• July National Weather Summary

    From James Munley@21:1/5 to All on Wed Aug 11 16:22:28 2021
    NATIONAL WEATHER SUMMARY

    JULY

    June 27-July 3: Extreme hot weather in the Northwest boosted weekly temperatures 10 to 20°F above normal and set many individual station records for any time of year. On June 28, all-time temperature records were broken by 6 to 9°F in Oregon locations
    such as Salem (117°F) and Portland (116°F), as well as Washington communities such as Vancouver (115°F) and Olympia (110°F). Farther inland, Northwestern heat generally peaked on June 29, when all-time-record highs soared to 117°F in Pendleton, OR,
    and Omak, WA. Heat extended eastward across the northern High Plains, where weekly readings averaged as much as 5 to 10°F above normal. A separate area of unusually hot weather affected the Northeast, where temperatures—despite a late-week trend
    toward cooler, wetter weather—averaged at least 5°F above normal in many locations. Conversely, relatively cool weather for this time of year prevailed across central and southern sections of the Rockies and Plains. Temperatures averaged as much as 10
    F below normal in New Mexico and western Texas. Elsewhere, near- to slightly below-normal temperatures covered the Southeast, while hot weather dominated California and the Great Basin. The Western and Northern heat was accompanied by mostly dry weather.


    At the end of June, simultaneous heat waves gripped the Northwest and Northeast. In the latter region, Portland, ME, closed the month (from June 28-30) with a first-ever June occurrence of three consecutive highs of 95°F or greater. Portland’s
    temperature peaked at 97°F on the 28th. Boston, MA, tied its monthly record with a high of 100°F on June 30; identical readings were observed on June 6, 1925, and June 26, 1952. Newark, NJ (103°F on the 30th), eclipsed by 1°F a June record set the
    previous day—also achieved in 1943, 1952, 1993, 1994, and 2011. New York’s LaGuardia Airport (100°F on June 30) attained a triple-digit temperature in June for only the fourth time on record—and narrowly missed its monthly standard of 101°F set
    on June 26, 1952, and June 13, 2017. Meanwhile in the Northwest, an extraordinary hot spell peaked on June 28-29. Quillayute, WA (110°F on June 28), demolished its all-time record high temperature by 11°F. Based on preliminary data, a state record was
    tied in Washington, where The Dalles Municipal Airport—across the Columbia River from The Dalles, OR—recorded 118°F on June 28. The following day in Oregon, a high of 118°F in Hermiston missed the state record, which has stood since 1898, by 1°F.
    On the 28th or 29th, all time temperature records were smashed by 5 to 9°F in several locations, including Olympia, Vancouver, and Wenatchee, WA, as well as Oregon communities such as Hermiston, Hillsboro, Portland, Roseburg, Salem, and Troutdale. Heat
    later spread across the northern Plains, where Glasgow, MT, posted consecutive, triple-digit, daily-record highs (102 and 101°F, respectively) on July 1-2. Other triple-digit, daily-record highs included 102°F (on July 2) in Havre, MT, and 107°F (on
    July 3) in Bismarck, ND. For Bismarck, it was the hottest day since July 30, 2006, when the high reached 112°F. The late-month heat propelled many Northern locations—including La Crosse, WI (76.6°F; previously 76.5°F in 1933); Portland, OR (70.7°F;
    previously, 70.3°F in 2015); Pocatello, ID (69.9°F; previously, 69.6°F in 1988); and Caribou, ME (64.9°F; previously, 64.4°F in 2020)—to their hottest June on record. In contrast, cool air settled across the mid-South and environs in early July.
    By July 3, daily-record lows dipped to 52°F in Crossville, TN, and 53°F in Lexington, KY.

    Drought-affected areas received rain, totals topped 2 inches in a few upper Midwestern locations. Parts of the Southwest, including southeastern Arizona, also received muchneeded rain. In contrast, hot, dry weather continued to dominate the Pacific Coast
    States, Great Basin, Intermountain West, and northern Rockies. Weekly temperatures again averaged more than 10°F above normal in several Western locations, with extreme heat shifting southward into the Great Basin and Desert Southwest. Meanwhile, near-
    or belownormal temperatures prevailed in most areas along and east of a line from the southern High Plains into the upper Midwest. Weekly temperatures averaged at least 5°F below normal in parts of Maine and Texas. Hotter-than-normal weather prevailed,
    however, in portions of the lower Great Lakes region and middle Atlantic States.

    By mid-week, record-setting heat returned across the Great Basin and the Southwest. From July 7-10, Tonopah, NV, logged four consecutive daily-record highs (102, 102, 104, and 104°F). Ely, NV, achieved the same feat, registering highs of 98°F on each
    of the 4 days. Record-setting temperatures briefly extended across the interior Northwest, where Boise, ID, tallied a daily-record high of 107°F on July 6. Late in the week, Western heat greatly intensified, with Death Valley, CA, reporting a high of
    130°F on July 9. Besides a high temperature of 130°F on August 16, 2020, the only other occurrences of readings of 130°F or higher in Death Valley were three controversial readings in 1913 (on July 10, 12, and 13). On July 10, all-time high
    temperature records were tied with readings of 118°F in BarstowDaggett, CA, and 117°F in Las Vegas, NV. On the same date in Utah, St. George (117°F) tied its own state record, based on preliminary reporting. All-time records were broken on July 10 in
    Bishop, CA (111°F; previously, 110°F on July 10, 2002), and Winslow, AZ (110°F; previously, 109°F on July 13, 1971). In contrast, cool air settled across the Midwest. In fact, consecutive daily-record lows were established on July 8-9 in Hibbing, MN (
    34 and 36°F, respectively), and Ashland, WI (36 and 37°F).

    10-14: Elsa produced heavy rain and gusty winds in parts of Florida before soaking the Atlantic Seaboard. Briefly a hurricane twice during its life cycle, Elsa crossed Cuba on July 5 and passed west of the Florida Keys on July 6. As a tropical storm,
    Elsa made landfall on the Gulf Coast in Taylor County, FL, on July 7, later moving roughly parallel to the Atlantic Coast. Elsa made the transition to a post-tropical cyclone on July 9 along the northern Atlantic Coast. Meanwhile, showers and
    thunderstorms and a slow-moving storm system, respectively dotted the Southwest and Midwest. Hot and dry weather continued to dominate the Pacific Coast States, Great Basin, Intermountain West, and northern Rockies. Weekly temperatures again averaged
    more than 10°F above normal in several Western locations, with extreme heat shifting southward into the Great Basin and Desert Southwest. Meanwhile, near- or below normal temperatures prevailed in most areas along and east of a line from the southern
    High Plains into the upper Midwest. Weekly temperatures averaged at least 5°F below normal in parts of Maine and Texas. Hotter-than-normal weather prevailed, however, in portions of the lower Great Lakes region and middle Atlantic States.

    From July 7-10, Tonopah, NV, logged four consecutive daily-record highs (102, 102, 104, and 104°F). Ely, NV, achieved the same feat, registering highs of 98°F on each of the 4 days. Record-setting temperatures briefly extended across the interior
    Northwest, where Boise, ID, tallied a daily-record high of 107°F on July 6. Late in the week, Western heat greatly intensified, with Death Valley, CA, reporting a high of 130°F on July 9. Besides a high temperature of 130°F on August 16, 2020, the
    only other occurrences of readings of 130°F or higher in Death Valley were three controversial readings in 1913 (on July 10, 12, and 13). On July 10, all-time high temperature records were tied with readings of 118°F in Barstow Daggett, CA, and 117°F
    in Las Vegas, NV. On the same date in Utah, St. George (117°F) tied its own state record, based on preliminary reporting. All-time records were broken on July 10 in Bishop, CA (111°F; previously, 110°F on July 10, 2002), and Winslow, AZ (110°F;
    previously, 109°F on July 13, 1971). In contrast, cool air settled across the Midwest. In fact, consecutive daily-record lows were established on July 8-9 in Hibbing, MN (34 and 36°F, respectively), and Ashland, WI (36 and 37°F).

    11-17: Serious drought and wildfire concerns persisted in the Far West and across the nation’s northern tier as far east as the upper Midwest. In those areas, drought’s impact on water supplies, as well as rangeland, pastures, and a variety of crops,
    was further amplified by ongoing heat. Weekly temperatures averaged as much as 10°F above normal across interior sections of the Far West. In contrast, near- or below-normal temperatures dominated the Plains, South, and Midwest. Weekly temperatures
    averaged at least 5°F below normal in scattered locations from Texas into the upper Mississippi Valley, with Midwestern temperatures remaining below 90°F throughout the week. Extreme heat persisted over the Far West as the week began. On July 11,
    Desert Rock, NV, attained 114°F, breaking by 1°F an all-time temperature record previously set on June 30, 2013; July 3, 2013; and July 10, 2021. In California, daily-record highs topped the 110-degree mark on July 11 in Central Valley locations such
    as Fresno (114°F), Hanford (112°F), and Bakersfield (111°F). From July 7-12, Tonopah, NV, collected six consecutive daily-record highs (102, 102, 104, 104, 105, and 104°F). During the mid- to late-week period, heat shifted northward, resulting in
    daily-record highs in Burns, OR (98°F on July 14), and Billings, MT (101°F on July 17). Meanwhile, cooler air pushed inland from coastal California; daily recordtying lows dipped to 54°F (on July 15) in Sacramento and 53°F (on July 16) in Stockton.
    Although relatively cool conditions prevailed for much of the week across the central and southern Plains, Midwest, and South, hot weather lingered in Florida. On July 16-17, Tampa, FL, notched consecutive daily recordtying highs (97 and 96°F,
    respectively).

    18-24: A hotter, drier pattern also developed across the central and southern Plains, although any impacts were tempered by mostly abundant soil moisture reserves.

    The country remained generally split between hot weather in much of the North and West and near- or below-normal temperatures across the South and East. The core area of extreme heat made another eastward shift across the northern Plains, where weekly
    temperatures averaged at least 10°F above normal in several locations. Hot weather also returned across drier areas of the upper Midwest, including Minnesota. However, near- or below-normal temperatures dominated the Ohio Valley and the middle and
    northern Atlantic States, while temperatures averaged as much as 5°F below normal on the southern Plains. In addition, monsoon-related cloudiness and showers helped to suppress Southwestern temperatures. Early-week Western heat pushed temperatures to
    daily-record levels for July 18 in locations such as Salt Lake City, UT (104°F), and Helena, MT (102°F). The following day, on July 19, Glasgow, MT, experienced its hottest day since 1936. In fact, Glasgow’s high of 110°F was the third-highest
    temperature (tied with June 17, 1933) on record in that location, behind only 113°F on July 31, 1900, and 112°F on July 18, 1936. Elsewhere in Montana, record-setting highs for July 19 soared to 107°F in Billings and 102°F in Livingston. On the same
    date in Wyoming, daily-record highs surged to 107°F in Greybull, 106°F in Worland, and 104°F in Sheridan. For a few days thereafter, record-setting heat retreated southward. In Florida, daily-record highs for July 22 reached 97°F in Orlando and Fort
    Myers. New Orleans, LA, notched a daily record-tying high (98°F) for July 24. Late in the week, hot weather again shifted toward the northern Plains and environs. On July 23, daily records were tied in International Falls, MN (92°F), and at the
    National Weather Service office in Grand Forks, ND (97°F). Drought in Montana resulted in large diurnal temperature variations; in Havre, for example, a daily-record low of 43°F occurred on July 23, in the midst of a string of at least 13 consecutive
    days (July 14-26) with highs of 90°F or greater. As the week began, heavy showers peppered the South and East.

    . Record-setting rainfall totals for July 18 included 3.10 inches in Cape Girardeau, MO; 2.77 inches in Jackson, TN; and 1.84 inches in Concord, NH. Worcester, MA, also netted a daily-record amount (1.74 inches) for July 18, helping to set a July
    rainfall record. Worcester’s month-to-date total (through the 24th), 12.70 inches, eclipsed the July 1938 record of 11.24 inches. Rain lingered across the South, where daily-record totals for July 19 topped the 2-inch mark in Tyler, TX (3.53 inches);
    El Dorado, AR (3.01 inches); North Myrtle Beach, SC (2.40 inches), and Huntsville, AL (2.30 inches). Alma, GA, recorded thunderstorm-related wind gusts to 43 mph on consecutive days, July 18 and 19. Meanwhile, spotty showers developed across the
    Northwest, where daily-record totals for July 20 reached 1.48 inches in Choteau, MT, and 1.19 inches in Laramie, WY. More organized rain fell, however, in the Southwest. At Utah’s Capitol Reef National Park, 1.07 inches fell in a 24-hour period on July
    20-21. Elsewhere in Utah, Bryce Canyon Airport collected 1.53 inches in 24 hours on July 22-23. In Arizona, Tucson received 4.20 inches in a 6-day period from July 20-25, topping its record-low 2020 annual sum of 4.17 inches. Farther north, some lateweek
    thunderstorms ripped through the Great Lakes region, generating high winds, isolated tornadoes, and heavy rain. On July 24 in Michigan, daily-record amounts totaled 3.36 inches in Traverse City and 2.24 inches in Flint. For Traverse City, it was the
    second-wettest July day on record, behind 4.01 inches on July 5, 1999.

    25-31: Elsewhere, the drought-affected northern Rockies and Pacific Coast States also remained dry, while abundant, monsoon-related showers across the remainder of the western U.S. boosted topsoil moisture, curbed the wildfire threat, and provided some
    drought relief. However, locally intense rain also sparked flash flooding and debris flows, especially in the Four Corners States.

    Cooler-than-normal conditions were confined to the Northeast and monsoonaffected areas of the Southwest. Near- or above-normal temperatures dominated the remainder of the country, as the hottest weather of the summer replaced previously cool weather in
    the South. Weekly temperatures averaged as much as 10°F above normal across the interior Northwest and northern Rockies, with hot weather extending across the northern Plains and western Corn Belt. In contrast, temperatures averaged at least 5°F below
    normal in parts of New York and northern New England. Chronically hot weather in the Northwest led to numerous daily-record highs. From July 25-27, Greybull, WY, tallied a trio of daily records (102, 102, and 105°F). Elsewhere in Wyoming, record-setting
    highs for July 27 soared to 107°F in Sheridan, 106°F in Worland, and 100°F in Casper. Other triple-digit, daily-record highs included 105°F (on July 25) in Winnemucca, NV, and 106°F (on July 27) in Billings, MT. Heat fully engulfed the High Plains
    by July 27, when temperatures surged to 108°F in Miles City, MT, and Pierre, SD. For Pierre, it was the hottest day since July 20, 2016, when the high reached 109°F. Similarly, Rapid City, SD (107°F on July 27), endured its highest reading since
    August 29, 2012, when it was also 107°F. During a final day of central Plains heat on July 28, triple-digit, daily-record highs climbed to 107°F in Chadron, NE, and 100°F in Denver, CO. From July 11-28, Bismarck, ND, noted 18 consecutive days with
    highs of 90°F or greater, tying an all-time station record originally set from July 2 – 19, 1936. Meanwhile, the focus for heat gradually shifted into the South and Northwest. Dallas-Fort Worth, TX, achieved it first three triple-digit readings of the
    year (100, 101, and 102°F) from July 25-27. On July 29, Vicksburg, MS, collected a daily-record high of 100°F. With a high of 101°F on July 30, Pine Bluff, AR, recorded its first triple-digit reading since August 7, 2015. Pine Bluff’s streak of days
    without 100-degree heat—2,183 days—shattered the former mark of 1,132 days set from July 9, 1948 – August 14, 1951. In the Northwest, Lewiston, ID, closed the month with a pair of daily-record highs (109°F both days) on July 30-31. Other
    Northwestern daily-records included 110°F (on July 30) in Hermiston, OR, and 109°F (on July 31) in Omak, WA. In Oregon, July records were set for the number of 90-degree readings in Eugene (18 days) and 95-degree readings in Medford (22 days). Medford
    also weathered its hottest month on record, with a July average temperature of 80.3°F (previously, 79.9°F in July 2014). It was also the hottest month in Northwestern locations such as Spokane, WA (77.5°F), and Lewiston, ID (82.0°F); both previous
    records had been set in July 1906.

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