• Muon University, Cosmic Rays 101

    From patdolan@21:1/5 to All on Wed Aug 30 11:08:23 2023
    Primary cosmic rays are credited with most muon production in the atmosphere. Legion has provided the following production data for muons:

    "Again, the flux of primary cosmic rays (that produce the muons) is about 13 uSv/hr at 60,000 ft and 5 uSv/hr at 35000 ft, but only about 0.08 uSv/hr at 6000 ft, and about 0.03 uSv/hr at sea level, so the rate of muon production below 6000 feet is
    negligible."

    For a moment let us consider a universe with no relativity. Recollecting that...wait a minute!...How do we know that the blips on the FSX o-scope were all muons??? Just look at this

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Air_shower_(physics)

    The FSX had no way to discriminate between the many varieties of shower particles reaching Mt. WA and the 2.2 usec muons.

    Which pupil would like to respond to this objection?

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Bill@21:1/5 to patdolan on Wed Aug 30 12:10:52 2023
    On Wednesday, August 30, 2023 at 11:08:26 AM UTC-7, patdolan wrote:
    [Continuing to run away from imnderstanding and the demolition of his
    silly beliefs as fast as his little legs can carry him.]
    [Please help me by answering this question:] How do we know that the
    blips on the o-scope were all muons?

    Different scintillator materials are selected to optimize the yield for the particles of interest. For example, to detect muons, BC412 is typically used. Of course, such detectors are also sensitive to other radiation, such as gamma rays, but these are
    easily distinguished from muon blips by the amplitude of the "blip".

    [I apologize for not finding that out myself, which anyone with a functioning brain could easily have done, and I offer my sincere thanks for once again educating me.]

    No problem, and you're welcome. If you're actually interested in understanding, go ahead and read the thorough debunking of your claims in the trail of other threads you've left as you scurry away from knowledge.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From patdolan@21:1/5 to Bill on Wed Aug 30 12:35:17 2023
    On Wednesday, August 30, 2023 at 12:10:55 PM UTC-7, Bill wrote:
    On Wednesday, August 30, 2023 at 11:08:26 AM UTC-7, patdolan wrote:
    [Continuing to run away from imnderstanding and the demolition of his silly beliefs as fast as his little legs can carry him.]
    [Please help me by answering this question:] How do we know that the
    blips on the o-scope were all muons?

    Different scintillator materials are selected to optimize the yield for the particles of interest. For example, to detect muons, BC412 is typically used. Of course, such detectors are also sensitive to other radiation, such as gamma rays, but these are
    easily distinguished from muon blips by the amplitude of the "blip".

    [I apologize for not finding that out myself, which anyone with a functioning
    brain could easily have done, and I offer my sincere thanks for once again educating me.]

    No problem, and you're welcome. If you're actually interested in understanding, go ahead and read the thorough debunking of your claims in the trail of other threads you've left as you scurry away from knowledge.
    Legion, You are the last person I would have suspected to sink into lies, half truths and chicanery. I will attribute your last post to an out of control sense of desperation at the inevitable loss of your precious muons.

    BC412 did not exist in 1963. I checked. Also, blip amplitude was neither screened for, nor mentioned as a component part of the FSX. Here--put on this dunce cap, go to the corner and remain silent until you are give permission to take your seat again.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From patdolan@21:1/5 to patdolan on Wed Aug 30 13:14:31 2023
    On Wednesday, August 30, 2023 at 12:35:20 PM UTC-7, patdolan wrote:
    On Wednesday, August 30, 2023 at 12:10:55 PM UTC-7, Bill wrote:
    On Wednesday, August 30, 2023 at 11:08:26 AM UTC-7, patdolan wrote:
    [Continuing to run away from imnderstanding and the demolition of his silly beliefs as fast as his little legs can carry him.]
    [Please help me by answering this question:] How do we know that the blips on the o-scope were all muons?

    Different scintillator materials are selected to optimize the yield for the particles of interest. For example, to detect muons, BC412 is typically used. Of course, such detectors are also sensitive to other radiation, such as gamma rays, but these
    are easily distinguished from muon blips by the amplitude of the "blip".

    [I apologize for not finding that out myself, which anyone with a functioning
    brain could easily have done, and I offer my sincere thanks for once again
    educating me.]

    No problem, and you're welcome. If you're actually interested in understanding, go ahead and read the thorough debunking of your claims in the trail of other threads you've left as you scurry away from knowledge.
    Legion, You are the last person I would have suspected to sink into lies, half truths and chicanery. I will attribute your last post to an out of control sense of desperation at the inevitable loss of your precious muons.

    BC412 did not exist in 1963. I checked. Also, blip amplitude was neither screened for, nor mentioned as a component part of the FSX. Here--put on this dunce cap, go to the corner and remain silent until you are give permission to take your seat again.
    Legion, gaze upon fig. 5 of the FSX paper and notice the variety of amplitudes. According to your latest fabrication most of those blips can't be muons because of their amplitudes. Yet Smith Frisch make no mention of this.

    https://d1b10bmlvqabco.cloudfront.net/attach/j6wg9vo05d118z/hjzs14rvhz419k/j7jdyxbbpuwu/AJPpaperMuMesons.pdf

    Either defend your muon amplitude statement, or defend why you shouldn't serve a five minute lying major in the forum penalty box.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Volney@21:1/5 to patdolan on Wed Aug 30 17:55:17 2023
    On 8/30/2023 3:35 PM, patdolan wrote:
    On Wednesday, August 30, 2023 at 12:10:55 PM UTC-7, Bill wrote:
    On Wednesday, August 30, 2023 at 11:08:26 AM UTC-7, patdolan wrote:
    [Continuing to run away from imnderstanding and the demolition of his
    silly beliefs as fast as his little legs can carry him.]
    [Please help me by answering this question:] How do we know that the
    blips on the o-scope were all muons?

    Different scintillator materials are selected to optimize the yield for the particles of interest. For example, to detect muons, BC412 is typically used. Of course, such detectors are also sensitive to other radiation, such as gamma rays, but these
    are easily distinguished from muon blips by the amplitude of the "blip".

    [I apologize for not finding that out myself, which anyone with a functioning
    brain could easily have done, and I offer my sincere thanks for once again >>> educating me.]

    No problem, and you're welcome. If you're actually interested in understanding, go ahead and read the thorough debunking of your claims in the trail of other threads you've left as you scurry away from knowledge.
    Legion, You are the last person I would have suspected to sink into lies, half truths and chicanery. I will attribute your last post to an out of control sense of desperation at the inevitable loss of your precious muons.

    BC412 did not exist in 1963. I checked. Also, blip amplitude was neither screened for, nor mentioned as a component part of the FSX. Here--put on this dunce cap, go to the corner and remain silent until you are give permission to take your seat
    again.

    And once again we see this crank red flag. Cranks consider the
    breakthrough experiment to be the end of discussion, and the fact that
    the experiment is repeated many times with improvements (such as this
    BC412, filtering on blip amplitude etc.) is disregarded. Also the
    repeated experiments are not valid unless they use Polaroid cameras and photomultipliers connected to vacuum tube oscilloscopes and
    electromechanical counters that go KLUNK.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Bill@21:1/5 to patdolan on Wed Aug 30 16:22:01 2023
    On Wednesday, August 30, 2023 at 1:14:33 PM UTC-7, patdolan wrote:
    [Please help me by answering this question:] How do we know that the blips on the o-scope were all muons?

    Different scintillator materials are selected to optimize the yield for the particles of interest. For example, to detect muons, BC412 is typically used. Of course, such detectors are also sensitive to other radiation, such as gamma rays, but these
    are easily distinguished from muon blips by the amplitude of the "blip".

    Gaze upon fig. 5 of the FSX paper and notice the variety of amplitudes. According
    to your latest fabrication most of those blips can't be muons because of their
    amplitudes.

    The blips from a muon that comes to rest in the scintillator are in the range of 50 MeV (give or take), whereas the beta and gamma rays are only about 1 MeV, so there's a big difference in scale that allows us to discriminate between them, even though
    the muon blips vary significantly in size.

    [I will now resume running away as fast as my little legs with carry me.]

    Well, okay, but if you really wanted to understand these subjects, you would pay attention and not just run away each time your silly misconceptions are exposed.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From mitchrae3323@gmail.com@21:1/5 to patdolan on Wed Aug 30 17:08:54 2023
    On Wednesday, August 30, 2023 at 11:08:26 AM UTC-7, patdolan wrote:
    Primary cosmic rays are credited with most muon production in the atmosphere.

    If cosmic rays are coming from all stars to Earth?
    Why isn't the nonmagnetic charges of cosmic rays contaminating
    Earth's atmosphere? What do those rays continuing to arrive
    since the formation of the Earth have done? Should their should
    build up not be measured?
    The magnetosphere can not defect all cosmic rays.
    At the poles there is no defection.

    Mitchell Raemsch


    Legion has provided the following production data for muons:

    "Again, the flux of primary cosmic rays (that produce the muons) is about 13 uSv/hr at 60,000 ft and 5 uSv/hr at 35000 ft, but only about 0.08 uSv/hr at 6000 ft, and about 0.03 uSv/hr at sea level, so the rate of muon production below 6000 feet is
    negligible."

    For a moment let us consider a universe with no relativity. Recollecting that...wait a minute!...How do we know that the blips on the FSX o-scope were all muons??? Just look at this

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Air_shower_(physics)

    The FSX had no way to discriminate between the many varieties of shower particles reaching Mt. WA and the 2.2 usec muons.

    Which pupil would like to respond to this objection?

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From patdolan@21:1/5 to Volney on Wed Aug 30 18:12:53 2023
    On Wednesday, August 30, 2023 at 2:55:19 PM UTC-7, Volney wrote:
    On 8/30/2023 3:35 PM, patdolan wrote:
    On Wednesday, August 30, 2023 at 12:10:55 PM UTC-7, Bill wrote:
    On Wednesday, August 30, 2023 at 11:08:26 AM UTC-7, patdolan wrote:
    [Continuing to run away from imnderstanding and the demolition of his >>> silly beliefs as fast as his little legs can carry him.]
    [Please help me by answering this question:] How do we know that the
    blips on the o-scope were all muons?

    Different scintillator materials are selected to optimize the yield for the particles of interest. For example, to detect muons, BC412 is typically used. Of course, such detectors are also sensitive to other radiation, such as gamma rays, but these
    are easily distinguished from muon blips by the amplitude of the "blip".

    [I apologize for not finding that out myself, which anyone with a functioning
    brain could easily have done, and I offer my sincere thanks for once again
    educating me.]

    No problem, and you're welcome. If you're actually interested in understanding, go ahead and read the thorough debunking of your claims in the trail of other threads you've left as you scurry away from knowledge.
    Legion, You are the last person I would have suspected to sink into lies, half truths and chicanery. I will attribute your last post to an out of control sense of desperation at the inevitable loss of your precious muons.

    BC412 did not exist in 1963. I checked. Also, blip amplitude was neither screened for, nor mentioned as a component part of the FSX. Here--put on this dunce cap, go to the corner and remain silent until you are give permission to take your seat again.
    And once again we see this crank red flag. Cranks consider the
    breakthrough experiment to be the end of discussion, and the fact that
    the experiment is repeated many times with improvements (such as this
    BC412, filtering on blip amplitude etc.) is disregarded. Also the
    repeated experiments are not valid unless they use Polaroid cameras and photomultipliers connected to vacuum tube oscilloscopes and electromechanical counters that go KLUNK.
    My concern, Volney, is that Legion has stooped to lying to this forum in an effort to forestall the inevitable debunking of the FSX. BC412 has no specific sensitivity to muons over other types of particles. The manufacturer of BC412 touts its
    sensitivity to GAMMA rays. Sensitivity to muons is not even mentioned:

    https://www.gammaspectacular.com/blue/XL-BC412-1520

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From patdolan@21:1/5 to mitchr...@gmail.com on Wed Aug 30 18:15:14 2023
    On Wednesday, August 30, 2023 at 5:08:57 PM UTC-7, mitchr...@gmail.com wrote:
    On Wednesday, August 30, 2023 at 11:08:26 AM UTC-7, patdolan wrote:
    Primary cosmic rays are credited with most muon production in the atmosphere.
    If cosmic rays are coming from all stars to Earth?
    Why isn't the nonmagnetic charges of cosmic rays contaminating
    Earth's atmosphere? What do those rays continuing to arrive
    since the formation of the Earth have done? Should their should
    build up not be measured?
    The magnetosphere can not defect all cosmic rays.
    At the poles there is no defection.

    Mitchell Raemsch
    Legion has provided the following production data for muons:

    "Again, the flux of primary cosmic rays (that produce the muons) is about 13 uSv/hr at 60,000 ft and 5 uSv/hr at 35000 ft, but only about 0.08 uSv/hr at 6000 ft, and about 0.03 uSv/hr at sea level, so the rate of muon production below 6000 feet is
    negligible."

    For a moment let us consider a universe with no relativity. Recollecting that...wait a minute!...How do we know that the blips on the FSX o-scope were all muons??? Just look at this

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Air_shower_(physics)

    The FSX had no way to discriminate between the many varieties of shower particles reaching Mt. WA and the 2.2 usec muons.

    Which pupil would like to respond to this objection?
    5 extra credit points to Mitch. What does 4 billion years of cosmic ray accumulation look like?

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  • From Python@21:1/5 to All on Thu Aug 31 04:29:40 2023
    Le 31/08/2023 à 03:15, patdolan a écrit :
    On Wednesday, August 30, 2023 at 5:08:57 PM UTC-7, mitchr...@gmail.com wrote:
    On Wednesday, August 30, 2023 at 11:08:26 AM UTC-7, patdolan wrote:
    Primary cosmic rays are credited with most muon production in the atmosphere.
    If cosmic rays are coming from all stars to Earth?
    Why isn't the nonmagnetic charges of cosmic rays contaminating
    Earth's atmosphere? What do those rays continuing to arrive
    since the formation of the Earth have done? Should their should
    build up not be measured?
    The magnetosphere can not defect all cosmic rays.
    At the poles there is no defection.

    Mitchell Raemsch
    Legion has provided the following production data for muons:

    "Again, the flux of primary cosmic rays (that produce the muons) is about 13 uSv/hr at 60,000 ft and 5 uSv/hr at 35000 ft, but only about 0.08 uSv/hr at 6000 ft, and about 0.03 uSv/hr at sea level, so the rate of muon production below 6000 feet is
    negligible."

    For a moment let us consider a universe with no relativity. Recollecting that...wait a minute!...How do we know that the blips on the FSX o-scope were all muons??? Just look at this

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Air_shower_(physics)

    The FSX had no way to discriminate between the many varieties of shower particles reaching Mt. WA and the 2.2 usec muons.

    Which pupil would like to respond to this objection?
    5 extra credit points to Mitch. What does 4 billion years of cosmic ray accumulation look like?

    there is no "Legion", Pathetic Pat,

    anyway

    legions are making a fun of you

    can you guess why?

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Bill@21:1/5 to patdolan on Wed Aug 30 19:30:07 2023
    On Wednesday, August 30, 2023 at 6:12:55 PM UTC-7, patdolan wrote:
    BC412 has no specific sensitivity to muons over other types of particles. The manufacturer of BC412 touts its sensitivity to GAMMA rays.

    As was explained to you, the scintillator is also sensitive to gamma rays, and as was further explained to you, the energy of a beta and gamma ray detection is almost two orders of magnitude less than of a muon detection, so "a discriminator easily
    filters out th weak light pulses they create". And as was still further explained to you, the BC412 is very commonly used to build muon detectors, e.g., "To optimize the yield for muon particles the plastic scintillator type BC412 has been chosen. It
    is particularly suited to detecting charged particles such as electrons or muons...", and "Recently I obtained some blocks of plastic scintillator BC412 which is ideally suited for detecting muons...", and so on.

    Different scintillator materials are selected to optimize the yield for the >> particles of interest. For example, to detect muons, BC412 is typically used.
    Of course, such detectors are also sensitive to other radiation, such as gamma
    rays, but these are easily distinguished from muon blips by the amplitude of
    the "blip".

    Right, well said. So the lazy juvenile know-nothing denialism has once again been exposed and eviscerated.

    Of course, more importantly, the explanation of the special relativistic account of the phenomena, and of the details of this particular demonstration (which, like Hafele-Keating, etc., was really just for fun, since the actual empirical basis of local
    Lorentz invariance was established long before) has also been thoroughly explained, so that even the most slow-witted among us (ahem) can no longer fail to understand it. Hence the HCC beats a hasty retreat, racing away from the debunkings and gibbering
    incoherently as he flees the scene.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Volney@21:1/5 to patdolan on Wed Aug 30 23:02:28 2023
    On 8/30/2023 9:12 PM, patdolan wrote:
    On Wednesday, August 30, 2023 at 2:55:19 PM UTC-7, Volney wrote:
    On 8/30/2023 3:35 PM, patdolan wrote:

    BC412 did not exist in 1963. I checked. Also, blip amplitude was neither screened for, nor mentioned as a component part of the FSX. Here--put on this dunce cap, go to the corner and remain silent until you are give permission to take your seat again.
    And once again we see this crank red flag. Cranks consider the
    breakthrough experiment to be the end of discussion, and the fact that
    the experiment is repeated many times with improvements (such as this
    BC412, filtering on blip amplitude etc.) is disregarded. Also the
    repeated experiments are not valid unless they use Polaroid cameras and
    photomultipliers connected to vacuum tube oscilloscopes and
    electromechanical counters that go KLUNK.

    My concern, Volney, is that Legion has stooped to lying to this forum in an effort to forestall the inevitable debunking of the FSX.

    There's no debunking of FSX forthcoming. Even if there were, it wouldn't
    come from you and your ignorance.

    BC412 has no specific sensitivity to muons over other types of particles. The manufacturer of BC412 touts its sensitivity to GAMMA rays. Sensitivity to muons is not even mentioned:

    Lots of times people, esp. scientists make a discovery to the usefulness
    of something for uses not quite as intended. If a bunch of scientists researching muons tell each other "hey this scintillator is really good
    at detecting muons", they're going to be using it for muons, even if the manufacturer never bothered to test it with muons.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From mitchrae3323@gmail.com@21:1/5 to patdolan on Wed Aug 30 21:02:44 2023
    On Wednesday, August 30, 2023 at 6:15:16 PM UTC-7, patdolan wrote:
    On Wednesday, August 30, 2023 at 5:08:57 PM UTC-7, mitchr...@gmail.com wrote:
    On Wednesday, August 30, 2023 at 11:08:26 AM UTC-7, patdolan wrote:
    Primary cosmic rays are credited with most muon production in the atmosphere.
    If cosmic rays are coming from all stars to Earth?
    Why isn't the nonmagnetic charges of cosmic rays contaminating
    Earth's atmosphere? What do those rays continuing to arrive
    since the formation of the Earth have done? Should their should
    build up not be measured?
    The magnetosphere can not defect all cosmic rays.
    At the poles there is no defection.

    Mitchell Raemsch
    Legion has provided the following production data for muons:

    "Again, the flux of primary cosmic rays (that produce the muons) is about 13 uSv/hr at 60,000 ft and 5 uSv/hr at 35000 ft, but only about 0.08 uSv/hr at 6000 ft, and about 0.03 uSv/hr at sea level, so the rate of muon production below 6000 feet is
    negligible."

    For a moment let us consider a universe with no relativity. Recollecting that...wait a minute!...How do we know that the blips on the FSX o-scope were all muons??? Just look at this

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Air_shower_(physics)

    The FSX had no way to discriminate between the many varieties of shower particles reaching Mt. WA and the 2.2 usec muons.

    Which pupil would like to respond to this objection?
    5 extra credit points to Mitch. What does 4 billion years of cosmic ray accumulation look like?

    An abnormal atmosphere.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From patdolan@21:1/5 to Python on Wed Aug 30 20:21:59 2023
    On Wednesday, August 30, 2023 at 7:29:44 PM UTC-7, Python wrote:
    Le 31/08/2023 à 03:15, patdolan a écrit :
    On Wednesday, August 30, 2023 at 5:08:57 PM UTC-7, mitchr...@gmail.com wrote:
    On Wednesday, August 30, 2023 at 11:08:26 AM UTC-7, patdolan wrote:
    Primary cosmic rays are credited with most muon production in the atmosphere.
    If cosmic rays are coming from all stars to Earth?
    Why isn't the nonmagnetic charges of cosmic rays contaminating
    Earth's atmosphere? What do those rays continuing to arrive
    since the formation of the Earth have done? Should their should
    build up not be measured?
    The magnetosphere can not defect all cosmic rays.
    At the poles there is no defection.

    Mitchell Raemsch
    Legion has provided the following production data for muons:

    "Again, the flux of primary cosmic rays (that produce the muons) is about 13 uSv/hr at 60,000 ft and 5 uSv/hr at 35000 ft, but only about 0.08 uSv/hr at 6000 ft, and about 0.03 uSv/hr at sea level, so the rate of muon production below 6000 feet is
    negligible."

    For a moment let us consider a universe with no relativity. Recollecting that...wait a minute!...How do we know that the blips on the FSX o-scope were all muons??? Just look at this

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Air_shower_(physics)

    The FSX had no way to discriminate between the many varieties of shower particles reaching Mt. WA and the 2.2 usec muons.

    Which pupil would like to respond to this objection?
    5 extra credit points to Mitch. What does 4 billion years of cosmic ray accumulation look like?
    there is no "Legion", Pathetic Pat,

    anyway

    legions are making a fun of you

    can you guess why?
    Legion has had several nom de plumes in this forum; including: Townes Olson, Trevor Lange, Bill, and a few others I can't remember.

    Luke 8:30 "Jesus then asked him, “What is your name?” He said, “Legion”; for many demons had entered him. 31They begged him not to order them to go back into the abyss. 32Now there on the hillside a large herd of swine was feeding; and the demons
    begged Jesus to let them enter these. So he gave them permission. 33Then the demons came out of the man and entered the swine, and the herd rushed down the steep bank into the lake and was drowned."

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Maciej Wozniak@21:1/5 to Volney on Wed Aug 30 22:14:42 2023
    On Wednesday, 30 August 2023 at 23:55:19 UTC+2, Volney wrote:
    On 8/30/2023 3:35 PM, patdolan wrote:
    On Wednesday, August 30, 2023 at 12:10:55 PM UTC-7, Bill wrote:
    On Wednesday, August 30, 2023 at 11:08:26 AM UTC-7, patdolan wrote:
    [Continuing to run away from imnderstanding and the demolition of his >>> silly beliefs as fast as his little legs can carry him.]
    [Please help me by answering this question:] How do we know that the
    blips on the o-scope were all muons?

    Different scintillator materials are selected to optimize the yield for the particles of interest. For example, to detect muons, BC412 is typically used. Of course, such detectors are also sensitive to other radiation, such as gamma rays, but these
    are easily distinguished from muon blips by the amplitude of the "blip".

    [I apologize for not finding that out myself, which anyone with a functioning
    brain could easily have done, and I offer my sincere thanks for once again
    educating me.]

    No problem, and you're welcome. If you're actually interested in understanding, go ahead and read the thorough debunking of your claims in the trail of other threads you've left as you scurry away from knowledge.
    Legion, You are the last person I would have suspected to sink into lies, half truths and chicanery. I will attribute your last post to an out of control sense of desperation at the inevitable loss of your precious muons.

    BC412 did not exist in 1963. I checked. Also, blip amplitude was neither screened for, nor mentioned as a component part of the FSX. Here--put on this dunce cap, go to the corner and remain silent until you are give permission to take your seat again.
    And once again we see this crank red flag. Cranks consider the

    And do you still believe that 9 192 631 770 ISO idiocy
    is some "Newton mode"? You're such an agnorant idiot,
    stupid Mike, even considering the standards of your
    moronic religion.


    breakthrough experiment to be the end of discussion, and the fact that
    the experiment is repeated many times with improvements (such as this
    BC412, filtering on blip amplitude etc.) is disregarded. Also the

    And relativistic halfbrain believe their precious experiments
    are supporting their wild claims, They're soooo stupid.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Richard Hachel@21:1/5 to All on Thu Aug 31 14:21:41 2023
    Le 31/08/2023 à 04:29, Python a écrit :
    Le 31/08/2023 à 03:15, patdolan a écrit :

    Pathetic Pat

    Ybmuche cruche.

    R.H.

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  • From Python@21:1/5 to M.D. Richard "Hachel" Lengrand on Fri Sep 1 03:08:43 2023
    M.D. Richard "Hachel" Lengrand wrote:
    [gna gna gna]

    tic tac tic tac

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