• Odd camera installation weight requirement

    From Don Y@21:1/5 to All on Thu Jun 30 14:33:37 2022
    I'm installing a PTZ camera on a ceiling. The unit weighs
    a bit less than a kg.

    The documentation claims:

    When installing the unit in a high location, be sure
    that the location and installation components (excluding
    the supplied accessories) are strong enough to withstand
    at least 60 kg of weight, and install the unit securely.
    If the components are not strong enough, the unit may fall
    and cause serious injury.

    I can't see from where the *60* kg requirement derives.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From a a@21:1/5 to Don Y on Thu Jun 30 15:14:55 2022
    On Thursday, 30 June 2022 at 23:34:02 UTC+2, Don Y wrote:
    I'm installing a PTZ camera on a ceiling. The unit weighs
    a bit less than a kg.

    The documentation claims:

    When installing the unit in a high location, be sure
    that the location and installation components (excluding
    the supplied accessories) are strong enough to withstand
    at least 60 kg of weight, and install the unit securely.
    If the components are not strong enough, the unit may fall
    and cause serious injury.

    I can't see from where the *60* kg requirement derives.
    don't waste our time
    contact manufacturer, seller directly with your questions

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com@21:1/5 to blockedofcourse@foo.invalid on Thu Jun 30 18:30:50 2022
    On Thu, 30 Jun 2022 14:33:37 -0700, Don Y
    <blockedofcourse@foo.invalid> wrote:

    I'm installing a PTZ camera on a ceiling. The unit weighs
    a bit less than a kg.

    The documentation claims:

    When installing the unit in a high location, be sure
    that the location and installation components (excluding
    the supplied accessories) are strong enough to withstand
    at least 60 kg of weight, and install the unit securely.
    If the components are not strong enough, the unit may fall
    and cause serious injury.

    I can't see from where the *60* kg requirement derives.

    That's in case the kids decide to swing from it.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Edward Hernandez@21:1/5 to All on Fri Jul 1 02:26:44 2022
    XPost: free.spam

    In message-id <t6nt3e$7bp$3@dont-email.me> (http://al.howardknight.net/?ID=165357273000) posted Thu, 26 May 2022
    12:50:54 -0000 (UTC) John Dope stated:

    Always Wrong, the utterly foulmouthed group idiot, adding absolutely
    NOTHING but insults to this thread, as usual...

    Yet, since Wed, 5 Jan 2022 04:10:38 -0000 (UTC) John Dope's post ratio
    to USENET (**) has been 66.8% of its posts contributing "nothing except insults" to USENET.

    ** Since Wed, 5 Jan 2022 04:10:38 -0000 (UTC) John Dope has posted at
    least 2524 articles to USENET. Of which 176 have been pure insults and
    1511 have been John Dope "troll format" postings.

    The Troll Doe stated the following in message-id
    <sdhn7c$pkp$4@dont-email.me>:

    The troll doesn't even know how to format a USENET post...

    And the Troll Doe stated the following in message-id <sg3kr7$qt5$1@dont-email.me>:

    The reason Bozo cannot figure out how to get Google to keep from
    breaking its lines in inappropriate places is because Bozo is
    CLUELESS...

    And yet, the clueless Troll Doe has continued to post incorrectly
    formatted USENET articles that are devoid of content (latest example on
    Fri, 01 Jul 2022 02:20:52 GMT in message-id <8SsvK.213631$pqD1.179717@usenetxs.com>).

    NOBODY likes the John Doe troll's contentless spam.

    This posting is a public service announcement for any google groups
    readers who happen by to point out that John Doe does not even follow
    the rules it uses to troll other posters.

    uLGWk5yWq2SW

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Doe@21:1/5 to Don Y on Fri Jul 1 02:20:52 2022
    XPost: free.spam

    Off-topic troll...

    --
    Don Y <blockedofcourse@foo.invalid> wrote:

    Path: not-for-mail
    From: Don Y <blockedofcourse@foo.invalid>
    Newsgroups: sci.electronics.design
    Subject: Odd camera installation weight requirement
    Date: Thu, 30 Jun 2022 14:33:37 -0700
    Organization: A noiseless patient Spider
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    I'm installing a PTZ camera on a ceiling. The unit weighs
    a bit less than a kg.

    The documentation claims:

    When installing the unit in a high location, be sure
    that the location and installation components (excluding
    the supplied accessories) are strong enough to withstand
    at least 60 kg of weight, and install the unit securely.
    If the components are not strong enough, the unit may fall
    and cause serious injury.

    I can't see from where the *60* kg requirement derives.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Sylvia Else@21:1/5 to Don Y on Fri Jul 1 13:46:42 2022
    On 01-July-22 7:33 am, Don Y wrote:
    I'm installing a PTZ camera on a ceiling.  The unit weighs
    a bit less than a kg.

    The documentation claims:

       When installing the unit in a high location, be sure
       that the location and installation components (excluding
       the supplied accessories) are strong enough to withstand
       at least 60 kg of weight, and install the unit securely.
       If the components are not strong enough, the unit may fall
       and cause serious injury.

    I can't see from where the *60* kg requirement derives.

    Perhaps they're just tired of dealing with the results of people being incapable of judging what's strong enough. While excessive for this
    purpose, 60kg is not difficult to achieve on most ceilings, and obviates
    the use of plastic hooks, string and sticky tape.

    Sylvia.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Edward Hernandez@21:1/5 to All on Fri Jul 1 05:36:27 2022
    XPost: free.spam, free.spam

    John Doe stated the following in message-id <svsh05$lbh$5@dont-email.me> (http://al.howardknight.net/?ID=164904625100) posted Fri, 4 Mar 2022
    08:01:09 -0000 (UTC):

    Compared to other regulars, Bozo contributes practically nothing
    except insults to this group.

    Yet, since Wed, 5 Jan 2022 04:10:38 -0000 (UTC) John Doe's post ratio to
    USENET (**) has been 67.1% of its posts contributing "nothing except
    insults" to USENET.

    ** Since Wed, 5 Jan 2022 04:10:38 -0000 (UTC) John Doe has posted at
    least 2542 articles to USENET. Of which 176 have been pure insults and
    1529 have been John Doe "troll format" postings.

    The John Doe troll stated the following in message-id <sdhn7c$pkp$4@dont-email.me>:

    The troll doesn't even know how to format a USENET post...

    And the John Doe troll stated the following in message-id <sg3kr7$qt5$1@dont-email.me>:

    The reason Bozo cannot figure out how to get Google to keep from
    breaking its lines in inappropriate places is because Bozo is
    CLUELESS...

    And yet, the clueless John Doe troll has itself posted yet another
    incorrectly formatted USENET posting on Fri, 1 Jul 2022 04:54:22 -0000
    (UTC) in message-id <t9lulu$266h3$13@dont-email.me>.

    This posting is a public service announcement for any google groups
    readers who happen by to point out that Troll Doe does not even follow
    the rules it uses to troll other posters.

    SQS2bwOVCy+W

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Don Y@21:1/5 to Sylvia Else on Fri Jul 1 01:20:05 2022
    On 6/30/2022 8:46 PM, Sylvia Else wrote:
    On 01-July-22 7:33 am, Don Y wrote:
    I'm installing a PTZ camera on a ceiling. The unit weighs
    a bit less than a kg.

    The documentation claims:

    When installing the unit in a high location, be sure
    that the location and installation components (excluding
    the supplied accessories) are strong enough to withstand
    at least 60 kg of weight, and install the unit securely.
    If the components are not strong enough, the unit may fall
    and cause serious injury.

    I can't see from where the *60* kg requirement derives.

    Perhaps they're just tired of dealing with the results of people being incapable of judging what's strong enough. While excessive for this purpose, 60kg is not difficult to achieve on most ceilings, and obviates the use of plastic hooks, string and sticky tape.

    I read that as worrying about failure of the *support*. "As if" the camera presented a 60Kg load (which it clearly doesn't) that could cause the supporting member to fail (or the attachment mechanism).

    My packaging engineer says "walls and ceilings are special". I'm
    guessing fear of the installed item coming crashing down, "unexpectedly",
    and injuring someone. But, he didn't elaborate -- teasing a steak dinner
    out of me to "discuss it". (his momma dint raise no fools!)

    In the time since, I've noticed other ekit items that have similarly "extreme" support requirements; one and two pound items requiring supports that can handle 50 pound loads. And, recall installing some (sealed, heavy) loudspeaker units that required a "safety cable" secured to a building member as extra protection against falling from their mount (earthquakes??).

    I guess that's why we have packaging engineers -- to be aware of all of
    these issues so we don't have to! (but, I will take the opportunity to
    discuss each of my designs with him lest there is something that might
    prove difficult to address, later.)

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From a a@21:1/5 to Don Y on Fri Jul 1 04:46:58 2022
    On Friday, 1 July 2022 at 10:20:31 UTC+2, Don Y wrote:
    On 6/30/2022 8:46 PM, Sylvia Else wrote:
    On 01-July-22 7:33 am, Don Y wrote:
    I'm installing a PTZ camera on a ceiling. The unit weighs
    a bit less than a kg.

    The documentation claims:

    When installing the unit in a high location, be sure
    that the location and installation components (excluding
    the supplied accessories) are strong enough to withstand
    at least 60 kg of weight, and install the unit securely.
    If the components are not strong enough, the unit may fall
    and cause serious injury.

    I can't see from where the *60* kg requirement derives.

    Perhaps they're just tired of dealing with the results of people being incapable of judging what's strong enough. While excessive for this purpose,
    60kg is not difficult to achieve on most ceilings, and obviates the use of plastic hooks, string and sticky tape.
    I read that as worrying about failure of the *support*. "As if" the camera presented a 60Kg load (which it clearly doesn't) that could cause the supporting member to fail (or the attachment mechanism).

    My packaging engineer says "walls and ceilings are special". I'm
    guessing fear of the installed item coming crashing down, "unexpectedly",
    and injuring someone. But, he didn't elaborate -- teasing a steak dinner
    out of me to "discuss it". (his momma dint raise no fools!)

    In the time since, I've noticed other ekit items that have similarly "extreme"
    support requirements; one and two pound items requiring supports that can handle 50 pound loads. And, recall installing some (sealed, heavy) loudspeaker
    units that required a "safety cable" secured to a building member as extra protection against falling from their mount (earthquakes??).

    I guess that's why we have packaging engineers -- to be aware of all of
    these issues so we don't have to! (but, I will take the opportunity to discuss each of my designs with him lest there is something that might
    prove difficult to address, later.)
    don't spam, call manufacturer or seller directly

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Don Y@21:1/5 to Don Y on Fri Jul 1 06:49:49 2022
    On 7/1/2022 1:20 AM, Don Y wrote:
    On 6/30/2022 8:46 PM, Sylvia Else wrote:
    On 01-July-22 7:33 am, Don Y wrote:
    I'm installing a PTZ camera on a ceiling. The unit weighs
    a bit less than a kg.

    The documentation claims:

    When installing the unit in a high location, be sure
    that the location and installation components (excluding
    the supplied accessories) are strong enough to withstand
    at least 60 kg of weight, and install the unit securely.
    If the components are not strong enough, the unit may fall
    and cause serious injury.

    I can't see from where the *60* kg requirement derives.

    Perhaps they're just tired of dealing with the results of people being
    incapable of judging what's strong enough. While excessive for this purpose, >> 60kg is not difficult to achieve on most ceilings, and obviates the use of >> plastic hooks, string and sticky tape.

    I read that as worrying about failure of the *support*. "As if" the camera presented a 60Kg load (which it clearly doesn't) that could cause the supporting member to fail (or the attachment mechanism).

    My packaging engineer says "walls and ceilings are special". I'm
    guessing fear of the installed item coming crashing down, "unexpectedly",
    and injuring someone. But, he didn't elaborate -- teasing a steak dinner
    out of me to "discuss it". (his momma dint raise no fools!)

    I found this:

    <https://shop.standards.ie/en-ie/standards/UL-2442-1-1070543_SAIG_UL_UL_2488371/#>

    which claims:

    "Pertains to shelves, brackets, and similar devices, that provide structural
    support for the mounting of audio/video equipment, information technology
    equipment, and similar products, to the building structure and are intended
    for indoor use only."

    So, it would presumably apply to everything designed, here. Joe Gwinn
    may have a more informed take on the matter (he's an amazing font of all
    sorts of standards related information!)

    But, I'll opt for the steak dinner over the $507.02 standard! :> I'm
    not /that/ curious!

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Joe Gwinn@21:1/5 to All on Fri Jul 1 13:15:10 2022
    On Fri, 1 Jul 2022 13:46:42 +1000, Sylvia Else <sylvia@email.invalid>
    wrote:

    On 01-July-22 7:33 am, Don Y wrote:
    I'm installing a PTZ camera on a ceiling. The unit weighs
    a bit less than a kg.

    The documentation claims:

    When installing the unit in a high location, be sure
    that the location and installation components (excluding
    the supplied accessories) are strong enough to withstand
    at least 60 kg of weight, and install the unit securely.
    If the components are not strong enough, the unit may fall
    and cause serious injury.

    I can't see from where the *60* kg requirement derives.

    Perhaps they're just tired of dealing with the results of people being >incapable of judging what's strong enough. While excessive for this
    purpose, 60kg is not difficult to achieve on most ceilings, and obviates
    the use of plastic hooks, string and sticky tape.

    Yes. War story: When I was in High School in the late 1960s, we were
    going to have a party or the like in the Gymnasium, which had a very
    high ceiling, as is usual. I was installing a ellipsoidal spotlight
    (borrowed from the auditorium lighting system) on a bit of iron pipe
    lashed to the steel trusses holding the roof up. The assembly and
    installation was done from a platform assembled for the purpose - no
    ladders were involved.

    The spotlight weighed maybe 20 pounds, and would kill someone if it
    fell. So I did worry about that pipe - would those galvanized steel
    ties really hold that pipe up, no fooling.

    I had my well-muscled 180# assistant chin on that bar. The bar didn't
    budge. This test also satisfied the school administration.

    Joe Gwinn

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Larkin@21:1/5 to All on Fri Jul 1 10:54:26 2022
    On Fri, 1 Jul 2022 13:46:42 +1000, Sylvia Else <sylvia@email.invalid>
    wrote:

    On 01-July-22 7:33 am, Don Y wrote:
    I'm installing a PTZ camera on a ceiling. The unit weighs
    a bit less than a kg.

    The documentation claims:

    When installing the unit in a high location, be sure
    that the location and installation components (excluding
    the supplied accessories) are strong enough to withstand
    at least 60 kg of weight, and install the unit securely.
    If the components are not strong enough, the unit may fall
    and cause serious injury.

    I can't see from where the *60* kg requirement derives.

    Perhaps they're just tired of dealing with the results of people being >incapable of judging what's strong enough. While excessive for this
    purpose, 60kg is not difficult to achieve on most ceilings, and obviates
    the use of plastic hooks, string and sticky tape.

    Sylvia.

    We have a ceiling fan directly over our bed. It is NOT screwed in to
    the sheetrock. A ceiling fan would make an unwelcome threesome.

    --

    If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end with doubts,
    but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties. Francis Bacon

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Phil Hobbs@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Fri Jul 1 15:21:34 2022
    John Larkin wrote:
    On Fri, 1 Jul 2022 13:46:42 +1000, Sylvia Else <sylvia@email.invalid>
    wrote:

    On 01-July-22 7:33 am, Don Y wrote:
    I'm installing a PTZ camera on a ceiling.  The unit weighs
    a bit less than a kg.

    The documentation claims:

       When installing the unit in a high location, be sure
       that the location and installation components (excluding
       the supplied accessories) are strong enough to withstand
       at least 60 kg of weight, and install the unit securely.
       If the components are not strong enough, the unit may fall
       and cause serious injury.

    I can't see from where the *60* kg requirement derives.

    Perhaps they're just tired of dealing with the results of people being
    incapable of judging what's strong enough. While excessive for this
    purpose, 60kg is not difficult to achieve on most ceilings, and obviates
    the use of plastic hooks, string and sticky tape.

    Sylvia.

    We have a ceiling fan directly over our bed. It is NOT screwed in to
    the sheetrock. A ceiling fan would make an unwelcome threesome.

    So it's held on by sticky tack?

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs

    --
    Dr Philip C D Hobbs
    Principal Consultant
    ElectroOptical Innovations LLC / Hobbs ElectroOptics
    Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics
    Briarcliff Manor NY 10510

    http://electrooptical.net
    http://hobbs-eo.com

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Joe Gwinn@21:1/5 to jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology. on Fri Jul 1 15:27:30 2022
    On Fri, 01 Jul 2022 10:54:26 -0700, John Larkin <jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote:

    On Fri, 1 Jul 2022 13:46:42 +1000, Sylvia Else <sylvia@email.invalid>
    wrote:

    On 01-July-22 7:33 am, Don Y wrote:
    I'm installing a PTZ camera on a ceiling. The unit weighs
    a bit less than a kg.

    The documentation claims:

    When installing the unit in a high location, be sure
    that the location and installation components (excluding
    the supplied accessories) are strong enough to withstand
    at least 60 kg of weight, and install the unit securely.
    If the components are not strong enough, the unit may fall
    and cause serious injury.

    I can't see from where the *60* kg requirement derives.

    Perhaps they're just tired of dealing with the results of people being >>incapable of judging what's strong enough. While excessive for this >>purpose, 60kg is not difficult to achieve on most ceilings, and obviates >>the use of plastic hooks, string and sticky tape.

    Sylvia.

    We have a ceiling fan directly over our bed. It is NOT screwed in to
    the sheetrock. A ceiling fan would make an unwelcome threesome.

    Yes. The building code requires such as ceiling fans (and
    chandeliers) to be attached to a stud or bridge to the nearby studs
    sufficient to bear the weight. Plaster is not involved.

    Joe Gwinn

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Larkin@21:1/5 to pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical. on Fri Jul 1 12:39:38 2022
    On Fri, 1 Jul 2022 15:21:34 -0400, Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    John Larkin wrote:
    On Fri, 1 Jul 2022 13:46:42 +1000, Sylvia Else <sylvia@email.invalid>
    wrote:

    On 01-July-22 7:33 am, Don Y wrote:
    I'm installing a PTZ camera on a ceiling. The unit weighs
    a bit less than a kg.

    The documentation claims:

    When installing the unit in a high location, be sure
    that the location and installation components (excluding
    the supplied accessories) are strong enough to withstand
    at least 60 kg of weight, and install the unit securely.
    If the components are not strong enough, the unit may fall
    and cause serious injury.

    I can't see from where the *60* kg requirement derives.

    Perhaps they're just tired of dealing with the results of people being
    incapable of judging what's strong enough. While excessive for this
    purpose, 60kg is not difficult to achieve on most ceilings, and obviates >>> the use of plastic hooks, string and sticky tape.

    Sylvia.

    We have a ceiling fan directly over our bed. It is NOT screwed in to
    the sheetrock. A ceiling fan would make an unwelcome threesome.

    So it's held on by sticky tack?

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs

    A 2x4 that sits on nearby studs.

    Nobody here has residential air conditioning. The heat is on just now.
    It's officially 61F right now, but our neighborhood runs colder, 58
    right now. A ceiling fan is great for the rare hot days that we have.

    Ceiling fans are amazing. Quiet, reliable, cheap.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ceiling_fan



    --

    If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end with doubts,
    but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties. Francis Bacon

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Phil Hobbs@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Fri Jul 1 15:44:56 2022
    John Larkin wrote:
    On Fri, 1 Jul 2022 15:21:34 -0400, Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    John Larkin wrote:
    On Fri, 1 Jul 2022 13:46:42 +1000, Sylvia Else <sylvia@email.invalid>
    wrote:

    On 01-July-22 7:33 am, Don Y wrote:
    I'm installing a PTZ camera on a ceiling.  The unit weighs
    a bit less than a kg.

    The documentation claims:

       When installing the unit in a high location, be sure
       that the location and installation components (excluding
       the supplied accessories) are strong enough to withstand
       at least 60 kg of weight, and install the unit securely.
       If the components are not strong enough, the unit may fall
       and cause serious injury.

    I can't see from where the *60* kg requirement derives.

    Perhaps they're just tired of dealing with the results of people being >>>> incapable of judging what's strong enough. While excessive for this
    purpose, 60kg is not difficult to achieve on most ceilings, and obviates >>>> the use of plastic hooks, string and sticky tape.

    Sylvia.

    We have a ceiling fan directly over our bed. It is NOT screwed in to
    the sheetrock. A ceiling fan would make an unwelcome threesome.

    So it's held on by sticky tack?

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs

    A 2x4 that sits on nearby studs.

    Nobody here has residential air conditioning. The heat is on just now.
    It's officially 61F right now, but our neighborhood runs colder, 58
    right now. A ceiling fan is great for the rare hot days that we have.

    Ceiling fans are amazing. Quiet, reliable, cheap.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ceiling_fan



    Yeah, we put one in our bedroom a few years ago--a fancy one with a
    remote, no less. Me, I like the pull chains--they don't get lost or get
    dead batteries.

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs

    --
    Dr Philip C D Hobbs
    Principal Consultant
    ElectroOptical Innovations LLC / Hobbs ElectroOptics
    Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics
    Briarcliff Manor NY 10510

    http://electrooptical.net
    http://hobbs-eo.com

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Don Y@21:1/5 to Joe Gwinn on Fri Jul 1 13:34:20 2022
    On 7/1/2022 10:15 AM, Joe Gwinn wrote:
    Yes. War story: When I was in High School in the late 1960s, we were
    going to have a party or the like in the Gymnasium, which had a very
    high ceiling, as is usual. I was installing a ellipsoidal spotlight (borrowed from the auditorium lighting system) on a bit of iron pipe
    lashed to the steel trusses holding the roof up. The assembly and installation was done from a platform assembled for the purpose - no
    ladders were involved.

    The spotlight weighed maybe 20 pounds, and would kill someone if it
    fell. So I did worry about that pipe - would those galvanized steel
    ties really hold that pipe up, no fooling.

    I had my well-muscled 180# assistant chin on that bar. The bar didn't
    budge. This test also satisfied the school administration.

    And the lamp was secured to the pipe with a safety "chain" in case the yoke bolt came loose.

    Of course, doesn't protect against some newbie loosening the side-tension knobs too much and the lamp falling out of the yoke (hoping the electrical connection will deter its falling).

    Or, loosening the lens assembly.

    Or a gel/filter slipping out of its holder.

    Or...

    gotta wonder what sort of person would be willing to ACT under a collection
    of such luminaires!

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Joe Gwinn@21:1/5 to All on Fri Jul 1 17:56:40 2022
    On Fri, 1 Jul 2022 14:28:29 -0700, Don Y <blockedofcourse@foo.invalid>
    wrote:

    On 7/1/2022 12:27 PM, Joe Gwinn wrote:
    Yes. The building code requires such as ceiling fans (and
    chandeliers) to be attached to a stud or bridge to the nearby studs
    sufficient to bear the weight. Plaster is not involved.

    Nor can a conventional Jbox be used as the attachment -- they
    have to be intended for use with the increased weight load
    (which can be dynamic).

    Some fans require a single point suspension (often an eye-bolt)
    to accommodate the wobble that can result from imbalance, over time.

    If you see cracks in the ceiling plaster adjacent to a fan,
    it's likely that the installation was botched!

    Yeah.

    .<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ceiling_fan#Safety_concerns_with_installation>

    Joe Gwinn

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  • From Don Y@21:1/5 to Joe Gwinn on Fri Jul 1 14:28:29 2022
    On 7/1/2022 12:27 PM, Joe Gwinn wrote:
    Yes. The building code requires such as ceiling fans (and
    chandeliers) to be attached to a stud or bridge to the nearby studs sufficient to bear the weight. Plaster is not involved.

    Nor can a conventional Jbox be used as the attachment -- they
    have to be intended for use with the increased weight load
    (which can be dynamic).

    Some fans require a single point suspension (often an eye-bolt)
    to accommodate the wobble that can result from imbalance, over time.

    If you see cracks in the ceiling plaster adjacent to a fan,
    it's likely that the installation was botched!

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  • From Sylvia Else@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Sat Jul 2 12:03:47 2022
    On 02-July-22 5:39 am, John Larkin wrote:

    Nobody here has residential air conditioning. The heat is on just now.
    It's officially 61F right now, but our neighborhood runs colder, 58
    right now. A ceiling fan is great for the rare hot days that we have.

    Ceiling fans are amazing. Quiet, reliable, cheap.


    Well, until the capacitors in the speed control box degrade. Mine got to
    the point where the choices were exceedingly slow, very slow, or
    gale-force. Of course, a trip to the electronics store fixed that, but
    not an option for most people.

    Oh, yes, and it is mounted on a crossbeam that is attached to the joists
    by large steel brackets and substantial screws. It's not going anywhere.

    Sylvia.

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  • From Fred Bloggs@21:1/5 to Don Y on Sat Jul 2 05:55:05 2022
    On Thursday, June 30, 2022 at 5:34:02 PM UTC-4, Don Y wrote:
    I'm installing a PTZ camera on a ceiling. The unit weighs
    a bit less than a kg.

    The documentation claims:

    When installing the unit in a high location, be sure
    that the location and installation components (excluding
    the supplied accessories) are strong enough to withstand
    at least 60 kg of weight, and install the unit securely.
    If the components are not strong enough, the unit may fall
    and cause serious injury.

    I can't see from where the *60* kg requirement derives.

    Is this thing made in or sold in Europe? The various building codes put requirements on the dead loads and live loads the structural ceiling is required to support. They're specified in pounds per square foot in U.S. - there are always exceptions and
    additional requirements you would have to check the residential code of the IRC to verify. So forget that. The majority of that 60kg pertains to the weight the ceiling is rated for to hold itself up. They don't want you hanging if off something flimsy
    like a suspended ceiling, drywall, or some cheap ass 2x2s you can effortlessly break over your knee. Use 150 lb *pullout* fasteners, which are pretty small, cheap and readily available, and attach them to *good* framing.

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