• Bad Chargers

    From Ed Lee@21:1/5 to All on Wed Jul 13 15:44:18 2022
    Recently, i met a Bolt driver with exactly this problem, while the other charger at the same site won't work at all. At another site, a Ioniq driver was waiting for AAA because both chargers won't work for him.

    CDM was working fine for me in both cases. So, good for me for now.

    If CCS is the only option for cars, i'll go back to gas.

    "The representative told me to hold the charging handle up once it was connected to the car rather than let the weight of the cable pull it down. The CCS cable and handle are hefty old things, much larger than the more elegant Supercharger plug. I'm
    beginning to think it's too heavy, or maybe carmakers are not making their charge ports robust enough, because I think a lot of these communication errors come from the plug weighing down and one or more pins losing their connection."

    https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/07/electric-cars-are-doomed-if-fast-charger-reliability-doesnt-get-better/

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ricky@21:1/5 to Ed Lee on Wed Jul 13 23:57:37 2022
    On Wednesday, July 13, 2022 at 6:44:22 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    Recently, i met a Bolt driver with exactly this problem, while the other charger at the same site won't work at all. At another site, a Ioniq driver was waiting for AAA because both chargers won't work for him.

    CDM was working fine for me in both cases. So, good for me for now.

    If CCS is the only option for cars, i'll go back to gas.

    "The representative told me to hold the charging handle up once it was connected to the car rather than let the weight of the cable pull it down. The CCS cable and handle are hefty old things, much larger than the more elegant Supercharger plug. I'm
    beginning to think it's too heavy, or maybe carmakers are not making their charge ports robust enough, because I think a lot of these communication errors come from the plug weighing down and one or more pins losing their connection."

    https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/07/electric-cars-are-doomed-if-fast-charger-reliability-doesnt-get-better/

    Glad I drive a Tesla.

    --

    Rick C.

    - Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
    - Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From bitrex@21:1/5 to Ricky on Thu Jul 14 09:12:21 2022
    On 7/14/2022 2:57 AM, Ricky wrote:
    On Wednesday, July 13, 2022 at 6:44:22 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    Recently, i met a Bolt driver with exactly this problem, while the other charger at the same site won't work at all. At another site, a Ioniq driver was waiting for AAA because both chargers won't work for him.

    CDM was working fine for me in both cases. So, good for me for now.

    If CCS is the only option for cars, i'll go back to gas.

    "The representative told me to hold the charging handle up once it was connected to the car rather than let the weight of the cable pull it down. The CCS cable and handle are hefty old things, much larger than the more elegant Supercharger plug. I'm
    beginning to think it's too heavy, or maybe carmakers are not making their charge ports robust enough, because I think a lot of these communication errors come from the plug weighing down and one or more pins losing their connection."

    https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/07/electric-cars-are-doomed-if-fast-charger-reliability-doesnt-get-better/

    Glad I drive a Tesla.


    Everyone around here charges at home, half the non-Tesla public chargers
    are broken because nobody besides weirdos like Ed Lee uses them anyway.
    But there's no shortage of EVs operating day in day out just fine.

    "But it's impossible to divorce oneself from the cultural context of the
    car, now tightly bound to the American sense of identity following
    decades of post-war construction that reshaped our built environment to prioritize the individual driver against all others. A car means freedom—being able to travel from coast to coast on a whim"

    You know when the author starts blathering on about the car's "cultural context" they don't have very much real. Just rent a gas car if you go
    driving around on long trips through some shithole state that never had
    very good infrastructure of any type to begin with, damn.

    But the boomers and boomers-at-heart will still be complaining about
    their precious road trips to the end of their days, who cares.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From bitrex@21:1/5 to bitrex on Thu Jul 14 09:19:27 2022
    On 7/14/2022 9:12 AM, bitrex wrote:
    On 7/14/2022 2:57 AM, Ricky wrote:
    On Wednesday, July 13, 2022 at 6:44:22 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    Recently, i met a Bolt driver with exactly this problem, while the
    other charger at the same site won't work at all. At another site, a
    Ioniq driver was waiting for AAA because both chargers won't work for
    him.

    CDM was working fine for me in both cases. So, good for me for now.

    If CCS is the only option for cars, i'll go back to gas.

    "The representative told me to hold the charging handle up once it
    was connected to the car rather than let the weight of the cable pull
    it down. The CCS cable and handle are hefty old things, much larger
    than the more elegant Supercharger plug. I'm beginning to think it's
    too heavy, or maybe carmakers are not making their charge ports
    robust enough, because I think a lot of these communication errors
    come from the plug weighing down and one or more pins losing their
    connection."

    https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/07/electric-cars-are-doomed-if-fast-charger-reliability-doesnt-get-better/


    Glad I drive a Tesla.


    Everyone around here charges at home, half the non-Tesla public chargers
    are broken because nobody besides weirdos like Ed Lee uses them anyway.
    But there's no shortage of EVs operating day in day out just fine.

    "But it's impossible to divorce oneself from the cultural context of the
    car, now tightly bound to the American sense of identity following
    decades of post-war construction that reshaped our built environment to prioritize the individual driver against all others. A car means freedom—being able to travel from coast to coast on a whim"

    Incidentally spending a huge lot of government money to put charging
    stations on every corner just to appease some historical American automobile-freedom cult is a huge waste of money, too.

    Stop subsidizing the petroleum industry and they'll sell just fine
    divorced from "cultural context" or not.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com@21:1/5 to bitrex on Thu Jul 14 07:40:57 2022
    On Thu, 14 Jul 2022 09:12:21 -0400, bitrex <user@example.net> wrote:

    On 7/14/2022 2:57 AM, Ricky wrote:
    On Wednesday, July 13, 2022 at 6:44:22 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    Recently, i met a Bolt driver with exactly this problem, while the other charger at the same site won't work at all. At another site, a Ioniq driver was waiting for AAA because both chargers won't work for him.

    CDM was working fine for me in both cases. So, good for me for now.

    If CCS is the only option for cars, i'll go back to gas.

    "The representative told me to hold the charging handle up once it was connected to the car rather than let the weight of the cable pull it down. The CCS cable and handle are hefty old things, much larger than the more elegant Supercharger plug. I'm
    beginning to think it's too heavy, or maybe carmakers are not making their charge ports robust enough, because I think a lot of these communication errors come from the plug weighing down and one or more pins losing their connection."

    https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/07/electric-cars-are-doomed-if-fast-charger-reliability-doesnt-get-better/

    Glad I drive a Tesla.


    Everyone around here charges at home, half the non-Tesla public chargers
    are broken because nobody besides weirdos like Ed Lee uses them anyway.
    But there's no shortage of EVs operating day in day out just fine.

    "But it's impossible to divorce oneself from the cultural context of the
    car, now tightly bound to the American sense of identity following
    decades of post-war construction that reshaped our built environment to >prioritize the individual driver against all others. A car means >freedombeing able to travel from coast to coast on a whim"

    You know when the author starts blathering on about the car's "cultural >context" they don't have very much real. Just rent a gas car if you go >driving around on long trips through some shithole state that never had
    very good infrastructure of any type to begin with, damn.

    Wyoming? Colorado? Horrible places. They had no public transit "to
    begin with, damn." I blame the natives.


    But the boomers and boomers-at-heart will still be complaining about
    their precious road trips to the end of their days, who cares.



    Not many people drive coast to coast on a whim. Or ever.

    Renting for vacation trips is annoying but practical, but hopping to
    work or Safeway or the dentist usually isn't. San Francisco has lots
    of public transit. I can drive to work in 8 minutes or use transit
    that takes about an hour and involves hiking two hills in the cold
    rain.

    One function of cars (and electricity, and running water) is to save
    peoples' time, so they are both more productive and have leisure to
    enjoy life.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ricky@21:1/5 to jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com on Thu Jul 14 09:43:46 2022
    On Thursday, July 14, 2022 at 10:41:06 AM UTC-4, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Thu, 14 Jul 2022 09:12:21 -0400, bitrex <us...@example.net> wrote:

    On 7/14/2022 2:57 AM, Ricky wrote:
    On Wednesday, July 13, 2022 at 6:44:22 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    Recently, i met a Bolt driver with exactly this problem, while the other charger at the same site won't work at all. At another site, a Ioniq driver was waiting for AAA because both chargers won't work for him.

    CDM was working fine for me in both cases. So, good for me for now.

    If CCS is the only option for cars, i'll go back to gas.

    "The representative told me to hold the charging handle up once it was connected to the car rather than let the weight of the cable pull it down. The CCS cable and handle are hefty old things, much larger than the more elegant Supercharger plug. I'
    m beginning to think it's too heavy, or maybe carmakers are not making their charge ports robust enough, because I think a lot of these communication errors come from the plug weighing down and one or more pins losing their connection."

    https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/07/electric-cars-are-doomed-if-fast-charger-reliability-doesnt-get-better/

    Glad I drive a Tesla.


    Everyone around here charges at home, half the non-Tesla public chargers >are broken because nobody besides weirdos like Ed Lee uses them anyway. >But there's no shortage of EVs operating day in day out just fine.

    "But it's impossible to divorce oneself from the cultural context of the >car, now tightly bound to the American sense of identity following
    decades of post-war construction that reshaped our built environment to >prioritize the individual driver against all others. A car means >freedom—being able to travel from coast to coast on a whim"

    You know when the author starts blathering on about the car's "cultural >context" they don't have very much real. Just rent a gas car if you go >driving around on long trips through some shithole state that never had >very good infrastructure of any type to begin with, damn.
    Wyoming? Colorado? Horrible places. They had no public transit "to
    begin with, damn." I blame the natives.

    But the boomers and boomers-at-heart will still be complaining about
    their precious road trips to the end of their days, who cares.


    Not many people drive coast to coast on a whim. Or ever.

    Renting for vacation trips is annoying but practical, but hopping to
    work or Safeway or the dentist usually isn't. San Francisco has lots
    of public transit. I can drive to work in 8 minutes or use transit
    that takes about an hour and involves hiking two hills in the cold
    rain.

    One function of cars (and electricity, and running water) is to save peoples' time, so they are both more productive and have leisure to
    enjoy life.

    The quickest way to your destination might be to jump from the airplane. It saves time compared to letting it land first. Not recommended because of the side effects. Same with driving petroleum powered smog makers.

    --

    Rick C.

    + Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
    + Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ed Lee@21:1/5 to bitrex on Thu Jul 14 09:46:21 2022
    On Thursday, July 14, 2022 at 6:19:35 AM UTC-7, bitrex wrote:
    On 7/14/2022 9:12 AM, bitrex wrote:
    On 7/14/2022 2:57 AM, Ricky wrote:
    On Wednesday, July 13, 2022 at 6:44:22 PM UTC-4, Ed Lee wrote:
    Recently, i met a Bolt driver with exactly this problem, while the
    other charger at the same site won't work at all. At another site, a
    Ioniq driver was waiting for AAA because both chargers won't work for >>> him.

    CDM was working fine for me in both cases. So, good for me for now.

    If CCS is the only option for cars, i'll go back to gas.

    "The representative told me to hold the charging handle up once it
    was connected to the car rather than let the weight of the cable pull >>> it down. The CCS cable and handle are hefty old things, much larger
    than the more elegant Supercharger plug. I'm beginning to think it's
    too heavy, or maybe carmakers are not making their charge ports
    robust enough, because I think a lot of these communication errors
    come from the plug weighing down and one or more pins losing their
    connection."

    https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/07/electric-cars-are-doomed-if-fast-charger-reliability-doesnt-get-better/


    Glad I drive a Tesla.


    Everyone around here charges at home, half the non-Tesla public chargers are broken because nobody besides weirdos like Ed Lee uses them anyway. But there's no shortage of EVs operating day in day out just fine.

    "But it's impossible to divorce oneself from the cultural context of the car, now tightly bound to the American sense of identity following
    decades of post-war construction that reshaped our built environment to prioritize the individual driver against all others. A car means freedom—being able to travel from coast to coast on a whim"
    Incidentally spending a huge lot of government money to put charging stations on every corner just to appease some historical American automobile-freedom cult is a huge waste of money, too.

    Stop subsidizing the petroleum industry and they'll sell just fine
    divorced from "cultural context" or not.

    Whether they should spend all these money on connectors is a different story. But if they do spend the money, spend it on good connectors, not on CCS shit.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From whit3rd@21:1/5 to jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com on Thu Jul 14 11:50:18 2022
    On Thursday, July 14, 2022 at 7:41:06 AM UTC-7, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:

    Renting for vacation trips is annoying but practical, but hopping to
    work or Safeway or the dentist usually isn't. San Francisco has lots
    of public transit. I can drive to work in 8 minutes or use transit
    that takes about an hour and involves hiking two hills in the cold
    rain.

    One function of cars (and electricity, and running water) is to save
    peoples' time, so they are both more productive and have leisure to
    enjoy life.

    Yeah, but it's a malfunction in some places (like downtown, where 40% of
    the cars on the road have already got to their destination, but haven't found
    a place to park).

    Transit solves the parking problem, AND the fuel problem, AND the
    maintenance problem, and covers insurance and license fees, and drivers' license, and... hiking a couple of hills in the cold rain is good exercise. Get
    a good Irish wool hat.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Larkin@21:1/5 to All on Thu Jul 14 17:55:51 2022
    On Thu, 14 Jul 2022 11:50:18 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Thursday, July 14, 2022 at 7:41:06 AM UTC-7, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:

    Renting for vacation trips is annoying but practical, but hopping to
    work or Safeway or the dentist usually isn't. San Francisco has lots
    of public transit. I can drive to work in 8 minutes or use transit
    that takes about an hour and involves hiking two hills in the cold
    rain.

    One function of cars (and electricity, and running water) is to save
    peoples' time, so they are both more productive and have leisure to
    enjoy life.

    Yeah, but it's a malfunction in some places (like downtown, where 40% of
    the cars on the road have already got to their destination, but haven't found >a place to park).

    It's peoples' choice where they want to live. I know people who like a high-rise apartment in a very dense city core and don't own a car. I
    like less civilization so a car suits me.

    I can always park at home and at work and at the cabin. By choice.


    Transit solves the parking problem, AND the fuel problem, AND the
    maintenance problem, and covers insurance and license fees, and drivers' >license, and... hiking a couple of hills in the cold rain is good exercise. Get
    a good Irish wool hat.

    I have a good hat but I don't want to waste 2 hours a day on a slow,
    smelly bus and BART car. I do park uphill from work - when I feel like
    it - precisely for the exercize.

    Do you own a car?

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From whit3rd@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Thu Jul 14 21:42:07 2022
    On Thursday, July 14, 2022 at 5:56:02 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:
    On Thu, 14 Jul 2022 11:50:18 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whi...@gmail.com>
    wrote:

    Transit solves the parking problem, AND the fuel problem, AND the >maintenance problem, and covers insurance and license fees, and drivers' >license, and... hiking a couple of hills in the cold rain is good exercise. Get
    a good Irish wool hat.

    I have a good hat but I don't want to waste 2 hours a day on a slow,
    smelly bus and BART car.

    It isn't waste if you take a book. Since such time isn't wasted, the 'slow' attribute doesn't signify.
    When all three of bicycle, transit, and auto are available, I'll choose... whatever seems most pleasant. I've tried walking, but usually that's inconvenient, as is a rowboat.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ricky@21:1/5 to All on Thu Jul 14 22:48:33 2022
    On Friday, July 15, 2022 at 12:42:10 AM UTC-4, whit3rd wrote:
    On Thursday, July 14, 2022 at 5:56:02 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:
    On Thu, 14 Jul 2022 11:50:18 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whi...@gmail.com>
    wrote:

    Transit solves the parking problem, AND the fuel problem, AND the >maintenance problem, and covers insurance and license fees, and drivers' >license, and... hiking a couple of hills in the cold rain is good exercise. Get
    a good Irish wool hat.

    I have a good hat but I don't want to waste 2 hours a day on a slow,
    smelly bus and BART car.
    It isn't waste if you take a book. Since such time isn't wasted, the 'slow' attribute doesn't signify.
    When all three of bicycle, transit, and auto are available, I'll choose... whatever seems most pleasant. I've tried walking, but usually that's inconvenient, as is a rowboat.

    Contrast spending hours each week reading books while commuting with charging a BEV at home each night or spending the odd half hour charging on trips.

    My morning commute is about 15 minutes, and most of that is spent in the bathroom.

    --

    Rick C.

    -- Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
    -- Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com@21:1/5 to All on Fri Jul 15 06:27:17 2022
    On Thu, 14 Jul 2022 21:42:07 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Thursday, July 14, 2022 at 5:56:02 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:
    On Thu, 14 Jul 2022 11:50:18 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whi...@gmail.com>
    wrote:

    Transit solves the parking problem, AND the fuel problem, AND the
    maintenance problem, and covers insurance and license fees, and drivers'
    license, and... hiking a couple of hills in the cold rain is good exercise. Get
    a good Irish wool hat.

    I have a good hat but I don't want to waste 2 hours a day on a slow,
    smelly bus and BART car.

    It isn't waste if you take a book. Since such time isn't wasted, the 'slow' >attribute doesn't signify.

    I can't read, or design electronics, while I'm hiking or walking or
    bicycling or standing on a BART platform or hiking a hill. Some forms
    of transit, like Lyft, are door-to-door. Public transit isn't.

    Public transport is inefficient of peoples' time.

    When all three of bicycle, transit, and auto are available, I'll choose... >whatever seems most pleasant. I've tried walking, but usually that's >inconvenient, as is a rowboat.

    Do you own a car?

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From bitrex@21:1/5 to jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com on Fri Jul 15 11:00:28 2022
    On 7/15/2022 9:27 AM, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Thu, 14 Jul 2022 21:42:07 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Thursday, July 14, 2022 at 5:56:02 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:
    On Thu, 14 Jul 2022 11:50:18 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whi...@gmail.com>
    wrote:

    Transit solves the parking problem, AND the fuel problem, AND the
    maintenance problem, and covers insurance and license fees, and drivers' >>>> license, and... hiking a couple of hills in the cold rain is good exercise. Get
    a good Irish wool hat.

    I have a good hat but I don't want to waste 2 hours a day on a slow,
    smelly bus and BART car.

    It isn't waste if you take a book. Since such time isn't wasted, the 'slow'
    attribute doesn't signify.

    I can't read, or design electronics, while I'm hiking or walking or
    bicycling or standing on a BART platform or hiking a hill. Some forms
    of transit, like Lyft, are door-to-door. Public transit isn't.

    Public transport is inefficient of peoples' time.

    Commuting by car from the Boston suburbs to Providence RI or vice versa
    is only hands-down time-efficient if you do it on weekend mornings or 2
    AM on a weekday, say. At other times it can _sometimes_ be comparably
    time efficient to commuter rail to drive it, but driving it is rarely
    the most sanity-efficient choice then.

    Congestion-clogged roads are fatiguing to deal with even if the traffic
    is moving along at the speed limit; after the better part of an hour of
    that at age 43 I mostly tend to want to take a nap, not meet with
    clients or do much work.

    But someone's got to take on the mental responsibility of not causing a
    deadly crash today, as many US drivers (well, Massachusetts and Rhode
    Island drivers, anyway) seem to coast on thoughts and prayers and don't
    care too much if they or anyone else get where they're going alive.


    When all three of bicycle, transit, and auto are available, I'll choose... >> whatever seems most pleasant. I've tried walking, but usually that's
    inconvenient, as is a rowboat.

    Now that I'm a "man of means" I sometimes skip both the commuter rail
    and and car and take Amtrak to Rhode Island, 50 miles in 19 minutes at a
    top speed of 150 mph and a cost of about 60 cents a mile IMO sometimes
    isn't a bad value from my personal "what is my time worth"-perspective
    these days.

    Do you own a car?


    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From bitrex@21:1/5 to bitrex on Fri Jul 15 11:05:19 2022
    On 7/15/2022 11:00 AM, bitrex wrote:
    On 7/15/2022 9:27 AM, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Thu, 14 Jul 2022 21:42:07 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Thursday, July 14, 2022 at 5:56:02 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:
    On Thu, 14 Jul 2022 11:50:18 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whi...@gmail.com>
    wrote:

    Transit solves the parking problem, AND the fuel problem, AND the
    maintenance problem, and covers insurance and license fees, and
    drivers'
    license, and... hiking a couple of hills in the cold rain is good
    exercise. Get
    a good Irish wool hat.

    I have a good hat but I don't want to waste 2 hours a day on a slow,
    smelly bus and BART car.

    It isn't waste if you take a book.   Since such time isn't wasted,
    the 'slow'
    attribute doesn't signify.

    I can't read, or design electronics, while I'm hiking or walking or
    bicycling or standing on a BART platform or hiking a hill. Some forms
    of transit, like Lyft, are door-to-door. Public transit isn't.

    Public transport is inefficient of peoples' time.

    Commuting by car from the Boston suburbs to Providence RI or vice versa
    is only hands-down time-efficient if you do it on weekend mornings or 2
    AM on a weekday, say. At other times it can _sometimes_ be comparably
    time efficient to commuter rail to drive it, but driving it is rarely
    the most sanity-efficient choice then.

    Congestion-clogged roads are fatiguing to deal with even if the traffic
    is moving along at the speed limit; after the better part of an hour of
    that at age 43 I mostly tend to want to take a nap, not meet with
    clients or do much work.

    But someone's got to take on the mental responsibility of not causing a deadly crash today, as many US drivers (well, Massachusetts and Rhode
    Island drivers, anyway) seem to coast on thoughts and prayers and don't
    care too much if they or anyone else get where they're going alive.


    When all three of bicycle, transit, and auto are available, I'll
    choose...
    whatever seems most pleasant.  I've tried walking, but usually that's
    inconvenient, as is a rowboat.

    Now that I'm a "man of means" I sometimes skip both the commuter rail
    and and car and take Amtrak to Rhode Island, 50 miles in 19 minutes

    30 miles in 19 minutes, rather, this isn't Japan.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com@21:1/5 to bitrex on Fri Jul 15 08:14:17 2022
    On Fri, 15 Jul 2022 11:05:19 -0400, bitrex <user@example.net> wrote:

    On 7/15/2022 11:00 AM, bitrex wrote:
    On 7/15/2022 9:27 AM, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Thu, 14 Jul 2022 21:42:07 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Thursday, July 14, 2022 at 5:56:02 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:
    On Thu, 14 Jul 2022 11:50:18 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whi...@gmail.com> >>>>> wrote:

    Transit solves the parking problem, AND the fuel problem, AND the
    maintenance problem, and covers insurance and license fees, and
    drivers'
    license, and... hiking a couple of hills in the cold rain is good
    exercise. Get
    a good Irish wool hat.

    I have a good hat but I don't want to waste 2 hours a day on a slow, >>>>> smelly bus and BART car.

    It isn't waste if you take a book. Since such time isn't wasted,
    the 'slow'
    attribute doesn't signify.

    I can't read, or design electronics, while I'm hiking or walking or
    bicycling or standing on a BART platform or hiking a hill. Some forms
    of transit, like Lyft, are door-to-door. Public transit isn't.

    Public transport is inefficient of peoples' time.

    Commuting by car from the Boston suburbs to Providence RI or vice versa
    is only hands-down time-efficient if you do it on weekend mornings or 2
    AM on a weekday, say. At other times it can _sometimes_ be comparably
    time efficient to commuter rail to drive it, but driving it is rarely
    the most sanity-efficient choice then.

    Congestion-clogged roads are fatiguing to deal with even if the traffic
    is moving along at the speed limit; after the better part of an hour of
    that at age 43 I mostly tend to want to take a nap, not meet with
    clients or do much work.

    But someone's got to take on the mental responsibility of not causing a
    deadly crash today, as many US drivers (well, Massachusetts and Rhode
    Island drivers, anyway) seem to coast on thoughts and prayers and don't
    care too much if they or anyone else get where they're going alive.


    When all three of bicycle, transit, and auto are available, I'll
    choose...
    whatever seems most pleasant. I've tried walking, but usually that's
    inconvenient, as is a rowboat.

    Now that I'm a "man of means" I sometimes skip both the commuter rail
    and and car and take Amtrak to Rhode Island, 50 miles in 19 minutes

    30 miles in 19 minutes, rather, this isn't Japan.

    Ever ride the bullet train? It's super clean and super quiet... you
    don't even feel it accelerate or brake. People with carts of tea and
    sushi enter a car, bow, offer their stuff, bow again, and move on.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From bitrex@21:1/5 to jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com on Fri Jul 15 11:37:35 2022
    On 7/15/2022 11:14 AM, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Fri, 15 Jul 2022 11:05:19 -0400, bitrex <user@example.net> wrote:

    On 7/15/2022 11:00 AM, bitrex wrote:
    On 7/15/2022 9:27 AM, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Thu, 14 Jul 2022 21:42:07 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Thursday, July 14, 2022 at 5:56:02 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:
    On Thu, 14 Jul 2022 11:50:18 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whi...@gmail.com> >>>>>> wrote:

    Transit solves the parking problem, AND the fuel problem, AND the >>>>>>> maintenance problem, and covers insurance and license fees, and
    drivers'
    license, and... hiking a couple of hills in the cold rain is good >>>>>>> exercise. Get
    a good Irish wool hat.

    I have a good hat but I don't want to waste 2 hours a day on a slow, >>>>>> smelly bus and BART car.

    It isn't waste if you take a book.   Since such time isn't wasted, >>>>> the 'slow'
    attribute doesn't signify.

    I can't read, or design electronics, while I'm hiking or walking or
    bicycling or standing on a BART platform or hiking a hill. Some forms
    of transit, like Lyft, are door-to-door. Public transit isn't.

    Public transport is inefficient of peoples' time.

    Commuting by car from the Boston suburbs to Providence RI or vice versa
    is only hands-down time-efficient if you do it on weekend mornings or 2
    AM on a weekday, say. At other times it can _sometimes_ be comparably
    time efficient to commuter rail to drive it, but driving it is rarely
    the most sanity-efficient choice then.

    Congestion-clogged roads are fatiguing to deal with even if the traffic
    is moving along at the speed limit; after the better part of an hour of
    that at age 43 I mostly tend to want to take a nap, not meet with
    clients or do much work.

    But someone's got to take on the mental responsibility of not causing a
    deadly crash today, as many US drivers (well, Massachusetts and Rhode
    Island drivers, anyway) seem to coast on thoughts and prayers and don't
    care too much if they or anyone else get where they're going alive.


    When all three of bicycle, transit, and auto are available, I'll
    choose...
    whatever seems most pleasant.  I've tried walking, but usually that's >>>>> inconvenient, as is a rowboat.

    Now that I'm a "man of means" I sometimes skip both the commuter rail
    and and car and take Amtrak to Rhode Island, 50 miles in 19 minutes

    30 miles in 19 minutes, rather, this isn't Japan.

    Ever ride the bullet train? It's super clean and super quiet... you
    don't even feel it accelerate or brake. People with carts of tea and
    sushi enter a car, bow, offer their stuff, bow again, and move on.


    Never had the pleasure of visiting Japan, maybe someday.

    Doing 150 over the 100+ year old right-of-way in the Northeast is
    definitely a different experience than on a laser-straight route. The
    tilting action of the Acela keeps your sense of the gravity vector
    generally pointed in the normal direction at 150 mph, but it's pretty aggressive at that speed and you can feel the train clunking from
    side-to-side like a ship on the water, I think I'd get seasick if I had
    to endure that for much longer than the 15 minutes or so its speed tops out.

    But the trainsets were the better part of 20 years old when I first rode
    them, they're being replaced now so I'll see how the new ones are.

    The old Amfleet coaches from the 80s will do a bit over 100 over on the
    same route, and they do push them that hard, but after going on 30-40
    years of refurbs if you ride near the front of a coach you can tell
    they're not really happy about it.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Phil Hobbs@21:1/5 to bitrex on Fri Jul 15 14:53:24 2022
    bitrex wrote:
    On 7/15/2022 11:14 AM, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Fri, 15 Jul 2022 11:05:19 -0400, bitrex <user@example.net> wrote:

    On 7/15/2022 11:00 AM, bitrex wrote:
    On 7/15/2022 9:27 AM, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Thu, 14 Jul 2022 21:42:07 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com> >>>>> wrote:

    On Thursday, July 14, 2022 at 5:56:02 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote: >>>>>>> On Thu, 14 Jul 2022 11:50:18 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whi...@gmail.com> >>>>>>> wrote:

    Transit solves the parking problem, AND the fuel problem, AND the >>>>>>>> maintenance problem, and covers insurance and license fees, and >>>>>>>> drivers'
    license, and... hiking a couple of hills in the cold rain is good >>>>>>>> exercise. Get
    a good Irish wool hat.

    I have a good hat but I don't want to waste 2 hours a day on a slow, >>>>>>> smelly bus and BART car.

    It isn't waste if you take a book.   Since such time isn't wasted, >>>>>> the 'slow'
    attribute doesn't signify.

    I can't read, or design electronics, while I'm hiking or walking or
    bicycling or standing on a BART platform or hiking a hill. Some forms >>>>> of transit, like Lyft, are door-to-door. Public transit isn't.

    Public transport is inefficient of peoples' time.

    Commuting by car from the Boston suburbs to Providence RI or vice versa >>>> is only hands-down time-efficient if you do it on weekend mornings or 2 >>>> AM on a weekday, say. At other times it can _sometimes_ be comparably
    time efficient to commuter rail to drive it, but driving it is rarely
    the most sanity-efficient choice then.

    Congestion-clogged roads are fatiguing to deal with even if the traffic >>>> is moving along at the speed limit; after the better part of an hour of >>>> that at age 43 I mostly tend to want to take a nap, not meet with
    clients or do much work.

    But someone's got to take on the mental responsibility of not causing a >>>> deadly crash today, as many US drivers (well, Massachusetts and Rhode
    Island drivers, anyway) seem to coast on thoughts and prayers and don't >>>> care too much if they or anyone else get where they're going alive.


    When all three of bicycle, transit, and auto are available, I'll
    choose...
    whatever seems most pleasant.  I've tried walking, but usually that's >>>>>> inconvenient, as is a rowboat.

    Now that I'm a "man of means" I sometimes skip both the commuter rail
    and and car and take Amtrak to Rhode Island, 50 miles in 19 minutes

    30 miles in 19 minutes, rather, this isn't Japan.

    Ever ride the bullet train? It's super clean and super quiet... you
    don't even feel it accelerate or brake. People with carts of tea and
    sushi enter a car, bow, offer their stuff, bow again, and move on.


    Never had the pleasure of visiting Japan, maybe someday.

    Doing 150 over the 100+ year old right-of-way in the Northeast is
    definitely a different experience than on a laser-straight route. The
    tilting action of the Acela keeps your sense of the gravity vector
    generally pointed in the normal direction at 150 mph, but it's pretty aggressive at that speed and you can feel the train clunking from side-to-side like a ship on the water, I think I'd get seasick if I had
    to endure that for much longer than the 15 minutes or so its speed tops
    out.

    But the trainsets were the better part of 20 years old when I first rode them, they're being replaced now so I'll see how the new ones are.

    The old Amfleet coaches from the 80s will do a bit over 100 over on the
    same route, and they do push them that hard, but after going on 30-40
    years of refurbs if you ride near the front of a coach you can tell
    they're not really happy about it.

    The old Metroliner on the NE corridor, now _that_ was a train. They
    finally scrapped it in the late '90s sometime, but until then it was
    definitely the way to get from NYC to DC.

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs

    --
    Dr Philip C D Hobbs
    Principal Consultant
    ElectroOptical Innovations LLC / Hobbs ElectroOptics
    Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics
    Briarcliff Manor NY 10510

    http://electrooptical.net
    http://hobbs-eo.com

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Larkin@21:1/5 to bitrex on Fri Jul 15 13:01:04 2022
    On Fri, 15 Jul 2022 11:37:35 -0400, bitrex <user@example.net> wrote:

    On 7/15/2022 11:14 AM, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Fri, 15 Jul 2022 11:05:19 -0400, bitrex <user@example.net> wrote:

    On 7/15/2022 11:00 AM, bitrex wrote:
    On 7/15/2022 9:27 AM, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Thu, 14 Jul 2022 21:42:07 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com> >>>>> wrote:

    On Thursday, July 14, 2022 at 5:56:02 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote: >>>>>>> On Thu, 14 Jul 2022 11:50:18 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whi...@gmail.com> >>>>>>> wrote:

    Transit solves the parking problem, AND the fuel problem, AND the >>>>>>>> maintenance problem, and covers insurance and license fees, and >>>>>>>> drivers'
    license, and... hiking a couple of hills in the cold rain is good >>>>>>>> exercise. Get
    a good Irish wool hat.

    I have a good hat but I don't want to waste 2 hours a day on a slow, >>>>>>> smelly bus and BART car.

    It isn't waste if you take a book. Since such time isn't wasted, >>>>>> the 'slow'
    attribute doesn't signify.

    I can't read, or design electronics, while I'm hiking or walking or
    bicycling or standing on a BART platform or hiking a hill. Some forms >>>>> of transit, like Lyft, are door-to-door. Public transit isn't.

    Public transport is inefficient of peoples' time.

    Commuting by car from the Boston suburbs to Providence RI or vice versa >>>> is only hands-down time-efficient if you do it on weekend mornings or 2 >>>> AM on a weekday, say. At other times it can _sometimes_ be comparably
    time efficient to commuter rail to drive it, but driving it is rarely
    the most sanity-efficient choice then.

    Congestion-clogged roads are fatiguing to deal with even if the traffic >>>> is moving along at the speed limit; after the better part of an hour of >>>> that at age 43 I mostly tend to want to take a nap, not meet with
    clients or do much work.

    But someone's got to take on the mental responsibility of not causing a >>>> deadly crash today, as many US drivers (well, Massachusetts and Rhode
    Island drivers, anyway) seem to coast on thoughts and prayers and don't >>>> care too much if they or anyone else get where they're going alive.


    When all three of bicycle, transit, and auto are available, I'll
    choose...
    whatever seems most pleasant. I've tried walking, but usually that's >>>>>> inconvenient, as is a rowboat.

    Now that I'm a "man of means" I sometimes skip both the commuter rail
    and and car and take Amtrak to Rhode Island, 50 miles in 19 minutes

    30 miles in 19 minutes, rather, this isn't Japan.

    Ever ride the bullet train? It's super clean and super quiet... you
    don't even feel it accelerate or brake. People with carts of tea and
    sushi enter a car, bow, offer their stuff, bow again, and move on.


    Never had the pleasure of visiting Japan, maybe someday.

    We visited the Hamamatsu factory, where they make PMTs and streak
    tubes and such. We were there to sell to them, but they paid for our
    hotel, took us touring, paid for every meal. They loved to take us to
    dinner because "we can't afford this ourselves." Imagine unagi, bbq
    eel, the size of beefsteaks.

    The production looked like a factory in Hell, gas flames shooting up
    from most every workbench.

    The train ride from Ngoya was beautiful, all green along the coast.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)