• roll your own?

    From RichD@21:1/5 to All on Sat Jun 18 17:05:58 2022
    I recall working at a company making high precision
    manufacturing equipment, for semiconductor fabs.
    At one meeting, an engineer announced he wanted to
    design a custom motor, for a particular project.

    I wasn't involved in that, don't know the specs. But I
    wondered, and still wonder, what would be the requirement
    for a custom design? From a system perspective, my
    view of 'motor design' is thumbing through vendors'
    manuals. There are thousands of models available, of
    every form factor and power level.

    Why would you need to roll your own?

    --
    Rich

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  • From Anthony William Sloman@21:1/5 to RichD on Sun Jun 19 03:51:04 2022
    On Sunday, June 19, 2022 at 2:06:06 AM UTC+2, RichD wrote:
    I recall working at a company making high precision
    manufacturing equipment, for semiconductor fabs.
    At one meeting, an engineer announced he wanted to
    design a custom motor, for a particular project.

    I wasn't involved in that, don't know the specs. But I
    wondered, and still wonder, what would be the requirement
    for a custom design? From a system perspective, my
    view of 'motor design' is thumbing through vendors'
    manuals. There are thousands of models available, of
    every form factor and power level.

    Why would you need to roll your own?

    I've contemplated it for a couple of projects. The one that comes to mind was for better electric piano.

    Piano keyboards are complicated mechanisms with some 14 to 19 moving parts per key, and keyboard touch is extremely important for concert pianists.

    One of the things that mechanism does is to detach the hammer that huts string form the key you press to get it moving before the hammer actually hits the spring, and the pianist can clearly feel that release as the key goes down. Nobody is conscious of
    it but the exact moment the hammer hits the string is controlled to within 10msec at concert level performance. Caroline Palmer wrote her Ph.D. about it

    The linear motor that would be narrow enough to fit in the width between the keys, long enough to cover the key travel and powerful enough to generate the forces required wasn't on offer in any of the manuals I looked at. It took me a while to sort out a
    design that might have worked, and the cost of making 88 of them put me off. One researcher put together a ten key element of a calliope keyboard - where the keys were a bit further apart - based on head positioning motors he'd dug out of obsolete hard
    disk drives, but it was purely a proof of principle machine.

    --
    Bill Sloman, Sydney

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  • From jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com@21:1/5 to r_delaney2001@yahoo.com on Sun Jun 19 07:02:11 2022
    On Sat, 18 Jun 2022 17:05:58 -0700 (PDT), RichD
    <r_delaney2001@yahoo.com> wrote:

    I recall working at a company making high precision
    manufacturing equipment, for semiconductor fabs.
    At one meeting, an engineer announced he wanted to
    design a custom motor, for a particular project.

    I wasn't involved in that, don't know the specs. But I
    wondered, and still wonder, what would be the requirement
    for a custom design? From a system perspective, my
    view of 'motor design' is thumbing through vendors'
    manuals. There are thousands of models available, of
    every form factor and power level.

    Why would you need to roll your own?

    A wafer scanner has high-power lightweight motors that move big things
    around with nanometer precision, even in motion. That is a very
    special motor.

    Some aircraft and spacecraft motors have to run at +- hundreds of
    degrees C. Lots of motors, valves, alternators, solenoids, synchros,
    torque motors, things like that on airplanes are full custom. It's
    even hard to get data sheets.

    I've had to get used units by various means and measure them. Some
    people even consider the weight to be secret.

    ebay sometimes helps, or second-tier suppliers, basically aircraft
    junkyards.



    --

    Anybody can count to one.

    - Robert Widlar

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  • From Les Cargill@21:1/5 to RichD on Fri Jun 24 21:59:55 2022
    RichD wrote:
    I recall working at a company making high precision
    manufacturing equipment, for semiconductor fabs.
    At one meeting, an engineer announced he wanted to
    design a custom motor, for a particular project.

    I wasn't involved in that, don't know the specs. But I
    wondered, and still wonder, what would be the requirement
    for a custom design? From a system perspective, my
    view of 'motor design' is thumbing through vendors'
    manuals. There are thousands of models available, of
    every form factor and power level.

    Why would you need to roll your own?

    --
    Rich


    1) Can't get one.
    1.a) Can only get one through sketchy and unreliable channels.
    2) Control of quality parameters is a universally agreed critical
    risk item.
    3) The motor design team is owed a favor and out of charge numbers.
    4) You need to put a motor in yourself: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CuQH6M8s6Cw

    --
    Les Cargill

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