• Ford F 150 Recall

    From Dean Hoffman@21:1/5 to All on Tue Jun 28 13:37:37 2022
    There's a problem with software on some of them that disables the low tire pressure warning light.
    <https://www.reuters.com/business/autos-transportation/ford-recalls-2900-ev-f-150-lightning-pickup-trucks-2022-06-27/>
    Cranky old white hairs like me wonder what's wrong with a walk around and a tire pressure gauge.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From wmartin@21:1/5 to Dean Hoffman on Tue Jun 28 14:14:19 2022
    On 6/28/22 13:37, Dean Hoffman wrote:
    There's a problem with software on some of them that disables the low tire pressure warning light.
    <https://www.reuters.com/business/autos-transportation/ford-recalls-2900-ev-f-150-lightning-pickup-trucks-2022-06-27/>
    Cranky old white hairs like me wonder what's wrong with a walk around and a tire pressure gauge.

    Hah, I wish my Tacoma had that "feature". Damn light is forever if you
    don't shell out a lot of money for new transmitters when the batteries
    die after about 10 years!

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Don Y@21:1/5 to Dean Hoffman on Tue Jun 28 13:51:24 2022
    On 6/28/2022 1:37 PM, Dean Hoffman wrote:
    There's a problem with software on some of them that disables the low tire pressure warning light.
    <https://www.reuters.com/business/autos-transportation/ford-recalls-2900-ev-f-150-lightning-pickup-trucks-2022-06-27/>
    Cranky old white hairs like me wonder what's wrong with a walk around and a tire pressure gauge.

    Aren't the "per wheel" pressures displayed in real-time? Can't
    the driver notice that a tire is low or, in our case, high (due
    to increasing ambient temperatures)?

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Edward Hernandez@21:1/5 to All on Tue Jun 28 21:48:45 2022
    XPost: free.spam

    Troll Doe stated the following in message-id
    <svsh05$lbh$5@dont-email.me>
    (http://al.howardknight.net/?ID=164904625100) posted Fri, 4 Mar 2022
    08:01:09 -0000 (UTC):

    Compared to other regulars, Bozo contributes practically nothing
    except insults to this group.

    Yet, since Wed, 5 Jan 2022 04:10:38 -0000 (UTC) Troll Doe's post ratio
    to USENET (**) has been 66.2% of its posts contributing "nothing except insults" to USENET.

    ** Since Wed, 5 Jan 2022 04:10:38 -0000 (UTC) Troll Doe has posted at
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    The John Doe troll stated the following in message-id <sdhn7c$pkp$4@dont-email.me>:

    The troll doesn't even know how to format a USENET post...

    And the John Doe troll stated the following in message-id <sg3kr7$qt5$1@dont-email.me>:

    The reason Bozo cannot figure out how to get Google to keep from
    breaking its lines in inappropriate places is because Bozo is
    CLUELESS...

    And yet, the clueless John Doe troll has continued to post incorrectly formatted USENET articles that are devoid of content (latest example on
    Tue, 28 Jun 2022 21:19:15 GMT in message-id <nfKuK.47035$LfE9.24100@usenetxs.com>).

    NOBODY likes the John Doe troll's contentless spam.

    This posting is a public service announcement for any google groups
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    the rules it uses to troll other posters.

    bnt0lBsLFfmN

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  • From John Doe@21:1/5 to Dean Hoffman on Tue Jun 28 21:19:15 2022
    XPost: free.spam

    Google Groups garbage...

    --
    Dean Hoffman <deanh6929@gmail.com> wrote:

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    Message-ID: <7f4e8b9d-f097-4c92-9f94-c6500c9301a8n@googlegroups.com>
    Subject: Ford F 150 Recall
    From: Dean Hoffman <deanh6929@gmail.com>
    Injection-Date: Tue, 28 Jun 2022 20:37:38 +0000
    Content-Type: text/plain; charset="UTF-8"
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    There's a problem with software on some of them that disables the low tire pressure warning light.
    <https://www.reuters.com/business/autos-transportation/ford-recalls-2900-ev-f-150-lightning-pickup-trucks-2022-06-27/>
    Cranky old white hairs like me wonder what's wrong with a walk around and a tire pressure gauge.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ralph Mowery@21:1/5 to All on Tue Jun 28 17:58:11 2022
    In article <t9fqvb$16j7b$1@dont-email.me>, wwm@wwmartin.net says...

    Hah, I wish my Tacoma had that "feature". Damn light is forever if you
    don't shell out a lot of money for new transmitters when the batteries
    die after about 10 years!




    Same here For what should be a few dollars I was asked for about $ 70
    per wheel. Just like the high price of the fobs that many cars are now
    using.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From bitrex@21:1/5 to Don Y on Tue Jun 28 18:18:17 2022
    On 6/28/2022 4:51 PM, Don Y wrote:
    On 6/28/2022 1:37 PM, Dean Hoffman wrote:
        There's a problem with software on some of them that disables the
    low tire pressure warning light.

    <https://www.reuters.com/business/autos-transportation/ford-recalls-2900-ev-f-150-lightning-pickup-trucks-2022-06-27/>

        Cranky old white hairs like me wonder what's wrong with a walk
    around and a tire pressure gauge.

    Aren't the "per wheel" pressures displayed in real-time?  Can't
    the driver notice that a tire is low or, in our case, high (due
    to increasing ambient temperatures)?


    Having real-time information on when you've blown a tire can help you
    get the car off the road more quickly, and on some low-sitting vehicles
    can help prevent further damage to the car

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Lasse Langwadt Christensen@21:1/5 to All on Tue Jun 28 15:33:40 2022
    tirsdag den 28. juni 2022 kl. 23.58.28 UTC+2 skrev Ralph Mowery:
    In article <t9fqvb$16j7b$1...@dont-email.me>, w...@wwmartin.net says...

    Hah, I wish my Tacoma had that "feature". Damn light is forever if you don't shell out a lot of money for new transmitters when the batteries
    die after about 10 years!



    Same here For what should be a few dollars I was asked for about $ 70
    per wheel. Just like the high price of the fobs that many cars are now
    using.


    tens seconds with google find 4 sensors for $30 at walmart.....

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From a a@21:1/5 to Don Y on Tue Jun 28 15:26:30 2022
    On Tuesday, 28 June 2022 at 22:51:34 UTC+2, Don Y wrote:
    On 6/28/2022 1:37 PM, Dean Hoffman wrote:
    There's a problem with software on some of them that disables the low tire pressure warning light.
    <https://www.reuters.com/business/autos-transportation/ford-recalls-2900-ev-f-150-lightning-pickup-trucks-2022-06-27/>
    Cranky old white hairs like me wonder what's wrong with a walk around and a tire pressure gauge.
    Aren't the "per wheel" pressures displayed in real-time? Can't
    the driver notice that a tire is low or, in our case, high (due
    to increasing ambient temperatures)?
    recall is recall
    bug is bug

    Low quality software resulted in 2 Boeing MAX MCAS crashes
    and the latest crash in China

    ===

    MCAS – Boeing 737 MAX Updates
    https://www.boeing.com › 737-max-updates › mcas

    What does MCAS do? MCAS, or Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System, provides consistent airplane handling characteristics in a very specific set of unusual flight conditions. MCAS now contains multiple enhanced protections: Measurements from two
    Angle of Attack (AOA) sensors will be compared.

    MCAS

    O MCAS, ou Sistema de Estabilização Automática, oferece características …
    Deutsche

    Wie funktionierte das MCAS ursprünglich? Vor seiner Weiterentwicklung verließ …

    Statements

    READ (November 18, 2020): Boeing Responds to FAA Approval to Resume …
    SMS Terms

    737 MAX. 747-8. 767. 777. 777X. 787. Freighters. Commercial Services. Boeing …

    Pokaż wyniki tylko z usługi boeing.com
    boeing.com
    MCAS
    Deutsche
    Statements
    SMS Terms
    Otwórz witrynę internetową
    Boeing: The 737 MAX MCAS Software Enhancement
    https://www.boeing.com › commercial › 737max › 737-max...

    OverviewBackgroundThe role of MCAS in accidentsDescriptionTechnology readinessScrutinySupporting systemsRunaway stabilizer and manual trim

    The Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System (MCAS) is a flight stabilizing program developed by Boeing that became notorious for its role in two fatal accidents of the 737 MAX, which killed all passengers and crew on both flights, 346 people in
    total. MCAS was first used on Boeing KC-46 Pegasus military air tanker to balance fuel loads, but the aircraft, which was

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From a a@21:1/5 to lang...@fonz.dk on Tue Jun 28 16:22:36 2022
    On Wednesday, 29 June 2022 at 00:33:47 UTC+2, lang...@fonz.dk wrote:
    tirsdag den 28. juni 2022 kl. 23.58.28 UTC+2 skrev Ralph Mowery:
    In article <t9fqvb$16j7b$1...@dont-email.me>, w...@wwmartin.net says...

    Hah, I wish my Tacoma had that "feature". Damn light is forever if you don't shell out a lot of money for new transmitters when the batteries die after about 10 years!



    Same here For what should be a few dollars I was asked for about $ 70
    per wheel. Just like the high price of the fobs that many cars are now using.
    tens seconds with google find 4 sensors for $30 at walmart.....
    Aliexpress

    Car TPMS Tyre Pressure Monitoring System Solar Power Digital LCD Display Auto Security Alarm Systems Pressure External Sensor
    £7.79
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    735 sold4.9
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    Smart Car TPMS Tire Pressure Monitoring System Solar Power Digital TMPS LCD Display USB Auto Security Alarm Tire Pressure Sensor
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    £10.94
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    New User Bonus
    £2.52 off every £25.19 spent
    4568 sold4.7
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    OUYOR Store
    Universal TPMS Wireless Tire Pressure Monitoring System Solar Power Clock LCD Display 4 External Sensor Tire Pressure Sensors
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    £13.46
    £2.52 off every £25.19 spent
    434 sold4.9
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    SinoTrack Official Store
    TPMS Solar Power TPMS Car Tire Pressure Alarm Monitor Auto Security System Tyre Pressure 360 Adjustable Temperature Warning
    TPMS Solar Power TPMS Car Tire Pressure Alarm Monitor Auto Security System Tyre Pressure 360 Adjustable Temperature Warning
    £11.53
    310 sold4.6
    + Shipping: £3.86
    Safety on way Car accessories Store


    https://www.aliexpress.com/wholesale?catId=0&initiative_id=SB_20220628152013&SearchText=tire+pressure+sensors&spm=a2g0o.home.1000002.0

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ralph Mowery@21:1/5 to All on Tue Jun 28 19:42:32 2022
    In article <32a35bbc-b21d-4a2a-b1a1-aa82f01edfe8n@googlegroups.com>, langwadt@fonz.dk says...
    Same here For what should be a few dollars I was asked for about $ 70
    per wheel. Just like the high price of the fobs that many cars are now using.


    tens seconds with google find 4 sensors for $30 at walmart.....



    Then how much to get them installed ?

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From bitrex@21:1/5 to Dean Hoffman on Tue Jun 28 19:29:44 2022
    On 6/28/2022 4:37 PM, Dean Hoffman wrote:
    There's a problem with software on some of them that disables the low tire pressure warning light.
    <https://www.reuters.com/business/autos-transportation/ford-recalls-2900-ev-f-150-lightning-pickup-trucks-2022-06-27/>
    Cranky old white hairs like me wonder what's wrong with a walk around and a tire pressure gauge.

    Most late-model cars will show you the tire pressure of each tire on the
    dash display, also.

    It's annoying when on occasion they rotate the tires but then forget to reprogram the computer so it knows what wheel which sensor is on, this
    requires a tool:

    <https://www.amazon.com/dp/B083XJSK8K/ref=sspa_dk_detail_3?psc=1&pd_rd_i=B083XJSK8K>

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Edward Hernandez@21:1/5 to All on Wed Jun 29 00:08:26 2022
    XPost: free.spam

    Troll Doe stated the following in message-id
    <svsh05$lbh$5@dont-email.me>
    (http://al.howardknight.net/?ID=164904625100) posted Fri, 4 Mar 2022
    08:01:09 -0000 (UTC):

    Compared to other regulars, Bozo contributes practically nothing
    except insults to this group.

    Yet, since Wed, 5 Jan 2022 04:10:38 -0000 (UTC) Troll Doe's post ratio
    to USENET (**) has been 66.4% of its posts contributing "nothing except insults" to USENET.

    ** Since Wed, 5 Jan 2022 04:10:38 -0000 (UTC) Troll Doe has posted at
    least 2478 articles to USENET. Of which 176 have been pure insults and
    1470 have been Troll Doe "troll format" postings.

    The John Dope troll stated the following in message-id <sdhn7c$pkp$4@dont-email.me>:

    The troll doesn't even know how to format a USENET post...

    And the John Dope troll stated the following in message-id <sg3kr7$qt5$1@dont-email.me>:

    The reason Bozo cannot figure out how to get Google to keep from
    breaking its lines in inappropriate places is because Bozo is
    CLUELESS...

    And yet, the clueless John Dope troll has itself posted yet another
    incorrectly formatted USENET posting on Tue, 28 Jun 2022 23:35:58 -0000
    (UTC) in message-id <t9g38u$17air$18@dont-email.me>.

    rToaWy18Ll79

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Don Y@21:1/5 to bitrex on Tue Jun 28 17:38:04 2022
    On 6/28/2022 4:29 PM, bitrex wrote:
    On 6/28/2022 4:37 PM, Dean Hoffman wrote:
    There's a problem with software on some of them that disables the low
    tire pressure warning light.

    <https://www.reuters.com/business/autos-transportation/ford-recalls-2900-ev-f-150-lightning-pickup-trucks-2022-06-27/>

    Cranky old white hairs like me wonder what's wrong with a walk around and
    a tire pressure gauge.

    Most late-model cars will show you the tire pressure of each tire on the dash display, also.

    It's annoying when on occasion they rotate the tires but then forget to reprogram the computer so it knows what wheel which sensor is on, this requires
    a tool:

    There are some systems that DON'T place pressure sensors on the wheels.
    They, instead, detect "low pressure" by noticing the different rates of rotation of the tires (based on the ABS sensors). ("poor mans TPMS")

    These "self calibrate", in a sense. Move a low tire and it will see that
    the new location is rotating with an effective smaller diameter than the
    others and flag *it* as being low (regardless of where it was previously located)

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From bitrex@21:1/5 to Don Y on Tue Jun 28 21:05:21 2022
    On 6/28/2022 8:38 PM, Don Y wrote:
    On 6/28/2022 4:29 PM, bitrex wrote:
    On 6/28/2022 4:37 PM, Dean Hoffman wrote:
        There's a problem with software on some of them that disables the >>> low tire pressure warning light.
    <https://www.reuters.com/business/autos-transportation/ford-recalls-2900-ev-f-150-lightning-pickup-trucks-2022-06-27/>

        Cranky old white hairs like me wonder what's wrong with a walk
    around and a tire pressure gauge.

    Most late-model cars will show you the tire pressure of each tire on
    the dash display, also.

    It's annoying when on occasion they rotate the tires but then forget
    to reprogram the computer so it knows what wheel which sensor is on,
    this requires a tool:

    There are some systems that DON'T place pressure sensors on the wheels.

    To clarify on Chevrolets at least the direct sensors integrated into the
    valve stems of the tires; I don't know if all brands do that with direct sensors though but it seems common.

    If just the module fails you can usually save the tire by pulling and de-flating the tire a bit then slipping the new module around the stem & hopefully can get away without re-balancing the wheel if you do this in
    your driveway

    They, instead, detect "low pressure" by noticing the different rates of rotation of the tires (based on the ABS sensors).  ("poor mans TPMS")

    These "self calibrate", in a sense.  Move a low tire and it will see that the new location is rotating with an effective smaller diameter than the others and flag *it* as being low (regardless of where it was previously located)

    Those used to suck but I guess nowadays some manufacturers like Audi can
    get their indirect sensors pretty accurate and they can somehow detect
    if all four tires are low or high, also

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ricky@21:1/5 to bitrex on Tue Jun 28 19:28:24 2022
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 9:05:30 PM UTC-4, bitrex wrote:
    On 6/28/2022 8:38 PM, Don Y wrote:
    On 6/28/2022 4:29 PM, bitrex wrote:
    On 6/28/2022 4:37 PM, Dean Hoffman wrote:
    There's a problem with software on some of them that disables the >>> low tire pressure warning light.
    <https://www.reuters.com/business/autos-transportation/ford-recalls-2900-ev-f-150-lightning-pickup-trucks-2022-06-27/>

    Cranky old white hairs like me wonder what's wrong with a walk
    around and a tire pressure gauge.

    Most late-model cars will show you the tire pressure of each tire on
    the dash display, also.

    It's annoying when on occasion they rotate the tires but then forget
    to reprogram the computer so it knows what wheel which sensor is on,
    this requires a tool:

    There are some systems that DON'T place pressure sensors on the wheels.
    To clarify on Chevrolets at least the direct sensors integrated into the valve stems of the tires; I don't know if all brands do that with direct sensors though but it seems common.

    If just the module fails you can usually save the tire by pulling and de-flating the tire a bit then slipping the new module around the stem & hopefully can get away without re-balancing the wheel if you do this in
    your driveway
    They, instead, detect "low pressure" by noticing the different rates of rotation of the tires (based on the ABS sensors). ("poor mans TPMS")

    These "self calibrate", in a sense. Move a low tire and it will see that the new location is rotating with an effective smaller diameter than the others and flag *it* as being low (regardless of where it was previously located)
    Those used to suck but I guess nowadays some manufacturers like Audi can
    get their indirect sensors pretty accurate and they can somehow detect
    if all four tires are low or high, also

    I've been told in the Teslas, the sensor is mounted so it passes close to a pickup that both inductively couples for transmitting a signal, but also to supply power to the sensor. That is why the tire pressure won't show up until you are something like
    a quarter mile down the road. It needs a few rotations to fire up the pressure sensor.

    --

    Rick C.

    + Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
    + Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ricky@21:1/5 to bitrex on Tue Jun 28 19:23:44 2022
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 6:18:27 PM UTC-4, bitrex wrote:
    On 6/28/2022 4:51 PM, Don Y wrote:
    On 6/28/2022 1:37 PM, Dean Hoffman wrote:
    There's a problem with software on some of them that disables the
    low tire pressure warning light.

    <https://www.reuters.com/business/autos-transportation/ford-recalls-2900-ev-f-150-lightning-pickup-trucks-2022-06-27/>

    Cranky old white hairs like me wonder what's wrong with a walk
    around and a tire pressure gauge.

    Aren't the "per wheel" pressures displayed in real-time? Can't
    the driver notice that a tire is low or, in our case, high (due
    to increasing ambient temperatures)?

    Having real-time information on when you've blown a tire can help you
    get the car off the road more quickly, and on some low-sitting vehicles
    can help prevent further damage to the car

    ??? I don't think the reading is that real time is it? When you've blown a tire, do you really need a dash gauge tell you?

    --

    Rick C.

    - Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
    - Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Fred Bloggs@21:1/5 to dean...@gmail.com on Tue Jun 28 19:53:44 2022
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 4:37:44 PM UTC-4, dean...@gmail.com wrote:
    There's a problem with software on some of them that disables the low tire pressure warning light.
    <https://www.reuters.com/business/autos-transportation/ford-recalls-2900-ev-f-150-lightning-pickup-trucks-2022-06-27/>
    Cranky old white hairs like me wonder what's wrong with a walk around and a tire pressure gauge.

    Sounds like the article states the cold tire pressure was set at 35 psi instead of 42, meaning the low pressure warning threshold is low by about 7 psi, meaning you're not going to get a warning for a low pressure that causes loss of control. When Ford
    says loss of control they really mean it.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From rbowman@21:1/5 to Ralph Mowery on Tue Jun 28 20:56:20 2022
    On 06/28/2022 03:58 PM, Ralph Mowery wrote:
    In article <t9fqvb$16j7b$1@dont-email.me>, wwm@wwmartin.net says...

    Hah, I wish my Tacoma had that "feature". Damn light is forever if you
    don't shell out a lot of money for new transmitters when the batteries
    die after about 10 years!




    Same here For what should be a few dollars I was asked for about $ 70
    per wheel. Just like the high price of the fobs that many cars are now using.


    The rims I use for the studs in the winter don't have sensors so I'm
    used to the light being on. I'm also used to the slow leaker that needs
    airing up every month or so.

    The last time I got a new set of tires I foolishly thought I would miss
    the ever popular valve stem charge. Nope, they charge for 'rebuilding'
    the transmitter.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From rbowman@21:1/5 to Ralph Mowery on Tue Jun 28 20:57:45 2022
    On 06/28/2022 05:42 PM, Ralph Mowery wrote:
    In article <32a35bbc-b21d-4a2a-b1a1-aa82f01edfe8n@googlegroups.com>, langwadt@fonz.dk says...
    Same here For what should be a few dollars I was asked for about $ 70
    per wheel. Just like the high price of the fobs that many cars are now
    using.


    tens seconds with google find 4 sensors for $30 at walmart.....



    Then how much to get them installed ?


    $62.50 per wheel...

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From bitrex@21:1/5 to Ricky on Tue Jun 28 23:34:00 2022
    On 6/28/2022 10:23 PM, Ricky wrote:
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 6:18:27 PM UTC-4, bitrex wrote:
    On 6/28/2022 4:51 PM, Don Y wrote:
    On 6/28/2022 1:37 PM, Dean Hoffman wrote:
    There's a problem with software on some of them that disables the >>>> low tire pressure warning light.

    <https://www.reuters.com/business/autos-transportation/ford-recalls-2900-ev-f-150-lightning-pickup-trucks-2022-06-27/>

    Cranky old white hairs like me wonder what's wrong with a walk
    around and a tire pressure gauge.

    Aren't the "per wheel" pressures displayed in real-time? Can't
    the driver notice that a tire is low or, in our case, high (due
    to increasing ambient temperatures)?

    Having real-time information on when you've blown a tire can help you
    get the car off the road more quickly, and on some low-sitting vehicles
    can help prevent further damage to the car

    ??? I don't think the reading is that real time is it? When you've blown a tire, do you really need a dash gauge tell you?


    I've never actually "blown" a tire as in a catastrophic failure where
    the pressure drops to almost nothing instantly that I recall, so
    "blowout" is the wrong term.

    I've hit nails, etc. and started pretty rapidly losing pressure, though,
    like 38...37...36...35 where you can count one-mississippi between each
    psi and yes in the late-model cars it's happened to me in it pops up the
    tire pressure display once it hits the low pressure-threshold and you
    can see it fall in real time, or close to it

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From bitrex@21:1/5 to Ralph Mowery on Tue Jun 28 23:51:02 2022
    On 6/28/2022 5:58 PM, Ralph Mowery wrote:
    In article <t9fqvb$16j7b$1@dont-email.me>, wwm@wwmartin.net says...

    Hah, I wish my Tacoma had that "feature". Damn light is forever if you
    don't shell out a lot of money for new transmitters when the batteries
    die after about 10 years!




    Same here For what should be a few dollars I was asked for about $ 70
    per wheel. Just like the high price of the fobs that many cars are now using.

    On late-model cars you can use two fobs to program infinite additional
    blank fobs.

    If you've lost a fob and only have one then things get real interesting.
    In theory in the US you only need one fob to make a second (vs Canada
    where you need at least two to do anything) however the process for
    programming a replacement yourself on Chevy cars at least becomes 10x
    more byzantine with only one, and the chances you brick your remaining
    fob and/or brick the car trying to do it yourself are IMO at least 50/50.

    I just called a locksmith the time I was in that situation.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Don Y@21:1/5 to bitrex on Tue Jun 28 22:46:24 2022
    On 6/28/2022 6:05 PM, bitrex wrote:

    They, instead, detect "low pressure" by noticing the different rates of
    rotation of the tires (based on the ABS sensors). ("poor mans TPMS")

    These "self calibrate", in a sense. Move a low tire and it will see that
    the new location is rotating with an effective smaller diameter than the
    others and flag *it* as being low (regardless of where it was previously
    located)

    Those used to suck but I guess nowadays some manufacturers like Audi can get their indirect sensors pretty accurate and they can somehow detect if all four
    tires are low or high, also

    ABS has to sense small changes in rotational speed to determine the onset of
    a skid. So, that sets the threshold for how "flat" a tire can be and be noticeable.

    Not sure if detecting all four in an identical -- but over/under-inflated
    state -- would be possible without another reference. E.g., if you had a road facing camera (like for lane monitoring), you might be able to deduce speed over ground and compare that to the "sensed" speed based on tire rotation (assuming the dashed lines on roads have some standard governing their spacing?)

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From a a@21:1/5 to Don Y on Wed Jun 29 05:51:17 2022
    On Wednesday, 29 June 2022 at 07:46:47 UTC+2, Don Y wrote:
    On 6/28/2022 6:05 PM, bitrex wrote:

    They, instead, detect "low pressure" by noticing the different rates of
    rotation of the tires (based on the ABS sensors). ("poor mans TPMS")

    These "self calibrate", in a sense. Move a low tire and it will see that >> the new location is rotating with an effective smaller diameter than the >> others and flag *it* as being low (regardless of where it was previously >> located)

    Those used to suck but I guess nowadays some manufacturers like Audi can get
    their indirect sensors pretty accurate and they can somehow detect if all four
    tires are low or high, also
    ABS has to sense small changes in rotational speed to determine the onset of a skid. So, that sets the threshold for how "flat" a tire can be and be noticeable.

    Not sure if detecting all four in an identical -- but over/under-inflated state -- would be possible without another reference. E.g., if you had a road facing camera (like for lane monitoring), you might be able to deduce speed over ground and compare that to the "sensed" speed based on tire rotation (assuming the dashed lines on roads have some standard governing their spacing?)
    --if you had a road
    facing camera (like for lane monitoring), you might be able to deduce speed over ground and compare that to the "sensed" speed based on tire rotation

    fake
    GPS senses car's speed much better

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From bitrex@21:1/5 to Ricky on Wed Jun 29 09:00:40 2022
    On 6/28/2022 10:28 PM, Ricky wrote:
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 9:05:30 PM UTC-4, bitrex wrote:
    On 6/28/2022 8:38 PM, Don Y wrote:
    On 6/28/2022 4:29 PM, bitrex wrote:
    On 6/28/2022 4:37 PM, Dean Hoffman wrote:
    There's a problem with software on some of them that disables the >>>>> low tire pressure warning light.
    <https://www.reuters.com/business/autos-transportation/ford-recalls-2900-ev-f-150-lightning-pickup-trucks-2022-06-27/>

    Cranky old white hairs like me wonder what's wrong with a walk
    around and a tire pressure gauge.

    Most late-model cars will show you the tire pressure of each tire on
    the dash display, also.

    It's annoying when on occasion they rotate the tires but then forget
    to reprogram the computer so it knows what wheel which sensor is on,
    this requires a tool:

    There are some systems that DON'T place pressure sensors on the wheels.
    To clarify on Chevrolets at least the direct sensors integrated into the
    valve stems of the tires; I don't know if all brands do that with direct
    sensors though but it seems common.

    If just the module fails you can usually save the tire by pulling and
    de-flating the tire a bit then slipping the new module around the stem &
    hopefully can get away without re-balancing the wheel if you do this in
    your driveway
    They, instead, detect "low pressure" by noticing the different rates of
    rotation of the tires (based on the ABS sensors). ("poor mans TPMS")

    These "self calibrate", in a sense. Move a low tire and it will see that >>> the new location is rotating with an effective smaller diameter than the >>> others and flag *it* as being low (regardless of where it was previously >>> located)
    Those used to suck but I guess nowadays some manufacturers like Audi can
    get their indirect sensors pretty accurate and they can somehow detect
    if all four tires are low or high, also

    I've been told in the Teslas, the sensor is mounted so it passes close to a pickup that both inductively couples for transmitting a signal, but also to supply power to the sensor. That is why the tire pressure won't show up until you are something
    like a quarter mile down the road. It needs a few rotations to fire up the pressure sensor.


    Seems like an ideal application for vibrational/piezoelectric energy
    scavenging e.g.

    <https://www.analog.com/en/products/ltc3588-1.html>

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Fred Bloggs@21:1/5 to dean...@gmail.com on Wed Jun 29 07:23:23 2022
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 4:37:44 PM UTC-4, dean...@gmail.com wrote:
    There's a problem with software on some of them that disables the low tire pressure warning light.
    <https://www.reuters.com/business/autos-transportation/ford-recalls-2900-ev-f-150-lightning-pickup-trucks-2022-06-27/>
    Cranky old white hairs like me wonder what's wrong with a walk around and a tire pressure gauge.

    So 3xn^2 + 5=42 gives you n=3.51... So it wasn't that. Somebody knew what they were doing and put the vehicle deep into loss of control without warning operator. Loss of control is a conditional parameter, operator doesn't know about it until the vehicle
    is maneuvered.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ricky@21:1/5 to bitrex on Wed Jun 29 10:10:10 2022
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 11:34:07 PM UTC-4, bitrex wrote:
    On 6/28/2022 10:23 PM, Ricky wrote:
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 6:18:27 PM UTC-4, bitrex wrote:
    On 6/28/2022 4:51 PM, Don Y wrote:
    On 6/28/2022 1:37 PM, Dean Hoffman wrote:
    There's a problem with software on some of them that disables the
    low tire pressure warning light.

    <https://www.reuters.com/business/autos-transportation/ford-recalls-2900-ev-f-150-lightning-pickup-trucks-2022-06-27/>

    Cranky old white hairs like me wonder what's wrong with a walk
    around and a tire pressure gauge.

    Aren't the "per wheel" pressures displayed in real-time? Can't
    the driver notice that a tire is low or, in our case, high (due
    to increasing ambient temperatures)?

    Having real-time information on when you've blown a tire can help you
    get the car off the road more quickly, and on some low-sitting vehicles >> can help prevent further damage to the car

    ??? I don't think the reading is that real time is it? When you've blown a tire, do you really need a dash gauge tell you?

    I've never actually "blown" a tire as in a catastrophic failure where
    the pressure drops to almost nothing instantly that I recall, so
    "blowout" is the wrong term.

    I've hit nails, etc. and started pretty rapidly losing pressure, though, like 38...37...36...35 where you can count one-mississippi between each
    psi and yes in the late-model cars it's happened to me in it pops up the tire pressure display once it hits the low pressure-threshold and you
    can see it fall in real time, or close to it

    I've never had that sort of failure, but even so, I don't think these things update in real time in that sense. A psi per second might take some seconds to show up. Some sensors have batteries, which means they are updating as little as possible. Mine
    are wheel powered.

    My tire leaks have either been so slow, the shop can't find the leak, or the blow NOW! Once it took a few seconds, very few. I felt the car handling oddly as I took an exit and it was flat by the time I got to the bottom and was a wild ride going down!
    It's one thing to get a flat on the road, on a sharp curve it's something else!

    --

    Rick C.

    -+ Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
    -+ Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ed Lee@21:1/5 to Ricky on Wed Jun 29 13:04:42 2022
    On Wednesday, June 29, 2022 at 10:10:18 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 11:34:07 PM UTC-4, bitrex wrote:
    On 6/28/2022 10:23 PM, Ricky wrote:
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 6:18:27 PM UTC-4, bitrex wrote:
    On 6/28/2022 4:51 PM, Don Y wrote:
    On 6/28/2022 1:37 PM, Dean Hoffman wrote:
    There's a problem with software on some of them that disables the >>>> low tire pressure warning light.

    <https://www.reuters.com/business/autos-transportation/ford-recalls-2900-ev-f-150-lightning-pickup-trucks-2022-06-27/>

    Cranky old white hairs like me wonder what's wrong with a walk
    around and a tire pressure gauge.

    Aren't the "per wheel" pressures displayed in real-time? Can't
    the driver notice that a tire is low or, in our case, high (due
    to increasing ambient temperatures)?

    Having real-time information on when you've blown a tire can help you >> get the car off the road more quickly, and on some low-sitting vehicles >> can help prevent further damage to the car

    ??? I don't think the reading is that real time is it? When you've blown a tire, do you really need a dash gauge tell you?

    I've never actually "blown" a tire as in a catastrophic failure where
    the pressure drops to almost nothing instantly that I recall, so
    "blowout" is the wrong term.

    I've hit nails, etc. and started pretty rapidly losing pressure, though, like 38...37...36...35 where you can count one-mississippi between each psi and yes in the late-model cars it's happened to me in it pops up the tire pressure display once it hits the low pressure-threshold and you
    can see it fall in real time, or close to it
    I've never had that sort of failure, but even so, I don't think these things update in real time in that sense. A psi per second might take some seconds to show up. Some sensors have batteries, which means they are updating as little as possible. Mine
    are wheel powered.

    My tire leaks have either been so slow, the shop can't find the leak, or the blow NOW! Once it took a few seconds, very few. I felt the car handling oddly as I took an exit and it was flat by the time I got to the bottom and was a wild ride going down!
    It's one thing to get a flat on the road, on a sharp curve it's something else!

    I've blown tires twice (or more) from hitting high concrete curb. First time, i drag it a few hundred feet to a nearby tire store. Second time, i drove around a mile with a hole on the side wall, no air, on run-flat tire. Tire pressure monitoring won'
    t make any difference. I only drive on run-flat tires now.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From bitrex@21:1/5 to Ricky on Wed Jun 29 16:08:23 2022
    On 6/29/2022 1:10 PM, Ricky wrote:
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 11:34:07 PM UTC-4, bitrex wrote:
    On 6/28/2022 10:23 PM, Ricky wrote:
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 6:18:27 PM UTC-4, bitrex wrote:
    On 6/28/2022 4:51 PM, Don Y wrote:
    On 6/28/2022 1:37 PM, Dean Hoffman wrote:
    There's a problem with software on some of them that disables the
    low tire pressure warning light.

    <https://www.reuters.com/business/autos-transportation/ford-recalls-2900-ev-f-150-lightning-pickup-trucks-2022-06-27/>

    Cranky old white hairs like me wonder what's wrong with a walk
    around and a tire pressure gauge.

    Aren't the "per wheel" pressures displayed in real-time? Can't
    the driver notice that a tire is low or, in our case, high (due
    to increasing ambient temperatures)?

    Having real-time information on when you've blown a tire can help you
    get the car off the road more quickly, and on some low-sitting vehicles >>>> can help prevent further damage to the car

    ??? I don't think the reading is that real time is it? When you've blown a tire, do you really need a dash gauge tell you?

    I've never actually "blown" a tire as in a catastrophic failure where
    the pressure drops to almost nothing instantly that I recall, so
    "blowout" is the wrong term.

    I've hit nails, etc. and started pretty rapidly losing pressure, though,
    like 38...37...36...35 where you can count one-mississippi between each
    psi and yes in the late-model cars it's happened to me in it pops up the
    tire pressure display once it hits the low pressure-threshold and you
    can see it fall in real time, or close to it

    I've never had that sort of failure, but even so, I don't think these things update in real time in that sense. A psi per second might take some seconds to show up. Some sensors have batteries, which means they are updating as little as possible.
    Mine are wheel powered.

    This says federal requirements are that it has to send an update at
    least every 20 min:

    <https://www.motor.com/magazine-summary/tpms-sensors-hit-retirement-age/>

    That was 10 years ago though. I think it's largely implementation-dependent.

    It doesn't seem inconceivable that the reporting interval isn't fixed,
    that a sensor could log the pressure every 100mS or something and if
    dP/dt isn't too high it only broadcasts every minute (more power hungry
    than just logging), but it begins reporting more often proportional to
    dP/dt.

    I don't know how much of this is the car's responsibility and how much
    the sensor does but the "sensor" ICs are highly configurable uPs in
    their own right, the datasheet of this one as an example is 176 pages long:

    <https://www.farnell.com/datasheets/2618548.pdf>


    My tire leaks have either been so slow, the shop can't find the leak, or the blow NOW! Once it took a few seconds, very few. I felt the car handling oddly as I took an exit and it was flat by the time I got to the bottom and was a wild ride going
    down! It's one thing to get a flat on the road, on a sharp curve it's something else!


    I've definitely had the presume monitor on my old Gen 1 Volt alert me to
    a tire deflating from a puncture so that I could pull off before it got
    to the flappa-flappa point, no wild ride. It naturally happened at about
    11 pm on a pouring rainy night about the middle of nowhere in
    northeastern CT.

    But the emergency goop-injector and air compressor aworked surprisingly
    well and I was rolling again in about 15 min. If it had been a bust
    severe enough to deflate the tire in just a couple seconds like a side
    wall blowout, I doubt gooping it would've helped much.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From bitrex@21:1/5 to Ed Lee on Wed Jun 29 16:11:55 2022
    On 6/29/2022 4:04 PM, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Wednesday, June 29, 2022 at 10:10:18 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 11:34:07 PM UTC-4, bitrex wrote:
    On 6/28/2022 10:23 PM, Ricky wrote:
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 6:18:27 PM UTC-4, bitrex wrote:
    On 6/28/2022 4:51 PM, Don Y wrote:
    On 6/28/2022 1:37 PM, Dean Hoffman wrote:
    There's a problem with software on some of them that disables the >>>>>>> low tire pressure warning light.

    <https://www.reuters.com/business/autos-transportation/ford-recalls-2900-ev-f-150-lightning-pickup-trucks-2022-06-27/>

    Cranky old white hairs like me wonder what's wrong with a walk
    around and a tire pressure gauge.

    Aren't the "per wheel" pressures displayed in real-time? Can't
    the driver notice that a tire is low or, in our case, high (due
    to increasing ambient temperatures)?

    Having real-time information on when you've blown a tire can help you >>>>> get the car off the road more quickly, and on some low-sitting vehicles >>>>> can help prevent further damage to the car

    ??? I don't think the reading is that real time is it? When you've blown a tire, do you really need a dash gauge tell you?

    I've never actually "blown" a tire as in a catastrophic failure where
    the pressure drops to almost nothing instantly that I recall, so
    "blowout" is the wrong term.

    I've hit nails, etc. and started pretty rapidly losing pressure, though, >>> like 38...37...36...35 where you can count one-mississippi between each
    psi and yes in the late-model cars it's happened to me in it pops up the >>> tire pressure display once it hits the low pressure-threshold and you
    can see it fall in real time, or close to it
    I've never had that sort of failure, but even so, I don't think these things update in real time in that sense. A psi per second might take some seconds to show up. Some sensors have batteries, which means they are updating as little as possible. Mine
    are wheel powered.

    My tire leaks have either been so slow, the shop can't find the leak, or the blow NOW! Once it took a few seconds, very few. I felt the car handling oddly as I took an exit and it was flat by the time I got to the bottom and was a wild ride going down!
    It's one thing to get a flat on the road, on a sharp curve it's something else!

    I've blown tires twice (or more) from hitting high concrete curb. First time, i drag it a few hundred feet to a nearby tire store. Second time, i drove around a mile with a hole on the side wall, no air, on run-flat tire. Tire pressure monitoring
    won't make any difference. I only drive on run-flat tires now.

    Well if you fuckin' clobber the thing on a curb such that you rupture
    the sidewall and it goes flat in one second then no it won't make any difference. Have you considered not clipping curves, granma?

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From bitrex@21:1/5 to Ed Lee on Wed Jun 29 16:18:49 2022
    On 6/29/2022 4:15 PM, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Wednesday, June 29, 2022 at 1:12:02 PM UTC-7, bitrex wrote:
    On 6/29/2022 4:04 PM, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Wednesday, June 29, 2022 at 10:10:18 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 11:34:07 PM UTC-4, bitrex wrote:
    On 6/28/2022 10:23 PM, Ricky wrote:
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 6:18:27 PM UTC-4, bitrex wrote:
    On 6/28/2022 4:51 PM, Don Y wrote:
    On 6/28/2022 1:37 PM, Dean Hoffman wrote:
    There's a problem with software on some of them that disables the >>>>>>>>> low tire pressure warning light.

    <https://www.reuters.com/business/autos-transportation/ford-recalls-2900-ev-f-150-lightning-pickup-trucks-2022-06-27/>

    Cranky old white hairs like me wonder what's wrong with a walk >>>>>>>>> around and a tire pressure gauge.

    Aren't the "per wheel" pressures displayed in real-time? Can't >>>>>>>> the driver notice that a tire is low or, in our case, high (due >>>>>>>> to increasing ambient temperatures)?

    Having real-time information on when you've blown a tire can help you >>>>>>> get the car off the road more quickly, and on some low-sitting vehicles >>>>>>> can help prevent further damage to the car

    ??? I don't think the reading is that real time is it? When you've blown a tire, do you really need a dash gauge tell you?

    I've never actually "blown" a tire as in a catastrophic failure where >>>>> the pressure drops to almost nothing instantly that I recall, so
    "blowout" is the wrong term.

    I've hit nails, etc. and started pretty rapidly losing pressure, though, >>>>> like 38...37...36...35 where you can count one-mississippi between each >>>>> psi and yes in the late-model cars it's happened to me in it pops up the >>>>> tire pressure display once it hits the low pressure-threshold and you >>>>> can see it fall in real time, or close to it
    I've never had that sort of failure, but even so, I don't think these things update in real time in that sense. A psi per second might take some seconds to show up. Some sensors have batteries, which means they are updating as little as possible.
    Mine are wheel powered.

    My tire leaks have either been so slow, the shop can't find the leak, or the blow NOW! Once it took a few seconds, very few. I felt the car handling oddly as I took an exit and it was flat by the time I got to the bottom and was a wild ride going
    down! It's one thing to get a flat on the road, on a sharp curve it's something else!

    I've blown tires twice (or more) from hitting high concrete curb. First time, i drag it a few hundred feet to a nearby tire store. Second time, i drove around a mile with a hole on the side wall, no air, on run-flat tire. Tire pressure monitoring won'
    t make any difference. I only drive on run-flat tires now.
    Well if you fuckin' clobber the thing on a curb such that you rupture
    the sidewall and it goes flat in one second then no it won't make any
    difference. Have you considered not clipping curves, granma?

    First time was dark at night. Couldn't see the island. Second time was just pulling over to park, at 5 to 10 MPH. Things happen.

    It's ok I'm just messing with ya. I ripped a rocker panel right off on a concrete stoop one time in a dark parking lot a few years ago,
    fortunately on that car it was just a piece of grey ABS plastic held on
    with clips, $82 NOS on the eBay.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ed Lee@21:1/5 to bitrex on Wed Jun 29 13:15:28 2022
    On Wednesday, June 29, 2022 at 1:12:02 PM UTC-7, bitrex wrote:
    On 6/29/2022 4:04 PM, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Wednesday, June 29, 2022 at 10:10:18 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 11:34:07 PM UTC-4, bitrex wrote:
    On 6/28/2022 10:23 PM, Ricky wrote:
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 6:18:27 PM UTC-4, bitrex wrote:
    On 6/28/2022 4:51 PM, Don Y wrote:
    On 6/28/2022 1:37 PM, Dean Hoffman wrote:
    There's a problem with software on some of them that disables the >>>>>>> low tire pressure warning light.

    <https://www.reuters.com/business/autos-transportation/ford-recalls-2900-ev-f-150-lightning-pickup-trucks-2022-06-27/>

    Cranky old white hairs like me wonder what's wrong with a walk >>>>>>> around and a tire pressure gauge.

    Aren't the "per wheel" pressures displayed in real-time? Can't
    the driver notice that a tire is low or, in our case, high (due >>>>>> to increasing ambient temperatures)?

    Having real-time information on when you've blown a tire can help you >>>>> get the car off the road more quickly, and on some low-sitting vehicles
    can help prevent further damage to the car

    ??? I don't think the reading is that real time is it? When you've blown a tire, do you really need a dash gauge tell you?

    I've never actually "blown" a tire as in a catastrophic failure where >>> the pressure drops to almost nothing instantly that I recall, so
    "blowout" is the wrong term.

    I've hit nails, etc. and started pretty rapidly losing pressure, though, >>> like 38...37...36...35 where you can count one-mississippi between each >>> psi and yes in the late-model cars it's happened to me in it pops up the >>> tire pressure display once it hits the low pressure-threshold and you >>> can see it fall in real time, or close to it
    I've never had that sort of failure, but even so, I don't think these things update in real time in that sense. A psi per second might take some seconds to show up. Some sensors have batteries, which means they are updating as little as possible.
    Mine are wheel powered.

    My tire leaks have either been so slow, the shop can't find the leak, or the blow NOW! Once it took a few seconds, very few. I felt the car handling oddly as I took an exit and it was flat by the time I got to the bottom and was a wild ride going
    down! It's one thing to get a flat on the road, on a sharp curve it's something else!

    I've blown tires twice (or more) from hitting high concrete curb. First time, i drag it a few hundred feet to a nearby tire store. Second time, i drove around a mile with a hole on the side wall, no air, on run-flat tire. Tire pressure monitoring won'
    t make any difference. I only drive on run-flat tires now.
    Well if you fuckin' clobber the thing on a curb such that you rupture
    the sidewall and it goes flat in one second then no it won't make any difference. Have you considered not clipping curves, granma?

    First time was dark at night. Couldn't see the island. Second time was just pulling over to park, at 5 to 10 MPH. Things happen.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ricky@21:1/5 to bitrex on Wed Jun 29 15:22:46 2022
    On Wednesday, June 29, 2022 at 4:12:02 PM UTC-4, bitrex wrote:
    On 6/29/2022 4:04 PM, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Wednesday, June 29, 2022 at 10:10:18 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 11:34:07 PM UTC-4, bitrex wrote:
    On 6/28/2022 10:23 PM, Ricky wrote:
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 6:18:27 PM UTC-4, bitrex wrote:
    On 6/28/2022 4:51 PM, Don Y wrote:
    On 6/28/2022 1:37 PM, Dean Hoffman wrote:
    There's a problem with software on some of them that disables the >>>>>>> low tire pressure warning light.

    <https://www.reuters.com/business/autos-transportation/ford-recalls-2900-ev-f-150-lightning-pickup-trucks-2022-06-27/>

    Cranky old white hairs like me wonder what's wrong with a walk >>>>>>> around and a tire pressure gauge.

    Aren't the "per wheel" pressures displayed in real-time? Can't
    the driver notice that a tire is low or, in our case, high (due >>>>>> to increasing ambient temperatures)?

    Having real-time information on when you've blown a tire can help you >>>>> get the car off the road more quickly, and on some low-sitting vehicles
    can help prevent further damage to the car

    ??? I don't think the reading is that real time is it? When you've blown a tire, do you really need a dash gauge tell you?

    I've never actually "blown" a tire as in a catastrophic failure where >>> the pressure drops to almost nothing instantly that I recall, so
    "blowout" is the wrong term.

    I've hit nails, etc. and started pretty rapidly losing pressure, though, >>> like 38...37...36...35 where you can count one-mississippi between each >>> psi and yes in the late-model cars it's happened to me in it pops up the >>> tire pressure display once it hits the low pressure-threshold and you >>> can see it fall in real time, or close to it
    I've never had that sort of failure, but even so, I don't think these things update in real time in that sense. A psi per second might take some seconds to show up. Some sensors have batteries, which means they are updating as little as possible.
    Mine are wheel powered.

    My tire leaks have either been so slow, the shop can't find the leak, or the blow NOW! Once it took a few seconds, very few. I felt the car handling oddly as I took an exit and it was flat by the time I got to the bottom and was a wild ride going
    down! It's one thing to get a flat on the road, on a sharp curve it's something else!

    I've blown tires twice (or more) from hitting high concrete curb. First time, i drag it a few hundred feet to a nearby tire store. Second time, i drove around a mile with a hole on the side wall, no air, on run-flat tire. Tire pressure monitoring won'
    t make any difference. I only drive on run-flat tires now.
    Well if you fuckin' clobber the thing on a curb such that you rupture
    the sidewall and it goes flat in one second then no it won't make any difference. Have you considered not clipping curves, granma?

    You have always been a twit, you usually hide it better though. It was an exit ramp and the tire had worn through on the inside tread because the rear was out of alignment from an accident years before. It developed that one flat, and never wore the
    tires oddly again. Weird. It was an old Nissan/Datsun (from the time they were changing the name) and only lasted 70,000 miles before the manual transmission locked in 5th gear.

    --

    Rick C.

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