• Spade connectors current ratings

    From Ed Lee@21:1/5 to All on Thu Jun 23 19:38:29 2022
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/144578327967

    Blue is 15A. Yellow is 24A. But i need 30A.

    The contact areas are the same and looks like it can handle 30A as well.

    The only difference is the cylinder holding the wire. If the blue can hold 3xAWG18 (30A), why can't it handle 30A?

    Can i add more wires, for example, 3 more 1" stub wires as heat sink, using the yellow connectors?

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Don Y@21:1/5 to Ed Lee on Thu Jun 23 20:02:52 2022
    On 6/23/2022 7:38 PM, Ed Lee wrote:
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/144578327967

    Blue is 15A. Yellow is 24A. But i need 30A.

    The contact areas are the same and looks like it can handle 30A as well.

    The only difference is the cylinder holding the wire. If the blue can hold 3xAWG18 (30A), why can't it handle 30A?

    Can i add more wires, for example, 3 more 1" stub wires as heat sink, using the yellow connectors?

    Why not use Anderson connectors?

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Phil Allison@21:1/5 to Don WHY on Thu Jun 23 20:16:07 2022
    Don WHY wrote:
    =================
    On 6/23/2022 7:38 PM, Ed Lee wrote:
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/144578327967

    Blue is 15A. Yellow is 24A. But i need 30A.

    The contact areas are the same and looks like it can handle 30A as well.

    The only difference is the cylinder holding the wire. If the blue can hold 3xAWG18 (30A), why can't it handle 30A?

    Can i add more wires, for example, 3 more 1" stub wires as heat sink, using the yellow connectors?


    Why not use Anderson connectors?

    ** Cost ??


    ..... Phil

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ed Lee@21:1/5 to palli...@gmail.com on Thu Jun 23 20:40:22 2022
    On Thursday, June 23, 2022 at 8:16:13 PM UTC-7, palli...@gmail.com wrote:
    Don WHY wrote:
    =================
    On 6/23/2022 7:38 PM, Ed Lee wrote:
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/144578327967

    Blue is 15A. Yellow is 24A. But i need 30A.

    The contact areas are the same and looks like it can handle 30A as well.

    The only difference is the cylinder holding the wire. If the blue can hold 3xAWG18 (30A), why can't it handle 30A?

    Can i add more wires, for example, 3 more 1" stub wires as heat sink, using the yellow connectors?


    Why not use Anderson connectors?
    ** Cost ??
    and availability.

    We use these everywhere in hooking up batteries. It's OK to burn them out elsewhere, but not with the main feeds. These on the main feed would be difficult to replace; so, we want them to burn last.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno@decadenc@21:1/5 to Don Y on Fri Jun 24 04:04:46 2022
    Don Y <blockedofcourse@foo.invalid> wrote in
    news:t939gu$n72$1@dont-email.me:

    On 6/23/2022 7:38 PM, Ed Lee wrote:
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/144578327967

    Blue is 15A. Yellow is 24A. But i need 30A.

    The contact areas are the same and looks like it can handle 30A
    as well.

    The only difference is the cylinder holding the wire. If the
    blue can hold 3xAWG18 (30A), why can't it handle 30A?

    Can i add more wires, for example, 3 more 1" stub wires as heat
    sink, using the yellow connectors?

    Why not use Anderson connectors?


    The WIRE getting attached to the lug is where you spec your current
    at. If the wire can take it, and the lug is meant for that gauge of
    wire, then it can also handle the current that wire can handle.

    If they cannot, then they are non-industry compliant JUNK.

    Name brands are far better and more compliant than cheap Home Depot
    chinese imports. Everything from the base metal to the plating on it.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Walliker@21:1/5 to DecadentLinux...@decadence.org on Fri Jun 24 00:35:20 2022
    On Friday, 24 June 2022 at 05:04:53 UTC+1, DecadentLinux...@decadence.org wrote:
    Don Y <blocked...@foo.invalid> wrote in
    news:t939gu$n72$1...@dont-email.me:
    On 6/23/2022 7:38 PM, Ed Lee wrote:
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/144578327967

    Blue is 15A. Yellow is 24A. But i need 30A.

    The contact areas are the same and looks like it can handle 30A
    as well.

    The only difference is the cylinder holding the wire. If the
    blue can hold 3xAWG18 (30A), why can't it handle 30A?

    Can i add more wires, for example, 3 more 1" stub wires as heat
    sink, using the yellow connectors?

    Why not use Anderson connectors?
    The WIRE getting attached to the lug is where you spec your current
    at. If the wire can take it, and the lug is meant for that gauge of
    wire, then it can also handle the current that wire can handle.

    If they cannot, then they are non-industry compliant JUNK.

    Name brands are far better and more compliant than cheap Home Depot
    chinese imports. Everything from the base metal to the plating on it.


    From a TE Connectivity quick reference guide:

    Current Carrying Capacity
    size 2.8mm 14A max with 1.5mm² wire size
    size 4.8mm / 5.2mm 20A max with 2.5mm² wire size
    size 6.3mm 28A max with 4 or 6mm² wire size
    size 9.5mm 50A max with 10mm² wire size

    https://www.mouser.com/pdfdocs/TEConnectivityFASTONQuickReferenceGuide.PDF

    If you want reliable operation at a continuous current of 30A then use the wider 375 series (9.5mm).

    Better still, use Anderson Powerpole. One of the key features of Powerpole connectors is that the contact is separated from the spring so that each
    uses the most suitable material for its function.

    John

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Phil Allison@21:1/5 to John Walliker on Fri Jun 24 06:08:44 2022
    John Walliker wrote:
    =================

    Better still, use Anderson Powerpole. One of the key features of Powerpole connectors is that the contact is separated from the spring so that each
    uses the most suitable material for its function.


    ** Yes, the design is excellent and suited to many cycles of use.
    Plus you can parallel them in multiples to eliminate connection errors.

    OTOH QCs play right into Murphy's hands.


    ...... Phil

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ed Lee@21:1/5 to John Walliker on Fri Jun 24 07:55:16 2022
    On Friday, June 24, 2022 at 12:35:27 AM UTC-7, John Walliker wrote:
    On Friday, 24 June 2022 at 05:04:53 UTC+1, DecadentLinux...@decadence.org wrote:
    Don Y <blocked...@foo.invalid> wrote in news:t939gu$n72$1...@dont-email.me:
    On 6/23/2022 7:38 PM, Ed Lee wrote:
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/144578327967

    Blue is 15A. Yellow is 24A. But i need 30A.

    The contact areas are the same and looks like it can handle 30A
    as well.

    The only difference is the cylinder holding the wire. If the
    blue can hold 3xAWG18 (30A), why can't it handle 30A?

    Can i add more wires, for example, 3 more 1" stub wires as heat
    sink, using the yellow connectors?

    Why not use Anderson connectors?
    The WIRE getting attached to the lug is where you spec your current
    at. If the wire can take it, and the lug is meant for that gauge of
    wire, then it can also handle the current that wire can handle.

    If they cannot, then they are non-industry compliant JUNK.

    Name brands are far better and more compliant than cheap Home Depot chinese imports. Everything from the base metal to the plating on it.
    From a TE Connectivity quick reference guide:

    Current Carrying Capacity
    size 2.8mm 14A max with 1.5mm² wire size
    size 4.8mm / 5.2mm 20A max with 2.5mm² wire size
    size 6.3mm 28A max with 4 or 6mm² wire size
    size 9.5mm 50A max with 10mm² wire size

    https://www.mouser.com/pdfdocs/TEConnectivityFASTONQuickReferenceGuide.PDF

    If you want reliable operation at a continuous current of 30A then use the wider 375 series (9.5mm).

    I think the link i posted are round 6.3mm. It should be good for 400V 28A. The battery is 400V 26Ah. So, 1C charge/discharge should be within spec.

    Better still, use Anderson Powerpole. One of the key features of Powerpole connectors is that the contact is separated from the spring so that each uses the most suitable material for its function.

    They costs at least 10x. I can use it (anderson) for the main feed, but will adapt to the rest (spade) I have 32 sets of 12V batteries connected together plus BMS junction tap (4 each). 32x6 connectors cost money.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno@decadenc@21:1/5 to Ed Lee on Fri Jun 24 17:33:57 2022
    Ed Lee <edward.ming.lee@gmail.com> wrote in news:a887f1de-ed5c-439e-b932-85f5ae286385n@googlegroups.com:

    On Friday, June 24, 2022 at 12:35:27 AM UTC-7, John Walliker
    wrote:
    On Friday, 24 June 2022 at 05:04:53 UTC+1,
    DecadentLinux...@decadence.org
    wrote:
    Don Y <blocked...@foo.invalid> wrote in
    news:t939gu$n72$1...@dont-email.me:
    On 6/23/2022 7:38 PM, Ed Lee wrote:
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/144578327967

    Blue is 15A. Yellow is 24A. But i need 30A.

    The contact areas are the same and looks like it can handle
    30A as well.

    The only difference is the cylinder holding the wire. If the
    blue can hold 3xAWG18 (30A), why can't it handle 30A?

    Can i add more wires, for example, 3 more 1" stub wires as
    heat sink, using the yellow connectors?

    Why not use Anderson connectors?
    The WIRE getting attached to the lug is where you spec your
    current at. If the wire can take it, and the lug is meant for
    that gauge of wire, then it can also handle the current that
    wire can handle.

    If they cannot, then they are non-industry compliant JUNK.

    Name brands are far better and more compliant than cheap Home
    Depot chinese imports. Everything from the base metal to the
    plating on it.
    From a TE Connectivity quick reference guide:

    Current Carrying Capacity
    size 2.8mm 14A max with 1.5mm² wire size
    size 4.8mm / 5.2mm 20A max with 2.5mm² wire size
    size 6.3mm 28A max with 4 or 6mm² wire size
    size 9.5mm 50A max with 10mm² wire size

    https://www.mouser.com/pdfdocs/TEConnectivityFASTONQuickReferenceG
    uide.PD
    F

    If you want reliable operation at a continuous current of 30A
    then use th
    e
    wider 375 series (9.5mm).

    I think the link i posted are round 6.3mm. It should be good for
    400V 28A. The battery is 400V 26Ah. So, 1C charge/discharge
    should be within spec.

    Better still, use Anderson Powerpole. One of the key features of
    Powerpol
    e
    connectors is that the contact is separated from the spring so
    that each

    uses the most suitable material for its function.

    They costs at least 10x. I can use it (anderson) for the main
    feed, but will adapt to the rest (spade) I have 32 sets of 12V
    batteries connected together plus BMS junction tap (4 each). 32x6
    connectors cost money.


    So does Silver Plated Copper (SPC) with PTFE insulation, but that
    still does not discount the fact that it is what you should use.

    You could also perform a 180 degree bend in an uninsulated segment
    and use a lug that accepts that size and then solder it in instead of
    crimping (or both). That way, your wire has no breaks in it and two connections need only one lug.

    Unless you are talking about large gauge wires and want something
    like the robot wars guys use.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Lasse Langwadt Christensen@21:1/5 to All on Fri Jun 24 10:46:57 2022
    fredag den 24. juni 2022 kl. 19.34.02 UTC+2 skrev DecadentLinux...@decadence.org:
    Ed Lee <edward....@gmail.com> wrote in news:a887f1de-ed5c-439e...@googlegroups.com:
    On Friday, June 24, 2022 at 12:35:27 AM UTC-7, John Walliker
    wrote:
    On Friday, 24 June 2022 at 05:04:53 UTC+1,
    DecadentLinux...@decadence.org
    wrote:
    Don Y <blocked...@foo.invalid> wrote in
    news:t939gu$n72$1...@dont-email.me:
    On 6/23/2022 7:38 PM, Ed Lee wrote:
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/144578327967

    Blue is 15A. Yellow is 24A. But i need 30A.

    The contact areas are the same and looks like it can handle
    30A as well.

    The only difference is the cylinder holding the wire. If the
    blue can hold 3xAWG18 (30A), why can't it handle 30A?

    Can i add more wires, for example, 3 more 1" stub wires as
    heat sink, using the yellow connectors?

    Why not use Anderson connectors?
    The WIRE getting attached to the lug is where you spec your
    current at. If the wire can take it, and the lug is meant for
    that gauge of wire, then it can also handle the current that
    wire can handle.

    If they cannot, then they are non-industry compliant JUNK.

    Name brands are far better and more compliant than cheap Home
    Depot chinese imports. Everything from the base metal to the
    plating on it.
    From a TE Connectivity quick reference guide:

    Current Carrying Capacity
    size 2.8mm 14A max with 1.5mm² wire size
    size 4.8mm / 5.2mm 20A max with 2.5mm² wire size
    size 6.3mm 28A max with 4 or 6mm² wire size
    size 9.5mm 50A max with 10mm² wire size

    https://www.mouser.com/pdfdocs/TEConnectivityFASTONQuickReferenceG
    uide.PD
    F

    If you want reliable operation at a continuous current of 30A
    then use th
    e
    wider 375 series (9.5mm).

    I think the link i posted are round 6.3mm. It should be good for
    400V 28A. The battery is 400V 26Ah. So, 1C charge/discharge
    should be within spec.

    Better still, use Anderson Powerpole. One of the key features of
    Powerpol
    e
    connectors is that the contact is separated from the spring so
    that each

    uses the most suitable material for its function.

    They costs at least 10x. I can use it (anderson) for the main
    feed, but will adapt to the rest (spade) I have 32 sets of 12V
    batteries connected together plus BMS junction tap (4 each). 32x6 connectors cost money.

    So does Silver Plated Copper (SPC) with PTFE insulation, but that
    still does not discount the fact that it is what you should use.

    You could also perform a 180 degree bend in an uninsulated segment
    and use a lug that accepts that size and then solder it in instead of crimping (or both). That way, your wire has no breaks in it and two connections need only one lug.

    solder instead of crimp? with what purpose? maximize the risk of failure?

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ed Lee@21:1/5 to DecadentLinux...@decadence.org on Fri Jun 24 12:10:50 2022
    On Friday, June 24, 2022 at 10:34:02 AM UTC-7, DecadentLinux...@decadence.org wrote:
    Ed Lee <edward....@gmail.com> wrote in news:a887f1de-ed5c-439e...@googlegroups.com:
    On Friday, June 24, 2022 at 12:35:27 AM UTC-7, John Walliker
    wrote:
    On Friday, 24 June 2022 at 05:04:53 UTC+1,
    DecadentLinux...@decadence.org
    wrote:
    Don Y <blocked...@foo.invalid> wrote in
    news:t939gu$n72$1...@dont-email.me:
    On 6/23/2022 7:38 PM, Ed Lee wrote:
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/144578327967

    Blue is 15A. Yellow is 24A. But i need 30A.

    The contact areas are the same and looks like it can handle
    30A as well.

    The only difference is the cylinder holding the wire. If the
    blue can hold 3xAWG18 (30A), why can't it handle 30A?

    Can i add more wires, for example, 3 more 1" stub wires as
    heat sink, using the yellow connectors?

    Why not use Anderson connectors?
    The WIRE getting attached to the lug is where you spec your
    current at. If the wire can take it, and the lug is meant for
    that gauge of wire, then it can also handle the current that
    wire can handle.

    If they cannot, then they are non-industry compliant JUNK.

    Name brands are far better and more compliant than cheap Home
    Depot chinese imports. Everything from the base metal to the
    plating on it.
    From a TE Connectivity quick reference guide:

    Current Carrying Capacity
    size 2.8mm 14A max with 1.5mm² wire size
    size 4.8mm / 5.2mm 20A max with 2.5mm² wire size
    size 6.3mm 28A max with 4 or 6mm² wire size
    size 9.5mm 50A max with 10mm² wire size

    https://www.mouser.com/pdfdocs/TEConnectivityFASTONQuickReferenceG
    uide.PD
    F

    If you want reliable operation at a continuous current of 30A
    then use th
    e
    wider 375 series (9.5mm).

    I think the link i posted are round 6.3mm. It should be good for
    400V 28A. The battery is 400V 26Ah. So, 1C charge/discharge
    should be within spec.

    Better still, use Anderson Powerpole. One of the key features of
    Powerpol
    e
    connectors is that the contact is separated from the spring so
    that each

    uses the most suitable material for its function.

    They costs at least 10x. I can use it (anderson) for the main
    feed, but will adapt to the rest (spade) I have 32 sets of 12V
    batteries connected together plus BMS junction tap (4 each). 32x6 connectors cost money.

    So does Silver Plated Copper (SPC) with PTFE insulation, but that
    still does not discount the fact that it is what you should use.

    You could also perform a 180 degree bend in an uninsulated segment
    and use a lug that accepts that size and then solder it in instead of crimping (or both). That way, your wire has no breaks in it and two connections need only one lug.

    Unless you are talking about large gauge wires and want something
    like the robot wars guys use.

    I just need something better than the other connections, so they blow up before the main feed, which is more difficult to replace.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ed Lee@21:1/5 to Ed Lee on Fri Jun 24 12:35:39 2022
    On Friday, June 24, 2022 at 12:10:57 PM UTC-7, Ed Lee wrote:
    On Friday, June 24, 2022 at 10:34:02 AM UTC-7, DecadentLinux...@decadence.org wrote:
    Ed Lee <edward....@gmail.com> wrote in news:a887f1de-ed5c-439e...@googlegroups.com:
    On Friday, June 24, 2022 at 12:35:27 AM UTC-7, John Walliker
    wrote:
    On Friday, 24 June 2022 at 05:04:53 UTC+1,
    DecadentLinux...@decadence.org
    wrote:
    Don Y <blocked...@foo.invalid> wrote in
    news:t939gu$n72$1...@dont-email.me:
    On 6/23/2022 7:38 PM, Ed Lee wrote:
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/144578327967

    Blue is 15A. Yellow is 24A. But i need 30A.

    The contact areas are the same and looks like it can handle
    30A as well.

    The only difference is the cylinder holding the wire. If the
    blue can hold 3xAWG18 (30A), why can't it handle 30A?

    Can i add more wires, for example, 3 more 1" stub wires as
    heat sink, using the yellow connectors?

    Why not use Anderson connectors?
    The WIRE getting attached to the lug is where you spec your
    current at. If the wire can take it, and the lug is meant for
    that gauge of wire, then it can also handle the current that
    wire can handle.

    If they cannot, then they are non-industry compliant JUNK.

    Name brands are far better and more compliant than cheap Home
    Depot chinese imports. Everything from the base metal to the
    plating on it.
    From a TE Connectivity quick reference guide:

    Current Carrying Capacity
    size 2.8mm 14A max with 1.5mm² wire size
    size 4.8mm / 5.2mm 20A max with 2.5mm² wire size
    size 6.3mm 28A max with 4 or 6mm² wire size
    size 9.5mm 50A max with 10mm² wire size

    https://www.mouser.com/pdfdocs/TEConnectivityFASTONQuickReferenceG
    uide.PD
    F

    If you want reliable operation at a continuous current of 30A
    then use th
    e
    wider 375 series (9.5mm).

    I think the link i posted are round 6.3mm. It should be good for
    400V 28A. The battery is 400V 26Ah. So, 1C charge/discharge
    should be within spec.

    Better still, use Anderson Powerpole. One of the key features of
    Powerpol
    e
    connectors is that the contact is separated from the spring so
    that each

    uses the most suitable material for its function.

    They costs at least 10x. I can use it (anderson) for the main
    feed, but will adapt to the rest (spade) I have 32 sets of 12V
    batteries connected together plus BMS junction tap (4 each). 32x6 connectors cost money.

    So does Silver Plated Copper (SPC) with PTFE insulation, but that
    still does not discount the fact that it is what you should use.

    You could also perform a 180 degree bend in an uninsulated segment
    and use a lug that accepts that size and then solder it in instead of crimping (or both). That way, your wire has no breaks in it and two connections need only one lug.

    Unless you are talking about large gauge wires and want something
    like the robot wars guys use.
    I just need something better than the other connections, so they blow up before the main feed, which is more difficult to replace.

    Actually, it's more of safety problem. I have a case mounted connector on the battery housing, but it would be inaccessible with the battery mounted on the vehicle. So, the main feeds are half-lived (one side of 200V) even with the shut off switched
    removed.

    While testing, i had a nasty plastic burn with the meter test leads gapped. The leads vaporized and covered my fingers with black plastic powders. It hurts but no serious damages. So, respect your 400V battery.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Joe Gwinn@21:1/5 to langwadt@fonz.dk on Fri Jun 24 18:45:27 2022
    On Fri, 24 Jun 2022 10:46:57 -0700 (PDT), Lasse Langwadt Christensen <langwadt@fonz.dk> wrote:

    fredag den 24. juni 2022 kl. 19.34.02 UTC+2 skrev DecadentLinux...@decadence.org:
    Ed Lee <edward....@gmail.com> wrote in
    news:a887f1de-ed5c-439e...@googlegroups.com:
    On Friday, June 24, 2022 at 12:35:27 AM UTC-7, John Walliker
    wrote:
    On Friday, 24 June 2022 at 05:04:53 UTC+1,
    DecadentLinux...@decadence.org
    wrote:
    Don Y <blocked...@foo.invalid> wrote in
    news:t939gu$n72$1...@dont-email.me:
    On 6/23/2022 7:38 PM, Ed Lee wrote:
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/144578327967

    Blue is 15A. Yellow is 24A. But i need 30A.

    The contact areas are the same and looks like it can handle
    30A as well.

    The only difference is the cylinder holding the wire. If the
    blue can hold 3xAWG18 (30A), why can't it handle 30A?

    Can i add more wires, for example, 3 more 1" stub wires as
    heat sink, using the yellow connectors?

    Why not use Anderson connectors?
    The WIRE getting attached to the lug is where you spec your
    current at. If the wire can take it, and the lug is meant for
    that gauge of wire, then it can also handle the current that
    wire can handle.

    If they cannot, then they are non-industry compliant JUNK.

    Name brands are far better and more compliant than cheap Home
    Depot chinese imports. Everything from the base metal to the
    plating on it.
    From a TE Connectivity quick reference guide:

    Current Carrying Capacity
    size 2.8mm 14A max with 1.5mm wire size
    size 4.8mm / 5.2mm 20A max with 2.5mm wire size
    size 6.3mm 28A max with 4 or 6mm wire size
    size 9.5mm 50A max with 10mm wire size

    https://www.mouser.com/pdfdocs/TEConnectivityFASTONQuickReferenceG
    uide.PD
    F

    If you want reliable operation at a continuous current of 30A
    then use th
    e
    wider 375 series (9.5mm).

    I think the link i posted are round 6.3mm. It should be good for
    400V 28A. The battery is 400V 26Ah. So, 1C charge/discharge
    should be within spec.

    Better still, use Anderson Powerpole. One of the key features of
    Powerpol
    e
    connectors is that the contact is separated from the spring so
    that each

    uses the most suitable material for its function.

    They costs at least 10x. I can use it (anderson) for the main
    feed, but will adapt to the rest (spade) I have 32 sets of 12V
    batteries connected together plus BMS junction tap (4 each). 32x6
    connectors cost money.

    So does Silver Plated Copper (SPC) with PTFE insulation, but that
    still does not discount the fact that it is what you should use.

    You could also perform a 180 degree bend in an uninsulated segment
    and use a lug that accepts that size and then solder it in instead of
    crimping (or both). That way, your wire has no breaks in it and two
    connections need only one lug.

    solder instead of crimp? with what purpose? maximize the risk of failure?

    Actually, properly made crimp connections are far more reliable than
    solder.

    Joe Gwinn

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Lasse Langwadt Christensen@21:1/5 to All on Fri Jun 24 16:45:22 2022
    lørdag den 25. juni 2022 kl. 00.45.38 UTC+2 skrev Joe Gwinn:
    On Fri, 24 Jun 2022 10:46:57 -0700 (PDT), Lasse Langwadt Christensen <lang...@fonz.dk> wrote:

    fredag den 24. juni 2022 kl. 19.34.02 UTC+2 skrev DecadentLinux...@decadence.org:
    Ed Lee <edward....@gmail.com> wrote in
    news:a887f1de-ed5c-439e...@googlegroups.com:
    On Friday, June 24, 2022 at 12:35:27 AM UTC-7, John Walliker
    wrote:
    On Friday, 24 June 2022 at 05:04:53 UTC+1,
    DecadentLinux...@decadence.org
    wrote:
    Don Y <blocked...@foo.invalid> wrote in
    news:t939gu$n72$1...@dont-email.me:
    On 6/23/2022 7:38 PM, Ed Lee wrote:
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/144578327967

    Blue is 15A. Yellow is 24A. But i need 30A.

    The contact areas are the same and looks like it can handle
    30A as well.

    The only difference is the cylinder holding the wire. If the
    blue can hold 3xAWG18 (30A), why can't it handle 30A?

    Can i add more wires, for example, 3 more 1" stub wires as
    heat sink, using the yellow connectors?

    Why not use Anderson connectors?
    The WIRE getting attached to the lug is where you spec your
    current at. If the wire can take it, and the lug is meant for
    that gauge of wire, then it can also handle the current that
    wire can handle.

    If they cannot, then they are non-industry compliant JUNK.

    Name brands are far better and more compliant than cheap Home
    Depot chinese imports. Everything from the base metal to the
    plating on it.
    From a TE Connectivity quick reference guide:

    Current Carrying Capacity
    size 2.8mm 14A max with 1.5mm² wire size
    size 4.8mm / 5.2mm 20A max with 2.5mm² wire size
    size 6.3mm 28A max with 4 or 6mm² wire size
    size 9.5mm 50A max with 10mm² wire size

    https://www.mouser.com/pdfdocs/TEConnectivityFASTONQuickReferenceG
    uide.PD
    F

    If you want reliable operation at a continuous current of 30A
    then use th
    e
    wider 375 series (9.5mm).

    I think the link i posted are round 6.3mm. It should be good for
    400V 28A. The battery is 400V 26Ah. So, 1C charge/discharge
    should be within spec.

    Better still, use Anderson Powerpole. One of the key features of
    Powerpol
    e
    connectors is that the contact is separated from the spring so
    that each

    uses the most suitable material for its function.

    They costs at least 10x. I can use it (anderson) for the main
    feed, but will adapt to the rest (spade) I have 32 sets of 12V
    batteries connected together plus BMS junction tap (4 each). 32x6
    connectors cost money.

    So does Silver Plated Copper (SPC) with PTFE insulation, but that
    still does not discount the fact that it is what you should use.

    You could also perform a 180 degree bend in an uninsulated segment
    and use a lug that accepts that size and then solder it in instead of
    crimping (or both). That way, your wire has no breaks in it and two
    connections need only one lug.

    solder instead of crimp? with what purpose? maximize the risk of failure? Actually, properly made crimp connections are far more reliable than
    solder.

    exactly

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Phil Allison@21:1/5 to Joe Gwinn on Fri Jun 24 18:04:53 2022
    Joe Gwinn wrote:
    Lasse Langwadt Christensen
    =========================

    solder instead of crimp? with what purpose? maximize the risk of failure?

    Actually, properly made crimp connections are far more reliable than
    solder.


    ** So all the ones that fail were therefore improperly made - right ?
    Nice example of a circular definition.

    There are way too many things to get right before crimping is reliable at all.


    ..... Phil

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Jasen Betts@21:1/5 to Ed Lee on Sat Jun 25 00:01:49 2022
    On 2022-06-24, Ed Lee <edward.ming.lee@gmail.com> wrote:
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/144578327967

    Blue is 15A. Yellow is 24A. But i need 30A.

    The contact areas are the same and looks like it can handle 30A as well.

    The only difference is the cylinder holding the wire. If the blue can hold 3xAWG18 (30A), why can't it handle 30A?

    Can i add more wires, for example, 3 more 1" stub wires as heat sink, using the yellow connectors?

    The yellow ones take 10AWG wire.

    how many amps that allows depends on how hot it gets. So it depends
    on how good your crimp tool is, and other factors. I cant find any
    data sheets that list ampacity for the connectors.

    personally I like the uninsualted fast-disconnects better, (the ones
    that make a "B" shaped crimp cross-section) but that may just be
    because I've never onwed a good crimp tool for the pre-insulated
    ones.

    --
    Jasen.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ed Lee@21:1/5 to Jasen Betts on Fri Jun 24 18:58:12 2022
    On Friday, June 24, 2022 at 5:30:59 PM UTC-7, Jasen Betts wrote:
    On 2022-06-24, Ed Lee <edward....@gmail.com> wrote:
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/144578327967

    Blue is 15A. Yellow is 24A. But i need 30A.

    The contact areas are the same and looks like it can handle 30A as well.

    The only difference is the cylinder holding the wire. If the blue can hold 3xAWG18 (30A), why can't it handle 30A?

    Can i add more wires, for example, 3 more 1" stub wires as heat sink, using the yellow connectors?
    The yellow ones take 10AWG wire.

    how many amps that allows depends on how hot it gets. So it depends
    on how good your crimp tool is, and other factors. I cant find any
    data sheets that list ampacity for the connectors.

    someone posted:
    "size 6.3mm 28A max with 4 or 6mm² wire size "
    which is more reasonable as the contact mating current capacity.

    personally I like the uninsualted fast-disconnects better, (the ones
    that make a "B" shaped crimp cross-section) but that may just be
    because I've never onwed a good crimp tool for the pre-insulated
    ones.

    It's not a good idea to use uninsulated connector for 400V, if you accidentally touch more than one of them.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Jasen Betts@21:1/5 to Ed Lee on Sat Jun 25 04:20:51 2022
    On 2022-06-25, Ed Lee <edward.ming.lee@gmail.com> wrote:
    On Friday, June 24, 2022 at 5:30:59 PM UTC-7, Jasen Betts wrote:
    On 2022-06-24, Ed Lee <edward....@gmail.com> wrote:
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/144578327967

    Blue is 15A. Yellow is 24A. But i need 30A.

    The contact areas are the same and looks like it can handle 30A as well. >> >
    The only difference is the cylinder holding the wire. If the blue can hold 3xAWG18 (30A), why can't it handle 30A?

    Can i add more wires, for example, 3 more 1" stub wires as heat sink, using the yellow connectors?
    The yellow ones take 10AWG wire.

    how many amps that allows depends on how hot it gets. So it depends
    on how good your crimp tool is, and other factors. I cant find any
    data sheets that list ampacity for the connectors.

    someone posted:
    "size 6.3mm 28A max with 4 or 6mm² wire size "
    which is more reasonable as the contact mating current capacity.

    personally I like the uninsualted fast-disconnects better, (the ones
    that make a "B" shaped crimp cross-section) but that may just be
    because I've never onwed a good crimp tool for the pre-insulated
    ones.

    It's not a good idea to use uninsulated connector for 400V, if you accidentally touch more than one of them.

    shrouds and sleeves are available to insulate after crimping.


    --
    Jasen.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno@decadenc@21:1/5 to Joe Gwinn on Sat Jun 25 08:07:09 2022
    Joe Gwinn <joegwinn@comcast.net> wrote in news:uifcbhhdi5t5mm9facm0ahr067dicvt35l@4ax.com:

    On Fri, 24 Jun 2022 10:46:57 -0700 (PDT), Lasse Langwadt
    Christensen <langwadt@fonz.dk> wrote:

    fredag den 24. juni 2022 kl. 19.34.02 UTC+2 skrev >>DecadentLinux...@decadence.org:
    Ed Lee <edward....@gmail.com> wrote in
    news:a887f1de-ed5c-439e...@googlegroups.com:
    On Friday, June 24, 2022 at 12:35:27 AM UTC-7, John Walliker
    wrote:
    On Friday, 24 June 2022 at 05:04:53 UTC+1,
    DecadentLinux...@decadence.org
    wrote:
    Don Y <blocked...@foo.invalid> wrote in
    news:t939gu$n72$1...@dont-email.me:
    On 6/23/2022 7:38 PM, Ed Lee wrote:
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/144578327967

    Blue is 15A. Yellow is 24A. But i need 30A.

    The contact areas are the same and looks like it can
    handle 30A as well.

    The only difference is the cylinder holding the wire. If
    the blue can hold 3xAWG18 (30A), why can't it handle
    30A?

    Can i add more wires, for example, 3 more 1" stub wires
    as heat sink, using the yellow connectors?

    Why not use Anderson connectors?
    The WIRE getting attached to the lug is where you spec your
    current at. If the wire can take it, and the lug is meant
    for that gauge of wire, then it can also handle the current
    that wire can handle.

    If they cannot, then they are non-industry compliant JUNK.

    Name brands are far better and more compliant than cheap
    Home Depot chinese imports. Everything from the base metal
    to the plating on it.
    From a TE Connectivity quick reference guide:

    Current Carrying Capacity
    size 2.8mm 14A max with 1.5mm wire size
    size 4.8mm / 5.2mm 20A max with 2.5mm wire size
    size 6.3mm 28A max with 4 or 6mm wire size
    size 9.5mm 50A max with 10mm wire size

    https://www.mouser.com/pdfdocs/TEConnectivityFASTONQuickRefere
    nceG uide.PD
    F

    If you want reliable operation at a continuous current of 30A
    then use th
    e
    wider 375 series (9.5mm).

    I think the link i posted are round 6.3mm. It should be good
    for 400V 28A. The battery is 400V 26Ah. So, 1C
    charge/discharge should be within spec.

    Better still, use Anderson Powerpole. One of the key features
    of Powerpol
    e
    connectors is that the contact is separated from the spring
    so that each

    uses the most suitable material for its function.

    They costs at least 10x. I can use it (anderson) for the main
    feed, but will adapt to the rest (spade) I have 32 sets of 12V
    batteries connected together plus BMS junction tap (4 each).
    32x6 connectors cost money.

    So does Silver Plated Copper (SPC) with PTFE insulation, but
    that still does not discount the fact that it is what you should
    use.

    You could also perform a 180 degree bend in an uninsulated
    segment and use a lug that accepts that size and then solder it
    in instead of crimping (or both). That way, your wire has no
    breaks in it and two connections need only one lug.

    solder instead of crimp? with what purpose? maximize the risk of
    failure?

    Actually, properly made crimp connections are far more reliable
    than solder.

    Joe Gwinn


    Tensile wise, sure. No other reason.

    Both are actually best in a non flexure environment. Crimp, then
    solder. Rules out PVC completely because it creeps away from heat.
    That PVC crap should have been drummed out of the industry decades
    ago, IMNSHO.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno@decadenc@21:1/5 to Lasse Langwadt Christensen on Sat Jun 25 08:01:09 2022
    Lasse Langwadt Christensen <langwadt@fonz.dk> wrote in news:88a83f98-b9ff-4b05-ad85-12f5069b7576n@googlegroups.com:

    fredag den 24. juni 2022 kl. 19.34.02 UTC+2 skrev DecadentLinux...@decadence.org:
    Ed Lee <edward....@gmail.com> wrote in
    news:a887f1de-ed5c-439e...@googlegroups.com:
    On Friday, June 24, 2022 at 12:35:27 AM UTC-7, John Walliker
    wrote:
    On Friday, 24 June 2022 at 05:04:53 UTC+1,
    DecadentLinux...@decadence.org
    wrote:
    Don Y <blocked...@foo.invalid> wrote in
    news:t939gu$n72$1...@dont-email.me:
    On 6/23/2022 7:38 PM, Ed Lee wrote:
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/144578327967

    Blue is 15A. Yellow is 24A. But i need 30A.

    The contact areas are the same and looks like it can
    handle 30A as well.

    The only difference is the cylinder holding the wire. If
    the blue can hold 3xAWG18 (30A), why can't it handle 30A?

    Can i add more wires, for example, 3 more 1" stub wires
    as heat sink, using the yellow connectors?

    Why not use Anderson connectors?
    The WIRE getting attached to the lug is where you spec your
    current at. If the wire can take it, and the lug is meant
    for that gauge of wire, then it can also handle the current
    that wire can handle.

    If they cannot, then they are non-industry compliant JUNK.

    Name brands are far better and more compliant than cheap
    Home Depot chinese imports. Everything from the base metal
    to the plating on it.
    From a TE Connectivity quick reference guide:

    Current Carrying Capacity
    size 2.8mm 14A max with 1.5mm² wire size
    size 4.8mm / 5.2mm 20A max with 2.5mm² wire size
    size 6.3mm 28A max with 4 or 6mm² wire size
    size 9.5mm 50A max with 10mm² wire size

    https://www.mouser.com/pdfdocs/TEConnectivityFASTONQuickReferen
    ceG uide.PD
    F

    If you want reliable operation at a continuous current of 30A
    then use th
    e
    wider 375 series (9.5mm).

    I think the link i posted are round 6.3mm. It should be good
    for 400V 28A. The battery is 400V 26Ah. So, 1C charge/discharge
    should be within spec.

    Better still, use Anderson Powerpole. One of the key features
    of Powerpol
    e
    connectors is that the contact is separated from the spring so
    that each

    uses the most suitable material for its function.

    They costs at least 10x. I can use it (anderson) for the main
    feed, but will adapt to the rest (spade) I have 32 sets of 12V
    batteries connected together plus BMS junction tap (4 each).
    32x6 connectors cost money.

    So does Silver Plated Copper (SPC) with PTFE insulation, but that
    still does not discount the fact that it is what you should use.

    You could also perform a 180 degree bend in an uninsulated
    segment and use a lug that accepts that size and then solder it
    in instead of crimping (or both). That way, your wire has no
    breaks in it and two connections need only one lug.

    solder instead of crimp? with what purpose? maximize the risk of
    failure?




    Maximize? Maybe in a high stress constant flexing scenario. These
    are not going to be moving around.

    With crimp in a weathered setting as this, there may be oxidation
    issues with a mere crimp. A crimp AND soldering makes for a slightly
    better longevity, especially if one is using a cheap consumer single impingement crimp element instead of a good hex crimper or Amp
    crimper (w crimp).

    Soldering after crimping gives perhaps a bit more tensile capacity,
    and makes it weather tight.

    Soldering without crimping is less tensile strength than both
    together, but no less than crimp alone. Crimp alone is open to the
    environment though. Not many field crimps are gas tight and can
    oxidize or even exhibit galvanic responses.

    So it is more about weathering longevity. The 180 bend segments at
    all the key points in the wire makes for a better connection from
    cell to cell and less lugs are needed. I suppose one could place two
    wire ends in one lug, but I feel that the 180 degree bend in the
    continuous wire makes for a better way to make each node.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno@decadenc@21:1/5 to Lasse Langwadt Christensen on Sat Jun 25 08:08:53 2022
    Lasse Langwadt Christensen <langwadt@fonz.dk> wrote in news:52dcf7f0-766b-43b6-b412-3552acc3c6b7n@googlegroups.com:

    lørdag den 25. juni 2022 kl. 00.45.38 UTC+2 skrev Joe Gwinn:
    On Fri, 24 Jun 2022 10:46:57 -0700 (PDT), Lasse Langwadt
    Christensen <lang...@fonz.dk> wrote:

    fredag den 24. juni 2022 kl. 19.34.02 UTC+2 skrev
    DecadentLinux...@decad
    ence.org:
    Ed Lee <edward....@gmail.com> wrote in
    news:a887f1de-ed5c-439e...@googlegroups.com:
    On Friday, June 24, 2022 at 12:35:27 AM UTC-7, John Walliker
    wrote:
    On Friday, 24 June 2022 at 05:04:53 UTC+1,
    DecadentLinux...@decadence.org
    wrote:
    Don Y <blocked...@foo.invalid> wrote in
    news:t939gu$n72$1...@dont-email.me:
    On 6/23/2022 7:38 PM, Ed Lee wrote:
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/144578327967

    Blue is 15A. Yellow is 24A. But i need 30A.

    The contact areas are the same and looks like it can
    handle 30A as well.

    The only difference is the cylinder holding the wire.
    If the

    blue can hold 3xAWG18 (30A), why can't it handle 30A?

    Can i add more wires, for example, 3 more 1" stub
    wires as heat sink, using the yellow connectors?

    Why not use Anderson connectors?
    The WIRE getting attached to the lug is where you spec
    your current at. If the wire can take it, and the lug is
    meant for that gauge of wire, then it can also handle the
    current that wire can handle.

    If they cannot, then they are non-industry compliant
    JUNK.

    Name brands are far better and more compliant than cheap
    Home Depot chinese imports. Everything from the base
    metal to the plating on it.
    From a TE Connectivity quick reference guide:

    Current Carrying Capacity
    size 2.8mm 14A max with 1.5mm² wire size
    size 4.8mm / 5.2mm 20A max with 2.5mm² wire size
    size 6.3mm 28A max with 4 or 6mm² wire size
    size 9.5mm 50A max with 10mm² wire size

    https://www.mouser.com/pdfdocs/TEConnectivityFASTONQuickRefe
    renceG

    uide.PD
    F

    If you want reliable operation at a continuous current of
    30A then use th
    e
    wider 375 series (9.5mm).

    I think the link i posted are round 6.3mm. It should be good
    for 400V 28A. The battery is 400V 26Ah. So, 1C
    charge/discharge should be within spec.

    Better still, use Anderson Powerpole. One of the key
    features of Powerpol
    e
    connectors is that the contact is separated from the spring
    so that each

    uses the most suitable material for its function.

    They costs at least 10x. I can use it (anderson) for the
    main feed, but will adapt to the rest (spade) I have 32 sets
    of 12V batteries connected together plus BMS junction tap (4
    each). 32x6 connectors cost money.

    So does Silver Plated Copper (SPC) with PTFE insulation, but
    that still does not discount the fact that it is what you
    should use.

    You could also perform a 180 degree bend in an uninsulated
    segment and use a lug that accepts that size and then solder
    it in instead of

    crimping (or both). That way, your wire has no breaks in it
    and two connections need only one lug.

    solder instead of crimp? with what purpose? maximize the risk of
    failure
    ?
    Actually, properly made crimp connections are far more reliable
    than solder.

    exactly


    Nice try. If he does not want to pay for a premium brand of lugs,
    he is not going to have a premium grade crimper, so attaining "a
    proper crimp" is not as easy as it is in an industrial setting with
    proper tools being used.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno@decadenc@21:1/5 to Ed Lee on Sat Jun 25 08:03:00 2022
    Ed Lee <edward.ming.lee@gmail.com> wrote in news:d43cd76f-1516-447c-98b5-8c063fc345d5n@googlegroups.com:

    I just need something better than the other connections, so they
    blow up before the main feed, which is more difficult to replace.


    You want connections that act as fuses?

    Bad, extremely flawed logic.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ed Lee@21:1/5 to DecadentLinux...@decadence.org on Sat Jun 25 06:44:39 2022
    On Saturday, June 25, 2022 at 1:03:05 AM UTC-7, DecadentLinux...@decadence.org wrote:
    Ed Lee <edward....@gmail.com> wrote in news:d43cd76f-1516-447c...@googlegroups.com:
    I just need something better than the other connections, so they
    blow up before the main feed, which is more difficult to replace.

    You want connections that act as fuses?

    Bad, extremely flawed logic.

    There is a 30A fuse. Unfortunately, they don't have 28A fuse. If any connector burn out, i just want the main feed to be the last.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From whit3rd@21:1/5 to DecadentLinux...@decadence.org on Sat Jun 25 21:19:23 2022
    On Saturday, June 25, 2022 at 1:08:59 AM UTC-7, DecadentLinux...@decadence.org wrote:
    Lasse Langwadt Christensen <lang...@fonz.dk> wrote in news:52dcf7f0-766b-43b6...@googlegroups.com:
    lørdag den 25. juni 2022 kl. 00.45.38 UTC+2 skrev Joe Gwinn:

    Actually, properly made crimp connections are far more reliable
    than solder.

    exactly

    Nice try. If he does not want to pay for a premium brand of lugs,
    he is not going to have a premium grade crimper, so attaining "a
    proper crimp" is not as easy as it is in an industrial setting with
    proper tools being used.

    Yeah, the 'yellow lugs' mentioned are insulated, consumer items.
    Better crimping uses barrel crimps, electrode paste (for aluminum), well-stripped wire of the right gage, and a ratchet crimper that gets recertified occasionally, and... pulling random stuff out of the drawer
    and getting it all right is hard. Sometimes, I solder over a crimp, because...
    well, I goofed. But, I have used the right hydraulic crimp tools on heavy cable, too; it's
    reliable all right.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno@decadenc@21:1/5 to whit3rd@gmail.com on Sun Jun 26 08:48:09 2022
    whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com> wrote in news:69ec7fb4-8a21-4ec2-a7eb-d62966b067cen@googlegroups.com:

    On Saturday, June 25, 2022 at 1:08:59 AM UTC-7, DecadentLinux...@decadence.org wrote:
    Lasse Langwadt Christensen <lang...@fonz.dk> wrote in
    news:52dcf7f0-766b-43b6...@googlegroups.com:
    lørdag den 25. juni 2022 kl. 00.45.38 UTC+2 skrev Joe Gwinn:

    Actually, properly made crimp connections are far more
    reliable than solder.

    exactly

    Nice try. If he does not want to pay for a premium brand of lugs,
    he is not going to have a premium grade crimper, so attaining "a
    proper crimp" is not as easy as it is in an industrial setting
    with proper tools being used.

    Yeah, the 'yellow lugs' mentioned are insulated, consumer items.
    Better crimping uses barrel crimps, electrode paste (for
    aluminum), well-stripped wire of the right gage, and a ratchet
    crimper that gets recertified occasionally, and... pulling random
    stuff out of the drawer and getting it all right is hard.
    Sometimes, I solder over a crimp, because... well, I goofed.
    But, I have used the right hydraulic crimp tools on heavy cable,
    too; it's reliable all right.


    Yes. A proper crimp is even what is referred to as "gas tight", and
    has a very high pull strength before failure.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ed Lee@21:1/5 to Ricky on Sun Jun 26 09:02:16 2022
    On Sunday, June 26, 2022 at 8:45:40 AM UTC-7, Ricky wrote:
    On Sunday, June 26, 2022 at 12:19:29 AM UTC-4, whit3rd wrote:
    On Saturday, June 25, 2022 at 1:08:59 AM UTC-7, DecadentLinux...@decadence.org wrote:
    Lasse Langwadt Christensen <lang...@fonz.dk> wrote in news:52dcf7f0-766b-43b6...@googlegroups.com:
    lørdag den 25. juni 2022 kl. 00.45.38 UTC+2 skrev Joe Gwinn:

    Actually, properly made crimp connections are far more reliable
    than solder.

    exactly

    Nice try. If he does not want to pay for a premium brand of lugs,
    he is not going to have a premium grade crimper, so attaining "a
    proper crimp" is not as easy as it is in an industrial setting with proper tools being used.
    Yeah, the 'yellow lugs' mentioned are insulated, consumer items.
    Better crimping uses barrel crimps, electrode paste (for aluminum), well-stripped wire of the right gage, and a ratchet crimper that gets recertified occasionally, and... pulling random stuff out of the drawer and getting it all right is hard. Sometimes, I solder over a crimp, because...
    well, I goofed. But, I have used the right hydraulic crimp tools on heavy cable, too; it's
    reliable all right.
    What surprises me, is this is the primary way of connecting lead-acid batteries that are bigger than a D cell, and smaller than a motorcycle battery. The potential for reversing the leads is not tiny and the consequences enormous! I believe the lithium
    batteries typically used in model airplanes, etc. have a polarized connector that even offers protection from the surge current when plugged in.

    I use male plugs for positive and female socket for negative. No chance of reversing. For uni-sexual male circuit breaker, i use a short female to female adapter glued to it.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ricky@21:1/5 to All on Sun Jun 26 08:45:33 2022
    On Sunday, June 26, 2022 at 12:19:29 AM UTC-4, whit3rd wrote:
    On Saturday, June 25, 2022 at 1:08:59 AM UTC-7, DecadentLinux...@decadence.org wrote:
    Lasse Langwadt Christensen <lang...@fonz.dk> wrote in news:52dcf7f0-766b-43b6...@googlegroups.com:
    lørdag den 25. juni 2022 kl. 00.45.38 UTC+2 skrev Joe Gwinn:

    Actually, properly made crimp connections are far more reliable
    than solder.

    exactly

    Nice try. If he does not want to pay for a premium brand of lugs,
    he is not going to have a premium grade crimper, so attaining "a
    proper crimp" is not as easy as it is in an industrial setting with
    proper tools being used.
    Yeah, the 'yellow lugs' mentioned are insulated, consumer items.
    Better crimping uses barrel crimps, electrode paste (for aluminum), well-stripped wire of the right gage, and a ratchet crimper that gets recertified occasionally, and... pulling random stuff out of the drawer
    and getting it all right is hard. Sometimes, I solder over a crimp, because...
    well, I goofed. But, I have used the right hydraulic crimp tools on heavy cable, too; it's
    reliable all right.

    What surprises me, is this is the primary way of connecting lead-acid batteries that are bigger than a D cell, and smaller than a motorcycle battery. The potential for reversing the leads is not tiny and the consequences enormous! I believe the lithium
    batteries typically used in model airplanes, etc. have a polarized connector that even offers protection from the surge current when plugged in.

    --

    Rick C.

    - Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
    - Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Cydrome Leader@21:1/5 to Ed Lee on Mon Jun 27 07:03:35 2022
    Ed Lee <edward.ming.lee@gmail.com> wrote:
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/144578327967

    Blue is 15A. Yellow is 24A. But i need 30A.

    The contact areas are the same and looks like it can handle 30A as well.

    The only difference is the cylinder holding the wire. If the blue can
    hold 3xAWG18 (30A), why can't it handle 30A?

    Because it's a garbage connector kit that you linked to.

    Can i add more wires, for example, 3 more 1" stub wires as heat sink,
    using the yellow connectors?

    30 amps is no problem with a 0.250 faston stuff. Buy US made terminals
    that have fully welded sleeves for the wire or a second metal shroud
    over the folded part.

    You can see the second sleeve on this splash page for 3M if you look
    carefully at the dark blue terminal on the left.

    https://www.3m.com/3M/en_US/p/c/electrical/crimp-terminals/

    Panduit makes good crimp terminals too. Whatever Amp is named this week
    makes quality terminals too, but good luck sifting through all the
    variations of stuff.

    There are also non-copper terminals for high temperature use for things
    like heating elements.

    A good quality crimper and dies are required for a solid, high current
    ready connection.

    Panduit has a decent line of controlled cycle crimpers. Even the "pliers" CT-260 is a good tool for the style that's generally considered terrible.
    The bolter-cutter, wire stripper and crimp tools made of stamped sheet
    metal are no good.

    I use an AMP ratcheting style tool that takes the standard 3 size/gang
    dies. Good dies are polished so they release from the connector.

    If you want to cadillac of crimpers and dies, DMC is the place to talk to.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno@decadenc@21:1/5 to All on Mon Jun 27 07:38:48 2022
    Cydrome Leader <presence@MUNGEpanix.com> wrote in news:t9bko7$214$1@reader2.panix.com:

    snip

    DMC makes the mil pin crimpers. They have a quad style impingement
    die.

    The best electrical large lug commercial crimpers are AMP and Panduit
    and others like TE connectivity. No sense spending 500 dollars on a
    DMC when you can get an AMP for a few hundred less.

    Panduit, AMP, Leviton, TTI.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Cydrome Leader@21:1/5 to DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno@decadenc on Mon Jun 27 22:41:57 2022
    DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno@decadence.org wrote:
    Cydrome Leader <presence@MUNGEpanix.com> wrote in news:t9bko7$214$1@reader2.panix.com:

    snip

    DMC makes the mil pin crimpers. They have a quad style impingement
    die.

    The best electrical large lug commercial crimpers are AMP and Panduit
    and others like TE connectivity. No sense spending 500 dollars on a
    DMC when you can get an AMP for a few hundred less.

    Panduit, AMP, Leviton, TTI.

    DMC makes the plain 1" dies too. I've not looked for any on ebay, but good tools turn up there all the time.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)