

    There is no solution to this, and we cannot change it.

    The universe is made like that.

    R.H.

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  • From patdolan@21:1/5 to Richard Hachel on Sun Sep 3 14:58:13 2023
    On Sunday, September 3, 2023 at 2:50:42 PM UTC-7, Richard Hachel wrote:
    Le 03/09/2023 à 23:04, patdolan a écrit :
    Consider two clocks approaching (or separating) at relative velocity |v|. According to the Tom Roberts (and Legion?) interpretation of the relativistic
    doppler, observers riding on those clocks will always measure the other's clock to
    be at rest, even as v approaches c, each clock will appear to tic a the same rate
    as the other. Consequently, for any observer and any clock, no distinction can be
    made between a moving clock and a clock at rest--even as the clock's velocity
    approaches c.

    "There is no absolute frame of reference. The laws of physics are always
    the same when there is a change of frame of reference,
    and the effects of this physics are always reciprocal by permutation of frame of reference"

    Several observers evolving at very different relative speeds will never be able to agree on the fact that one of them
    moves faster or slower than the other in a possible ether.

    If we take an terrestrial observer, and an observer moving almost at the speed of light (0.9999c): for the other observer, there is no doubt that
    it is the earth which is moving at 0.9999c.

    There is no solution to this, and we cannot change it.

    The universe is made like that.

    R.H.
    Doctor Hachel, This post got away from me before my thinking was fully formed. I disown it. More later.

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  • From Tom Roberts@21:1/5 to patdolan on Sun Sep 3 17:37:58 2023
    On 9/3/23 4:04 PM, patdolan wrote:
    Consider two clocks approaching (or separating) at relative velocity
    |v|. According to the Tom Roberts (and Legion?) interpretation of
    the relativistic doppler, observers riding on those clocks will
    always measure the other's clock to be at rest, even as v approaches
    c, each clock will appear to tic a the same rate as the other.
    Consequently, for any observer and any clock, no distinction can be
    made between a moving clock and a clock at rest--even as the clock's
    velocity approaches c.

    This is garbled and completely ridiculous -- each observer cannot
    possibly "measure the other's clock to be at rest" as they are
    "approaching (or separating) at relative velocity |v|".

    No response to such internally-inconsistent nonsense is possible.

    Tom Roberts

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