• Coca Cola is a light explosive ! HAHA.

    From Skybuck Flying@21:1/5 to All on Mon Aug 15 11:49:57 2022
    Long can of Coca Cola just exploded in my freezer... Wow... this was unknown to me. (It exploded after 4 hours of freezing, the top of the can ripped).

    A warning should be on the package, that Coca Cola is a light explosive under certain situations !

    Bye,
    Skybuck.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Fred Bloggs@21:1/5 to Skybuck Flying on Mon Aug 15 12:30:53 2022
    On Monday, August 15, 2022 at 2:50:02 PM UTC-4, Skybuck Flying wrote:
    Long can of Coca Cola just exploded in my freezer... Wow... this was unknown to me. (It exploded after 4 hours of freezing, the top of the can ripped).

    A warning should be on the package, that Coca Cola is a light explosive under certain situations !

    It's mostly water and water expands upon freezing. You want to pay a lot extra just for a reinforced can that can take the pressure, or maybe just stop putting the soda in a freezer.


    Bye,
    Skybuck.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From whit3rd@21:1/5 to Skybuck Flying on Mon Aug 15 16:27:03 2022
    On Monday, August 15, 2022 at 11:50:02 AM UTC-7, Skybuck Flying wrote:
    Long can of Coca Cola just exploded in my freezer... Wow...

    I get my kitchen exposions from Orville Redenbacher; much more satisfying.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Walliker@21:1/5 to Fred Bloggs on Tue Aug 16 02:56:24 2022
    On Monday, 15 August 2022 at 20:30:57 UTC+1, Fred Bloggs wrote:
    On Monday, August 15, 2022 at 2:50:02 PM UTC-4, Skybuck Flying wrote:
    Long can of Coca Cola just exploded in my freezer... Wow... this was unknown to me.
    (It exploded after 4 hours of freezing, the top of the can ripped).

    A warning should be on the package, that Coca Cola is a light explosive under certain situations !
    It's mostly water and water expands upon freezing. You want to pay a lot extra just for a reinforced
    can that can take the pressure, or maybe just stop putting the soda in a freezer.

    Not only does the water expand when it freezes, but the carbon dioxide is forced out of
    solution, so there is a lot of very high pressure gas in a small space. It doesn't fit
    so the can explodes.
    Its even worse with a glass bottle.
    John

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From a a@21:1/5 to John Walliker on Tue Aug 16 03:53:22 2022
    On Tuesday, 16 August 2022 at 11:56:29 UTC+2, John Walliker wrote:
    On Monday, 15 August 2022 at 20:30:57 UTC+1, Fred Bloggs wrote:
    On Monday, August 15, 2022 at 2:50:02 PM UTC-4, Skybuck Flying wrote:
    Long can of Coca Cola just exploded in my freezer... Wow... this was unknown to me.
    (It exploded after 4 hours of freezing, the top of the can ripped).

    A warning should be on the package, that Coca Cola is a light explosive under certain situations !
    It's mostly water and water expands upon freezing. You want to pay a lot extra just for a reinforced
    can that can take the pressure, or maybe just stop putting the soda in a freezer.
    Not only does the water expand when it freezes, but the carbon dioxide is forced out of
    solution, so there is a lot of very high pressure gas in a small space. It doesn't fit
    so the can explodes.
    Its even worse with a glass bottle.
    John
    completely wrong
    it doesn't matter if carbon is forced out of solution
    since water freezes carbon bubbles in the water

    So the only pressure is one of the water converted into ice
    since the volume of the frozen water increases by 10%

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Fred Bloggs@21:1/5 to a a on Tue Aug 16 08:57:46 2022
    On Tuesday, August 16, 2022 at 6:53:26 AM UTC-4, a a wrote:
    On Tuesday, 16 August 2022 at 11:56:29 UTC+2, John Walliker wrote:
    On Monday, 15 August 2022 at 20:30:57 UTC+1, Fred Bloggs wrote:
    On Monday, August 15, 2022 at 2:50:02 PM UTC-4, Skybuck Flying wrote:
    Long can of Coca Cola just exploded in my freezer... Wow... this was unknown to me.
    (It exploded after 4 hours of freezing, the top of the can ripped).

    A warning should be on the package, that Coca Cola is a light explosive under certain situations !
    It's mostly water and water expands upon freezing. You want to pay a lot extra just for a reinforced
    can that can take the pressure, or maybe just stop putting the soda in a freezer.
    Not only does the water expand when it freezes, but the carbon dioxide is forced out of
    solution, so there is a lot of very high pressure gas in a small space. It doesn't fit
    so the can explodes.
    Its even worse with a glass bottle.
    John
    completely wrong
    it doesn't matter if carbon is forced out of solution
    since water freezes carbon bubbles in the water

    So the only pressure is one of the water converted into ice
    since the volume of the frozen water increases by 10%

    That's why you want building foundations on footers deeper than the frost line, assuming the soil has adequate compressive strength in the first place.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Walliker@21:1/5 to a a on Tue Aug 16 10:17:26 2022
    On Tuesday, 16 August 2022 at 11:53:26 UTC+1, a a wrote:
    On Tuesday, 16 August 2022 at 11:56:29 UTC+2, John Walliker wrote:
    On Monday, 15 August 2022 at 20:30:57 UTC+1, Fred Bloggs wrote:
    On Monday, August 15, 2022 at 2:50:02 PM UTC-4, Skybuck Flying wrote:
    Long can of Coca Cola just exploded in my freezer... Wow... this was unknown to me.
    (It exploded after 4 hours of freezing, the top of the can ripped).

    A warning should be on the package, that Coca Cola is a light explosive under certain situations !
    It's mostly water and water expands upon freezing. You want to pay a lot extra just for a reinforced
    can that can take the pressure, or maybe just stop putting the soda in a freezer.
    Not only does the water expand when it freezes, but the carbon dioxide is forced out of
    solution, so there is a lot of very high pressure gas in a small space. It doesn't fit
    so the can explodes.
    Its even worse with a glass bottle.
    John
    completely wrong
    it doesn't matter if carbon is forced out of solution
    since water freezes carbon bubbles in the water

    So the only pressure is one of the water converted into ice
    since the volume of the frozen water increases by 10%

    Have you actually seen the results of such an explosion? If you had
    I think you would change your mind. A simple expansion of the water
    would push the lid off the can or crack a glass bottle. That isn't
    what happens when carbonated drinks are frozen. The mess goes
    everywhere in the freezer, propelled by the high pressure CO2 that
    is NOT contained in lots of harmless little bubbles.
    John

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno@decadenc@21:1/5 to whit3rd@gmail.com on Tue Aug 16 19:39:33 2022
    whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com> wrote in news:28efeec8-d472-44da-8b40-90beb2e3b914n@googlegroups.com:

    On Monday, August 15, 2022 at 11:50:02 AM UTC-7, Skybuck Flying
    wrote:
    Long can of Coca Cola just exploded in my freezer... Wow...

    I get my kitchen exposions from Orville Redenbacher; much more
    satisfying.



    When a frozen dinner POPs its lid in the microwave because you forgot
    to vent it. Some can be pretty loud.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From a a@21:1/5 to Skybuck Flying on Wed Aug 17 05:53:12 2022
    On Wednesday, 17 August 2022 at 14:32:58 UTC+2, Skybuck Flying wrote:
    On Tuesday, August 16, 2022 at 7:17:31 PM UTC+2, John Walliker wrote:
    On Tuesday, 16 August 2022 at 11:53:26 UTC+1, a a wrote:
    On Tuesday, 16 August 2022 at 11:56:29 UTC+2, John Walliker wrote:
    On Monday, 15 August 2022 at 20:30:57 UTC+1, Fred Bloggs wrote:
    On Monday, August 15, 2022 at 2:50:02 PM UTC-4, Skybuck Flying wrote:
    Long can of Coca Cola just exploded in my freezer... Wow... this was unknown to me.
    (It exploded after 4 hours of freezing, the top of the can ripped).

    A warning should be on the package, that Coca Cola is a light explosive under certain situations !
    It's mostly water and water expands upon freezing. You want to pay a lot extra just for a reinforced
    can that can take the pressure, or maybe just stop putting the soda in a freezer.
    Not only does the water expand when it freezes, but the carbon dioxide is forced out of
    solution, so there is a lot of very high pressure gas in a small space. It doesn't fit
    so the can explodes.
    Its even worse with a glass bottle.
    John
    completely wrong
    it doesn't matter if carbon is forced out of solution
    since water freezes carbon bubbles in the water

    So the only pressure is one of the water converted into ice
    since the volume of the frozen water increases by 10%
    Have you actually seen the results of such an explosion? If you had
    I think you would change your mind. A simple expansion of the water
    would push the lid off the can or crack a glass bottle. That isn't
    what happens when carbonated drinks are frozen. The mess goes
    everywhere in the freezer, propelled by the high pressure CO2 that
    is NOT contained in lots of harmless little bubbles.
    John
    ^ This is correct.

    1. I heard a loud pop.

    2. The freezer was covered with delicious Coca Coca ICE everywhere. So something forced it out and spread it all over. Must have been the CO2.

    I was almost like there was more Coca Cola in the can to begin with... Quite a strange experience, but a nice one ! If you want to increase the ammount of Coca Coca lol.

    Bye,
    Skybuck.
    don't be silly
    you get the same effect with a can filled with water only, no carbon

    The level of CO2 saturation reflects the t ype of beverages and consumer preferences. Beverage additives, such as tonic, require high CO2 saturation - using 8.8 g CO2/dm3 in the final product, while fruit drinks use only 5.5 g CO2/dm3.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Skybuck Flying@21:1/5 to John Walliker on Wed Aug 17 05:32:54 2022
    On Tuesday, August 16, 2022 at 7:17:31 PM UTC+2, John Walliker wrote:
    On Tuesday, 16 August 2022 at 11:53:26 UTC+1, a a wrote:
    On Tuesday, 16 August 2022 at 11:56:29 UTC+2, John Walliker wrote:
    On Monday, 15 August 2022 at 20:30:57 UTC+1, Fred Bloggs wrote:
    On Monday, August 15, 2022 at 2:50:02 PM UTC-4, Skybuck Flying wrote:
    Long can of Coca Cola just exploded in my freezer... Wow... this was unknown to me.
    (It exploded after 4 hours of freezing, the top of the can ripped).

    A warning should be on the package, that Coca Cola is a light explosive under certain situations !
    It's mostly water and water expands upon freezing. You want to pay a lot extra just for a reinforced
    can that can take the pressure, or maybe just stop putting the soda in a freezer.
    Not only does the water expand when it freezes, but the carbon dioxide is forced out of
    solution, so there is a lot of very high pressure gas in a small space. It doesn't fit
    so the can explodes.
    Its even worse with a glass bottle.
    John
    completely wrong
    it doesn't matter if carbon is forced out of solution
    since water freezes carbon bubbles in the water

    So the only pressure is one of the water converted into ice
    since the volume of the frozen water increases by 10%
    Have you actually seen the results of such an explosion? If you had
    I think you would change your mind. A simple expansion of the water
    would push the lid off the can or crack a glass bottle. That isn't
    what happens when carbonated drinks are frozen. The mess goes
    everywhere in the freezer, propelled by the high pressure CO2 that
    is NOT contained in lots of harmless little bubbles.
    John

    ^ This is correct.

    1. I heard a loud pop.

    2. The freezer was covered with delicious Coca Coca ICE everywhere. So something forced it out and spread it all over. Must have been the CO2.

    I was almost like there was more Coca Cola in the can to begin with... Quite a strange experience, but a nice one ! If you want to increase the ammount of Coca Coca lol.

    Bye,
    Skybuck.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Walliker@21:1/5 to a a on Wed Aug 17 11:02:10 2022
    On Wednesday, 17 August 2022 at 13:53:16 UTC+1, a a wrote:
    On Wednesday, 17 August 2022 at 14:32:58 UTC+2, Skybuck Flying wrote:
    On Tuesday, August 16, 2022 at 7:17:31 PM UTC+2, John Walliker wrote:
    On Tuesday, 16 August 2022 at 11:53:26 UTC+1, a a wrote:
    On Tuesday, 16 August 2022 at 11:56:29 UTC+2, John Walliker wrote:
    On Monday, 15 August 2022 at 20:30:57 UTC+1, Fred Bloggs wrote:
    On Monday, August 15, 2022 at 2:50:02 PM UTC-4, Skybuck Flying wrote:
    Long can of Coca Cola just exploded in my freezer... Wow... this was unknown to me.
    (It exploded after 4 hours of freezing, the top of the can ripped).

    A warning should be on the package, that Coca Cola is a light explosive under certain situations !
    It's mostly water and water expands upon freezing. You want to pay a lot extra just for a reinforced
    can that can take the pressure, or maybe just stop putting the soda in a freezer.
    Not only does the water expand when it freezes, but the carbon dioxide is forced out of
    solution, so there is a lot of very high pressure gas in a small space. It doesn't fit
    so the can explodes.
    Its even worse with a glass bottle.
    John
    completely wrong
    it doesn't matter if carbon is forced out of solution
    since water freezes carbon bubbles in the water

    So the only pressure is one of the water converted into ice
    since the volume of the frozen water increases by 10%
    Have you actually seen the results of such an explosion? If you had
    I think you would change your mind. A simple expansion of the water
    would push the lid off the can or crack a glass bottle. That isn't
    what happens when carbonated drinks are frozen. The mess goes
    everywhere in the freezer, propelled by the high pressure CO2 that
    is NOT contained in lots of harmless little bubbles.
    John
    ^ This is correct.

    1. I heard a loud pop.

    2. The freezer was covered with delicious Coca Coca ICE everywhere. So something forced it out and spread it all over. Must have been the CO2.

    I was almost like there was more Coca Cola in the can to begin with... Quite a strange experience, but a nice one ! If you want to increase the ammount of Coca Coca lol.

    Bye,
    Skybuck.
    don't be silly
    you get the same effect with a can filled with water only, no carbon

    The level of CO2 saturation reflects the t ype of beverages and consumer preferences. Beverage additives, such as tonic, require high CO2 saturation - using 8.8 g CO2/dm3 in the final product, while fruit drinks use only 5.5 g CO2/dm3.

    This is one of those rare occasions when Skybuck is right. Plain water will crack a bottle or force the top off a can. A carbonated drink when frozen explodes. I have seen the effects of both.

    John

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From a a@21:1/5 to John Walliker on Wed Aug 17 11:07:17 2022
    On Wednesday, 17 August 2022 at 20:02:14 UTC+2, John Walliker wrote:
    On Wednesday, 17 August 2022 at 13:53:16 UTC+1, a a wrote:
    On Wednesday, 17 August 2022 at 14:32:58 UTC+2, Skybuck Flying wrote:
    On Tuesday, August 16, 2022 at 7:17:31 PM UTC+2, John Walliker wrote:
    On Tuesday, 16 August 2022 at 11:53:26 UTC+1, a a wrote:
    On Tuesday, 16 August 2022 at 11:56:29 UTC+2, John Walliker wrote:
    On Monday, 15 August 2022 at 20:30:57 UTC+1, Fred Bloggs wrote:
    On Monday, August 15, 2022 at 2:50:02 PM UTC-4, Skybuck Flying wrote:
    Long can of Coca Cola just exploded in my freezer... Wow... this was unknown to me.
    (It exploded after 4 hours of freezing, the top of the can ripped).

    A warning should be on the package, that Coca Cola is a light explosive under certain situations !
    It's mostly water and water expands upon freezing. You want to pay a lot extra just for a reinforced
    can that can take the pressure, or maybe just stop putting the soda in a freezer.
    Not only does the water expand when it freezes, but the carbon dioxide is forced out of
    solution, so there is a lot of very high pressure gas in a small space. It doesn't fit
    so the can explodes.
    Its even worse with a glass bottle.
    John
    completely wrong
    it doesn't matter if carbon is forced out of solution
    since water freezes carbon bubbles in the water

    So the only pressure is one of the water converted into ice
    since the volume of the frozen water increases by 10%
    Have you actually seen the results of such an explosion? If you had
    I think you would change your mind. A simple expansion of the water would push the lid off the can or crack a glass bottle. That isn't
    what happens when carbonated drinks are frozen. The mess goes everywhere in the freezer, propelled by the high pressure CO2 that
    is NOT contained in lots of harmless little bubbles.
    John
    ^ This is correct.

    1. I heard a loud pop.

    2. The freezer was covered with delicious Coca Coca ICE everywhere. So something forced it out and spread it all over. Must have been the CO2.

    I was almost like there was more Coca Cola in the can to begin with... Quite a strange experience, but a nice one ! If you want to increase the ammount of Coca Coca lol.

    Bye,
    Skybuck.
    don't be silly
    you get the same effect with a can filled with water only, no carbon

    The level of CO2 saturation reflects the t ype of beverages and consumer preferences. Beverage additives, such as tonic, require high CO2 saturation - using 8.8 g CO2/dm3 in the final product, while fruit drinks use only 5.5 g CO2/dm3.
    This is one of those rare occasions when Skybuck is right. Plain water will crack a bottle or force the top off a can. A carbonated drink when frozen explodes. I have seen the effects of both.

    John
    fake
    just prove it


    Cola is highly toxic for your health
    since sweetened with corn starch treated with hydrochloric acid to convert the starch into simple sugars
    called glucose and fructose

    never drink cola

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From a a@21:1/5 to John Walliker on Wed Aug 17 12:01:11 2022
    On Wednesday, 17 August 2022 at 20:20:59 UTC+2, John Walliker wrote:
    On Wednesday, 17 August 2022 at 19:07:21 UTC+1, a a wrote:
    On Wednesday, 17 August 2022 at 20:02:14 UTC+2, John Walliker wrote:
    On Wednesday, 17 August 2022 at 13:53:16 UTC+1, a a wrote:
    On Wednesday, 17 August 2022 at 14:32:58 UTC+2, Skybuck Flying wrote:
    On Tuesday, August 16, 2022 at 7:17:31 PM UTC+2, John Walliker wrote:
    On Tuesday, 16 August 2022 at 11:53:26 UTC+1, a a wrote:
    On Tuesday, 16 August 2022 at 11:56:29 UTC+2, John Walliker wrote:
    On Monday, 15 August 2022 at 20:30:57 UTC+1, Fred Bloggs wrote:
    On Monday, August 15, 2022 at 2:50:02 PM UTC-4, Skybuck Flying wrote:
    Long can of Coca Cola just exploded in my freezer... Wow... this was unknown to me.
    (It exploded after 4 hours of freezing, the top of the can ripped).

    A warning should be on the package, that Coca Cola is a light explosive under certain situations !
    It's mostly water and water expands upon freezing. You want to pay a lot extra just for a reinforced
    can that can take the pressure, or maybe just stop putting the soda in a freezer.
    Not only does the water expand when it freezes, but the carbon dioxide is forced out of
    solution, so there is a lot of very high pressure gas in a small space. It doesn't fit
    so the can explodes.
    Its even worse with a glass bottle.
    John
    completely wrong
    it doesn't matter if carbon is forced out of solution
    since water freezes carbon bubbles in the water

    So the only pressure is one of the water converted into ice since the volume of the frozen water increases by 10%
    Have you actually seen the results of such an explosion? If you had
    I think you would change your mind. A simple expansion of the water
    would push the lid off the can or crack a glass bottle. That isn't what happens when carbonated drinks are frozen. The mess goes everywhere in the freezer, propelled by the high pressure CO2 that is NOT contained in lots of harmless little bubbles.
    John
    ^ This is correct.

    1. I heard a loud pop.

    2. The freezer was covered with delicious Coca Coca ICE everywhere. So something forced it out and spread it all over. Must have been the CO2.

    I was almost like there was more Coca Cola in the can to begin with... Quite a strange experience, but a nice one ! If you want to increase the ammount of Coca Coca lol.

    Bye,
    Skybuck.
    don't be silly
    you get the same effect with a can filled with water only, no carbon

    The level of CO2 saturation reflects the t ype of beverages and consumer preferences. Beverage additives, such as tonic, require high CO2 saturation - using 8.8 g CO2/dm3 in the final product, while fruit drinks use only 5.5 g CO2/dm3.
    This is one of those rare occasions when Skybuck is right. Plain water will
    crack a bottle or force the top off a can. A carbonated drink when frozen
    explodes. I have seen the effects of both.

    John
    fake
    just prove it

    Cola is highly toxic for your health
    since sweetened with corn starch treated with hydrochloric acid to convert the starch into simple sugars
    called glucose and fructose

    never drink cola
    I don't drink it. I once liked 7-up but stopped drinking that after sticking a pH meter in it
    and deciding it would not be doing my teeth any good. It contained a large amount of
    phosphoric acid. I once helped somebody clear up their freezer after several bottles of
    carbonated drinks had violently exploded.
    They were probably Coke or Fanta. It was a very sticky mess, everywhere in the freezer.
    Still wine is interesting when it freezes. It forms a slush which is soft enough
    that the bottle doesn't crack but the expansion forces the cork out of the neck of the bottle.
    John
    If sparkling water freezes, does it effect the carbonation?

    Freezing carbonated water causes dissolved gas to come out of solution to form entrapped bubbles of CO2 in the ice. It is the expression of dissolved gases into entrapped air cavities in ancient ice masses that enables climatologists to infer the amount
    of CO2 in air, eons ago. https://www.quora.com/If-sparkling-water-freezes-does-it-effect-the-carbonation


    Can You Freeze Carbonated or Sparkling Water? | Home … https://homeardent.com/can-you-freeze-carbonated-water

    When you freeze carbonated water, it expands by approximately 9 percent. Also, the carbonated bubbles will result in unusual swelling patterns, though all this will not significantly

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Walliker@21:1/5 to a a on Wed Aug 17 11:20:55 2022
    On Wednesday, 17 August 2022 at 19:07:21 UTC+1, a a wrote:
    On Wednesday, 17 August 2022 at 20:02:14 UTC+2, John Walliker wrote:
    On Wednesday, 17 August 2022 at 13:53:16 UTC+1, a a wrote:
    On Wednesday, 17 August 2022 at 14:32:58 UTC+2, Skybuck Flying wrote:
    On Tuesday, August 16, 2022 at 7:17:31 PM UTC+2, John Walliker wrote:
    On Tuesday, 16 August 2022 at 11:53:26 UTC+1, a a wrote:
    On Tuesday, 16 August 2022 at 11:56:29 UTC+2, John Walliker wrote:
    On Monday, 15 August 2022 at 20:30:57 UTC+1, Fred Bloggs wrote:
    On Monday, August 15, 2022 at 2:50:02 PM UTC-4, Skybuck Flying wrote:
    Long can of Coca Cola just exploded in my freezer... Wow... this was unknown to me.
    (It exploded after 4 hours of freezing, the top of the can ripped).

    A warning should be on the package, that Coca Cola is a light explosive under certain situations !
    It's mostly water and water expands upon freezing. You want to pay a lot extra just for a reinforced
    can that can take the pressure, or maybe just stop putting the soda in a freezer.
    Not only does the water expand when it freezes, but the carbon dioxide is forced out of
    solution, so there is a lot of very high pressure gas in a small space. It doesn't fit
    so the can explodes.
    Its even worse with a glass bottle.
    John
    completely wrong
    it doesn't matter if carbon is forced out of solution
    since water freezes carbon bubbles in the water

    So the only pressure is one of the water converted into ice
    since the volume of the frozen water increases by 10%
    Have you actually seen the results of such an explosion? If you had
    I think you would change your mind. A simple expansion of the water would push the lid off the can or crack a glass bottle. That isn't what happens when carbonated drinks are frozen. The mess goes everywhere in the freezer, propelled by the high pressure CO2 that
    is NOT contained in lots of harmless little bubbles.
    John
    ^ This is correct.

    1. I heard a loud pop.

    2. The freezer was covered with delicious Coca Coca ICE everywhere. So something forced it out and spread it all over. Must have been the CO2.

    I was almost like there was more Coca Cola in the can to begin with... Quite a strange experience, but a nice one ! If you want to increase the ammount of Coca Coca lol.

    Bye,
    Skybuck.
    don't be silly
    you get the same effect with a can filled with water only, no carbon

    The level of CO2 saturation reflects the t ype of beverages and consumer preferences. Beverage additives, such as tonic, require high CO2 saturation - using 8.8 g CO2/dm3 in the final product, while fruit drinks use only 5.5 g CO2/dm3.
    This is one of those rare occasions when Skybuck is right. Plain water will crack a bottle or force the top off a can. A carbonated drink when frozen explodes. I have seen the effects of both.

    John
    fake
    just prove it

    Cola is highly toxic for your health
    since sweetened with corn starch treated with hydrochloric acid to convert the starch into simple sugars
    called glucose and fructose

    never drink cola

    I don't drink it. I once liked 7-up but stopped drinking that after sticking a pH meter in it
    and deciding it would not be doing my teeth any good. It contained a large amount of
    phosphoric acid. I once helped somebody clear up their freezer after several bottles of
    carbonated drinks had violently exploded.
    They were probably Coke or Fanta. It was a very sticky mess, everywhere in the freezer.
    Still wine is interesting when it freezes. It forms a slush which is soft enough
    that the bottle doesn't crack but the expansion forces the cork out of the
    neck of the bottle.
    John

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From a a@21:1/5 to John Walliker on Wed Aug 17 13:11:45 2022
    On Wednesday, 17 August 2022 at 21:48:28 UTC+2, John Walliker wrote:
    On Wednesday, 17 August 2022 at 20:01:16 UTC+1, a a wrote:
    On Wednesday, 17 August 2022 at 20:20:59 UTC+2, John Walliker wrote:
    On Wednesday, 17 August 2022 at 19:07:21 UTC+1, a a wrote:
    On Wednesday, 17 August 2022 at 20:02:14 UTC+2, John Walliker wrote:
    On Wednesday, 17 August 2022 at 13:53:16 UTC+1, a a wrote:
    On Wednesday, 17 August 2022 at 14:32:58 UTC+2, Skybuck Flying wrote:
    On Tuesday, August 16, 2022 at 7:17:31 PM UTC+2, John Walliker wrote:
    On Tuesday, 16 August 2022 at 11:53:26 UTC+1, a a wrote:
    On Tuesday, 16 August 2022 at 11:56:29 UTC+2, John Walliker wrote:
    On Monday, 15 August 2022 at 20:30:57 UTC+1, Fred Bloggs wrote:
    On Monday, August 15, 2022 at 2:50:02 PM UTC-4, Skybuck Flying wrote:
    Long can of Coca Cola just exploded in my freezer... Wow... this was unknown to me.
    (It exploded after 4 hours of freezing, the top of the can ripped).

    A warning should be on the package, that Coca Cola is a light explosive under certain situations !
    It's mostly water and water expands upon freezing. You want to pay a lot extra just for a reinforced
    can that can take the pressure, or maybe just stop putting the soda in a freezer.
    Not only does the water expand when it freezes, but the carbon dioxide is forced out of
    solution, so there is a lot of very high pressure gas in a small space. It doesn't fit
    so the can explodes.
    Its even worse with a glass bottle.
    John
    completely wrong
    it doesn't matter if carbon is forced out of solution
    since water freezes carbon bubbles in the water

    So the only pressure is one of the water converted into ice since the volume of the frozen water increases by 10%
    Have you actually seen the results of such an explosion? If you had
    I think you would change your mind. A simple expansion of the water
    would push the lid off the can or crack a glass bottle. That isn't
    what happens when carbonated drinks are frozen. The mess goes everywhere in the freezer, propelled by the high pressure CO2 that
    is NOT contained in lots of harmless little bubbles.
    John
    ^ This is correct.

    1. I heard a loud pop.

    2. The freezer was covered with delicious Coca Coca ICE everywhere. So something forced it out and spread it all over. Must have been the CO2.

    I was almost like there was more Coca Cola in the can to begin with... Quite a strange experience, but a nice one ! If you want to increase the ammount of Coca Coca lol.

    Bye,
    Skybuck.
    don't be silly
    you get the same effect with a can filled with water only, no carbon

    The level of CO2 saturation reflects the t ype of beverages and consumer preferences. Beverage additives, such as tonic, require high CO2 saturation - using 8.8 g CO2/dm3 in the final product, while fruit drinks use only 5.5 g CO2/dm3.
    This is one of those rare occasions when Skybuck is right. Plain water will
    crack a bottle or force the top off a can. A carbonated drink when frozen
    explodes. I have seen the effects of both.

    John
    fake
    just prove it

    Cola is highly toxic for your health
    since sweetened with corn starch treated with hydrochloric acid to convert the starch into simple sugars
    called glucose and fructose

    never drink cola
    I don't drink it. I once liked 7-up but stopped drinking that after sticking a pH meter in it
    and deciding it would not be doing my teeth any good. It contained a large amount of
    phosphoric acid. I once helped somebody clear up their freezer after several bottles of
    carbonated drinks had violently exploded.
    They were probably Coke or Fanta. It was a very sticky mess, everywhere in the freezer.
    Still wine is interesting when it freezes. It forms a slush which is soft enough
    that the bottle doesn't crack but the expansion forces the cork out of the
    neck of the bottle.
    John
    If sparkling water freezes, does it effect the carbonation?

    Freezing carbonated water causes dissolved gas to come out of solution to form entrapped bubbles of CO2 in the ice. It is the expression of dissolved gases into entrapped air cavities in ancient ice masses that enables climatologists to infer the
    amount of CO2 in air, eons ago.
    https://www.quora.com/If-sparkling-water-freezes-does-it-effect-the-carbonation


    Can You Freeze Carbonated or Sparkling Water? | Home … https://homeardent.com/can-you-freeze-carbonated-water

    When you freeze carbonated water, it expands by approximately 9 percent. Also, the carbonated bubbles will result in unusual swelling patterns, though all this will not significantly
    You forgot to quote the following from your second link:

    "Carbonated water will expand evenly, but because pressured carbon dioxide has been
    infused into the water, some unusual patterns may occur that can create problems
    when you try to freeze it. However, the biggest mistake most people make is freezing
    carbonated water in their original container.
    While this may be presumed as standard, the truth is that only a few of these containers
    can allow for the uneven expansion that fizzy water will undergo when you toss it in
    the freezer. Even worse, many people will freeze carbonated water with their seals,
    leading to a problematic situation that can cause the soda can explode."

    The problem is that the situation is not the same as bubbles of gas trapped in ancient ice samples. They were most likely formed when air became trapped in snow which was then gradually compressed into ice by many subsequent layers
    of snow.
    When a carbonated drink is frozen in its original container the freezing is progressive.
    A void forms which contains nearly all the CO2 in one place rather than distributed
    in lots of bubbles. Also, slush formation is likely due to the dissolved sugar and other
    rubbish. As the ice expands, the space for the CO2 decreases resulting in an extremely
    high pressure. When the container finally bursts the slush is explosively propelled
    into every nook and cranny in the freezer.

    On a similar subject, I once came across a bottle of still water at the back of my refrigerator next to the heat exchanger. The thermostat had been set too cold
    and the water became supercooled. When I took it out, it had the viscosity of
    glycerine. After handling it for a short time the whole lot froze in just a few seconds.
    I think the water had been so heavily filtered that there were no nucleation centres
    which allowed the supercooling to take place.
    I have never managed to replicate the effect, but others have managed to do so.

    John
    the below contradicts the above

    Absolutely, so long as you don't rupture the can by freezing it. This means that when it thaws the contents are still under pressure and this ensures that the CO2 (the fizz) remains dissolved in the liquid.Jul 18, 2008
    ==================================================

    https://www.thenakedscientists.com/forum/index.php?topic=15994.0

    vs.

    ===A void forms which contains nearly all the CO2 in one place rather than distributed
    in lots of bubbles.

    --
    this thread looks to be a fake marketing campaign by Cola
    to have subject line including "Cola" read by many and replied by many

    I don't drink cola

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Walliker@21:1/5 to a a on Wed Aug 17 12:48:24 2022
    On Wednesday, 17 August 2022 at 20:01:16 UTC+1, a a wrote:
    On Wednesday, 17 August 2022 at 20:20:59 UTC+2, John Walliker wrote:
    On Wednesday, 17 August 2022 at 19:07:21 UTC+1, a a wrote:
    On Wednesday, 17 August 2022 at 20:02:14 UTC+2, John Walliker wrote:
    On Wednesday, 17 August 2022 at 13:53:16 UTC+1, a a wrote:
    On Wednesday, 17 August 2022 at 14:32:58 UTC+2, Skybuck Flying wrote:
    On Tuesday, August 16, 2022 at 7:17:31 PM UTC+2, John Walliker wrote:
    On Tuesday, 16 August 2022 at 11:53:26 UTC+1, a a wrote:
    On Tuesday, 16 August 2022 at 11:56:29 UTC+2, John Walliker wrote:
    On Monday, 15 August 2022 at 20:30:57 UTC+1, Fred Bloggs wrote:
    On Monday, August 15, 2022 at 2:50:02 PM UTC-4, Skybuck Flying wrote:
    Long can of Coca Cola just exploded in my freezer... Wow... this was unknown to me.
    (It exploded after 4 hours of freezing, the top of the can ripped).

    A warning should be on the package, that Coca Cola is a light explosive under certain situations !
    It's mostly water and water expands upon freezing. You want to pay a lot extra just for a reinforced
    can that can take the pressure, or maybe just stop putting the soda in a freezer.
    Not only does the water expand when it freezes, but the carbon dioxide is forced out of
    solution, so there is a lot of very high pressure gas in a small space. It doesn't fit
    so the can explodes.
    Its even worse with a glass bottle.
    John
    completely wrong
    it doesn't matter if carbon is forced out of solution
    since water freezes carbon bubbles in the water

    So the only pressure is one of the water converted into ice since the volume of the frozen water increases by 10%
    Have you actually seen the results of such an explosion? If you had
    I think you would change your mind. A simple expansion of the water
    would push the lid off the can or crack a glass bottle. That isn't
    what happens when carbonated drinks are frozen. The mess goes everywhere in the freezer, propelled by the high pressure CO2 that
    is NOT contained in lots of harmless little bubbles.
    John
    ^ This is correct.

    1. I heard a loud pop.

    2. The freezer was covered with delicious Coca Coca ICE everywhere. So something forced it out and spread it all over. Must have been the CO2.

    I was almost like there was more Coca Cola in the can to begin with... Quite a strange experience, but a nice one ! If you want to increase the ammount of Coca Coca lol.

    Bye,
    Skybuck.
    don't be silly
    you get the same effect with a can filled with water only, no carbon

    The level of CO2 saturation reflects the t ype of beverages and consumer preferences. Beverage additives, such as tonic, require high CO2 saturation - using 8.8 g CO2/dm3 in the final product, while fruit drinks use only 5.5 g CO2/dm3.
    This is one of those rare occasions when Skybuck is right. Plain water will
    crack a bottle or force the top off a can. A carbonated drink when frozen
    explodes. I have seen the effects of both.

    John
    fake
    just prove it

    Cola is highly toxic for your health
    since sweetened with corn starch treated with hydrochloric acid to convert the starch into simple sugars
    called glucose and fructose

    never drink cola
    I don't drink it. I once liked 7-up but stopped drinking that after sticking a pH meter in it
    and deciding it would not be doing my teeth any good. It contained a large amount of
    phosphoric acid. I once helped somebody clear up their freezer after several bottles of
    carbonated drinks had violently exploded.
    They were probably Coke or Fanta. It was a very sticky mess, everywhere in the freezer.
    Still wine is interesting when it freezes. It forms a slush which is soft enough
    that the bottle doesn't crack but the expansion forces the cork out of the neck of the bottle.
    John
    If sparkling water freezes, does it effect the carbonation?

    Freezing carbonated water causes dissolved gas to come out of solution to form entrapped bubbles of CO2 in the ice. It is the expression of dissolved gases into entrapped air cavities in ancient ice masses that enables climatologists to infer the
    amount of CO2 in air, eons ago.
    https://www.quora.com/If-sparkling-water-freezes-does-it-effect-the-carbonation


    Can You Freeze Carbonated or Sparkling Water? | Home … https://homeardent.com/can-you-freeze-carbonated-water

    When you freeze carbonated water, it expands by approximately 9 percent. Also, the carbonated bubbles will result in unusual swelling patterns, though all this will not significantly

    You forgot to quote the following from your second link:

    "Carbonated water will expand evenly, but because pressured carbon dioxide has been
    infused into the water, some unusual patterns may occur that can create problems
    when you try to freeze it. However, the biggest mistake most people make is freezing
    carbonated water in their original container.
    While this may be presumed as standard, the truth is that only a few of these containers
    can allow for the uneven expansion that fizzy water will undergo when you toss it in
    the freezer. Even worse, many people will freeze carbonated water with their seals,
    leading to a problematic situation that can cause the soda can explode."

    The problem is that the situation is not the same as bubbles of gas trapped
    in ancient ice samples. They were most likely formed when air became trapped in snow which was then gradually compressed into ice by many subsequent layers of snow.
    When a carbonated drink is frozen in its original container the freezing is progressive.
    A void forms which contains nearly all the CO2 in one place rather than distributed
    in lots of bubbles. Also, slush formation is likely due to the dissolved sugar and other
    rubbish. As the ice expands, the space for the CO2 decreases resulting in an extremely
    high pressure. When the container finally bursts the slush is explosively propelled
    into every nook and cranny in the freezer.

    On a similar subject, I once came across a bottle of still water at the back
    of my refrigerator next to the heat exchanger. The thermostat had been set too cold
    and the water became supercooled. When I took it out, it had the viscosity of glycerine. After handling it for a short time the whole lot froze in just a few seconds.
    I think the water had been so heavily filtered that there were no nucleation centres
    which allowed the supercooling to take place.
    I have never managed to replicate the effect, but others have managed to do so.

    John

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Walliker@21:1/5 to a a on Wed Aug 17 15:24:30 2022
    On Wednesday, 17 August 2022 at 21:11:50 UTC+1, a a wrote:
    On Wednesday, 17 August 2022 at 21:48:28 UTC+2, John Walliker wrote:
    On Wednesday, 17 August 2022 at 20:01:16 UTC+1, a a wrote:
    On Wednesday, 17 August 2022 at 20:20:59 UTC+2, John Walliker wrote:
    On Wednesday, 17 August 2022 at 19:07:21 UTC+1, a a wrote:
    On Wednesday, 17 August 2022 at 20:02:14 UTC+2, John Walliker wrote:
    On Wednesday, 17 August 2022 at 13:53:16 UTC+1, a a wrote:
    On Wednesday, 17 August 2022 at 14:32:58 UTC+2, Skybuck Flying wrote:
    On Tuesday, August 16, 2022 at 7:17:31 PM UTC+2, John Walliker wrote:
    On Tuesday, 16 August 2022 at 11:53:26 UTC+1, a a wrote:
    On Tuesday, 16 August 2022 at 11:56:29 UTC+2, John Walliker wrote:
    On Monday, 15 August 2022 at 20:30:57 UTC+1, Fred Bloggs wrote:
    On Monday, August 15, 2022 at 2:50:02 PM UTC-4, Skybuck Flying wrote:
    Long can of Coca Cola just exploded in my freezer... Wow... this was unknown to me.
    (It exploded after 4 hours of freezing, the top of the can ripped).

    A warning should be on the package, that Coca Cola is a light explosive under certain situations !
    It's mostly water and water expands upon freezing. You want to pay a lot extra just for a reinforced
    can that can take the pressure, or maybe just stop putting the soda in a freezer.
    Not only does the water expand when it freezes, but the carbon dioxide is forced out of
    solution, so there is a lot of very high pressure gas in a small space. It doesn't fit
    so the can explodes.
    Its even worse with a glass bottle.
    John
    completely wrong
    it doesn't matter if carbon is forced out of solution since water freezes carbon bubbles in the water

    So the only pressure is one of the water converted into ice
    since the volume of the frozen water increases by 10%
    Have you actually seen the results of such an explosion? If you had
    I think you would change your mind. A simple expansion of the water
    would push the lid off the can or crack a glass bottle. That isn't
    what happens when carbonated drinks are frozen. The mess goes
    everywhere in the freezer, propelled by the high pressure CO2 that
    is NOT contained in lots of harmless little bubbles.
    John
    ^ This is correct.

    1. I heard a loud pop.

    2. The freezer was covered with delicious Coca Coca ICE everywhere. So something forced it out and spread it all over. Must have been the CO2.

    I was almost like there was more Coca Cola in the can to begin with... Quite a strange experience, but a nice one ! If you want to increase the ammount of Coca Coca lol.

    Bye,
    Skybuck.
    don't be silly
    you get the same effect with a can filled with water only, no carbon

    The level of CO2 saturation reflects the t ype of beverages and consumer preferences. Beverage additives, such as tonic, require high CO2 saturation - using 8.8 g CO2/dm3 in the final product, while fruit drinks use only 5.5 g CO2/dm3.
    This is one of those rare occasions when Skybuck is right. Plain water will
    crack a bottle or force the top off a can. A carbonated drink when frozen
    explodes. I have seen the effects of both.

    John
    fake
    just prove it

    Cola is highly toxic for your health
    since sweetened with corn starch treated with hydrochloric acid to convert the starch into simple sugars
    called glucose and fructose

    never drink cola
    I don't drink it. I once liked 7-up but stopped drinking that after sticking a pH meter in it
    and deciding it would not be doing my teeth any good. It contained a large amount of
    phosphoric acid. I once helped somebody clear up their freezer after several bottles of
    carbonated drinks had violently exploded.
    They were probably Coke or Fanta. It was a very sticky mess, everywhere in the freezer.
    Still wine is interesting when it freezes. It forms a slush which is soft enough
    that the bottle doesn't crack but the expansion forces the cork out of the
    neck of the bottle.
    John
    If sparkling water freezes, does it effect the carbonation?

    Freezing carbonated water causes dissolved gas to come out of solution to form entrapped bubbles of CO2 in the ice. It is the expression of dissolved gases into entrapped air cavities in ancient ice masses that enables climatologists to infer the
    amount of CO2 in air, eons ago.
    https://www.quora.com/If-sparkling-water-freezes-does-it-effect-the-carbonation


    Can You Freeze Carbonated or Sparkling Water? | Home … https://homeardent.com/can-you-freeze-carbonated-water

    When you freeze carbonated water, it expands by approximately 9 percent. Also, the carbonated bubbles will result in unusual swelling patterns, though all this will not significantly
    You forgot to quote the following from your second link:

    "Carbonated water will expand evenly, but because pressured carbon dioxide has been
    infused into the water, some unusual patterns may occur that can create problems
    when you try to freeze it. However, the biggest mistake most people make is freezing
    carbonated water in their original container.
    While this may be presumed as standard, the truth is that only a few of these containers
    can allow for the uneven expansion that fizzy water will undergo when you toss it in
    the freezer. Even worse, many people will freeze carbonated water with their seals,
    leading to a problematic situation that can cause the soda can explode."

    The problem is that the situation is not the same as bubbles of gas trapped
    in ancient ice samples. They were most likely formed when air became trapped
    in snow which was then gradually compressed into ice by many subsequent layers
    of snow.
    When a carbonated drink is frozen in its original container the freezing is progressive.
    A void forms which contains nearly all the CO2 in one place rather than distributed
    in lots of bubbles. Also, slush formation is likely due to the dissolved sugar and other
    rubbish. As the ice expands, the space for the CO2 decreases resulting in an extremely
    high pressure. When the container finally bursts the slush is explosively propelled
    into every nook and cranny in the freezer.

    On a similar subject, I once came across a bottle of still water at the back
    of my refrigerator next to the heat exchanger. The thermostat had been set too cold
    and the water became supercooled. When I took it out, it had the viscosity of
    glycerine. After handling it for a short time the whole lot froze in just a few seconds.
    I think the water had been so heavily filtered that there were no nucleation centres
    which allowed the supercooling to take place.
    I have never managed to replicate the effect, but others have managed to do so.

    John
    the below contradicts the above

    Absolutely, so long as you don't rupture the can by freezing it. This means that when it thaws the contents are still under pressure and this ensures that the CO2 (the fizz) remains dissolved in the liquid.Jul 18, 2008
    ==================================================

    https://www.thenakedscientists.com/forum/index.php?topic=15994.0

    vs.

    ===A void forms which contains nearly all the CO2 in one place rather than distributed
    in lots of bubbles.


    this thread looks to be a fake marketing campaign by Cola
    to have subject line including "Cola" read by many and replied by many

    I don't drink cola

    Where is the contradiction? If you freeze the fizzy drink and the can or bottle survives
    and is then thawed out of course the drink will be just the same as before (*). The CO2 will
    re-dissolve and the drink will be just as good as before. Or just as horrible, depending
    on your taste. I also don't drink cola.
    What is remarkable is that on this one rare occasion Skybuck wrote something that is correct. This deserves to be celebrated!
    John
    * It may not be QUITE the same. The stress on a can or plastic bottle might have taken
    it beyond its elastic limit and permanently stretched it resulting in a small increase in volume.
    This would cause the equilibrium pressure of CO2 to be slightly lower, resulting in
    the drink being slightly less fizzy. In the case of a glass bottle, the situation is more binary.
    It either explodes or it doesn't.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From a a@21:1/5 to John Walliker on Wed Aug 17 15:43:34 2022
    On Thursday, 18 August 2022 at 00:24:34 UTC+2, John Walliker wrote:
    On Wednesday, 17 August 2022 at 21:11:50 UTC+1, a a wrote:
    On Wednesday, 17 August 2022 at 21:48:28 UTC+2, John Walliker wrote:
    On Wednesday, 17 August 2022 at 20:01:16 UTC+1, a a wrote:
    On Wednesday, 17 August 2022 at 20:20:59 UTC+2, John Walliker wrote:
    On Wednesday, 17 August 2022 at 19:07:21 UTC+1, a a wrote:
    On Wednesday, 17 August 2022 at 20:02:14 UTC+2, John Walliker wrote:
    On Wednesday, 17 August 2022 at 13:53:16 UTC+1, a a wrote:
    On Wednesday, 17 August 2022 at 14:32:58 UTC+2, Skybuck Flying wrote:
    On Tuesday, August 16, 2022 at 7:17:31 PM UTC+2, John Walliker wrote:
    On Tuesday, 16 August 2022 at 11:53:26 UTC+1, a a wrote:
    On Tuesday, 16 August 2022 at 11:56:29 UTC+2, John Walliker wrote:
    On Monday, 15 August 2022 at 20:30:57 UTC+1, Fred Bloggs wrote:
    On Monday, August 15, 2022 at 2:50:02 PM UTC-4, Skybuck Flying wrote:
    Long can of Coca Cola just exploded in my freezer... Wow... this was unknown to me.
    (It exploded after 4 hours of freezing, the top of the can ripped).

    A warning should be on the package, that Coca Cola is a light explosive under certain situations !
    It's mostly water and water expands upon freezing. You want to pay a lot extra just for a reinforced
    can that can take the pressure, or maybe just stop putting the soda in a freezer.
    Not only does the water expand when it freezes, but the carbon dioxide is forced out of
    solution, so there is a lot of very high pressure gas in a small space. It doesn't fit
    so the can explodes.
    Its even worse with a glass bottle.
    John
    completely wrong
    it doesn't matter if carbon is forced out of solution since water freezes carbon bubbles in the water

    So the only pressure is one of the water converted into ice
    since the volume of the frozen water increases by 10%
    Have you actually seen the results of such an explosion? If you had
    I think you would change your mind. A simple expansion of the water
    would push the lid off the can or crack a glass bottle. That isn't
    what happens when carbonated drinks are frozen. The mess goes
    everywhere in the freezer, propelled by the high pressure CO2 that
    is NOT contained in lots of harmless little bubbles.
    John
    ^ This is correct.

    1. I heard a loud pop.

    2. The freezer was covered with delicious Coca Coca ICE everywhere. So something forced it out and spread it all over. Must have been the CO2.

    I was almost like there was more Coca Cola in the can to begin with... Quite a strange experience, but a nice one ! If you want to increase the ammount of Coca Coca lol.

    Bye,
    Skybuck.
    don't be silly
    you get the same effect with a can filled with water only, no carbon

    The level of CO2 saturation reflects the t ype of beverages and consumer preferences. Beverage additives, such as tonic, require high CO2 saturation - using 8.8 g CO2/dm3 in the final product, while fruit drinks use only 5.5 g CO2/dm3.
    This is one of those rare occasions when Skybuck is right. Plain water will
    crack a bottle or force the top off a can. A carbonated drink when frozen
    explodes. I have seen the effects of both.

    John
    fake
    just prove it

    Cola is highly toxic for your health
    since sweetened with corn starch treated with hydrochloric acid to convert the starch into simple sugars
    called glucose and fructose

    never drink cola
    I don't drink it. I once liked 7-up but stopped drinking that after sticking a pH meter in it
    and deciding it would not be doing my teeth any good. It contained a large amount of
    phosphoric acid. I once helped somebody clear up their freezer after several bottles of
    carbonated drinks had violently exploded.
    They were probably Coke or Fanta. It was a very sticky mess, everywhere in the freezer.
    Still wine is interesting when it freezes. It forms a slush which is soft enough
    that the bottle doesn't crack but the expansion forces the cork out of the
    neck of the bottle.
    John
    If sparkling water freezes, does it effect the carbonation?

    Freezing carbonated water causes dissolved gas to come out of solution to form entrapped bubbles of CO2 in the ice. It is the expression of dissolved gases into entrapped air cavities in ancient ice masses that enables climatologists to infer the
    amount of CO2 in air, eons ago.
    https://www.quora.com/If-sparkling-water-freezes-does-it-effect-the-carbonation


    Can You Freeze Carbonated or Sparkling Water? | Home … https://homeardent.com/can-you-freeze-carbonated-water

    When you freeze carbonated water, it expands by approximately 9 percent. Also, the carbonated bubbles will result in unusual swelling patterns, though all this will not significantly
    You forgot to quote the following from your second link:

    "Carbonated water will expand evenly, but because pressured carbon dioxide has been
    infused into the water, some unusual patterns may occur that can create problems
    when you try to freeze it. However, the biggest mistake most people make is freezing
    carbonated water in their original container.
    While this may be presumed as standard, the truth is that only a few of these containers
    can allow for the uneven expansion that fizzy water will undergo when you toss it in
    the freezer. Even worse, many people will freeze carbonated water with their seals,
    leading to a problematic situation that can cause the soda can explode."

    The problem is that the situation is not the same as bubbles of gas trapped
    in ancient ice samples. They were most likely formed when air became trapped
    in snow which was then gradually compressed into ice by many subsequent layers
    of snow.
    When a carbonated drink is frozen in its original container the freezing is progressive.
    A void forms which contains nearly all the CO2 in one place rather than distributed
    in lots of bubbles. Also, slush formation is likely due to the dissolved sugar and other
    rubbish. As the ice expands, the space for the CO2 decreases resulting in an extremely
    high pressure. When the container finally bursts the slush is explosively propelled
    into every nook and cranny in the freezer.

    On a similar subject, I once came across a bottle of still water at the back
    of my refrigerator next to the heat exchanger. The thermostat had been set too cold
    and the water became supercooled. When I took it out, it had the viscosity of
    glycerine. After handling it for a short time the whole lot froze in just a few seconds.
    I think the water had been so heavily filtered that there were no nucleation centres
    which allowed the supercooling to take place.
    I have never managed to replicate the effect, but others have managed to do so.

    John
    the below contradicts the above

    Absolutely, so long as you don't rupture the can by freezing it. This means that when it thaws the contents are still under pressure and this ensures that the CO2 (the fizz) remains dissolved in the liquid.Jul 18, 2008
    ==================================================

    https://www.thenakedscientists.com/forum/index.php?topic=15994.0

    vs.

    ===A void forms which contains nearly all the CO2 in one place rather than distributed
    in lots of bubbles.

    this thread looks to be a fake marketing campaign by Cola
    to have subject line including "Cola" read by many and replied by many

    I don't drink cola
    Where is the contradiction? If you freeze the fizzy drink and the can or bottle survives
    and is then thawed out of course the drink will be just the same as before (*). The CO2 will
    re-dissolve and the drink will be just as good as before. Or just as horrible, depending
    on your taste. I also don't drink cola.
    What is remarkable is that on this one rare occasion Skybuck wrote something that is correct. This deserves to be celebrated!
    John
    * It may not be QUITE the same. The stress on a can or plastic bottle might have taken
    it beyond its elastic limit and permanently stretched it resulting in a small increase in volume.
    This would cause the equilibrium pressure of CO2 to be slightly lower, resulting in
    the drink being slightly less fizzy. In the case of a glass bottle, the situation is more binary.
    It either explodes or it doesn't.
    read once again

    --This means that when it thaws the contents are still under pressure and this ensures that the CO2 (the fizz) remains dissolved in the liquid.Jul 18, 2008
    ==================================================

    --https://www.thenakedscientists.com/forum/index.php?topic=15994.0


    --and this ensures that the CO2 (the fizz) remains dissolved in the liquid.Jul 18, 2008




    this is fake marketing of Col;a
    and exactly resembles the marketing of Mentos on Youtube

    ---
    when it thaws the contents are still under pressure and this ensures that the CO2 (the fizz) remains dissolved in the liquid.


    remains
    remains
    remains

    by scientists

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)