• How slowly do atomic clocks have to be moved apart so as to remain sync

    From gehan.ameresekere@gmail.com@21:1/5 to All on Thu May 4 09:33:47 2023
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Einstein synchronisation (or Poincaré–Einstein synchronisation) is a convention for synchronising clocks at different places by means of signal exchanges. This synchronisation method was used by telegraphers in the middle 19th century, but was
    popularized by Henri Poincaré and Albert Einstein, who applied it to light signals and recognized its fundamental role in relativity theory. Its principal value is for clocks within a single inertial frame.

    Poincare's description was quite clear:

    "In 1904 Poincaré illustrated the same procedure in the following way:

    Imagine two observers who wish to adjust their timepieces by optical signals; they exchange signals, but as they know that the transmission of light is not instantaneous, they are careful to cross them. When station B perceives the signal from station A,
    its clock should not mark the same hour as that of station A at the moment of sending the signal, but this hour augmented by a constant representing the duration of the transmission. Suppose, for example, that station A sends its signal when its clock
    marks the hour 0, and that station B perceives it when its clock marks the hour

    t. The clocks are adjusted if the slowness equal to t represents the duration of the transmission, and to verify it, station B sends in its turn a signal when its clock marks 0; then station A should perceive it when its clock marks

    t. The timepieces are then adjusted. And in fact they mark the same hour at the same physical instant, but on the one condition, that the two stations are fixed. Otherwise the duration of the transmission will not be the same in the two senses, since the
    station A, for example, moves forward to meet the optical perturbation emanating from B, whereas the station B flees before the perturbation emanating from A. The watches adjusted in that way will not mark, therefore, the true time; they will mark what
    may be called the local time, so that one of them will be slow of the other.[12]

    "

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Dono.@21:1/5 to gehan.am...@gmail.com on Thu May 4 09:48:42 2023
    On Thursday, May 4, 2023 at 9:33:49 AM UTC-7, gehan.am...@gmail.com wrote:
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Einstein synchronisation (or Poincaré–Einstein synchronisation) is a convention for synchronising clocks at different places by means of signal exchanges. This synchronisation method was used by telegraphers in the middle 19th century, but was
    popularized by Henri Poincaré and Albert Einstein, who applied it to light signals and recognized its fundamental role in relativity theory. Its principal value is for clocks within a single inertial frame.

    Poincare's description was quite clear:

    "In 1904 Poincaré illustrated the same procedure in the following way:

    Imagine two observers who wish to adjust their timepieces by optical signals; they exchange signals, but as they know that the transmission of light is not instantaneous, they are careful to cross them. When station B perceives the signal from station
    A, its clock should not mark the same hour as that of station A at the moment of sending the signal, but this hour augmented by a constant representing the duration of the transmission. Suppose, for example, that station A sends its signal when its clock
    marks the hour 0, and that station B perceives it when its clock marks the hour

    t. The clocks are adjusted if the slowness equal to t represents the duration of the transmission, and to verify it, station B sends in its turn a signal when its clock marks 0; then station A should perceive it when its clock marks

    t. The timepieces are then adjusted. And in fact they mark the same hour at the same physical instant, but on the one condition, that the two stations are fixed. Otherwise the duration of the transmission will not be the same in the two senses, since
    the station A, for example, moves forward to meet the optical perturbation emanating from B, whereas the station B flees before the perturbation emanating from A. The watches adjusted in that way will not mark, therefore, the true time; they will mark
    what may be called the local time, so that one of them will be slow of the other.[12]

    "
    This is an easy exercise for someone willing to learn relativity . This excludes you, Gehan

    Let's say that you wand to move the clocks apart by a distance D. The movement is made at a constant speed v. Initially, the clocks were side by side. After a time T=D/v they are D meters apart. By how much did the clocks get de-synchronize? What needs
    to be the speed v such the de-synch is less than "epsilon"? Instead of us spoonfeeding you answers, try to solve this simple exercise.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From mitchrae3323@gmail.com@21:1/5 to gehan.am...@gmail.com on Thu May 4 10:42:42 2023
    On Thursday, May 4, 2023 at 9:33:49 AM UTC-7, gehan.am...@gmail.com wrote:
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Einstein synchronisation (or Poincaré–Einstein synchronisation) is a convention for synchronising clocks at different places by means of signal exchanges. This synchronisation method was used by telegraphers in the middle 19th century, but was
    popularized by Henri Poincaré and Albert Einstein, who applied it to light signals and recognized its fundamental role in relativity theory. Its principal value is for clocks within a single inertial frame.

    Poincare's description was quite clear:

    "In 1904 Poincaré illustrated the same procedure in the following way:

    Imagine two observers who wish to adjust their timepieces by optical signals; they exchange signals, but as they know that the transmission of light is not instantaneous, they are careful to cross them. When station B perceives the signal from station
    A, its clock should not mark the same hour as that of station A at the moment of sending the signal, but this hour augmented by a constant representing the duration of the transmission. Suppose, for example, that station A sends its signal when its clock
    marks the hour 0, and that station B perceives it when its clock marks the hour

    t. The clocks are adjusted if the slowness equal to t represents the duration of the transmission, and to verify it, station B sends in its turn a signal when its clock marks 0; then station A should perceive it when its clock marks

    t. The timepieces are then adjusted. And in fact they mark the same hour at the same physical instant, but on the one condition, that the two stations are fixed. Otherwise the duration of the transmission will not be the same in the two senses, since
    the station A, for example, moves forward to meet the optical perturbation emanating from B, whereas the station B flees before the perturbation emanating from A. The watches adjusted in that way will not mark, therefore, the true time; they will mark
    what may be called the local time, so that one of them will be slow of the other.[12]

    "

    The fastest separation would give the clocks the greatest difference.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From gehan.ameresekere@gmail.com@21:1/5 to mitchr...@gmail.com on Thu May 4 19:38:41 2023
    On Thursday, May 4, 2023 at 10:42:44 PM UTC+5, mitchr...@gmail.com wrote:
    On Thursday, May 4, 2023 at 9:33:49 AM UTC-7, gehan.am...@gmail.com wrote:
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Einstein synchronisation (or Poincaré–Einstein synchronisation) is a convention for synchronising clocks at different places by means of signal exchanges. This synchronisation method was used by telegraphers in the middle 19th century, but was
    popularized by Henri Poincaré and Albert Einstein, who applied it to light signals and recognized its fundamental role in relativity theory. Its principal value is for clocks within a single inertial frame.

    Poincare's description was quite clear:

    "In 1904 Poincaré illustrated the same procedure in the following way:

    Imagine two observers who wish to adjust their timepieces by optical signals; they exchange signals, but as they know that the transmission of light is not instantaneous, they are careful to cross them. When station B perceives the signal from
    station A, its clock should not mark the same hour as that of station A at the moment of sending the signal, but this hour augmented by a constant representing the duration of the transmission. Suppose, for example, that station A sends its signal when
    its clock marks the hour 0, and that station B perceives it when its clock marks the hour

    t. The clocks are adjusted if the slowness equal to t represents the duration of the transmission, and to verify it, station B sends in its turn a signal when its clock marks 0; then station A should perceive it when its clock marks

    t. The timepieces are then adjusted. And in fact they mark the same hour at the same physical instant, but on the one condition, that the two stations are fixed. Otherwise the duration of the transmission will not be the same in the two senses, since
    the station A, for example, moves forward to meet the optical perturbation emanating from B, whereas the station B flees before the perturbation emanating from A. The watches adjusted in that way will not mark, therefore, the true time; they will mark
    what may be called the local time, so that one of them will be slow of the other.[12]

    "
    The fastest separation would give the clocks the greatest difference.

    ChatGPT
    Q: According to relativity, what is the time difference between two clocks moved 1 million kilometers apart at 1 metre per second, in nano seconds, and show working.

    A:So the time difference between the two clocks is 0.1 nanoseconds.

    Q:How long will an atomic clock take to go out of synch by 0.1 nano second
    A:So for an atomic clock with a fractional frequency stability of 1.157 x 10^11 ppb, it would take one day (or 24 hours) for the clock to go out of sync by 0.1 nanoseconds.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)