• =?UTF-8?Q?You_won=E2=80=99t_be_confused_about_electric_vehicle_charg?=

    From Ed Lee@21:1/5 to All on Thu Jul 28 06:26:58 2022
    I am confused. Should the car be turned upside down to charge with CCS? Or at least horizontally with center of gravity of the plug tilted to the signal end? Otherwise, weight of the plug tends to pull the signal pins off.

    https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/07/the-ars-technica-guide-to-electric-vehicle-charging/

    Seriously, is CCS CP using the LIN physical layer, or a similar version of it? Any CCS experts here?

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ricky@21:1/5 to Ed Lee on Thu Jul 28 09:46:41 2022
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 9:27:02 AM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    I am confused. Should the car be turned upside down to charge with CCS? Or at least horizontally with center of gravity of the plug tilted to the signal end? Otherwise, weight of the plug tends to pull the signal pins off.

    https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/07/the-ars-technica-guide-to-electric-vehicle-charging/

    Seriously, is CCS CP using the LIN physical layer, or a similar version of it? Any CCS experts here?

    Ed, you are doing your usual thing of expecting people to read your post as well as your mind. I don't see LIN mentioned in the article you link at all. The body of the connector maintains a physical alignment. The pins are supported by the body and
    so are aligned with the mating pins. This is connectors 101, and is how nearly all connectors work.

    What are you talking about???

    --

    Rick C.

    - Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
    - Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ed Lee@21:1/5 to Ricky on Thu Jul 28 10:02:31 2022
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 9:46:44 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 9:27:02 AM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    I am confused. Should the car be turned upside down to charge with CCS? Or at least horizontally with center of gravity of the plug tilted to the signal end? Otherwise, weight of the plug tends to pull the signal pins off.

    https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/07/the-ars-technica-guide-to-electric-vehicle-charging/

    Seriously, is CCS CP using the LIN physical layer, or a similar version of it? Any CCS experts here?
    Ed, you are doing your usual thing of expecting people to read your post as well as your mind. I don't see LIN mentioned in the article you link at all.

    Sorry, it's two different issues.

    LIN bus is simplified CAN. 12V PLC pulled-up with 1K. Sound like it should work with the CCS Control Pilot (CP) physical layer. I am looking to buy or build the protocol analyser.

    The body of the connector maintains a physical alignment. The pins are supported by the body and so are aligned with the mating pins. This is connectors 101, and is how nearly all connectors work.

    Many CCS drivers can tell you that it should be up-side down. It does not connect reliable sometime. Perhaps they should plug in and hold the plug for an hour while charging.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ed Lee@21:1/5 to Ed Lee on Thu Jul 28 10:13:39 2022
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:02:35 AM UTC-7, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 9:46:44 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 9:27:02 AM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    I am confused. Should the car be turned upside down to charge with CCS? Or at least horizontally with center of gravity of the plug tilted to the signal end? Otherwise, weight of the plug tends to pull the signal pins off.

    https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/07/the-ars-technica-guide-to-electric-vehicle-charging/

    Seriously, is CCS CP using the LIN physical layer, or a similar version of it? Any CCS experts here?
    Ed, you are doing your usual thing of expecting people to read your post as well as your mind. I don't see LIN mentioned in the article you link at all.
    Sorry, it's two different issues.

    LIN bus is simplified CAN. 12V PLC pulled-up with 1K. Sound like it should work with the CCS Control Pilot (CP) physical layer. I am looking to buy or build the protocol analyser.
    The body of the connector maintains a physical alignment. The pins are supported by the body and so are aligned with the mating pins. This is connectors 101, and is how nearly all connectors work.
    Many CCS drivers can tell you that it should be up-side down. It does not connect reliable sometime. Perhaps they should plug in and hold the plug for an hour while charging.

    One CCS driver reported on plugshare that intermittent charger caused EV system crash with idiot light (check engine). I had experienced similar problem with J1772 with the #1 (left most) plug at Bakersfield Amtrak. #4 connector is broken. #3 is power-
    off. #2 is OK.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ricky@21:1/5 to Ed Lee on Thu Jul 28 10:25:01 2022
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:13:42 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:02:35 AM UTC-7, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 9:46:44 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 9:27:02 AM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    I am confused. Should the car be turned upside down to charge with CCS? Or at least horizontally with center of gravity of the plug tilted to the signal end? Otherwise, weight of the plug tends to pull the signal pins off.

    https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/07/the-ars-technica-guide-to-electric-vehicle-charging/

    Seriously, is CCS CP using the LIN physical layer, or a similar version of it? Any CCS experts here?
    Ed, you are doing your usual thing of expecting people to read your post as well as your mind. I don't see LIN mentioned in the article you link at all.
    Sorry, it's two different issues.

    LIN bus is simplified CAN. 12V PLC pulled-up with 1K. Sound like it should work with the CCS Control Pilot (CP) physical layer. I am looking to buy or build the protocol analyser.
    The body of the connector maintains a physical alignment. The pins are supported by the body and so are aligned with the mating pins. This is connectors 101, and is how nearly all connectors work.
    Many CCS drivers can tell you that it should be up-side down. It does not connect reliable sometime. Perhaps they should plug in and hold the plug for an hour while charging.
    One CCS driver reported on plugshare that intermittent charger caused EV system crash with idiot light (check engine). I had experienced similar problem with J1772 with the #1 (left most) plug at Bakersfield Amtrak. #4 connector is broken. #3 is power-
    off. #2 is OK.

    Maybe Tesla won't be giving up their customer interface design after all. Seems to work pretty well compared to your experiences... although, your experiences are anything but typical.

    --

    Rick C.

    -- Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
    -- Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ed Lee@21:1/5 to Ricky on Thu Jul 28 10:35:29 2022
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:25:04 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:13:42 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:02:35 AM UTC-7, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 9:46:44 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 9:27:02 AM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    I am confused. Should the car be turned upside down to charge with CCS? Or at least horizontally with center of gravity of the plug tilted to the signal end? Otherwise, weight of the plug tends to pull the signal pins off.

    https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/07/the-ars-technica-guide-to-electric-vehicle-charging/

    Seriously, is CCS CP using the LIN physical layer, or a similar version of it? Any CCS experts here?
    Ed, you are doing your usual thing of expecting people to read your post as well as your mind. I don't see LIN mentioned in the article you link at all.
    Sorry, it's two different issues.

    LIN bus is simplified CAN. 12V PLC pulled-up with 1K. Sound like it should work with the CCS Control Pilot (CP) physical layer. I am looking to buy or build the protocol analyser.
    The body of the connector maintains a physical alignment. The pins are supported by the body and so are aligned with the mating pins. This is connectors 101, and is how nearly all connectors work.
    Many CCS drivers can tell you that it should be up-side down. It does not connect reliable sometime. Perhaps they should plug in and hold the plug for an hour while charging.
    One CCS driver reported on plugshare that intermittent charger caused EV system crash with idiot light (check engine). I had experienced similar problem with J1772 with the #1 (left most) plug at Bakersfield Amtrak. #4 connector is broken. #3 is
    power-off. #2 is OK.
    Maybe Tesla won't be giving up their customer interface design after all. Seems to work pretty well compared to your experiences... although, your experiences are anything but typical.

    Yes, i have to agree that Tesla's physical design is better. Logical design is same as CDM (CAN based). I am just reported many other drivers' experiences, not just mine.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ed Lee@21:1/5 to Ricky on Thu Jul 28 10:26:57 2022
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:23:48 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:02:35 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 9:46:44 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 9:27:02 AM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    I am confused. Should the car be turned upside down to charge with CCS? Or at least horizontally with center of gravity of the plug tilted to the signal end? Otherwise, weight of the plug tends to pull the signal pins off.

    https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/07/the-ars-technica-guide-to-electric-vehicle-charging/

    Seriously, is CCS CP using the LIN physical layer, or a similar version of it? Any CCS experts here?
    Ed, you are doing your usual thing of expecting people to read your post as well as your mind. I don't see LIN mentioned in the article you link at all.
    Sorry, it's two different issues.

    LIN bus is simplified CAN. 12V PLC pulled-up with 1K. Sound like it should work with the CCS Control Pilot (CP) physical layer. I am looking to buy or build the protocol analyser.
    The body of the connector maintains a physical alignment. The pins are supported by the body and so are aligned with the mating pins. This is connectors 101, and is how nearly all connectors work.
    Many CCS drivers can tell you that it should be up-side down. It does not connect reliable sometime. Perhaps they should plug in and hold the plug for an hour while charging.
    How would upside down make it work better? The catch is on the top. The weight of the cable pulls down, but the lever arm presses the connector more tightly, not apart. Look at the mechanics.

    Upside down would push the signal pins in, instead of pulling out. Or just mount the socket horizontally as in my case.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ricky@21:1/5 to Ed Lee on Thu Jul 28 10:23:44 2022
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:02:35 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 9:46:44 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 9:27:02 AM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    I am confused. Should the car be turned upside down to charge with CCS? Or at least horizontally with center of gravity of the plug tilted to the signal end? Otherwise, weight of the plug tends to pull the signal pins off.

    https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/07/the-ars-technica-guide-to-electric-vehicle-charging/

    Seriously, is CCS CP using the LIN physical layer, or a similar version of it? Any CCS experts here?
    Ed, you are doing your usual thing of expecting people to read your post as well as your mind. I don't see LIN mentioned in the article you link at all.
    Sorry, it's two different issues.

    LIN bus is simplified CAN. 12V PLC pulled-up with 1K. Sound like it should work with the CCS Control Pilot (CP) physical layer. I am looking to buy or build the protocol analyser.
    The body of the connector maintains a physical alignment. The pins are supported by the body and so are aligned with the mating pins. This is connectors 101, and is how nearly all connectors work.
    Many CCS drivers can tell you that it should be up-side down. It does not connect reliable sometime. Perhaps they should plug in and hold the plug for an hour while charging.

    How would upside down make it work better? The catch is on the top. The weight of the cable pulls down, but the lever arm presses the connector more tightly, not apart. Look at the mechanics.

    --

    Rick C.

    + Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
    + Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Larkin@21:1/5 to edward.ming.lee@gmail.com on Thu Jul 28 10:43:22 2022
    On Thu, 28 Jul 2022 06:26:58 -0700 (PDT), Ed Lee
    <edward.ming.lee@gmail.com> wrote:

    I am confused. Should the car be turned upside down to charge with CCS? Or at least horizontally with center of gravity of the plug tilted to the signal end? Otherwise, weight of the plug tends to pull the signal pins off.

    https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/07/the-ars-technica-guide-to-electric-vehicle-charging/

    Seriously, is CCS CP using the LIN physical layer, or a similar version of it? Any CCS experts here?

    If cars had a USB C connector for charging things would be simpler.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ricky@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Thu Jul 28 10:45:19 2022
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:43:34 PM UTC-4, John Larkin wrote:
    On Thu, 28 Jul 2022 06:26:58 -0700 (PDT), Ed Lee
    <edward....@gmail.com> wrote:

    I am confused. Should the car be turned upside down to charge with CCS? Or at least horizontally with center of gravity of the plug tilted to the signal end? Otherwise, weight of the plug tends to pull the signal pins off.

    https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/07/the-ars-technica-guide-to-electric-vehicle-charging/

    Seriously, is CCS CP using the LIN physical layer, or a similar version of it? Any CCS experts here?
    If cars had a USB C connector for charging things would be simpler.

    Another country heard from.

    --

    Rick C.

    +- Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
    +- Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ed Lee@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Thu Jul 28 10:47:13 2022
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:43:34 AM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:
    On Thu, 28 Jul 2022 06:26:58 -0700 (PDT), Ed Lee
    <edward....@gmail.com> wrote:

    I am confused. Should the car be turned upside down to charge with CCS? Or at least horizontally with center of gravity of the plug tilted to the signal end? Otherwise, weight of the plug tends to pull the signal pins off.

    https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/07/the-ars-technica-guide-to-electric-vehicle-charging/

    Seriously, is CCS CP using the LIN physical layer, or a similar version of it? Any CCS experts here?
    If cars had a USB C connector for charging things would be simpler.

    Yes, 12V USB C would work.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ricky@21:1/5 to Ed Lee on Thu Jul 28 10:44:30 2022
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:27:12 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:23:48 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:02:35 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 9:46:44 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 9:27:02 AM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    I am confused. Should the car be turned upside down to charge with CCS? Or at least horizontally with center of gravity of the plug tilted to the signal end? Otherwise, weight of the plug tends to pull the signal pins off.

    https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/07/the-ars-technica-guide-to-electric-vehicle-charging/

    Seriously, is CCS CP using the LIN physical layer, or a similar version of it? Any CCS experts here?
    Ed, you are doing your usual thing of expecting people to read your post as well as your mind. I don't see LIN mentioned in the article you link at all.
    Sorry, it's two different issues.

    LIN bus is simplified CAN. 12V PLC pulled-up with 1K. Sound like it should work with the CCS Control Pilot (CP) physical layer. I am looking to buy or build the protocol analyser.
    The body of the connector maintains a physical alignment. The pins are supported by the body and so are aligned with the mating pins. This is connectors 101, and is how nearly all connectors work.
    Many CCS drivers can tell you that it should be up-side down. It does not connect reliable sometime. Perhaps they should plug in and hold the plug for an hour while charging.
    How would upside down make it work better? The catch is on the top. The weight of the cable pulls down, but the lever arm presses the connector more tightly, not apart. Look at the mechanics.
    Upside down would push the signal pins in, instead of pulling out. Or just mount the socket horizontally as in my case.

    You aren't explaining anything, just making an unsupported statement. The latch is at the top. It can't be pulled out at the top by the weight of the cable. But the rest of the connector can be pushed in with the latch as a pivot point. However, the
    body of the connector will prevent very much movement. I'm not seeing what you are talking about. In fact, an upside down connector would tend to pull the pins out, rather than push them in, again, the latch is the pivot point as much as it can move.

    --

    Rick C.

    -+ Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
    -+ Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ed Lee@21:1/5 to Ricky on Thu Jul 28 10:49:05 2022
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:44:33 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:27:12 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:23:48 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:02:35 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 9:46:44 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 9:27:02 AM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    I am confused. Should the car be turned upside down to charge with CCS? Or at least horizontally with center of gravity of the plug tilted to the signal end? Otherwise, weight of the plug tends to pull the signal pins off.

    https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/07/the-ars-technica-guide-to-electric-vehicle-charging/

    Seriously, is CCS CP using the LIN physical layer, or a similar version of it? Any CCS experts here?
    Ed, you are doing your usual thing of expecting people to read your post as well as your mind. I don't see LIN mentioned in the article you link at all.
    Sorry, it's two different issues.

    LIN bus is simplified CAN. 12V PLC pulled-up with 1K. Sound like it should work with the CCS Control Pilot (CP) physical layer. I am looking to buy or build the protocol analyser.
    The body of the connector maintains a physical alignment. The pins are supported by the body and so are aligned with the mating pins. This is connectors 101, and is how nearly all connectors work.
    Many CCS drivers can tell you that it should be up-side down. It does not connect reliable sometime. Perhaps they should plug in and hold the plug for an hour while charging.
    How would upside down make it work better? The catch is on the top. The weight of the cable pulls down, but the lever arm presses the connector more tightly, not apart. Look at the mechanics.
    Upside down would push the signal pins in, instead of pulling out. Or just mount the socket horizontally as in my case.
    You aren't explaining anything, just making an unsupported statement. The latch is at the top. It can't be pulled out at the top by the weight of the cable. But the rest of the connector can be pushed in with the latch as a pivot point. However, the
    body of the connector will prevent very much movement. I'm not seeing what you are talking about. In fact, an upside down connector would tend to pull the pins out, rather than push them in, again, the latch is the pivot point as much as it can move.

    I haven't really use CCS, just relaying other CCS drivers' complaint. Unlike J1772, the top latch might not be there for CCS.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Larkin@21:1/5 to edward.ming.lee@gmail.com on Thu Jul 28 11:00:46 2022
    On Thu, 28 Jul 2022 10:47:13 -0700 (PDT), Ed Lee
    <edward.ming.lee@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:43:34 AM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:
    On Thu, 28 Jul 2022 06:26:58 -0700 (PDT), Ed Lee
    <edward....@gmail.com> wrote:

    I am confused. Should the car be turned upside down to charge with CCS? Or at least horizontally with center of gravity of the plug tilted to the signal end? Otherwise, weight of the plug tends to pull the signal pins off.

    https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/07/the-ars-technica-guide-to-electric-vehicle-charging/

    Seriously, is CCS CP using the LIN physical layer, or a similar version of it? Any CCS experts here?
    If cars had a USB C connector for charging things would be simpler.

    Yes, 12V USB C would work.

    Your article is interesting.

    Given an infinitely long 120v extension cord, an ecar might travel at
    2 to 4 MPH forever.

    Level 2 can manage 10 to 20 MPH forever, always connected.

    I gassed up this morning, as I have to do about every 2 weeks. About
    400 KWH equivalent in maybe 3 minutes. A gas pump delivers roughly 20
    megawatts equivalent.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ricky@21:1/5 to Ed Lee on Thu Jul 28 11:09:01 2022
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:49:08 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:44:33 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:27:12 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:23:48 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:02:35 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 9:46:44 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 9:27:02 AM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    I am confused. Should the car be turned upside down to charge with CCS? Or at least horizontally with center of gravity of the plug tilted to the signal end? Otherwise, weight of the plug tends to pull the signal pins off.

    https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/07/the-ars-technica-guide-to-electric-vehicle-charging/

    Seriously, is CCS CP using the LIN physical layer, or a similar version of it? Any CCS experts here?
    Ed, you are doing your usual thing of expecting people to read your post as well as your mind. I don't see LIN mentioned in the article you link at all.
    Sorry, it's two different issues.

    LIN bus is simplified CAN. 12V PLC pulled-up with 1K. Sound like it should work with the CCS Control Pilot (CP) physical layer. I am looking to buy or build the protocol analyser.
    The body of the connector maintains a physical alignment. The pins are supported by the body and so are aligned with the mating pins. This is connectors 101, and is how nearly all connectors work.
    Many CCS drivers can tell you that it should be up-side down. It does not connect reliable sometime. Perhaps they should plug in and hold the plug for an hour while charging.
    How would upside down make it work better? The catch is on the top. The weight of the cable pulls down, but the lever arm presses the connector more tightly, not apart. Look at the mechanics.
    Upside down would push the signal pins in, instead of pulling out. Or just mount the socket horizontally as in my case.
    You aren't explaining anything, just making an unsupported statement. The latch is at the top. It can't be pulled out at the top by the weight of the cable. But the rest of the connector can be pushed in with the latch as a pivot point. However, the
    body of the connector will prevent very much movement. I'm not seeing what you are talking about. In fact, an upside down connector would tend to pull the pins out, rather than push them in, again, the latch is the pivot point as much as it can move.
    I haven't really use CCS, just relaying other CCS drivers' complaint. Unlike J1772, the top latch might not be there for CCS.

    It's the same connector. Look at a picture. Heck, look at the picture in your link!

    --

    Rick C.

    ++ Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
    ++ Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ricky@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Thu Jul 28 11:13:27 2022
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 2:00:58 PM UTC-4, John Larkin wrote:
    On Thu, 28 Jul 2022 10:47:13 -0700 (PDT), Ed Lee
    <edward....@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:43:34 AM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:
    On Thu, 28 Jul 2022 06:26:58 -0700 (PDT), Ed Lee
    <edward....@gmail.com> wrote:

    I am confused. Should the car be turned upside down to charge with CCS? Or at least horizontally with center of gravity of the plug tilted to the signal end? Otherwise, weight of the plug tends to pull the signal pins off.

    https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/07/the-ars-technica-guide-to-electric-vehicle-charging/

    Seriously, is CCS CP using the LIN physical layer, or a similar version of it? Any CCS experts here?
    If cars had a USB C connector for charging things would be simpler.

    Yes, 12V USB C would work.
    Your article is interesting.

    Given an infinitely long 120v extension cord, an ecar might travel at
    2 to 4 MPH forever.

    As usual, you either don't understand BEVs, or are in denial. A 120V, 15A outlet will produce at least 1 kW of power for the motor. With 4 mi/kWh, that is 4 mph minimum.


    Level 2 can manage 10 to 20 MPH forever, always connected.

    Again, misinformation. Level two chargers range from about 5 kW to 19 kW or 20 to 76 mph.


    I gassed up this morning, as I have to do about every 2 weeks. About
    400 KWH equivalent in maybe 3 minutes. A gas pump delivers roughly 20 megawatts equivalent.

    Most BEV owners never have to "gas up" meaning going to a charger. They simply fill their tank every night at home. Gas stations smell bad and get your shoes oily. Great places to avoid.

    --

    Rick C.

    --- Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
    --- Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ed Lee@21:1/5 to Ricky on Thu Jul 28 11:36:49 2022
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 11:09:04 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:49:08 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:44:33 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:27:12 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:23:48 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:02:35 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 9:46:44 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 9:27:02 AM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    I am confused. Should the car be turned upside down to charge with CCS? Or at least horizontally with center of gravity of the plug tilted to the signal end? Otherwise, weight of the plug tends to pull the signal pins off.

    https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/07/the-ars-technica-guide-to-electric-vehicle-charging/

    Seriously, is CCS CP using the LIN physical layer, or a similar version of it? Any CCS experts here?
    Ed, you are doing your usual thing of expecting people to read your post as well as your mind. I don't see LIN mentioned in the article you link at all.
    Sorry, it's two different issues.

    LIN bus is simplified CAN. 12V PLC pulled-up with 1K. Sound like it should work with the CCS Control Pilot (CP) physical layer. I am looking to buy or build the protocol analyser.
    The body of the connector maintains a physical alignment. The pins are supported by the body and so are aligned with the mating pins. This is connectors 101, and is how nearly all connectors work.
    Many CCS drivers can tell you that it should be up-side down. It does not connect reliable sometime. Perhaps they should plug in and hold the plug for an hour while charging.
    How would upside down make it work better? The catch is on the top. The weight of the cable pulls down, but the lever arm presses the connector more tightly, not apart. Look at the mechanics.
    Upside down would push the signal pins in, instead of pulling out. Or just mount the socket horizontally as in my case.
    You aren't explaining anything, just making an unsupported statement. The latch is at the top. It can't be pulled out at the top by the weight of the cable. But the rest of the connector can be pushed in with the latch as a pivot point. However,
    the body of the connector will prevent very much movement. I'm not seeing what you are talking about. In fact, an upside down connector would tend to pull the pins out, rather than push them in, again, the latch is the pivot point as much as it can move.
    I haven't really use CCS, just relaying other CCS drivers' complaint. Unlike J1772, the top latch might not be there for CCS.
    It's the same connector. Look at a picture. Heck, look at the picture in your link!

    Some J-plugs don't have the top latch. Some are disabled/broken. I don't know if all CCS plugs have the latch. I will check on my next long distance trip. It's not a big deal for J-plug, but big deal for CCS.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ed Lee@21:1/5 to Ricky on Thu Jul 28 11:51:19 2022
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 11:13:30 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 2:00:58 PM UTC-4, John Larkin wrote:
    On Thu, 28 Jul 2022 10:47:13 -0700 (PDT), Ed Lee
    <edward....@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:43:34 AM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:
    On Thu, 28 Jul 2022 06:26:58 -0700 (PDT), Ed Lee
    <edward....@gmail.com> wrote:

    I am confused. Should the car be turned upside down to charge with CCS? Or at least horizontally with center of gravity of the plug tilted to the signal end? Otherwise, weight of the plug tends to pull the signal pins off.

    https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/07/the-ars-technica-guide-to-electric-vehicle-charging/

    Seriously, is CCS CP using the LIN physical layer, or a similar version of it? Any CCS experts here?
    If cars had a USB C connector for charging things would be simpler.

    Yes, 12V USB C would work.
    Your article is interesting.

    Given an infinitely long 120v extension cord, an ecar might travel at
    2 to 4 MPH forever.
    As usual, you either don't understand BEVs, or are in denial. A 120V, 15A outlet will produce at least 1 kW of power for the motor. With 4 mi/kWh, that is 4 mph minimum.

    Why stay with 120V? 220V three phases cable can run at 55MPH forever. I am building a 4 o 8 phases charger and i need to manage the batteries/chargers with USB, but running with 12V open drain/collector signals on single power wire at 12V. I can have
    upto 15 batteries. Some people call it LIN bus.

    Currently, my primary vehicle (13-8) has 13kwhr #1 and 8kwhr #2. My secondary vehicle will have 3 batteries 10-8-8. I need to enable/disable them in sequences, to avoid overloading the 30A circuit.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ricky@21:1/5 to Ed Lee on Thu Jul 28 12:06:19 2022
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 2:36:52 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 11:09:04 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:49:08 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:44:33 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:27:12 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:23:48 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:02:35 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 9:46:44 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 9:27:02 AM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    I am confused. Should the car be turned upside down to charge with CCS? Or at least horizontally with center of gravity of the plug tilted to the signal end? Otherwise, weight of the plug tends to pull the signal pins off.

    https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/07/the-ars-technica-guide-to-electric-vehicle-charging/

    Seriously, is CCS CP using the LIN physical layer, or a similar version of it? Any CCS experts here?
    Ed, you are doing your usual thing of expecting people to read your post as well as your mind. I don't see LIN mentioned in the article you link at all.
    Sorry, it's two different issues.

    LIN bus is simplified CAN. 12V PLC pulled-up with 1K. Sound like it should work with the CCS Control Pilot (CP) physical layer. I am looking to buy or build the protocol analyser.
    The body of the connector maintains a physical alignment. The pins are supported by the body and so are aligned with the mating pins. This is connectors 101, and is how nearly all connectors work.
    Many CCS drivers can tell you that it should be up-side down. It does not connect reliable sometime. Perhaps they should plug in and hold the plug for an hour while charging.
    How would upside down make it work better? The catch is on the top. The weight of the cable pulls down, but the lever arm presses the connector more tightly, not apart. Look at the mechanics.
    Upside down would push the signal pins in, instead of pulling out. Or just mount the socket horizontally as in my case.
    You aren't explaining anything, just making an unsupported statement. The latch is at the top. It can't be pulled out at the top by the weight of the cable. But the rest of the connector can be pushed in with the latch as a pivot point. However,
    the body of the connector will prevent very much movement. I'm not seeing what you are talking about. In fact, an upside down connector would tend to pull the pins out, rather than push them in, again, the latch is the pivot point as much as it can move.
    I haven't really use CCS, just relaying other CCS drivers' complaint. Unlike J1772, the top latch might not be there for CCS.
    It's the same connector. Look at a picture. Heck, look at the picture in your link!
    Some J-plugs don't have the top latch. Some are disabled/broken. I don't know if all CCS plugs have the latch. I will check on my next long distance trip. It's not a big deal for J-plug, but big deal for CCS.

    If your connector is broken, I would not expect it to work well. Duh!

    The Tesla connector is not without flaws. The locking mechanism can fail in a way the cable can not be removed without having to go through the truck to reach a manual release.

    This seems to me as much ado about nothing.

    --

    Rick C.

    --+ Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
    --+ Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ed Lee@21:1/5 to Ricky on Thu Jul 28 12:13:19 2022
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 12:06:23 PM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 2:36:52 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 11:09:04 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:49:08 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:44:33 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:27:12 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:23:48 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:02:35 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 9:46:44 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 9:27:02 AM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    I am confused. Should the car be turned upside down to charge with CCS? Or at least horizontally with center of gravity of the plug tilted to the signal end? Otherwise, weight of the plug tends to pull the signal pins off.

    https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/07/the-ars-technica-guide-to-electric-vehicle-charging/

    Seriously, is CCS CP using the LIN physical layer, or a similar version of it? Any CCS experts here?
    Ed, you are doing your usual thing of expecting people to read your post as well as your mind. I don't see LIN mentioned in the article you link at all.
    Sorry, it's two different issues.

    LIN bus is simplified CAN. 12V PLC pulled-up with 1K. Sound like it should work with the CCS Control Pilot (CP) physical layer. I am looking to buy or build the protocol analyser.
    The body of the connector maintains a physical alignment. The pins are supported by the body and so are aligned with the mating pins. This is connectors 101, and is how nearly all connectors work.
    Many CCS drivers can tell you that it should be up-side down. It does not connect reliable sometime. Perhaps they should plug in and hold the plug for an hour while charging.
    How would upside down make it work better? The catch is on the top. The weight of the cable pulls down, but the lever arm presses the connector more tightly, not apart. Look at the mechanics.
    Upside down would push the signal pins in, instead of pulling out. Or just mount the socket horizontally as in my case.
    You aren't explaining anything, just making an unsupported statement. The latch is at the top. It can't be pulled out at the top by the weight of the cable. But the rest of the connector can be pushed in with the latch as a pivot point. However,
    the body of the connector will prevent very much movement. I'm not seeing what you are talking about. In fact, an upside down connector would tend to pull the pins out, rather than push them in, again, the latch is the pivot point as much as it can move.

    I haven't really use CCS, just relaying other CCS drivers' complaint. Unlike J1772, the top latch might not be there for CCS.
    It's the same connector. Look at a picture. Heck, look at the picture in your link!
    Some J-plugs don't have the top latch. Some are disabled/broken. I don't know if all CCS plugs have the latch. I will check on my next long distance trip. It's not a big deal for J-plug, but big deal for CCS.
    If your connector is broken, I would not expect it to work well. Duh!

    It's still work with the latch broken, and it's the cases with many of them.

    The Tesla connector is not without flaws. The locking mechanism can fail in a way the cable can not be removed without having to go through the truck to reach a manual release.

    Vehicle locking is a different issue than the handle locking.

    This seems to me as much ado about nothing.

    It's just the fact of (real) life.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ed Lee@21:1/5 to Ricky on Thu Jul 28 12:20:43 2022
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 12:16:17 PM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 3:13:22 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 12:06:23 PM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 2:36:52 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 11:09:04 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:49:08 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:44:33 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:27:12 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:23:48 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:02:35 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 9:46:44 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 9:27:02 AM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    I am confused. Should the car be turned upside down to charge with CCS? Or at least horizontally with center of gravity of the plug tilted to the signal end? Otherwise, weight of the plug tends to pull the signal pins off.

    https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/07/the-ars-technica-guide-to-electric-vehicle-charging/

    Seriously, is CCS CP using the LIN physical layer, or a similar version of it? Any CCS experts here?
    Ed, you are doing your usual thing of expecting people to read your post as well as your mind. I don't see LIN mentioned in the article you link at all.
    Sorry, it's two different issues.

    LIN bus is simplified CAN. 12V PLC pulled-up with 1K. Sound like it should work with the CCS Control Pilot (CP) physical layer. I am looking to buy or build the protocol analyser.
    The body of the connector maintains a physical alignment. The pins are supported by the body and so are aligned with the mating pins. This is connectors 101, and is how nearly all connectors work.
    Many CCS drivers can tell you that it should be up-side down. It does not connect reliable sometime. Perhaps they should plug in and hold the plug for an hour while charging.
    How would upside down make it work better? The catch is on the top. The weight of the cable pulls down, but the lever arm presses the connector more tightly, not apart. Look at the mechanics.
    Upside down would push the signal pins in, instead of pulling out. Or just mount the socket horizontally as in my case.
    You aren't explaining anything, just making an unsupported statement. The latch is at the top. It can't be pulled out at the top by the weight of the cable. But the rest of the connector can be pushed in with the latch as a pivot point.
    However, the body of the connector will prevent very much movement. I'm not seeing what you are talking about. In fact, an upside down connector would tend to pull the pins out, rather than push them in, again, the latch is the pivot point as much as it
    can move.
    I haven't really use CCS, just relaying other CCS drivers' complaint. Unlike J1772, the top latch might not be there for CCS.
    It's the same connector. Look at a picture. Heck, look at the picture in your link!
    Some J-plugs don't have the top latch. Some are disabled/broken. I don't know if all CCS plugs have the latch. I will check on my next long distance trip. It's not a big deal for J-plug, but big deal for CCS.
    If your connector is broken, I would not expect it to work well. Duh!
    It's still work with the latch broken, and it's the cases with many of them.
    But you are complaining about how it doesn't work properly. Pick one.
    The Tesla connector is not without flaws. The locking mechanism can fail in a way the cable can not be removed without having to go through the truck to reach a manual release.
    Vehicle locking is a different issue than the handle locking.
    ???
    This seems to me as much ado about nothing.
    It's just the fact of (real) life.
    It's a broken connector. If the connector is broken, fix it and stop whining.

    Some station owners intentionally disable the latch, because too many Tesla just lock the connector after finishing charging. Other vehicles (like Leaf and Bolt) don't lock the connector.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ricky@21:1/5 to Ed Lee on Thu Jul 28 12:16:13 2022
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 3:13:22 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 12:06:23 PM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 2:36:52 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 11:09:04 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:49:08 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:44:33 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:27:12 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:23:48 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:02:35 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 9:46:44 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 9:27:02 AM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    I am confused. Should the car be turned upside down to charge with CCS? Or at least horizontally with center of gravity of the plug tilted to the signal end? Otherwise, weight of the plug tends to pull the signal pins off.

    https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/07/the-ars-technica-guide-to-electric-vehicle-charging/

    Seriously, is CCS CP using the LIN physical layer, or a similar version of it? Any CCS experts here?
    Ed, you are doing your usual thing of expecting people to read your post as well as your mind. I don't see LIN mentioned in the article you link at all.
    Sorry, it's two different issues.

    LIN bus is simplified CAN. 12V PLC pulled-up with 1K. Sound like it should work with the CCS Control Pilot (CP) physical layer. I am looking to buy or build the protocol analyser.
    The body of the connector maintains a physical alignment. The pins are supported by the body and so are aligned with the mating pins. This is connectors 101, and is how nearly all connectors work.
    Many CCS drivers can tell you that it should be up-side down. It does not connect reliable sometime. Perhaps they should plug in and hold the plug for an hour while charging.
    How would upside down make it work better? The catch is on the top. The weight of the cable pulls down, but the lever arm presses the connector more tightly, not apart. Look at the mechanics.
    Upside down would push the signal pins in, instead of pulling out. Or just mount the socket horizontally as in my case.
    You aren't explaining anything, just making an unsupported statement. The latch is at the top. It can't be pulled out at the top by the weight of the cable. But the rest of the connector can be pushed in with the latch as a pivot point.
    However, the body of the connector will prevent very much movement. I'm not seeing what you are talking about. In fact, an upside down connector would tend to pull the pins out, rather than push them in, again, the latch is the pivot point as much as it
    can move.
    I haven't really use CCS, just relaying other CCS drivers' complaint. Unlike J1772, the top latch might not be there for CCS.
    It's the same connector. Look at a picture. Heck, look at the picture in your link!
    Some J-plugs don't have the top latch. Some are disabled/broken. I don't know if all CCS plugs have the latch. I will check on my next long distance trip. It's not a big deal for J-plug, but big deal for CCS.
    If your connector is broken, I would not expect it to work well. Duh!
    It's still work with the latch broken, and it's the cases with many of them.

    But you are complaining about how it doesn't work properly. Pick one.


    The Tesla connector is not without flaws. The locking mechanism can fail in a way the cable can not be removed without having to go through the truck to reach a manual release.
    Vehicle locking is a different issue than the handle locking.

    ???


    This seems to me as much ado about nothing.
    It's just the fact of (real) life.

    It's a broken connector. If the connector is broken, fix it and stop whining.

    --

    Rick C.

    -+- Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
    -+- Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From a a@21:1/5 to Ed Lee on Thu Jul 28 14:25:23 2022
    On Thursday, 28 July 2022 at 21:20:47 UTC+2, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 12:16:17 PM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 3:13:22 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 12:06:23 PM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 2:36:52 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 11:09:04 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:49:08 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:44:33 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:27:12 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:23:48 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:02:35 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 9:46:44 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 9:27:02 AM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    I am confused. Should the car be turned upside down to charge with CCS? Or at least horizontally with center of gravity of the plug tilted to the signal end? Otherwise, weight of the plug tends to pull the signal pins off.

    https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/07/the-ars-technica-guide-to-electric-vehicle-charging/

    Seriously, is CCS CP using the LIN physical layer, or a similar version of it? Any CCS experts here?
    Ed, you are doing your usual thing of expecting people to read your post as well as your mind. I don't see LIN mentioned in the article you link at all.
    Sorry, it's two different issues.

    LIN bus is simplified CAN. 12V PLC pulled-up with 1K. Sound like it should work with the CCS Control Pilot (CP) physical layer. I am looking to buy or build the protocol analyser.
    The body of the connector maintains a physical alignment. The pins are supported by the body and so are aligned with the mating pins. This is connectors 101, and is how nearly all connectors work.
    Many CCS drivers can tell you that it should be up-side down. It does not connect reliable sometime. Perhaps they should plug in and hold the plug for an hour while charging.
    How would upside down make it work better? The catch is on the top. The weight of the cable pulls down, but the lever arm presses the connector more tightly, not apart. Look at the mechanics.
    Upside down would push the signal pins in, instead of pulling out. Or just mount the socket horizontally as in my case.
    You aren't explaining anything, just making an unsupported statement. The latch is at the top. It can't be pulled out at the top by the weight of the cable. But the rest of the connector can be pushed in with the latch as a pivot point.
    However, the body of the connector will prevent very much movement. I'm not seeing what you are talking about. In fact, an upside down connector would tend to pull the pins out, rather than push them in, again, the latch is the pivot point as much as it
    can move.
    I haven't really use CCS, just relaying other CCS drivers' complaint. Unlike J1772, the top latch might not be there for CCS.
    It's the same connector. Look at a picture. Heck, look at the picture in your link!
    Some J-plugs don't have the top latch. Some are disabled/broken. I don't know if all CCS plugs have the latch. I will check on my next long distance trip. It's not a big deal for J-plug, but big deal for CCS.
    If your connector is broken, I would not expect it to work well. Duh!
    It's still work with the latch broken, and it's the cases with many of them.
    But you are complaining about how it doesn't work properly. Pick one.
    The Tesla connector is not without flaws. The locking mechanism can fail in a way the cable can not be removed without having to go through the truck to reach a manual release.
    Vehicle locking is a different issue than the handle locking.
    ???
    This seems to me as much ado about nothing.
    It's just the fact of (real) life.
    It's a broken connector. If the connector is broken, fix it and stop whining.
    Some station owners intentionally disable the latch, because too many Tesla just lock the connector after finishing charging. Other vehicles (like Leaf and Bolt) don't lock the connector.
    could you give links to images of corrupt chargers ?
    Never promote
    https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/07/the-ars-technica-gu....

    stealing our cookies

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ed Lee@21:1/5 to a a on Thu Jul 28 14:51:36 2022
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 2:25:26 PM UTC-7, a a wrote:
    On Thursday, 28 July 2022 at 21:20:47 UTC+2, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 12:16:17 PM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 3:13:22 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 12:06:23 PM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 2:36:52 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 11:09:04 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:49:08 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:44:33 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:27:12 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:23:48 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:02:35 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 9:46:44 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 9:27:02 AM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    I am confused. Should the car be turned upside down to charge with CCS? Or at least horizontally with center of gravity of the plug tilted to the signal end? Otherwise, weight of the plug tends to pull the signal pins off.

    https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/07/the-ars-technica-guide-to-electric-vehicle-charging/

    Seriously, is CCS CP using the LIN physical layer, or a similar version of it? Any CCS experts here?
    Ed, you are doing your usual thing of expecting people to read your post as well as your mind. I don't see LIN mentioned in the article you link at all.
    Sorry, it's two different issues.

    LIN bus is simplified CAN. 12V PLC pulled-up with 1K. Sound like it should work with the CCS Control Pilot (CP) physical layer. I am looking to buy or build the protocol analyser.
    The body of the connector maintains a physical alignment. The pins are supported by the body and so are aligned with the mating pins. This is connectors 101, and is how nearly all connectors work.
    Many CCS drivers can tell you that it should be up-side down. It does not connect reliable sometime. Perhaps they should plug in and hold the plug for an hour while charging.
    How would upside down make it work better? The catch is on the top. The weight of the cable pulls down, but the lever arm presses the connector more tightly, not apart. Look at the mechanics.
    Upside down would push the signal pins in, instead of pulling out. Or just mount the socket horizontally as in my case.
    You aren't explaining anything, just making an unsupported statement. The latch is at the top. It can't be pulled out at the top by the weight of the cable. But the rest of the connector can be pushed in with the latch as a pivot point.
    However, the body of the connector will prevent very much movement. I'm not seeing what you are talking about. In fact, an upside down connector would tend to pull the pins out, rather than push them in, again, the latch is the pivot point as much as it
    can move.
    I haven't really use CCS, just relaying other CCS drivers' complaint. Unlike J1772, the top latch might not be there for CCS.
    It's the same connector. Look at a picture. Heck, look at the picture in your link!
    Some J-plugs don't have the top latch. Some are disabled/broken. I don't know if all CCS plugs have the latch. I will check on my next long distance trip. It's not a big deal for J-plug, but big deal for CCS.
    If your connector is broken, I would not expect it to work well. Duh!
    It's still work with the latch broken, and it's the cases with many of them.
    But you are complaining about how it doesn't work properly. Pick one.
    The Tesla connector is not without flaws. The locking mechanism can fail in a way the cable can not be removed without having to go through the truck to reach a manual release.
    Vehicle locking is a different issue than the handle locking.
    ???
    This seems to me as much ado about nothing.
    It's just the fact of (real) life.
    It's a broken connector. If the connector is broken, fix it and stop whining.
    Some station owners intentionally disable the latch, because too many Tesla just lock the connector after finishing charging. Other vehicles (like Leaf and Bolt) don't lock the connector.
    could you give links to images of corrupt chargers ?

    Bad J1772: Bakersfield Amtrak.
    The #3 (right to left) mentioned in comment is my #2 (left to right). Avoid #1 (left most) at all cost.
    https://www.plugshare.com/location/168953

    Bad CCS: Boron Rest Area Westbound.
    A dead (idiot light) Ioniq towed by AAA. https://www.plugshare.com/location/305459

    Another dead Bolt somewhere on plugshare. Don't remember where.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From keith@kjwdesigns.com@21:1/5 to Ed Lee on Fri Jul 29 18:07:21 2022
    On Thursday, 28 July 2022 at 06:27:02 UTC-7, Ed Lee wrote:
    I am confused. Should the car be turned upside down to charge with CCS? Or at least horizontally with center of gravity of the plug tilted to the signal end? Otherwise, weight of the plug tends to pull the signal pins off.

    https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/07/the-ars-technica-guide-to-electric-vehicle-charging/

    Seriously, is CCS CP using the LIN physical layer, or a similar version of it? Any CCS experts here?

    CCS uses PLC (Power Line Communications) over the Pilot signal to establish a bidirectional link between the car and the charger. It is not LIN.

    The data is modulated onto a carrier that is transmitted on top of any lower frequency signals already present on the wire.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SAE_J1772

    kw

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ricky@21:1/5 to Ed Lee on Fri Jul 29 21:18:48 2022
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 3:20:47 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 12:16:17 PM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 3:13:22 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 12:06:23 PM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 2:36:52 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 11:09:04 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:49:08 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:44:33 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:27:12 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:23:48 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:02:35 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 9:46:44 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 9:27:02 AM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    I am confused. Should the car be turned upside down to charge with CCS? Or at least horizontally with center of gravity of the plug tilted to the signal end? Otherwise, weight of the plug tends to pull the signal pins off.

    https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/07/the-ars-technica-guide-to-electric-vehicle-charging/

    Seriously, is CCS CP using the LIN physical layer, or a similar version of it? Any CCS experts here?
    Ed, you are doing your usual thing of expecting people to read your post as well as your mind. I don't see LIN mentioned in the article you link at all.
    Sorry, it's two different issues.

    LIN bus is simplified CAN. 12V PLC pulled-up with 1K. Sound like it should work with the CCS Control Pilot (CP) physical layer. I am looking to buy or build the protocol analyser.
    The body of the connector maintains a physical alignment. The pins are supported by the body and so are aligned with the mating pins. This is connectors 101, and is how nearly all connectors work.
    Many CCS drivers can tell you that it should be up-side down. It does not connect reliable sometime. Perhaps they should plug in and hold the plug for an hour while charging.
    How would upside down make it work better? The catch is on the top. The weight of the cable pulls down, but the lever arm presses the connector more tightly, not apart. Look at the mechanics.
    Upside down would push the signal pins in, instead of pulling out. Or just mount the socket horizontally as in my case.
    You aren't explaining anything, just making an unsupported statement. The latch is at the top. It can't be pulled out at the top by the weight of the cable. But the rest of the connector can be pushed in with the latch as a pivot point.
    However, the body of the connector will prevent very much movement. I'm not seeing what you are talking about. In fact, an upside down connector would tend to pull the pins out, rather than push them in, again, the latch is the pivot point as much as it
    can move.
    I haven't really use CCS, just relaying other CCS drivers' complaint. Unlike J1772, the top latch might not be there for CCS.
    It's the same connector. Look at a picture. Heck, look at the picture in your link!
    Some J-plugs don't have the top latch. Some are disabled/broken. I don't know if all CCS plugs have the latch. I will check on my next long distance trip. It's not a big deal for J-plug, but big deal for CCS.
    If your connector is broken, I would not expect it to work well. Duh!
    It's still work with the latch broken, and it's the cases with many of them.
    But you are complaining about how it doesn't work properly. Pick one.
    The Tesla connector is not without flaws. The locking mechanism can fail in a way the cable can not be removed without having to go through the truck to reach a manual release.
    Vehicle locking is a different issue than the handle locking.
    ???
    This seems to me as much ado about nothing.
    It's just the fact of (real) life.
    It's a broken connector. If the connector is broken, fix it and stop whining.
    Some station owners intentionally disable the latch, because too many Tesla just lock the connector after finishing charging. Other vehicles (like Leaf and Bolt) don't lock the connector.

    Tesla can't lock the J1772 connector. It doesn't connect to the car, it connects to the adapter which does lock to the car.

    Like I said, you are complaining about a broken connector. Get it fixed. You also have no way of knowing why a connector is broken. It's better not to make stuff up.

    --

    Rick C.

    -++ Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
    -++ Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From a a@21:1/5 to Ricky on Sat Jul 30 05:46:45 2022
    On Saturday, 30 July 2022 at 06:18:51 UTC+2, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 3:20:47 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 12:16:17 PM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 3:13:22 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 12:06:23 PM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 2:36:52 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 11:09:04 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:49:08 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:44:33 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:27:12 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:23:48 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:02:35 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 9:46:44 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 9:27:02 AM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    I am confused. Should the car be turned upside down to charge with CCS? Or at least horizontally with center of gravity of the plug tilted to the signal end? Otherwise, weight of the plug tends to pull the signal pins off.

    https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/07/the-ars-technica-guide-to-electric-vehicle-charging/

    Seriously, is CCS CP using the LIN physical layer, or a similar version of it? Any CCS experts here?
    Ed, you are doing your usual thing of expecting people to read your post as well as your mind. I don't see LIN mentioned in the article you link at all.
    Sorry, it's two different issues.

    LIN bus is simplified CAN. 12V PLC pulled-up with 1K. Sound like it should work with the CCS Control Pilot (CP) physical layer. I am looking to buy or build the protocol analyser.
    The body of the connector maintains a physical alignment. The pins are supported by the body and so are aligned with the mating pins. This is connectors 101, and is how nearly all connectors work.
    Many CCS drivers can tell you that it should be up-side down. It does not connect reliable sometime. Perhaps they should plug in and hold the plug for an hour while charging.
    How would upside down make it work better? The catch is on the top. The weight of the cable pulls down, but the lever arm presses the connector more tightly, not apart. Look at the mechanics.
    Upside down would push the signal pins in, instead of pulling out. Or just mount the socket horizontally as in my case.
    You aren't explaining anything, just making an unsupported statement. The latch is at the top. It can't be pulled out at the top by the weight of the cable. But the rest of the connector can be pushed in with the latch as a pivot point.
    However, the body of the connector will prevent very much movement. I'm not seeing what you are talking about. In fact, an upside down connector would tend to pull the pins out, rather than push them in, again, the latch is the pivot point as much as it
    can move.
    I haven't really use CCS, just relaying other CCS drivers' complaint. Unlike J1772, the top latch might not be there for CCS.
    It's the same connector. Look at a picture. Heck, look at the picture in your link!
    Some J-plugs don't have the top latch. Some are disabled/broken. I don't know if all CCS plugs have the latch. I will check on my next long distance trip. It's not a big deal for J-plug, but big deal for CCS.
    If your connector is broken, I would not expect it to work well. Duh!
    It's still work with the latch broken, and it's the cases with many of them.
    But you are complaining about how it doesn't work properly. Pick one.
    The Tesla connector is not without flaws. The locking mechanism can fail in a way the cable can not be removed without having to go through the truck to reach a manual release.
    Vehicle locking is a different issue than the handle locking.
    ???
    This seems to me as much ado about nothing.
    It's just the fact of (real) life.
    It's a broken connector. If the connector is broken, fix it and stop whining.
    Some station owners intentionally disable the latch, because too many Tesla just lock the connector after finishing charging. Other vehicles (like Leaf and Bolt) don't lock the connector.
    Tesla can't lock the J1772 connector. It doesn't connect to the car, it connects to the adapter which does lock to the car.

    Like I said, you are complaining about a broken connector. Get it fixed. You also have no way of knowing why a connector is broken. It's better not to make stuff up.

    --

    Rick C.

    -++ Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
    -++ Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209
    Tesla fired 230-man AI Autopilot team on poor performance and life, accident risks

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ed Lee@21:1/5 to Ricky on Sat Jul 30 06:06:16 2022
    On Friday, July 29, 2022 at 9:18:51 PM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 3:20:47 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 12:16:17 PM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 3:13:22 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 12:06:23 PM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 2:36:52 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 11:09:04 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:49:08 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:44:33 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:27:12 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:23:48 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:02:35 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 9:46:44 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 9:27:02 AM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    I am confused. Should the car be turned upside down to charge with CCS? Or at least horizontally with center of gravity of the plug tilted to the signal end? Otherwise, weight of the plug tends to pull the signal pins off.

    https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/07/the-ars-technica-guide-to-electric-vehicle-charging/

    Seriously, is CCS CP using the LIN physical layer, or a similar version of it? Any CCS experts here?
    Ed, you are doing your usual thing of expecting people to read your post as well as your mind. I don't see LIN mentioned in the article you link at all.
    Sorry, it's two different issues.

    LIN bus is simplified CAN. 12V PLC pulled-up with 1K. Sound like it should work with the CCS Control Pilot (CP) physical layer. I am looking to buy or build the protocol analyser.
    The body of the connector maintains a physical alignment. The pins are supported by the body and so are aligned with the mating pins. This is connectors 101, and is how nearly all connectors work.
    Many CCS drivers can tell you that it should be up-side down. It does not connect reliable sometime. Perhaps they should plug in and hold the plug for an hour while charging.
    How would upside down make it work better? The catch is on the top. The weight of the cable pulls down, but the lever arm presses the connector more tightly, not apart. Look at the mechanics.
    Upside down would push the signal pins in, instead of pulling out. Or just mount the socket horizontally as in my case.
    You aren't explaining anything, just making an unsupported statement. The latch is at the top. It can't be pulled out at the top by the weight of the cable. But the rest of the connector can be pushed in with the latch as a pivot point.
    However, the body of the connector will prevent very much movement. I'm not seeing what you are talking about. In fact, an upside down connector would tend to pull the pins out, rather than push them in, again, the latch is the pivot point as much as it
    can move.
    I haven't really use CCS, just relaying other CCS drivers' complaint. Unlike J1772, the top latch might not be there for CCS.
    It's the same connector. Look at a picture. Heck, look at the picture in your link!
    Some J-plugs don't have the top latch. Some are disabled/broken. I don't know if all CCS plugs have the latch. I will check on my next long distance trip. It's not a big deal for J-plug, but big deal for CCS.
    If your connector is broken, I would not expect it to work well. Duh!
    It's still work with the latch broken, and it's the cases with many of them.
    But you are complaining about how it doesn't work properly. Pick one.
    The Tesla connector is not without flaws. The locking mechanism can fail in a way the cable can not be removed without having to go through the truck to reach a manual release.
    Vehicle locking is a different issue than the handle locking.
    ???
    This seems to me as much ado about nothing.
    It's just the fact of (real) life.
    It's a broken connector. If the connector is broken, fix it and stop whining.
    Some station owners intentionally disable the latch, because too many Tesla just lock the connector after finishing charging. Other vehicles (like Leaf and Bolt) don't lock the connector.
    Tesla can't lock the J1772 connector. It doesn't connect to the car, it connects to the adapter which does lock to the car.

    Many INCONSIDERATE Tesla drivers use a locking ring ($10 on ebay) to lock the adapter and connector. Perhaps some other angry driver broke the latch to avoid this.

    From memory, i don't think many CCS plugs have the locking latch. Which would make the huge plug huger (or bigger).

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ed Lee@21:1/5 to ke...@kjwdesigns.com on Sat Jul 30 06:13:58 2022
    On Friday, July 29, 2022 at 6:07:24 PM UTC-7, ke...@kjwdesigns.com wrote:
    On Thursday, 28 July 2022 at 06:27:02 UTC-7, Ed Lee wrote:
    I am confused. Should the car be turned upside down to charge with CCS? Or at least horizontally with center of gravity of the plug tilted to the signal end? Otherwise, weight of the plug tends to pull the signal pins off.

    https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/07/the-ars-technica-guide-to-electric-vehicle-charging/

    Seriously, is CCS CP using the LIN physical layer, or a similar version of it? Any CCS experts here?
    CCS uses PLC (Power Line Communications) over the Pilot signal to establish a bidirectional link between the car and the charger. It is not LIN.

    The data is modulated onto a carrier that is transmitted on top of any lower frequency signals already present on the wire.

    Yes, CCS is probably overkill for me.

    I will probably use a simple protocol like LIN (Local Interconnecting Network) to manage my external batteries and chargers. Assuming that the current draw is proportional to the battery capacity, vehicle A (13-8) would draw around 40% of the peak
    current. Vehicle B (10-8-4) would draw 60% if both external batteries are enabled.

    I have a 30A circuit breaker on the external link. So far, it's holding up. But a 80 kw motor could draw 200A peak current.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ricky@21:1/5 to Ed Lee on Sat Jul 30 08:29:24 2022
    On Saturday, July 30, 2022 at 9:06:19 AM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Friday, July 29, 2022 at 9:18:51 PM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 3:20:47 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 12:16:17 PM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 3:13:22 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 12:06:23 PM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 2:36:52 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 11:09:04 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:49:08 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:44:33 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:27:12 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:23:48 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:02:35 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 9:46:44 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 9:27:02 AM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    I am confused. Should the car be turned upside down to charge with CCS? Or at least horizontally with center of gravity of the plug tilted to the signal end? Otherwise, weight of the plug tends to pull the signal pins off.

    https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/07/the-ars-technica-guide-to-electric-vehicle-charging/

    Seriously, is CCS CP using the LIN physical layer, or a similar version of it? Any CCS experts here?
    Ed, you are doing your usual thing of expecting people to read your post as well as your mind. I don't see LIN mentioned in the article you link at all.
    Sorry, it's two different issues.

    LIN bus is simplified CAN. 12V PLC pulled-up with 1K. Sound like it should work with the CCS Control Pilot (CP) physical layer. I am looking to buy or build the protocol analyser.
    The body of the connector maintains a physical alignment. The pins are supported by the body and so are aligned with the mating pins. This is connectors 101, and is how nearly all connectors work.
    Many CCS drivers can tell you that it should be up-side down. It does not connect reliable sometime. Perhaps they should plug in and hold the plug for an hour while charging.
    How would upside down make it work better? The catch is on the top. The weight of the cable pulls down, but the lever arm presses the connector more tightly, not apart. Look at the mechanics.
    Upside down would push the signal pins in, instead of pulling out. Or just mount the socket horizontally as in my case.
    You aren't explaining anything, just making an unsupported statement. The latch is at the top. It can't be pulled out at the top by the weight of the cable. But the rest of the connector can be pushed in with the latch as a pivot
    point. However, the body of the connector will prevent very much movement. I'm not seeing what you are talking about. In fact, an upside down connector would tend to pull the pins out, rather than push them in, again, the latch is the pivot point as much
    as it can move.
    I haven't really use CCS, just relaying other CCS drivers' complaint. Unlike J1772, the top latch might not be there for CCS.
    It's the same connector. Look at a picture. Heck, look at the picture in your link!
    Some J-plugs don't have the top latch. Some are disabled/broken. I don't know if all CCS plugs have the latch. I will check on my next long distance trip. It's not a big deal for J-plug, but big deal for CCS.
    If your connector is broken, I would not expect it to work well. Duh!
    It's still work with the latch broken, and it's the cases with many of them.
    But you are complaining about how it doesn't work properly. Pick one.
    The Tesla connector is not without flaws. The locking mechanism can fail in a way the cable can not be removed without having to go through the truck to reach a manual release.
    Vehicle locking is a different issue than the handle locking.
    ???
    This seems to me as much ado about nothing.
    It's just the fact of (real) life.
    It's a broken connector. If the connector is broken, fix it and stop whining.
    Some station owners intentionally disable the latch, because too many Tesla just lock the connector after finishing charging. Other vehicles (like Leaf and Bolt) don't lock the connector.
    Tesla can't lock the J1772 connector. It doesn't connect to the car, it connects to the adapter which does lock to the car.
    Many INCONSIDERATE Tesla drivers use a locking ring ($10 on ebay) to lock the adapter and connector. Perhaps some other angry driver broke the latch to avoid this.

    Vandalism by any other name still leaves you with a broken connector. Get it fixed.


    From memory, i don't think many CCS plugs have the locking latch. Which would make the huge plug huger (or bigger).

    You are still the same loon you have always been. Happy to post unconfirmed information.

    Whatever. As usual your posts are not worth reading.

    --

    Rick C.

    +-- Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
    +-- Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ed Lee@21:1/5 to Ricky on Sat Jul 30 08:34:53 2022
    On Saturday, July 30, 2022 at 8:29:27 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Saturday, July 30, 2022 at 9:06:19 AM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Friday, July 29, 2022 at 9:18:51 PM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 3:20:47 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 12:16:17 PM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 3:13:22 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 12:06:23 PM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 2:36:52 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 11:09:04 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:49:08 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:44:33 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:27:12 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:23:48 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:02:35 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 9:46:44 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 9:27:02 AM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    I am confused. Should the car be turned upside down to charge with CCS? Or at least horizontally with center of gravity of the plug tilted to the signal end? Otherwise, weight of the plug tends to pull the signal pins off.

    https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/07/the-ars-technica-guide-to-electric-vehicle-charging/

    Seriously, is CCS CP using the LIN physical layer, or a similar version of it? Any CCS experts here?
    Ed, you are doing your usual thing of expecting people to read your post as well as your mind. I don't see LIN mentioned in the article you link at all.
    Sorry, it's two different issues.

    LIN bus is simplified CAN. 12V PLC pulled-up with 1K. Sound like it should work with the CCS Control Pilot (CP) physical layer. I am looking to buy or build the protocol analyser.
    The body of the connector maintains a physical alignment. The pins are supported by the body and so are aligned with the mating pins. This is connectors 101, and is how nearly all connectors work.
    Many CCS drivers can tell you that it should be up-side down. It does not connect reliable sometime. Perhaps they should plug in and hold the plug for an hour while charging.
    How would upside down make it work better? The catch is on the top. The weight of the cable pulls down, but the lever arm presses the connector more tightly, not apart. Look at the mechanics.
    Upside down would push the signal pins in, instead of pulling out. Or just mount the socket horizontally as in my case.
    You aren't explaining anything, just making an unsupported statement. The latch is at the top. It can't be pulled out at the top by the weight of the cable. But the rest of the connector can be pushed in with the latch as a pivot
    point. However, the body of the connector will prevent very much movement. I'm not seeing what you are talking about. In fact, an upside down connector would tend to pull the pins out, rather than push them in, again, the latch is the pivot point as much
    as it can move.
    I haven't really use CCS, just relaying other CCS drivers' complaint. Unlike J1772, the top latch might not be there for CCS.
    It's the same connector. Look at a picture. Heck, look at the picture in your link!
    Some J-plugs don't have the top latch. Some are disabled/broken. I don't know if all CCS plugs have the latch. I will check on my next long distance trip. It's not a big deal for J-plug, but big deal for CCS.
    If your connector is broken, I would not expect it to work well. Duh!
    It's still work with the latch broken, and it's the cases with many of them.
    But you are complaining about how it doesn't work properly. Pick one.
    The Tesla connector is not without flaws. The locking mechanism can fail in a way the cable can not be removed without having to go through the truck to reach a manual release.
    Vehicle locking is a different issue than the handle locking.
    ???
    This seems to me as much ado about nothing.
    It's just the fact of (real) life.
    It's a broken connector. If the connector is broken, fix it and stop whining.
    Some station owners intentionally disable the latch, because too many Tesla just lock the connector after finishing charging. Other vehicles (like Leaf and Bolt) don't lock the connector.
    Tesla can't lock the J1772 connector. It doesn't connect to the car, it connects to the adapter which does lock to the car.
    Many INCONSIDERATE Tesla drivers use a locking ring ($10 on ebay) to lock the adapter and connector. Perhaps some other angry driver broke the latch to avoid this.
    Vandalism by any other name still leaves you with a broken connector. Get it fixed.

    It's not my charger/plug. How can i fix it?

    From memory, i don't think many CCS plugs have the locking latch. Which would make the huge plug huger (or bigger).
    You are still the same loon you have always been. Happy to post unconfirmed information.

    Easy enough to confirm it. I'll do it next week.

    This is a plug without top latch: https://www.digikey.com/en/products/detail/phoenix-contact/1106633

    Whatever. As usual your posts are not worth reading.

    Fine. You don't have to read them.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ricky@21:1/5 to Ed Lee on Sat Jul 30 09:05:55 2022
    On Saturday, July 30, 2022 at 11:34:57 AM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Saturday, July 30, 2022 at 8:29:27 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Saturday, July 30, 2022 at 9:06:19 AM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Friday, July 29, 2022 at 9:18:51 PM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 3:20:47 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 12:16:17 PM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 3:13:22 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 12:06:23 PM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 2:36:52 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 11:09:04 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:49:08 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:44:33 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:27:12 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:23:48 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:02:35 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 9:46:44 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 9:27:02 AM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    I am confused. Should the car be turned upside down to charge with CCS? Or at least horizontally with center of gravity of the plug tilted to the signal end? Otherwise, weight of the plug tends to pull the signal pins
    off.

    https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/07/the-ars-technica-guide-to-electric-vehicle-charging/

    Seriously, is CCS CP using the LIN physical layer, or a similar version of it? Any CCS experts here?
    Ed, you are doing your usual thing of expecting people to read your post as well as your mind. I don't see LIN mentioned in the article you link at all.
    Sorry, it's two different issues.

    LIN bus is simplified CAN. 12V PLC pulled-up with 1K. Sound like it should work with the CCS Control Pilot (CP) physical layer. I am looking to buy or build the protocol analyser.
    The body of the connector maintains a physical alignment. The pins are supported by the body and so are aligned with the mating pins. This is connectors 101, and is how nearly all connectors work.
    Many CCS drivers can tell you that it should be up-side down. It does not connect reliable sometime. Perhaps they should plug in and hold the plug for an hour while charging.
    How would upside down make it work better? The catch is on the top. The weight of the cable pulls down, but the lever arm presses the connector more tightly, not apart. Look at the mechanics.
    Upside down would push the signal pins in, instead of pulling out. Or just mount the socket horizontally as in my case.
    You aren't explaining anything, just making an unsupported statement. The latch is at the top. It can't be pulled out at the top by the weight of the cable. But the rest of the connector can be pushed in with the latch as a pivot
    point. However, the body of the connector will prevent very much movement. I'm not seeing what you are talking about. In fact, an upside down connector would tend to pull the pins out, rather than push them in, again, the latch is the pivot point as much
    as it can move.
    I haven't really use CCS, just relaying other CCS drivers' complaint. Unlike J1772, the top latch might not be there for CCS.
    It's the same connector. Look at a picture. Heck, look at the picture in your link!
    Some J-plugs don't have the top latch. Some are disabled/broken. I don't know if all CCS plugs have the latch. I will check on my next long distance trip. It's not a big deal for J-plug, but big deal for CCS.
    If your connector is broken, I would not expect it to work well. Duh!
    It's still work with the latch broken, and it's the cases with many of them.
    But you are complaining about how it doesn't work properly. Pick one.
    The Tesla connector is not without flaws. The locking mechanism can fail in a way the cable can not be removed without having to go through the truck to reach a manual release.
    Vehicle locking is a different issue than the handle locking.
    ???
    This seems to me as much ado about nothing.
    It's just the fact of (real) life.
    It's a broken connector. If the connector is broken, fix it and stop whining.
    Some station owners intentionally disable the latch, because too many Tesla just lock the connector after finishing charging. Other vehicles (like Leaf and Bolt) don't lock the connector.
    Tesla can't lock the J1772 connector. It doesn't connect to the car, it connects to the adapter which does lock to the car.
    Many INCONSIDERATE Tesla drivers use a locking ring ($10 on ebay) to lock the adapter and connector. Perhaps some other angry driver broke the latch to avoid this.
    Vandalism by any other name still leaves you with a broken connector. Get it fixed.
    It's not my charger/plug. How can i fix it?

    I said "get it fixed". If you don't understand that, there's no hope for you.


    From memory, i don't think many CCS plugs have the locking latch. Which would make the huge plug huger (or bigger).
    You are still the same loon you have always been. Happy to post unconfirmed information.
    Easy enough to confirm it. I'll do it next week.

    This is a plug without top latch: https://www.digikey.com/en/products/detail/phoenix-contact/1106633

    404 error


    Whatever. As usual your posts are not worth reading.
    Fine. You don't have to read them.

    That is the best advice you've ever given.

    --

    Rick C.

    +-+ Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
    +-+ Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ricky@21:1/5 to Ed Lee on Sat Jul 30 09:25:44 2022
    On Saturday, July 30, 2022 at 12:17:24 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Saturday, July 30, 2022 at 9:05:59 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Saturday, July 30, 2022 at 11:34:57 AM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Saturday, July 30, 2022 at 8:29:27 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Saturday, July 30, 2022 at 9:06:19 AM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Friday, July 29, 2022 at 9:18:51 PM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 3:20:47 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 12:16:17 PM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 3:13:22 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 12:06:23 PM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 2:36:52 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 11:09:04 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:49:08 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:44:33 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:27:12 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:23:48 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:02:35 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 9:46:44 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 9:27:02 AM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    I am confused. Should the car be turned upside down to charge with CCS? Or at least horizontally with center of gravity of the plug tilted to the signal end? Otherwise, weight of the plug tends to pull the signal
    pins off.

    https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/07/the-ars-technica-guide-to-electric-vehicle-charging/

    Seriously, is CCS CP using the LIN physical layer, or a similar version of it? Any CCS experts here?
    Ed, you are doing your usual thing of expecting people to read your post as well as your mind. I don't see LIN mentioned in the article you link at all.
    Sorry, it's two different issues.

    LIN bus is simplified CAN. 12V PLC pulled-up with 1K. Sound like it should work with the CCS Control Pilot (CP) physical layer. I am looking to buy or build the protocol analyser.
    The body of the connector maintains a physical alignment. The pins are supported by the body and so are aligned with the mating pins. This is connectors 101, and is how nearly all connectors work.
    Many CCS drivers can tell you that it should be up-side down. It does not connect reliable sometime. Perhaps they should plug in and hold the plug for an hour while charging.
    How would upside down make it work better? The catch is on the top. The weight of the cable pulls down, but the lever arm presses the connector more tightly, not apart. Look at the mechanics.
    Upside down would push the signal pins in, instead of pulling out. Or just mount the socket horizontally as in my case.
    You aren't explaining anything, just making an unsupported statement. The latch is at the top. It can't be pulled out at the top by the weight of the cable. But the rest of the connector can be pushed in with the latch as a
    pivot point. However, the body of the connector will prevent very much movement. I'm not seeing what you are talking about. In fact, an upside down connector would tend to pull the pins out, rather than push them in, again, the latch is the pivot point
    as much as it can move.
    I haven't really use CCS, just relaying other CCS drivers' complaint. Unlike J1772, the top latch might not be there for CCS.
    It's the same connector. Look at a picture. Heck, look at the picture in your link!
    Some J-plugs don't have the top latch. Some are disabled/broken. I don't know if all CCS plugs have the latch. I will check on my next long distance trip. It's not a big deal for J-plug, but big deal for CCS.
    If your connector is broken, I would not expect it to work well. Duh!
    It's still work with the latch broken, and it's the cases with many of them.
    But you are complaining about how it doesn't work properly. Pick one.
    The Tesla connector is not without flaws. The locking mechanism can fail in a way the cable can not be removed without having to go through the truck to reach a manual release.
    Vehicle locking is a different issue than the handle locking.
    ???
    This seems to me as much ado about nothing.
    It's just the fact of (real) life.
    It's a broken connector. If the connector is broken, fix it and stop whining.
    Some station owners intentionally disable the latch, because too many Tesla just lock the connector after finishing charging. Other vehicles (like Leaf and Bolt) don't lock the connector.
    Tesla can't lock the J1772 connector. It doesn't connect to the car, it connects to the adapter which does lock to the car.
    Many INCONSIDERATE Tesla drivers use a locking ring ($10 on ebay) to lock the adapter and connector. Perhaps some other angry driver broke the latch to avoid this.
    Vandalism by any other name still leaves you with a broken connector. Get it fixed.
    It's not my charger/plug. How can i fix it?
    I said "get it fixed". If you don't understand that, there's no hope for you.
    If you mean fixing the battery, then i did. I now have 70 to 80 miles with 13+8 kwhr, 100 miles with 13+8+8.
    From memory, i don't think many CCS plugs have the locking latch. Which would make the huge plug huger (or bigger).
    You are still the same loon you have always been. Happy to post unconfirmed information.
    Easy enough to confirm it. I'll do it next week.

    This is a plug without top latch: https://www.digikey.com/en/products/detail/phoenix-contact/1106633
    404 error
    https://www.digikey.com/en/products/detail/phoenix-contact/1106633/15211593

    Yes, you might want to contact Phoenix Contact and find out what's up with that.


    Plenty of other images with Google search.
    Whatever. As usual your posts are not worth reading.
    Fine. You don't have to read them.
    That is the best advice you've ever given.
    Yes, stop read my posts and reply. You are annoying other readers.

    Yes, I am warning other readers. You are right.

    --

    Rick C.

    ++- Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
    ++- Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ed Lee@21:1/5 to Ricky on Sat Jul 30 09:17:21 2022
    On Saturday, July 30, 2022 at 9:05:59 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Saturday, July 30, 2022 at 11:34:57 AM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Saturday, July 30, 2022 at 8:29:27 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Saturday, July 30, 2022 at 9:06:19 AM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Friday, July 29, 2022 at 9:18:51 PM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 3:20:47 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 12:16:17 PM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 3:13:22 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 12:06:23 PM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 2:36:52 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 11:09:04 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:49:08 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:44:33 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:27:12 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:23:48 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:02:35 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 9:46:44 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 9:27:02 AM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    I am confused. Should the car be turned upside down to charge with CCS? Or at least horizontally with center of gravity of the plug tilted to the signal end? Otherwise, weight of the plug tends to pull the signal pins
    off.

    https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/07/the-ars-technica-guide-to-electric-vehicle-charging/

    Seriously, is CCS CP using the LIN physical layer, or a similar version of it? Any CCS experts here?
    Ed, you are doing your usual thing of expecting people to read your post as well as your mind. I don't see LIN mentioned in the article you link at all.
    Sorry, it's two different issues.

    LIN bus is simplified CAN. 12V PLC pulled-up with 1K. Sound like it should work with the CCS Control Pilot (CP) physical layer. I am looking to buy or build the protocol analyser.
    The body of the connector maintains a physical alignment. The pins are supported by the body and so are aligned with the mating pins. This is connectors 101, and is how nearly all connectors work.
    Many CCS drivers can tell you that it should be up-side down. It does not connect reliable sometime. Perhaps they should plug in and hold the plug for an hour while charging.
    How would upside down make it work better? The catch is on the top. The weight of the cable pulls down, but the lever arm presses the connector more tightly, not apart. Look at the mechanics.
    Upside down would push the signal pins in, instead of pulling out. Or just mount the socket horizontally as in my case.
    You aren't explaining anything, just making an unsupported statement. The latch is at the top. It can't be pulled out at the top by the weight of the cable. But the rest of the connector can be pushed in with the latch as a
    pivot point. However, the body of the connector will prevent very much movement. I'm not seeing what you are talking about. In fact, an upside down connector would tend to pull the pins out, rather than push them in, again, the latch is the pivot point
    as much as it can move.
    I haven't really use CCS, just relaying other CCS drivers' complaint. Unlike J1772, the top latch might not be there for CCS.
    It's the same connector. Look at a picture. Heck, look at the picture in your link!
    Some J-plugs don't have the top latch. Some are disabled/broken. I don't know if all CCS plugs have the latch. I will check on my next long distance trip. It's not a big deal for J-plug, but big deal for CCS.
    If your connector is broken, I would not expect it to work well. Duh!
    It's still work with the latch broken, and it's the cases with many of them.
    But you are complaining about how it doesn't work properly. Pick one.
    The Tesla connector is not without flaws. The locking mechanism can fail in a way the cable can not be removed without having to go through the truck to reach a manual release.
    Vehicle locking is a different issue than the handle locking.
    ???
    This seems to me as much ado about nothing.
    It's just the fact of (real) life.
    It's a broken connector. If the connector is broken, fix it and stop whining.
    Some station owners intentionally disable the latch, because too many Tesla just lock the connector after finishing charging. Other vehicles (like Leaf and Bolt) don't lock the connector.
    Tesla can't lock the J1772 connector. It doesn't connect to the car, it connects to the adapter which does lock to the car.
    Many INCONSIDERATE Tesla drivers use a locking ring ($10 on ebay) to lock the adapter and connector. Perhaps some other angry driver broke the latch to avoid this.
    Vandalism by any other name still leaves you with a broken connector. Get it fixed.
    It's not my charger/plug. How can i fix it?
    I said "get it fixed". If you don't understand that, there's no hope for you.

    If you mean fixing the battery, then i did. I now have 70 to 80 miles with 13+8 kwhr, 100 miles with 13+8+8.

    From memory, i don't think many CCS plugs have the locking latch. Which would make the huge plug huger (or bigger).
    You are still the same loon you have always been. Happy to post unconfirmed information.
    Easy enough to confirm it. I'll do it next week.

    This is a plug without top latch: https://www.digikey.com/en/products/detail/phoenix-contact/1106633
    404 error

    https://www.digikey.com/en/products/detail/phoenix-contact/1106633/15211593

    Plenty of other images with Google search.

    Whatever. As usual your posts are not worth reading.
    Fine. You don't have to read them.
    That is the best advice you've ever given.

    Yes, stop read my posts and reply. You are annoying other readers.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ed Lee@21:1/5 to Ricky on Sat Jul 30 09:29:36 2022
    On Saturday, July 30, 2022 at 9:25:47 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Saturday, July 30, 2022 at 12:17:24 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Saturday, July 30, 2022 at 9:05:59 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Saturday, July 30, 2022 at 11:34:57 AM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Saturday, July 30, 2022 at 8:29:27 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Saturday, July 30, 2022 at 9:06:19 AM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Friday, July 29, 2022 at 9:18:51 PM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 3:20:47 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 12:16:17 PM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 3:13:22 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 12:06:23 PM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 2:36:52 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 11:09:04 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:49:08 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:44:33 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:27:12 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:23:48 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:02:35 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 9:46:44 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 9:27:02 AM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    I am confused. Should the car be turned upside down to charge with CCS? Or at least horizontally with center of gravity of the plug tilted to the signal end? Otherwise, weight of the plug tends to pull the signal
    pins off.

    https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/07/the-ars-technica-guide-to-electric-vehicle-charging/

    Seriously, is CCS CP using the LIN physical layer, or a similar version of it? Any CCS experts here?
    Ed, you are doing your usual thing of expecting people to read your post as well as your mind. I don't see LIN mentioned in the article you link at all.
    Sorry, it's two different issues.

    LIN bus is simplified CAN. 12V PLC pulled-up with 1K. Sound like it should work with the CCS Control Pilot (CP) physical layer. I am looking to buy or build the protocol analyser.
    The body of the connector maintains a physical alignment. The pins are supported by the body and so are aligned with the mating pins. This is connectors 101, and is how nearly all connectors work.
    Many CCS drivers can tell you that it should be up-side down. It does not connect reliable sometime. Perhaps they should plug in and hold the plug for an hour while charging.
    How would upside down make it work better? The catch is on the top. The weight of the cable pulls down, but the lever arm presses the connector more tightly, not apart. Look at the mechanics.
    Upside down would push the signal pins in, instead of pulling out. Or just mount the socket horizontally as in my case.
    You aren't explaining anything, just making an unsupported statement. The latch is at the top. It can't be pulled out at the top by the weight of the cable. But the rest of the connector can be pushed in with the latch as a
    pivot point. However, the body of the connector will prevent very much movement. I'm not seeing what you are talking about. In fact, an upside down connector would tend to pull the pins out, rather than push them in, again, the latch is the pivot point
    as much as it can move.
    I haven't really use CCS, just relaying other CCS drivers' complaint. Unlike J1772, the top latch might not be there for CCS.
    It's the same connector. Look at a picture. Heck, look at the picture in your link!
    Some J-plugs don't have the top latch. Some are disabled/broken. I don't know if all CCS plugs have the latch. I will check on my next long distance trip. It's not a big deal for J-plug, but big deal for CCS.
    If your connector is broken, I would not expect it to work well. Duh!
    It's still work with the latch broken, and it's the cases with many of them.
    But you are complaining about how it doesn't work properly. Pick one.
    The Tesla connector is not without flaws. The locking mechanism can fail in a way the cable can not be removed without having to go through the truck to reach a manual release.
    Vehicle locking is a different issue than the handle locking.
    ???
    This seems to me as much ado about nothing.
    It's just the fact of (real) life.
    It's a broken connector. If the connector is broken, fix it and stop whining.
    Some station owners intentionally disable the latch, because too many Tesla just lock the connector after finishing charging. Other vehicles (like Leaf and Bolt) don't lock the connector.
    Tesla can't lock the J1772 connector. It doesn't connect to the car, it connects to the adapter which does lock to the car.
    Many INCONSIDERATE Tesla drivers use a locking ring ($10 on ebay) to lock the adapter and connector. Perhaps some other angry driver broke the latch to avoid this.
    Vandalism by any other name still leaves you with a broken connector. Get it fixed.
    It's not my charger/plug. How can i fix it?
    I said "get it fixed". If you don't understand that, there's no hope for you.
    If you mean fixing the battery, then i did. I now have 70 to 80 miles with 13+8 kwhr, 100 miles with 13+8+8.
    From memory, i don't think many CCS plugs have the locking latch. Which would make the huge plug huger (or bigger).
    You are still the same loon you have always been. Happy to post unconfirmed information.
    Easy enough to confirm it. I'll do it next week.

    This is a plug without top latch: https://www.digikey.com/en/products/detail/phoenix-contact/1106633
    404 error
    https://www.digikey.com/en/products/detail/phoenix-contact/1106633/15211593
    Yes, you might want to contact Phoenix Contact and find out what's up with that.

    And many other plug and car manufacturers that i have no idea with. Most likely, the EV just lock the power pins, not the signal pins.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ricky@21:1/5 to Ed Lee on Sat Jul 30 10:39:06 2022
    On Saturday, July 30, 2022 at 12:29:39 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Saturday, July 30, 2022 at 9:25:47 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Saturday, July 30, 2022 at 12:17:24 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Saturday, July 30, 2022 at 9:05:59 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Saturday, July 30, 2022 at 11:34:57 AM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Saturday, July 30, 2022 at 8:29:27 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Saturday, July 30, 2022 at 9:06:19 AM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Friday, July 29, 2022 at 9:18:51 PM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 3:20:47 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 12:16:17 PM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 3:13:22 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 12:06:23 PM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 2:36:52 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 11:09:04 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:49:08 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:44:33 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:27:12 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:23:48 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:02:35 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 9:46:44 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 9:27:02 AM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    I am confused. Should the car be turned upside down to charge with CCS? Or at least horizontally with center of gravity of the plug tilted to the signal end? Otherwise, weight of the plug tends to pull the signal
    pins off.

    https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/07/the-ars-technica-guide-to-electric-vehicle-charging/

    Seriously, is CCS CP using the LIN physical layer, or a similar version of it? Any CCS experts here?
    Ed, you are doing your usual thing of expecting people to read your post as well as your mind. I don't see LIN mentioned in the article you link at all.
    Sorry, it's two different issues.

    LIN bus is simplified CAN. 12V PLC pulled-up with 1K. Sound like it should work with the CCS Control Pilot (CP) physical layer. I am looking to buy or build the protocol analyser.
    The body of the connector maintains a physical alignment. The pins are supported by the body and so are aligned with the mating pins. This is connectors 101, and is how nearly all connectors work.
    Many CCS drivers can tell you that it should be up-side down. It does not connect reliable sometime. Perhaps they should plug in and hold the plug for an hour while charging.
    How would upside down make it work better? The catch is on the top. The weight of the cable pulls down, but the lever arm presses the connector more tightly, not apart. Look at the mechanics.
    Upside down would push the signal pins in, instead of pulling out. Or just mount the socket horizontally as in my case.
    You aren't explaining anything, just making an unsupported statement. The latch is at the top. It can't be pulled out at the top by the weight of the cable. But the rest of the connector can be pushed in with the latch as
    a pivot point. However, the body of the connector will prevent very much movement. I'm not seeing what you are talking about. In fact, an upside down connector would tend to pull the pins out, rather than push them in, again, the latch is the pivot point
    as much as it can move.
    I haven't really use CCS, just relaying other CCS drivers' complaint. Unlike J1772, the top latch might not be there for CCS.
    It's the same connector. Look at a picture. Heck, look at the picture in your link!
    Some J-plugs don't have the top latch. Some are disabled/broken. I don't know if all CCS plugs have the latch. I will check on my next long distance trip. It's not a big deal for J-plug, but big deal for CCS.
    If your connector is broken, I would not expect it to work well. Duh!
    It's still work with the latch broken, and it's the cases with many of them.
    But you are complaining about how it doesn't work properly. Pick one.
    The Tesla connector is not without flaws. The locking mechanism can fail in a way the cable can not be removed without having to go through the truck to reach a manual release.
    Vehicle locking is a different issue than the handle locking.
    ???
    This seems to me as much ado about nothing.
    It's just the fact of (real) life.
    It's a broken connector. If the connector is broken, fix it and stop whining.
    Some station owners intentionally disable the latch, because too many Tesla just lock the connector after finishing charging. Other vehicles (like Leaf and Bolt) don't lock the connector.
    Tesla can't lock the J1772 connector. It doesn't connect to the car, it connects to the adapter which does lock to the car.
    Many INCONSIDERATE Tesla drivers use a locking ring ($10 on ebay) to lock the adapter and connector. Perhaps some other angry driver broke the latch to avoid this.
    Vandalism by any other name still leaves you with a broken connector. Get it fixed.
    It's not my charger/plug. How can i fix it?
    I said "get it fixed". If you don't understand that, there's no hope for you.
    If you mean fixing the battery, then i did. I now have 70 to 80 miles with 13+8 kwhr, 100 miles with 13+8+8.
    From memory, i don't think many CCS plugs have the locking latch. Which would make the huge plug huger (or bigger).
    You are still the same loon you have always been. Happy to post unconfirmed information.
    Easy enough to confirm it. I'll do it next week.

    This is a plug without top latch: https://www.digikey.com/en/products/detail/phoenix-contact/1106633
    404 error
    https://www.digikey.com/en/products/detail/phoenix-contact/1106633/15211593
    Yes, you might want to contact Phoenix Contact and find out what's up with that.
    And many other plug and car manufacturers that i have no idea with. Most likely, the EV just lock the power pins, not the signal pins.

    I have no idea what you are talking about "locking pins". Either the connector is locked, or nothing is locked.

    I just realized why the connector has the button. That informs the system the user is about to detach the connector, so the power can be interrupted. I know on the J1772 connector it is required. I can't imagine it is not required on the CCS1
    connector.

    So don't use a charger with a broken connector. It can be dangerous.

    --

    Rick C.

    +++ Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
    +++ Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ed Lee@21:1/5 to Ricky on Sat Jul 30 10:45:29 2022
    On Saturday, July 30, 2022 at 10:39:09 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Saturday, July 30, 2022 at 12:29:39 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Saturday, July 30, 2022 at 9:25:47 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Saturday, July 30, 2022 at 12:17:24 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Saturday, July 30, 2022 at 9:05:59 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Saturday, July 30, 2022 at 11:34:57 AM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Saturday, July 30, 2022 at 8:29:27 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Saturday, July 30, 2022 at 9:06:19 AM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Friday, July 29, 2022 at 9:18:51 PM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 3:20:47 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 12:16:17 PM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 3:13:22 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 12:06:23 PM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 2:36:52 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 11:09:04 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:49:08 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:44:33 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:27:12 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:23:48 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 1:02:35 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 9:46:44 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 9:27:02 AM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    I am confused. Should the car be turned upside down to charge with CCS? Or at least horizontally with center of gravity of the plug tilted to the signal end? Otherwise, weight of the plug tends to pull the
    signal pins off.

    https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/07/the-ars-technica-guide-to-electric-vehicle-charging/

    Seriously, is CCS CP using the LIN physical layer, or a similar version of it? Any CCS experts here?
    Ed, you are doing your usual thing of expecting people to read your post as well as your mind. I don't see LIN mentioned in the article you link at all.
    Sorry, it's two different issues.

    LIN bus is simplified CAN. 12V PLC pulled-up with 1K. Sound like it should work with the CCS Control Pilot (CP) physical layer. I am looking to buy or build the protocol analyser.
    The body of the connector maintains a physical alignment. The pins are supported by the body and so are aligned with the mating pins. This is connectors 101, and is how nearly all connectors work.
    Many CCS drivers can tell you that it should be up-side down. It does not connect reliable sometime. Perhaps they should plug in and hold the plug for an hour while charging.
    How would upside down make it work better? The catch is on the top. The weight of the cable pulls down, but the lever arm presses the connector more tightly, not apart. Look at the mechanics.
    Upside down would push the signal pins in, instead of pulling out. Or just mount the socket horizontally as in my case.
    You aren't explaining anything, just making an unsupported statement. The latch is at the top. It can't be pulled out at the top by the weight of the cable. But the rest of the connector can be pushed in with the latch
    as a pivot point. However, the body of the connector will prevent very much movement. I'm not seeing what you are talking about. In fact, an upside down connector would tend to pull the pins out, rather than push them in, again, the latch is the pivot
    point as much as it can move.
    I haven't really use CCS, just relaying other CCS drivers' complaint. Unlike J1772, the top latch might not be there for CCS.
    It's the same connector. Look at a picture. Heck, look at the picture in your link!
    Some J-plugs don't have the top latch. Some are disabled/broken. I don't know if all CCS plugs have the latch. I will check on my next long distance trip. It's not a big deal for J-plug, but big deal for CCS.
    If your connector is broken, I would not expect it to work well. Duh!
    It's still work with the latch broken, and it's the cases with many of them.
    But you are complaining about how it doesn't work properly. Pick one.
    The Tesla connector is not without flaws. The locking mechanism can fail in a way the cable can not be removed without having to go through the truck to reach a manual release.
    Vehicle locking is a different issue than the handle locking.
    ???
    This seems to me as much ado about nothing.
    It's just the fact of (real) life.
    It's a broken connector. If the connector is broken, fix it and stop whining.
    Some station owners intentionally disable the latch, because too many Tesla just lock the connector after finishing charging. Other vehicles (like Leaf and Bolt) don't lock the connector.
    Tesla can't lock the J1772 connector. It doesn't connect to the car, it connects to the adapter which does lock to the car.
    Many INCONSIDERATE Tesla drivers use a locking ring ($10 on ebay) to lock the adapter and connector. Perhaps some other angry driver broke the latch to avoid this.
    Vandalism by any other name still leaves you with a broken connector. Get it fixed.
    It's not my charger/plug. How can i fix it?
    I said "get it fixed". If you don't understand that, there's no hope for you.
    If you mean fixing the battery, then i did. I now have 70 to 80 miles with 13+8 kwhr, 100 miles with 13+8+8.
    From memory, i don't think many CCS plugs have the locking latch. Which would make the huge plug huger (or bigger).
    You are still the same loon you have always been. Happy to post unconfirmed information.
    Easy enough to confirm it. I'll do it next week.

    This is a plug without top latch: https://www.digikey.com/en/products/detail/phoenix-contact/1106633
    404 error
    https://www.digikey.com/en/products/detail/phoenix-contact/1106633/15211593
    Yes, you might want to contact Phoenix Contact and find out what's up with that.
    And many other plug and car manufacturers that i have no idea with. Most likely, the EV just lock the power pins, not the signal pins.
    I have no idea what you are talking about "locking pins". Either the connector is locked, or nothing is locked.

    The locking square holes on side of the connector. Most vehicle lock the pair of holes next to the power pins.
    ,
    I just realized why the connector has the button. That informs the system the user is about to detach the connector, so the
    power can be interrupted. I know on the J1772 connector it is required. I can't imagine it is not required on the CCS1 connector.

    CCS locking is controlled by the charger and EV not by the user. I think you know less about CCS than me, which is low already.

    So don't use a charger with a broken connector. It can be dangerous.

    Yes it is. All poorly designed CCS are dangerous. All it take is one bad CCS to crash the EV. Not a big deal for me, but for people without the tools on hand. It would need a tow to the shop.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From keith@kjwdesigns.com@21:1/5 to Ed Lee on Sat Jul 30 11:17:45 2022
    On Saturday, 30 July 2022 at 10:45:33 UTC-7, Ed Lee wrote:
    ...
    ,
    I just realized why the connector has the button. That informs the system the user is about to detach the connector, so the
    power can be interrupted. I know on the J1772 connector it is required. I can't imagine it is not required on the CCS1 connector.
    CCS locking is controlled by the charger and EV not by the user. I think you know less about CCS than me, which is low already.
    So don't use a charger with a broken connector. It can be dangerous.
    Yes it is. All poorly designed CCS are dangerous. All it take is one bad CCS to crash the EV. Not a big deal for me, but for people without the tools on hand. It would need a tow to the shop.

    The Proximity Pilot (PP) signal signals the EV that the user has pressed the latch release button.

    The EV can then disable charging so there is no current flowing when the plug is pulled and release the plug latch if present.

    In a normal cable the EVSE/DC charger does not get the proximity pilot signal so doesn't know whether the button has been pressed.

    kw

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ed Lee@21:1/5 to bill....@ieee.org on Sat Jul 30 19:42:14 2022
    On Saturday, July 30, 2022 at 7:28:29 PM UTC-7, bill....@ieee.org wrote:
    On Friday, July 29, 2022 at 4:00:58 AM UTC+10, John Larkin wrote:
    On Thu, 28 Jul 2022 10:47:13 -0700 (PDT), Ed Lee
    <edward....@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:43:34 AM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:
    On Thu, 28 Jul 2022 06:26:58 -0700 (PDT), Ed Lee
    <edward....@gmail.com> wrote:

    I am confused. Should the car be turned upside down to charge with CCS? Or at least horizontally with center of gravity of the plug tilted to the signal end? Otherwise, weight of the plug tends to pull the signal pins off.

    https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/07/the-ars-technica-guide-to-electric-vehicle-charging/

    Seriously, is CCS CP using the LIN physical layer, or a similar version of it? Any CCS experts here?
    If cars had a USB C connector for charging things would be simpler.

    Yes, 12V USB C would work.
    Your article is interesting.

    Given an infinitely long 120v extension cord, an ecar might travel at
    2 to 4 MPH forever.

    Level 2 can manage 10 to 20 MPH forever, always connected.

    I gassed up this morning, as I have to do about every 2 weeks. About
    400 KWH equivalent in maybe 3 minutes. A gas pump delivers roughly 20 megawatts equivalent.

    Not everybody can install a gas pump at home. Everybody got 120V outlet at home.

    Cars spend 95% of their time parked. Two to fours miles per hour forever translates to 40 to 80 MPH while they aren't parked, and that wimpy 120V extension cord must have a very limited current capacity. Put a heavy duty socket next to where the e-car
    is normally parked and you should be able to do better, but John Larkin doesn't know enough about electric wiring to be aware of this.

    120V 15A is around 1.8kw. Get 5.4 miles per hour even for my lowly Leaf.

    But i park my car mostly in the street, sometimes moving it once a week for street cleaning. So, sometimes i drive a few miles per week and sometimes hundred miles a day.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Anthony William Sloman@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Sat Jul 30 19:28:26 2022
    On Friday, July 29, 2022 at 4:00:58 AM UTC+10, John Larkin wrote:
    On Thu, 28 Jul 2022 10:47:13 -0700 (PDT), Ed Lee
    <edward....@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:43:34 AM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:
    On Thu, 28 Jul 2022 06:26:58 -0700 (PDT), Ed Lee
    <edward....@gmail.com> wrote:

    I am confused. Should the car be turned upside down to charge with CCS? Or at least horizontally with center of gravity of the plug tilted to the signal end? Otherwise, weight of the plug tends to pull the signal pins off.

    https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/07/the-ars-technica-guide-to-electric-vehicle-charging/

    Seriously, is CCS CP using the LIN physical layer, or a similar version of it? Any CCS experts here?
    If cars had a USB C connector for charging things would be simpler.

    Yes, 12V USB C would work.
    Your article is interesting.

    Given an infinitely long 120v extension cord, an ecar might travel at
    2 to 4 MPH forever.

    Level 2 can manage 10 to 20 MPH forever, always connected.

    I gassed up this morning, as I have to do about every 2 weeks. About
    400 KWH equivalent in maybe 3 minutes. A gas pump delivers roughly 20 megawatts equivalent.

    Cars spend 95% of their time parked. Two to fours miles per hour forever translates to 40 to 80 MPH while they aren't parked, and that wimpy 120V extension cord must have a very limited current capacity. Put a heavy duty socket next to where the e-car is
    normally parked and you should be able to do better, but John Larkin doesn't know enough about electric wiring to be aware of this.

    --
    Bill Sloman, Sydney

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Anthony William Sloman@21:1/5 to Ed Lee on Sat Jul 30 21:26:59 2022
    On Sunday, July 31, 2022 at 12:42:17 PM UTC+10, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Saturday, July 30, 2022 at 7:28:29 PM UTC-7, bill....@ieee.org wrote:
    On Friday, July 29, 2022 at 4:00:58 AM UTC+10, John Larkin wrote:
    On Thu, 28 Jul 2022 10:47:13 -0700 (PDT), Ed Lee <edward....@gmail.com> wrote:
    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:43:34 AM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:
    On Thu, 28 Jul 2022 06:26:58 -0700 (PDT), Ed Lee <edward....@gmail.com> wrote:

    <snip>

    I gassed up this morning, as I have to do about every 2 weeks. About
    400 KWH equivalent in maybe 3 minutes. A gas pump delivers roughly 20 megawatts equivalent.

    Not everybody can install a gas pump at home. Everybody got 120V outlet at home.

    Cars spend 95% of their time parked. Two to fours miles per hour forever translates to 40 to 80 MPH while they aren't parked, and that wimpy 120V extension cord must have a very limited current capacity. Put a heavy duty socket next to where the e-
    car is normally parked and you should be able to do better, but John Larkin doesn't know enough about electric wiring to be aware of this.

    120V 15A is around 1.8kw. Get 5.4 miles per hour even for my lowly Leaf.

    But i park my car mostly in the street, sometimes moving it once a week for street cleaning. So, sometimes i drive a few miles per week and sometimes hundred miles a day.

    Once electric cars get more popular, street parking will probably include access to charging. The charger will have to be clever enough to know whose car is it is charging, and who to bill for the charge delivered, but that's trivial. Apparently Canadian
    parking meters already come with a power plug to drive the radiator warmer to keep the radiator from freezing solid in winter.

    --
    Bill Sloman, Sydney

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ricky@21:1/5 to ke...@kjwdesigns.com on Sat Jul 30 23:27:21 2022
    On Saturday, July 30, 2022 at 2:17:48 PM UTC-4, ke...@kjwdesigns.com wrote:
    On Saturday, 30 July 2022 at 10:45:33 UTC-7, Ed Lee wrote:
    ...
    ,
    I just realized why the connector has the button. That informs the system the user is about to detach the connector, so the
    power can be interrupted. I know on the J1772 connector it is required. I can't imagine it is not required on the CCS1 connector.
    CCS locking is controlled by the charger and EV not by the user. I think you know less about CCS than me, which is low already.
    So don't use a charger with a broken connector. It can be dangerous.
    Yes it is. All poorly designed CCS are dangerous. All it take is one bad CCS to crash the EV. Not a big deal for me, but for people without the tools on hand. It would need a tow to the shop.
    The Proximity Pilot (PP) signal signals the EV that the user has pressed the latch release button.

    The EV can then disable charging so there is no current flowing when the plug is pulled and release the plug latch if present.

    In a normal cable the EVSE/DC charger does not get the proximity pilot signal so doesn't know whether the button has been pressed.

    The pin is in the connector. Are you saying they don't include a wire in the cable for it? Yeah, looks that way. Odd.

    I suppose the EVSE doesn't need to know the user has pressed the button. The car lets the EVSE know the charging has ended through the control pilot signal. They don't show that very clearly in the various docs I can find. But it seems the car removes
    the 1300 ohm resistor from in parallel with the 2.7k resistor, which tells the EVSE that charging has ended.

    --

    Rick C.

    ---- Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
    ---- Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ed Lee@21:1/5 to Ricky on Sun Jul 31 07:36:31 2022
    On Saturday, July 30, 2022 at 11:27:24 PM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Saturday, July 30, 2022 at 2:17:48 PM UTC-4, ke...@kjwdesigns.com wrote:
    On Saturday, 30 July 2022 at 10:45:33 UTC-7, Ed Lee wrote:
    ...
    ,
    I just realized why the connector has the button. That informs the system the user is about to detach the connector, so the
    power can be interrupted. I know on the J1772 connector it is required. I can't imagine it is not required on the CCS1 connector.
    CCS locking is controlled by the charger and EV not by the user. I think you know less about CCS than me, which is low already.
    So don't use a charger with a broken connector. It can be dangerous.
    Yes it is. All poorly designed CCS are dangerous. All it take is one bad CCS to crash the EV. Not a big dyou eal for me, but for people without the tools on hand. It would need a tow to the shop.
    The Proximity Pilot (PP) signal signals the EV that the user has pressed the latch release button.

    The EV can then disable charging so there is no current flowing when the plug is pulled and release the plug latch if present.

    In a normal cable the EVSE/DC charger does not get the proximity pilot signal so doesn't know whether the button has been pressed.
    The pin is in the connector. Are you saying they don't include a wire in the cable for it? Yeah, looks that way. Odd.

    I don't think DC chargers take any action with the proximity pin. I only use the CDM plug, but probably work the same with CCS. When you plug it into the vehicle, the charger does not initiate, you have to press a button on the touch screen (or with an
    RFID card) first. It run an insulation test. Probably locking and testing the DC power connection. That mean it did not do anything before your pressing the button on the screen. Problem is that you are at the charger and not at the vehicle to hold
    the plug while the charger is trying to lock the plug. If it does not lock properly, we have a problem.

    I suppose the EVSE doesn't need to know the user has pressed the button. The car lets the EVSE know the charging has ended through the control pilot signal. They don't show that very clearly in the various docs I can find. But it seems the car removes
    the 1300 ohm resistor from in parallel with the 2.7k resistor, which tells the EVSE that charging has ended.

    That's for J1772. DC charger only use PLC over CP. Unfortunately, nothing about the protocol available.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Larkin@21:1/5 to edward.ming.lee@gmail.com on Mon Aug 1 12:06:06 2022
    On Sat, 30 Jul 2022 19:42:14 -0700 (PDT), Ed Lee
    <edward.ming.lee@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Saturday, July 30, 2022 at 7:28:29 PM UTC-7, bill....@ieee.org wrote:
    On Friday, July 29, 2022 at 4:00:58 AM UTC+10, John Larkin wrote:
    On Thu, 28 Jul 2022 10:47:13 -0700 (PDT), Ed Lee
    <edward....@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:43:34 AM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:
    On Thu, 28 Jul 2022 06:26:58 -0700 (PDT), Ed Lee
    <edward....@gmail.com> wrote:

    I am confused. Should the car be turned upside down to charge with CCS? Or at least horizontally with center of gravity of the plug tilted to the signal end? Otherwise, weight of the plug tends to pull the signal pins off.

    https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/07/the-ars-technica-guide-to-electric-vehicle-charging/

    Seriously, is CCS CP using the LIN physical layer, or a similar version of it? Any CCS experts here?
    If cars had a USB C connector for charging things would be simpler.

    Yes, 12V USB C would work.
    Your article is interesting.

    Given an infinitely long 120v extension cord, an ecar might travel at
    2 to 4 MPH forever.

    Level 2 can manage 10 to 20 MPH forever, always connected.

    I gassed up this morning, as I have to do about every 2 weeks. About
    400 KWH equivalent in maybe 3 minutes. A gas pump delivers roughly 20
    megawatts equivalent.

    Not everybody can install a gas pump at home. Everybody got 120V outlet at home.

    Not everybody can coun t on parking within reach of that outlet. I
    park on the street. I do sometimes trip over neighbors' extension
    cords strung across the sidewalk.


    Cars spend 95% of their time parked. Two to fours miles per hour forever translates to 40 to 80 MPH while they aren't parked, and that wimpy 120V extension cord must have a very limited current capacity. Put a heavy duty socket next to where the e-car
    is normally parked and you should be able to do better, but John Larkin doesn't know enough about electric wiring to be aware of this.

    120V 15A is around 1.8kw. Get 5.4 miles per hour even for my lowly Leaf.

    Oh, 5 MPH!


    But i park my car mostly in the street, sometimes moving it once a week for street cleaning. So, sometimes i drive a few miles per week and sometimes hundred miles a day.

    Extension cord across the sidewalk?

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ed Lee@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Mon Aug 1 13:22:23 2022
    On Monday, August 1, 2022 at 12:06:16 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:
    On Sat, 30 Jul 2022 19:42:14 -0700 (PDT), Ed Lee
    <edward....@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Saturday, July 30, 2022 at 7:28:29 PM UTC-7, bill....@ieee.org wrote:
    On Friday, July 29, 2022 at 4:00:58 AM UTC+10, John Larkin wrote:
    On Thu, 28 Jul 2022 10:47:13 -0700 (PDT), Ed Lee
    <edward....@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:43:34 AM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:
    On Thu, 28 Jul 2022 06:26:58 -0700 (PDT), Ed Lee
    <edward....@gmail.com> wrote:

    I am confused. Should the car be turned upside down to charge with CCS? Or at least horizontally with center of gravity of the plug tilted to the signal end? Otherwise, weight of the plug tends to pull the signal pins off.

    https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/07/the-ars-technica-guide-to-electric-vehicle-charging/

    Seriously, is CCS CP using the LIN physical layer, or a similar version of it? Any CCS experts here?
    If cars had a USB C connector for charging things would be simpler. >> > >
    Yes, 12V USB C would work.
    Your article is interesting.

    Given an infinitely long 120v extension cord, an ecar might travel at >> > 2 to 4 MPH forever.

    Level 2 can manage 10 to 20 MPH forever, always connected.

    I gassed up this morning, as I have to do about every 2 weeks. About
    400 KWH equivalent in maybe 3 minutes. A gas pump delivers roughly 20 >> > megawatts equivalent.

    Not everybody can install a gas pump at home. Everybody got 120V outlet at home.
    Not everybody can coun t on parking within reach of that outlet. I
    park on the street. I do sometimes trip over neighbors' extension
    cords strung across the sidewalk.

    Cars spend 95% of their time parked. Two to fours miles per hour forever translates to 40 to 80 MPH while they aren't parked, and that wimpy 120V extension cord must have a very limited current capacity. Put a heavy duty socket next to where the e-
    car is normally parked and you should be able to do better, but John Larkin doesn't know enough about electric wiring to be aware of this.

    120V 15A is around 1.8kw. Get 5.4 miles per hour even for my lowly Leaf.
    Oh, 5 MPH!

    But i park my car mostly in the street, sometimes moving it once a week for street cleaning. So, sometimes i drive a few miles per week and sometimes hundred miles a day.
    Extension cord across the sidewalk?

    When i am not doing road trip, I just charge it for an hour or two once a week. There are usually space for free charging early in the morning around 7am to 8am. I have to move it for street cleaning anyway.

    When i have the solar panel, i would not need to charge it at all. But i have to work on shunt regulating the batteries first. Even 100w can overcharge them in a week.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ricky@21:1/5 to Ed Lee on Mon Aug 1 13:53:14 2022
    On Monday, August 1, 2022 at 4:22:26 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Monday, August 1, 2022 at 12:06:16 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:
    On Sat, 30 Jul 2022 19:42:14 -0700 (PDT), Ed Lee
    <edward....@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Saturday, July 30, 2022 at 7:28:29 PM UTC-7, bill....@ieee.org wrote: >> On Friday, July 29, 2022 at 4:00:58 AM UTC+10, John Larkin wrote:
    On Thu, 28 Jul 2022 10:47:13 -0700 (PDT), Ed Lee
    <edward....@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:43:34 AM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote: >> > >> On Thu, 28 Jul 2022 06:26:58 -0700 (PDT), Ed Lee
    <edward....@gmail.com> wrote:

    I am confused. Should the car be turned upside down to charge with CCS? Or at least horizontally with center of gravity of the plug tilted to the signal end? Otherwise, weight of the plug tends to pull the signal pins off.

    https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/07/the-ars-technica-guide-to-electric-vehicle-charging/

    Seriously, is CCS CP using the LIN physical layer, or a similar version of it? Any CCS experts here?
    If cars had a USB C connector for charging things would be simpler.

    Yes, 12V USB C would work.
    Your article is interesting.

    Given an infinitely long 120v extension cord, an ecar might travel at >> > 2 to 4 MPH forever.

    Level 2 can manage 10 to 20 MPH forever, always connected.

    I gassed up this morning, as I have to do about every 2 weeks. About >> > 400 KWH equivalent in maybe 3 minutes. A gas pump delivers roughly 20 >> > megawatts equivalent.

    Not everybody can install a gas pump at home. Everybody got 120V outlet at home.
    Not everybody can coun t on parking within reach of that outlet. I
    park on the street. I do sometimes trip over neighbors' extension
    cords strung across the sidewalk.

    Cars spend 95% of their time parked. Two to fours miles per hour forever translates to 40 to 80 MPH while they aren't parked, and that wimpy 120V extension cord must have a very limited current capacity. Put a heavy duty socket next to where the e-
    car is normally parked and you should be able to do better, but John Larkin doesn't know enough about electric wiring to be aware of this.

    120V 15A is around 1.8kw. Get 5.4 miles per hour even for my lowly Leaf. Oh, 5 MPH!

    But i park my car mostly in the street, sometimes moving it once a week for street cleaning. So, sometimes i drive a few miles per week and sometimes hundred miles a day.
    Extension cord across the sidewalk?
    When i am not doing road trip, I just charge it for an hour or two once a week. There are usually space for free charging early in the morning around 7am to 8am. I have to move it for street cleaning anyway.

    When i have the solar panel, i would not need to charge it at all. But i have to work on shunt regulating the batteries first. Even 100w can overcharge them in a week.

    If you run the solar panels through an inverter, you will be able to use the existing controller and not have any fear of damaging the battery, the precious, expensive battery.

    --

    Rick C.

    ---+ Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
    ---+ Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ed Lee@21:1/5 to Ricky on Mon Aug 1 14:01:54 2022
    On Monday, August 1, 2022 at 1:53:18 PM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Monday, August 1, 2022 at 4:22:26 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Monday, August 1, 2022 at 12:06:16 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:
    On Sat, 30 Jul 2022 19:42:14 -0700 (PDT), Ed Lee
    <edward....@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Saturday, July 30, 2022 at 7:28:29 PM UTC-7, bill....@ieee.org wrote:
    On Friday, July 29, 2022 at 4:00:58 AM UTC+10, John Larkin wrote:
    On Thu, 28 Jul 2022 10:47:13 -0700 (PDT), Ed Lee
    <edward....@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:43:34 AM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:
    On Thu, 28 Jul 2022 06:26:58 -0700 (PDT), Ed Lee
    <edward....@gmail.com> wrote:

    I am confused. Should the car be turned upside down to charge with CCS? Or at least horizontally with center of gravity of the plug tilted to the signal end? Otherwise, weight of the plug tends to pull the signal pins off.

    https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/07/the-ars-technica-guide-to-electric-vehicle-charging/

    Seriously, is CCS CP using the LIN physical layer, or a similar version of it? Any CCS experts here?
    If cars had a USB C connector for charging things would be simpler.

    Yes, 12V USB C would work.
    Your article is interesting.

    Given an infinitely long 120v extension cord, an ecar might travel at
    2 to 4 MPH forever.

    Level 2 can manage 10 to 20 MPH forever, always connected.

    I gassed up this morning, as I have to do about every 2 weeks. About
    400 KWH equivalent in maybe 3 minutes. A gas pump delivers roughly 20
    megawatts equivalent.

    Not everybody can install a gas pump at home. Everybody got 120V outlet at home.
    Not everybody can coun t on parking within reach of that outlet. I
    park on the street. I do sometimes trip over neighbors' extension
    cords strung across the sidewalk.

    Cars spend 95% of their time parked. Two to fours miles per hour forever translates to 40 to 80 MPH while they aren't parked, and that wimpy 120V extension cord must have a very limited current capacity. Put a heavy duty socket next to where the
    e-car is normally parked and you should be able to do better, but John Larkin doesn't know enough about electric wiring to be aware of this.

    120V 15A is around 1.8kw. Get 5.4 miles per hour even for my lowly Leaf.
    Oh, 5 MPH!

    But i park my car mostly in the street, sometimes moving it once a week for street cleaning. So, sometimes i drive a few miles per week and sometimes hundred miles a day.
    Extension cord across the sidewalk?
    When i am not doing road trip, I just charge it for an hour or two once a week. There are usually space for free charging early in the morning around 7am to 8am. I have to move it for street cleaning anyway.

    When i have the solar panel, i would not need to charge it at all. But i have to work on shunt regulating the batteries first. Even 100w can overcharge them in a week.
    If you run the solar panels through an inverter, you will be able to use the existing controller and not have any fear of damaging the battery, the precious, expensive battery.

    Yes, but i need to balance them anyway. I have 32x 12V modules. The stronger one should be shunted out at 12.6V. It is necessary for solar and regular charging.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From a a@21:1/5 to Ed Lee on Mon Aug 1 13:57:25 2022
    On Monday, 1 August 2022 at 22:22:26 UTC+2, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Monday, August 1, 2022 at 12:06:16 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:
    On Sat, 30 Jul 2022 19:42:14 -0700 (PDT), Ed Lee
    <edward....@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Saturday, July 30, 2022 at 7:28:29 PM UTC-7, bill....@ieee.org wrote: >> On Friday, July 29, 2022 at 4:00:58 AM UTC+10, John Larkin wrote:
    On Thu, 28 Jul 2022 10:47:13 -0700 (PDT), Ed Lee
    <edward....@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:43:34 AM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote: >> > >> On Thu, 28 Jul 2022 06:26:58 -0700 (PDT), Ed Lee
    <edward....@gmail.com> wrote:

    I am confused. Should the car be turned upside down to charge with CCS? Or at least horizontally with center of gravity of the plug tilted to the signal end? Otherwise, weight of the plug tends to pull the signal pins off.

    https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/07/the-ars-technica-guide-to-electric-vehicle-charging/

    Seriously, is CCS CP using the LIN physical layer, or a similar version of it? Any CCS experts here?
    If cars had a USB C connector for charging things would be simpler.

    Yes, 12V USB C would work.
    Your article is interesting.

    Given an infinitely long 120v extension cord, an ecar might travel at >> > 2 to 4 MPH forever.

    Level 2 can manage 10 to 20 MPH forever, always connected.

    I gassed up this morning, as I have to do about every 2 weeks. About >> > 400 KWH equivalent in maybe 3 minutes. A gas pump delivers roughly 20 >> > megawatts equivalent.

    Not everybody can install a gas pump at home. Everybody got 120V outlet at home.
    Not everybody can coun t on parking within reach of that outlet. I
    park on the street. I do sometimes trip over neighbors' extension
    cords strung across the sidewalk.

    Cars spend 95% of their time parked. Two to fours miles per hour forever translates to 40 to 80 MPH while they aren't parked, and that wimpy 120V extension cord must have a very limited current capacity. Put a heavy duty socket next to where the e-
    car is normally parked and you should be able to do better, but John Larkin doesn't know enough about electric wiring to be aware of this.

    120V 15A is around 1.8kw. Get 5.4 miles per hour even for my lowly Leaf. Oh, 5 MPH!

    But i park my car mostly in the street, sometimes moving it once a week for street cleaning. So, sometimes i drive a few miles per week and sometimes hundred miles a day.
    Extension cord across the sidewalk?
    When i am not doing road trip, I just charge it for an hour or two once a week. There are usually space for free charging early in the morning around 7am to 8am. I have to move it for street cleaning anyway.

    When i have the solar panel, i would not need to charge it at all. But i have to work on shunt regulating the batteries first. Even 100w can overcharge them in a week.
    100W x 7 days x 5 hrs = 3,500W
    \not much to overcharge

    In standard cars you can charge car battery from solar panel via cigarette lighter socket

    AUDI A6, A8 implemented solar cell roof by Webasto (controller included)
    And in early days of solar panels
    it was the only way to buy used Audi solar roofs to get quality, glass laminated solar panels for home use

    and Webasto Manager installed 100 used Audi solar panels on roof of his barnhouse.

    (In early days of Internet it was easy to make friends with everyone in the world)

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From a a@21:1/5 to Ricky on Mon Aug 1 14:05:21 2022
    On Monday, 1 August 2022 at 22:53:18 UTC+2, Ricky wrote:
    On Monday, August 1, 2022 at 4:22:26 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Monday, August 1, 2022 at 12:06:16 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:
    On Sat, 30 Jul 2022 19:42:14 -0700 (PDT), Ed Lee
    <edward....@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Saturday, July 30, 2022 at 7:28:29 PM UTC-7, bill....@ieee.org wrote:
    On Friday, July 29, 2022 at 4:00:58 AM UTC+10, John Larkin wrote:
    On Thu, 28 Jul 2022 10:47:13 -0700 (PDT), Ed Lee
    <edward....@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:43:34 AM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:
    On Thu, 28 Jul 2022 06:26:58 -0700 (PDT), Ed Lee
    <edward....@gmail.com> wrote:

    I am confused. Should the car be turned upside down to charge with CCS? Or at least horizontally with center of gravity of the plug tilted to the signal end? Otherwise, weight of the plug tends to pull the signal pins off.

    https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/07/the-ars-technica-guide-to-electric-vehicle-charging/

    Seriously, is CCS CP using the LIN physical layer, or a similar version of it? Any CCS experts here?
    If cars had a USB C connector for charging things would be simpler.

    Yes, 12V USB C would work.
    Your article is interesting.

    Given an infinitely long 120v extension cord, an ecar might travel at
    2 to 4 MPH forever.

    Level 2 can manage 10 to 20 MPH forever, always connected.

    I gassed up this morning, as I have to do about every 2 weeks. About
    400 KWH equivalent in maybe 3 minutes. A gas pump delivers roughly 20
    megawatts equivalent.

    Not everybody can install a gas pump at home. Everybody got 120V outlet at home.
    Not everybody can coun t on parking within reach of that outlet. I
    park on the street. I do sometimes trip over neighbors' extension
    cords strung across the sidewalk.

    Cars spend 95% of their time parked. Two to fours miles per hour forever translates to 40 to 80 MPH while they aren't parked, and that wimpy 120V extension cord must have a very limited current capacity. Put a heavy duty socket next to where the
    e-car is normally parked and you should be able to do better, but John Larkin doesn't know enough about electric wiring to be aware of this.

    120V 15A is around 1.8kw. Get 5.4 miles per hour even for my lowly Leaf.
    Oh, 5 MPH!

    But i park my car mostly in the street, sometimes moving it once a week for street cleaning. So, sometimes i drive a few miles per week and sometimes hundred miles a day.
    Extension cord across the sidewalk?
    When i am not doing road trip, I just charge it for an hour or two once a week. There are usually space for free charging early in the morning around 7am to 8am. I have to move it for street cleaning anyway.

    When i have the solar panel, i would not need to charge it at all. But i have to work on shunt regulating the batteries first. Even 100w can overcharge them in a week.
    If you run the solar panels through an inverter, you will be able to use the existing controller and not have any fear of damaging the battery, the precious, expensive battery.

    Ric ky,
    do you earn pennies from Tesla ?

    Tesla is coming with charging socket and protocol controls the charging process How can you implement the protocol into third party inverter to be recognized by Tesla car, as a charging station ?

    Tesla car should be foolproof to never let that happen.

    Exactly the case with laptop battery, controlled by protocol
    to not you let charge the battery off-the-laptop or use as a mobile power bank

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ed Lee@21:1/5 to a a on Mon Aug 1 14:09:11 2022
    On Monday, August 1, 2022 at 1:57:29 PM UTC-7, a a wrote:
    On Monday, 1 August 2022 at 22:22:26 UTC+2, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Monday, August 1, 2022 at 12:06:16 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:
    On Sat, 30 Jul 2022 19:42:14 -0700 (PDT), Ed Lee
    <edward....@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Saturday, July 30, 2022 at 7:28:29 PM UTC-7, bill....@ieee.org wrote:
    On Friday, July 29, 2022 at 4:00:58 AM UTC+10, John Larkin wrote:
    On Thu, 28 Jul 2022 10:47:13 -0700 (PDT), Ed Lee
    <edward....@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:43:34 AM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:
    On Thu, 28 Jul 2022 06:26:58 -0700 (PDT), Ed Lee
    <edward....@gmail.com> wrote:

    I am confused. Should the car be turned upside down to charge with CCS? Or at least horizontally with center of gravity of the plug tilted to the signal end? Otherwise, weight of the plug tends to pull the signal pins off.

    https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/07/the-ars-technica-guide-to-electric-vehicle-charging/

    Seriously, is CCS CP using the LIN physical layer, or a similar version of it? Any CCS experts here?
    If cars had a USB C connector for charging things would be simpler.

    Yes, 12V USB C would work.
    Your article is interesting.

    Given an infinitely long 120v extension cord, an ecar might travel at
    2 to 4 MPH forever.

    Level 2 can manage 10 to 20 MPH forever, always connected.

    I gassed up this morning, as I have to do about every 2 weeks. About
    400 KWH equivalent in maybe 3 minutes. A gas pump delivers roughly 20
    megawatts equivalent.

    Not everybody can install a gas pump at home. Everybody got 120V outlet at home.
    Not everybody can coun t on parking within reach of that outlet. I
    park on the street. I do sometimes trip over neighbors' extension
    cords strung across the sidewalk.

    Cars spend 95% of their time parked. Two to fours miles per hour forever translates to 40 to 80 MPH while they aren't parked, and that wimpy 120V extension cord must have a very limited current capacity. Put a heavy duty socket next to where the
    e-car is normally parked and you should be able to do better, but John Larkin doesn't know enough about electric wiring to be aware of this.

    120V 15A is around 1.8kw. Get 5.4 miles per hour even for my lowly Leaf.
    Oh, 5 MPH!

    But i park my car mostly in the street, sometimes moving it once a week for street cleaning. So, sometimes i drive a few miles per week and sometimes hundred miles a day.
    Extension cord across the sidewalk?
    When i am not doing road trip, I just charge it for an hour or two once a week. There are usually space for free charging early in the morning around 7am to 8am. I have to move it for street cleaning anyway.

    When i have the solar panel, i would not need to charge it at all. But i have to work on shunt regulating the batteries first. Even 100w can overcharge them in a week.
    100W x 7 days x 5 hrs = 3,500W
    \not much to overcharge

    But if i only drive one mile or two to Safeway (only reason i need to drive) a week. It will be 6kW in two weeks.

    In standard cars you can charge car battery from solar panel via cigarette lighter socket

    Lead acid don't care much about 100% SOC. It's deadly for Lithium.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ricky@21:1/5 to a a on Mon Aug 1 14:21:13 2022
    On Monday, August 1, 2022 at 5:05:25 PM UTC-4, a a wrote:
    On Monday, 1 August 2022 at 22:53:18 UTC+2, Ricky wrote:
    On Monday, August 1, 2022 at 4:22:26 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Monday, August 1, 2022 at 12:06:16 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:
    On Sat, 30 Jul 2022 19:42:14 -0700 (PDT), Ed Lee <edward....@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Saturday, July 30, 2022 at 7:28:29 PM UTC-7, bill....@ieee.org wrote:
    On Friday, July 29, 2022 at 4:00:58 AM UTC+10, John Larkin wrote: >> > On Thu, 28 Jul 2022 10:47:13 -0700 (PDT), Ed Lee
    <edward....@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:43:34 AM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:
    On Thu, 28 Jul 2022 06:26:58 -0700 (PDT), Ed Lee
    <edward....@gmail.com> wrote:

    I am confused. Should the car be turned upside down to charge with CCS? Or at least horizontally with center of gravity of the plug tilted to the signal end? Otherwise, weight of the plug tends to pull the signal pins off.

    https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/07/the-ars-technica-guide-to-electric-vehicle-charging/

    Seriously, is CCS CP using the LIN physical layer, or a similar version of it? Any CCS experts here?
    If cars had a USB C connector for charging things would be simpler.

    Yes, 12V USB C would work.
    Your article is interesting.

    Given an infinitely long 120v extension cord, an ecar might travel at
    2 to 4 MPH forever.

    Level 2 can manage 10 to 20 MPH forever, always connected.

    I gassed up this morning, as I have to do about every 2 weeks. About
    400 KWH equivalent in maybe 3 minutes. A gas pump delivers roughly 20
    megawatts equivalent.

    Not everybody can install a gas pump at home. Everybody got 120V outlet at home.
    Not everybody can coun t on parking within reach of that outlet. I park on the street. I do sometimes trip over neighbors' extension cords strung across the sidewalk.

    Cars spend 95% of their time parked. Two to fours miles per hour forever translates to 40 to 80 MPH while they aren't parked, and that wimpy 120V extension cord must have a very limited current capacity. Put a heavy duty socket next to where
    the e-car is normally parked and you should be able to do better, but John Larkin doesn't know enough about electric wiring to be aware of this.

    120V 15A is around 1.8kw. Get 5.4 miles per hour even for my lowly Leaf.
    Oh, 5 MPH!

    But i park my car mostly in the street, sometimes moving it once a week for street cleaning. So, sometimes i drive a few miles per week and sometimes hundred miles a day.
    Extension cord across the sidewalk?
    When i am not doing road trip, I just charge it for an hour or two once a week. There are usually space for free charging early in the morning around 7am to 8am. I have to move it for street cleaning anyway.

    When i have the solar panel, i would not need to charge it at all. But i have to work on shunt regulating the batteries first. Even 100w can overcharge them in a week.
    If you run the solar panels through an inverter, you will be able to use the existing controller and not have any fear of damaging the battery, the precious, expensive battery.
    Ric ky,
    do you earn pennies from Tesla ?

    Tesla is coming with charging socket and protocol controls the charging process
    How can you implement the protocol into third party inverter to be recognized by Tesla car, as a charging station ?

    Tesla car should be foolproof to never let that happen.

    Exactly the case with laptop battery, controlled by protocol
    to not you let charge the battery off-the-laptop or use as a mobile power bank

    Sorry, I can't figure out what you are trying to say. It sounds like you think BEVs are charged the same way as a cheap battery charger where you have to unplug it to prevent overcharging.

    Try using a translation program. Maybe that would be more clear?

    --

    Rick C.

    --+- Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
    --+- Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From keith@kjwdesigns.com@21:1/5 to a a on Mon Aug 1 17:57:58 2022
    On Monday, 1 August 2022 at 13:57:29 UTC-7, a a wrote:
    ...

    In standard cars you can charge car battery from solar panel via cigarette lighter socket

    Many (most?) Japanese cars disconnect the cigarette lighter socket when the ignition is off.

    kw
    ...

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ed Lee@21:1/5 to Ricky on Mon Aug 1 18:37:53 2022
    On Monday, August 1, 2022 at 6:21:48 PM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Monday, August 1, 2022 at 8:58:02 PM UTC-4, ke...@kjwdesigns.com wrote:
    On Monday, 1 August 2022 at 13:57:29 UTC-7, a a wrote:
    ...

    In standard cars you can charge car battery from solar panel via cigarette lighter socket

    Many (most?) Japanese cars disconnect the cigarette lighter socket when the ignition is off.
    That just means it's a bit more work. Ed and a a don't mind that. They like inconvenience.

    Don't know about aa. Ed got 30A direct link to the main battery, 24/7 on. Can't afford to turn on the 100W power relay with solar.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ricky@21:1/5 to ke...@kjwdesigns.com on Mon Aug 1 18:21:45 2022
    On Monday, August 1, 2022 at 8:58:02 PM UTC-4, ke...@kjwdesigns.com wrote:
    On Monday, 1 August 2022 at 13:57:29 UTC-7, a a wrote:
    ...

    In standard cars you can charge car battery from solar panel via cigarette lighter socket

    Many (most?) Japanese cars disconnect the cigarette lighter socket when the ignition is off.

    That just means it's a bit more work. Ed and a a don't mind that. They like inconvenience.

    --

    Rick C.

    --++ Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
    --++ Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From a a@21:1/5 to Ricky on Tue Aug 2 03:17:08 2022
    On Tuesday, 2 August 2022 at 03:21:48 UTC+2, Ricky wrote:
    On Monday, August 1, 2022 at 8:58:02 PM UTC-4, ke...@kjwdesigns.com wrote:
    On Monday, 1 August 2022 at 13:57:29 UTC-7, a a wrote:
    ...

    In standard cars you can charge car battery from solar panel via cigarette lighter socket

    Many (most?) Japanese cars disconnect the cigarette lighter socket when the ignition is off.
    That just means it's a bit more work. Ed and a a don't mind that. They like inconvenience.

    --

    Rick C.

    --++ Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
    --++ Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209
    Ricky,
    since you make pennies from Tesla, marketing supercharging fake

    Just call Elon to get latest technology on how to use local, home solar panels for supercharging Tesla.

    If supercharging is too complicated, just any form of reliable solar charger which would work for Tesla, is sought.

    Elon promoted PowerWall in the past, promoted Tesla car turned into power bank to feed your home with electric energy,
    so we need to know what specification inverter would work for solar panels to turn inverter's outlet into charging socket for Tesla.

    BTW

    I will suggest Elon to build some Teslas with solar roofs.
    200W is not much, but may keep your battery protected against being completely depleted.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From a a@21:1/5 to Ed Lee on Tue Aug 2 03:18:34 2022
    On Tuesday, 2 August 2022 at 03:37:56 UTC+2, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Monday, August 1, 2022 at 6:21:48 PM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Monday, August 1, 2022 at 8:58:02 PM UTC-4, ke...@kjwdesigns.com wrote:
    On Monday, 1 August 2022 at 13:57:29 UTC-7, a a wrote:
    ...

    In standard cars you can charge car battery from solar panel via cigarette lighter socket

    Many (most?) Japanese cars disconnect the cigarette lighter socket when the ignition is off.
    That just means it's a bit more work. Ed and a a don't mind that. They like inconvenience.
    Don't know about aa. Ed got 30A direct link to the main battery, 24/7 on. Can't afford to turn on the 100W power relay with solar.
    why not to call Elon directly ?

    He lives on Twitter with his delusional day dreaming ideas.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ed Lee@21:1/5 to a a on Tue Aug 2 07:05:39 2022
    On Tuesday, August 2, 2022 at 3:18:37 AM UTC-7, a a wrote:
    On Tuesday, 2 August 2022 at 03:37:56 UTC+2, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Monday, August 1, 2022 at 6:21:48 PM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Monday, August 1, 2022 at 8:58:02 PM UTC-4, ke...@kjwdesigns.com wrote:
    On Monday, 1 August 2022 at 13:57:29 UTC-7, a a wrote:
    ...

    In standard cars you can charge car battery from solar panel via cigarette lighter socket

    Many (most?) Japanese cars disconnect the cigarette lighter socket when the ignition is off.
    That just means it's a bit more work. Ed and a a don't mind that. They like inconvenience.
    Don't know about aa. Ed got 30A direct link to the main battery, 24/7 on. Can't afford to turn on the 100W power relay with solar.
    why not to call Elon directly ?

    It's too simple to ask. Just tap into the traction battery directly with 400V 30A cable. If you are only doing solar, 5A o 10A should be enough. I have a 48V to 220V inverter, which can rectify into 374V DC. It should be able to keep the battery from
    dropping below 60%.

    However, if you have some kind of buffering battery (i got 8kwhr), you still need to balance the cells to avoid any of them from OV (4.3V).

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)