• vitamin A

    From John Larkin@21:1/5 to All on Tue Jun 14 10:29:56 2022
    Eyesight is important in this biz.

    Make sure you get lots of vitamin A, but not too much. It's good for
    your retinas and can help prevent macular degeneration.

    --

    If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end with doubts,
    but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties. Francis Bacon

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From John S@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Tue Jun 14 13:28:39 2022
    On 6/14/2022 12:29 PM, John Larkin wrote:
    Eyesight is important in this biz.

    Make sure you get lots of vitamin A, but not too much. It's good for
    your retinas and can help prevent macular degeneration.


    Bausch and Lomb make PreserVision AREDS pills for that purpose. I take
    them because I have the early stage of macular degeneration.

    tinyurl.com/rchzazrc

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Fred Bloggs@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Tue Jun 14 12:34:21 2022
    On Tuesday, June 14, 2022 at 1:30:08 PM UTC-4, John Larkin wrote:
    Eyesight is important in this biz.

    Make sure you get lots of vitamin A, but not too much. It's good for
    your retinas and can help prevent macular degeneration.

    Supplements will not reverse an existing condition. There is significant reduction of progression from intermediate to advanced AMD, 25%, which is something. AREDS and AREDS2 supplements do not prevent AMD onset. The beta-carotene bit is from an old
    study out of Finland that yielded surprising results. They were dosing the test subjects with huge 50,000 IU (or something ) dosing, and it was Finland so of course they were all drunks. Even supplementation with vitamin E has been shown to increase
    death from all causes by 13% for some reason no one knows. You can't even be outside during a thunderstorm, the vitamin E will attract a strike.

    https://www.nei.nih.gov/research/clinical-trials/age-related-eye-disease-studies-aredsareds2/about-areds-and-areds2

    That's the one and only link I'm giving for that certain group of worthless link-collectors.


    --

    If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end with doubts,
    but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties. Francis Bacon

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Martin Brown@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Tue Jun 14 20:23:10 2022
    On 14/06/2022 18:29, John Larkin wrote:
    Eyesight is important in this biz.

    Make sure you get lots of vitamin A, but not too much. It's good for
    your retinas and can help prevent macular degeneration.

    Vitamin A is one of the more poisonous vitamins. It is quite hard to be deficient in it with a normal diet. Eating polar bear liver can be fatal because of the high concentration of vitamin A in it. Second one down:

    https://blogs.unimelb.edu.au/sciencecommunication/2016/10/04/eating-these-animals-just-might-kill-you/#

    Or the infamous case of the UK guy with a carrot juice addiction.

    https://www.nytimes.com/1974/02/17/archives/carrotjuice-addiction-cited-in-britons-death.html

    Golden rice has been made by GM to avoid problems in the third world.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_rice

    --
    Regards,
    Martin Brown

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From John Larkin@21:1/5 to All on Tue Jun 14 12:16:55 2022
    On Tue, 14 Jun 2022 13:28:39 -0500, John S <Sophi.2@invalid.org>
    wrote:

    On 6/14/2022 12:29 PM, John Larkin wrote:
    Eyesight is important in this biz.

    Make sure you get lots of vitamin A, but not too much. It's good for
    your retinas and can help prevent macular degeneration.


    Bausch and Lomb make PreserVision AREDS pills for that purpose. I take
    them because I have the early stage of macular degeneration.

    tinyurl.com/rchzazrc

    That stuff looks good.

    I was disgnosed with major MD and got a pretty gloomy lecture about my
    future. Then they did a retinal tomograph just for fun and found a
    macular hole, not MD. That can probably be repaired, but the scare
    made me amp up on Vitamin A.

    My eyesight is horrible anyhow. My Mantis is indispensable when
    probing or soldering or hacking small stuff.

    --

    If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end with doubts,
    but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties. Francis Bacon

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Tabby@21:1/5 to Martin Brown on Tue Jun 14 14:25:12 2022
    On Tuesday, 14 June 2022 at 20:23:23 UTC+1, Martin Brown wrote:
    On 14/06/2022 18:29, John Larkin wrote:
    Eyesight is important in this biz.

    Make sure you get lots of vitamin A, but not too much. It's good for
    your retinas and can help prevent macular degeneration.
    Vitamin A is one of the more poisonous vitamins. It is quite hard to be deficient in it with a normal diet. Eating polar bear liver can be fatal because of the high concentration of vitamin A in it. Second one down:

    https://blogs.unimelb.edu.au/sciencecommunication/2016/10/04/eating-these-animals-just-might-kill-you/#

    Or the infamous case of the UK guy with a carrot juice addiction.

    https://www.nytimes.com/1974/02/17/archives/carrotjuice-addiction-cited-in-britons-death.html

    Golden rice has been made by GM to avoid problems in the third world.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_rice

    Carrots don't contain vitamin A, they have carotenes. The rate of conversion to vitamin A in humans is close to zero.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Lasse Langwadt Christensen@21:1/5 to All on Tue Jun 14 14:38:22 2022
    tirsdag den 14. juni 2022 kl. 23.25.16 UTC+2 skrev Tabby:
    On Tuesday, 14 June 2022 at 20:23:23 UTC+1, Martin Brown wrote:
    On 14/06/2022 18:29, John Larkin wrote:
    Eyesight is important in this biz.

    Make sure you get lots of vitamin A, but not too much. It's good for
    your retinas and can help prevent macular degeneration.
    Vitamin A is one of the more poisonous vitamins. It is quite hard to be deficient in it with a normal diet. Eating polar bear liver can be fatal because of the high concentration of vitamin A in it. Second one down:

    https://blogs.unimelb.edu.au/sciencecommunication/2016/10/04/eating-these-animals-just-might-kill-you/#

    Or the infamous case of the UK guy with a carrot juice addiction.

    https://www.nytimes.com/1974/02/17/archives/carrotjuice-addiction-cited-in-britons-death.html

    Golden rice has been made by GM to avoid problems in the third world.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_rice
    Carrots don't contain vitamin A, they have carotenes. The rate of conversion to vitamin A in humans is close to zero.

    hmm https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/91/5/1468S/4597430

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Clifford Heath@21:1/5 to Lasse Langwadt Christensen on Wed Jun 15 08:53:00 2022
    On 15/6/22 07:38, Lasse Langwadt Christensen wrote:
    tirsdag den 14. juni 2022 kl. 23.25.16 UTC+2 skrev Tabby:
    On Tuesday, 14 June 2022 at 20:23:23 UTC+1, Martin Brown wrote:
    On 14/06/2022 18:29, John Larkin wrote:
    Eyesight is important in this biz.

    Make sure you get lots of vitamin A, but not too much. It's good for
    your retinas and can help prevent macular degeneration.
    Vitamin A is one of the more poisonous vitamins. It is quite hard to be
    deficient in it with a normal diet. Eating polar bear liver can be fatal >>> because of the high concentration of vitamin A in it. Second one down:

    https://blogs.unimelb.edu.au/sciencecommunication/2016/10/04/eating-these-animals-just-might-kill-you/#

    Or the infamous case of the UK guy with a carrot juice addiction.

    https://www.nytimes.com/1974/02/17/archives/carrotjuice-addiction-cited-in-britons-death.html

    Golden rice has been made by GM to avoid problems in the third world.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_rice
    Carrots don't contain vitamin A, they have carotenes. The rate of conversion to vitamin A in humans is close to zero.

    hmm https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/91/5/1468S/4597430

    Conversion rates as low as 28:1... meaning a single carrot will give you sufficient vitamin-A for months of normal sight.

    We don't use much retinol. Buying vitamin A pills is just dumb.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Martin Rid@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Tue Jun 14 18:56:50 2022
    John Larkin <jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> Wrote in message:r
    On Tue, 14 Jun 2022 13:28:39 -0500, John S <Sophi.2@invalid.org>wrote:>On 6/14/2022 12:29 PM, John Larkin wrote:>> Eyesight is important in this biz.>> >> Make sure you get lots of vitamin A, but not too much. It's good for>> your retinas and can help
    prevent macular degeneration.>> >>Bausch and Lomb make PreserVision AREDS pills for that purpose. I take >them because I have the early stage of macular degeneration.>>tinyurl.com/rchzazrcThat stuff looks good.I was disgnosed with major MD and got a
    pretty gloomy lecture about myfuture. Then they did a retinal tomograph just for fun and found amacular hole, not MD. That can probably be repaired, but the scaremade me amp up on Vitamin A.My eyesight is horrible anyhow. My Mantis is indispensable
    whenprobing or soldering or hacking small stuff.-- If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end with doubts, but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties.Francis Bacon

    Make sure you use a fume extractor when soldering. That flux
    isn't good for your corneas either.

    Cheers
    --


    ----Android NewsGroup Reader---- https://piaohong.s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/usenet/index.html

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  • From John Doe@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Tue Jun 14 23:48:14 2022
    John Larkin <jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote:

    Eyesight is important in this biz.

    Make sure you get lots of vitamin A, but not too much. It's good for
    your retinas and can help prevent macular degeneration.

    I doubt anything besides maybe a good diet helps prevent macular
    degeneration. I never got any such advice before cataract surgery.

    Nothing against vitamins, I have always taken ordinary multivitamin multimineral supplements like One-A-Day or Centrum (regular).

    You don't know how bad your eyesight is until they stick new lenses in
    there. I was in-line street skating ("rollerblading" to the layman) for
    years, often at nighttime. Might have been even more fun with clear
    vision. DEFINITELY would have been more fun with a modern, lightweight, extremely bright headlamp.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From a a@21:1/5 to Tabby on Tue Jun 14 17:09:03 2022
    On Tuesday, 14 June 2022 at 23:25:16 UTC+2, Tabby wrote:
    On Tuesday, 14 June 2022 at 20:23:23 UTC+1, Martin Brown wrote:
    On 14/06/2022 18:29, John Larkin wrote:
    Eyesight is important in this biz.

    Make sure you get lots of vitamin A, but not too much. It's good for your retinas and can help prevent macular degeneration.
    Vitamin A is one of the more poisonous vitamins. It is quite hard to be deficient in it with a normal diet. Eating polar bear liver can be fatal because of the high concentration of vitamin A in it. Second one down:

    https://blogs.unimelb.edu.au/sciencecommunication/2016/10/04/eating-these-animals-just-might-kill-you/#

    Or the infamous case of the UK guy with a carrot juice addiction.

    https://www.nytimes.com/1974/02/17/archives/carrotjuice-addiction-cited-in-britons-death.html

    Golden rice has been made by GM to avoid problems in the third world.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_rice
    Carrots don't contain vitamin A, they have carotenes. The rate of conversion to vitamin A in humans is close to zero.
    fake

    Actually, carrots are pretty rich in carotenoids. 100g contain 8,280 mcg of beta-carotene and 3,480 of alpha-carotene. Practically, a medium carrot has about 500 mcg RAE of vitamin A, or 56% of the recommended daily intake! Furthermore, you could drink
    carrot juice to really boost your vitamin A intake.
    How much vitamin A in carrots? - LazyPlant lazyplant.com/vegan-diet/vitamin-a-in-carrots/ lazyplant.com/vegan-diet/vitamin-a-in-carrots/


    Is Vitamin A In Carrots - TheSuperHealthyFood https://thesuperhealthyfood.com/is-vitamin-a-in-carrots

    12.06.2022 · Carrots are an excellent source of vitamin A in the form of beta carotene. They are also a good source of several B vitamins, as well as vitamin K and potassium. Other plant


    What are the benefits of vitamin A in carrots?
    Vitamin A is a fat-soluble vitamin that increases body immunity, organ function, and eye health. Vitamin A also increases visual acuity to adjust your eyes in dimming light. One cup of raw carrots gives 50 calories and 430% of the daily value for vitamin
    A and cooked carrots provide 530% of the recommended daily value per cup.

    10 Vitamin in Carrots: Nutrition Facts and Health Benefits www.thewownutrition.com/vitamin-in-carrots/

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  • From David Eather@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Wed Jun 15 10:34:22 2022
    On 15/06/2022 3:29 am, John Larkin wrote:
    Eyesight is important in this biz.

    Make sure you get lots of vitamin A, but not too much. It's good for
    your retinas and can help prevent macular degeneration.


    You might also like to try Taurine which has heaps of research showing a positive (albeit sometimes small) benefit. And Lutein which has a long
    history of use to prevent and treat MD.

    I might be on JL's shit list so can someone who isn't respond so he
    see's this - nothing worse than sitting in the dark if you don't have to.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Larkin@21:1/5 to martin_riddle@verison.net on Tue Jun 14 17:22:27 2022
    On Tue, 14 Jun 2022 18:56:50 -0400 (EDT), Martin Rid <martin_riddle@verison.net> wrote:

    John Larkin <jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> Wrote in message:r
    On Tue, 14 Jun 2022 13:28:39 -0500, John S <Sophi.2@invalid.org>wrote:>On 6/14/2022 12:29 PM, John Larkin wrote:>> Eyesight is important in this biz.>> >> Make sure you get lots of vitamin A, but not too much. It's good for>> your retinas and can help
    prevent macular degeneration.>> >>Bausch and Lomb make PreserVision AREDS pills for that purpose. I take >them because I have the early stage of macular degeneration.>>tinyurl.com/rchzazrcThat stuff looks good.I was disgnosed with major MD and got a
    pretty gloomy lecture about myfuture. Then they did a retinal tomograph just for fun and found amacular hole, not MD. That can probably be repaired, but the scaremade me amp up on Vitamin A.My eyesight is horrible anyhow. My Mantis is indispensable
    whenprobing or soldering or hacking small stuff.-- If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end with doubts, but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties.Francis Bacon

    Make sure you use a fume extractor when soldering. That flux
    isn't good for your corneas either.

    Cheers

    My eyes are tucked into the Mantis visor, about 12" above the bench.
    Another great thing about the Mantis is the huge working distance.

    --

    If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end with doubts,
    but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties. Francis Bacon

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From rbowman@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Tue Jun 14 20:24:01 2022
    On 06/14/2022 01:16 PM, John Larkin wrote:
    I was disgnosed with major MD and got a pretty gloomy lecture about my future. Then they did a retinal tomograph just for fun and found a
    macular hole, not MD. That can probably be repaired, but the scare
    made me amp up on Vitamin A.

    I had a macular hole repair about 4 years ago. The operation itself
    isn't a big deal. The vitreous fluid is removed and the eye inflated
    with a gas. Sulfur hexafluoride is the more modern one and absorbs
    faster. That's where the fun begins. To ensure the gas supports the
    retina you are required to be face down for about three days depending
    on the surgeon. As a bonus the SF6 hastens cataract formation.

    There's an interesting effect as the eyeball refills with vitreous
    fluid. It brings home the fact that the image on the retina is upside
    down and your brain does some post-processing.

    I haven't done the cataract operation yet although I should. It takes a
    long time for the hole to refill with sensors and between that and the
    cataract I still see a little distortion in printed material etc.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com@21:1/5 to All on Tue Jun 14 21:10:05 2022
    On Tue, 14 Jun 2022 20:24:01 -0600, rbowman <bowman@montana.com>
    wrote:

    On 06/14/2022 01:16 PM, John Larkin wrote:
    I was disgnosed with major MD and got a pretty gloomy lecture about my
    future. Then they did a retinal tomograph just for fun and found a
    macular hole, not MD. That can probably be repaired, but the scare
    made me amp up on Vitamin A.

    I had a macular hole repair about 4 years ago. The operation itself
    isn't a big deal. The vitreous fluid is removed and the eye inflated
    with a gas. Sulfur hexafluoride is the more modern one and absorbs
    faster. That's where the fun begins. To ensure the gas supports the
    retina you are required to be face down for about three days depending
    on the surgeon. As a bonus the SF6 hastens cataract formation.

    There's an interesting effect as the eyeball refills with vitreous
    fluid. It brings home the fact that the image on the retina is upside
    down and your brain does some post-processing.

    I haven't done the cataract operation yet although I should. It takes a
    long time for the hole to refill with sensors and between that and the >cataract I still see a little distortion in printed material etc.


    I had cataract surgery on my right eye. Followed by a tear, a massive
    retinal detach, vitrectomy, retina repair, laser spot welding,
    secondary cataract, two laser fixes for that. Everything went wrong
    but it's fine now. It's stunning how good opthomologists are these
    days.

    Some people say that the inverted human retina is a mistake of
    evolution. I disagree: virtuous humor is the mistake. Eyes are much
    better off with liquid inside than with gummy gel.

    Time to do the left one now: first cataract surgery, then the macular
    hole repair. These things take 20 minutes and don't hurt at all.

    I'm going for nearsighted in both eyes, for reading and computing and
    close work.





    --

    Anybody can count to one.

    - Robert Widlar

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  • From rbowman@21:1/5 to jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com on Wed Jun 15 08:15:42 2022
    On 06/14/2022 10:10 PM, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    I had cataract surgery on my right eye. Followed by a tear, a massive
    retinal detach, vitrectomy, retina repair, laser spot welding,
    secondary cataract, two laser fixes for that. Everything went wrong
    but it's fine now. It's stunning how good opthomologists are these
    days.

    I had a little welding done prior to the hole repair. The shrinking
    vitreous resulted in a little bleeder and I suddenly had floaters from
    hell.

    Some people say that the inverted human retina is a mistake of
    evolution. I disagree: virtuous humor is the mistake. Eyes are much
    better off with liquid inside than with gummy gel.

    It's not a mistake, just optics. I recall an experiment where the
    subject wore prismatic glasses that would invert the image. In a few
    days the brain adapted. The optic chiasm is another design feature,
    sort of a signal splitter followed by a mixer.


    I'm going for nearsighted in both eyes, for reading and computing and
    close work.

    I'll probably go nearsighted for my right eye since it naturally is more nearsighted than my left.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From John Larkin@21:1/5 to eatREMOVEher@tpg.com.au on Wed Jun 15 13:49:26 2022
    On Wed, 15 Jun 2022 10:34:22 +1000, David Eather
    <eatREMOVEher@tpg.com.au> wrote:

    On 15/06/2022 3:29 am, John Larkin wrote:
    Eyesight is important in this biz.

    Make sure you get lots of vitamin A, but not too much. It's good for
    your retinas and can help prevent macular degeneration.


    You might also like to try Taurine which has heaps of research showing a >positive (albeit sometimes small) benefit. And Lutein which has a long >history of use to prevent and treat MD.

    I might be on JL's shit list so can someone who isn't respond so he
    see's this - nothing worse than sitting in the dark if you don't have to.

    There are a few people here who are not worth reading, much less
    responding to, but you're not one of them.

    Eyesight is not a very far off-topic issue for electronic designers.
    Our biz is very visual and often the parts are hard to see.



    --

    If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end with doubts,
    but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties. Francis Bacon

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Larkin@21:1/5 to All on Wed Jun 15 13:45:06 2022
    On Wed, 15 Jun 2022 08:15:42 -0600, rbowman <bowman@montana.com>
    wrote:

    On 06/14/2022 10:10 PM, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    I had cataract surgery on my right eye. Followed by a tear, a massive
    retinal detach, vitrectomy, retina repair, laser spot welding,
    secondary cataract, two laser fixes for that. Everything went wrong
    but it's fine now. It's stunning how good opthomologists are these
    days.

    I had a little welding done prior to the hole repair. The shrinking
    vitreous resulted in a little bleeder and I suddenly had floaters from
    hell.

    Some people say that the inverted human retina is a mistake of
    evolution. I disagree: virtuous humor is the mistake. Eyes are much
    better off with liquid inside than with gummy gel.

    It's not a mistake, just optics. I recall an experiment where the
    subject wore prismatic glasses that would invert the image. In a few
    days the brain adapted. The optic chiasm is another design feature,
    sort of a signal splitter followed by a mixer.


    I'm going for nearsighted in both eyes, for reading and computing and
    close work.

    I'll probably go nearsighted for my right eye since it naturally is more >nearsighted than my left.


    If you skew the focal lengths, your brain will merge the images and
    you can get sharp vision over a pretty wide distance range. My fake
    lens focusses at about 17", so the new one might be 10 or 12. I'm
    going to talk to the cataract surgeon about how far that concept can
    be pushed. 17 works for computing and most reading but is marginal for
    fine print.

    --

    If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end with doubts,
    but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties. Francis Bacon

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Tabby@21:1/5 to lang...@fonz.dk on Wed Jun 15 15:40:14 2022
    On Tuesday, 14 June 2022 at 22:38:27 UTC+1, lang...@fonz.dk wrote:
    tirsdag den 14. juni 2022 kl. 23.25.16 UTC+2 skrev Tabby:
    On Tuesday, 14 June 2022 at 20:23:23 UTC+1, Martin Brown wrote:
    On 14/06/2022 18:29, John Larkin wrote:
    Eyesight is important in this biz.

    Make sure you get lots of vitamin A, but not too much. It's good for your retinas and can help prevent macular degeneration.
    Vitamin A is one of the more poisonous vitamins. It is quite hard to be deficient in it with a normal diet. Eating polar bear liver can be fatal because of the high concentration of vitamin A in it. Second one down:

    https://blogs.unimelb.edu.au/sciencecommunication/2016/10/04/eating-these-animals-just-might-kill-you/#

    Or the infamous case of the UK guy with a carrot juice addiction.

    https://www.nytimes.com/1974/02/17/archives/carrotjuice-addiction-cited-in-britons-death.html

    Golden rice has been made by GM to avoid problems in the third world.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_rice
    Carrots don't contain vitamin A, they have carotenes. The rate of conversion to vitamin A in humans is close to zero.
    hmm https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/91/5/1468S/4597430

    says " There is a wide variation in conversion factors reported not only between different studies but also between individuals in a particular study."
    so one can not rely on carotenes ro provide vit A.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Tabby@21:1/5 to a a on Wed Jun 15 15:44:57 2022
    On Wednesday, 15 June 2022 at 01:09:08 UTC+1, a a wrote:
    On Tuesday, 14 June 2022 at 23:25:16 UTC+2, Tabby wrote:
    On Tuesday, 14 June 2022 at 20:23:23 UTC+1, Martin Brown wrote:
    On 14/06/2022 18:29, John Larkin wrote:
    Eyesight is important in this biz.

    Make sure you get lots of vitamin A, but not too much. It's good for your retinas and can help prevent macular degeneration.
    Vitamin A is one of the more poisonous vitamins. It is quite hard to be deficient in it with a normal diet. Eating polar bear liver can be fatal because of the high concentration of vitamin A in it. Second one down:

    https://blogs.unimelb.edu.au/sciencecommunication/2016/10/04/eating-these-animals-just-might-kill-you/#

    Or the infamous case of the UK guy with a carrot juice addiction.

    https://www.nytimes.com/1974/02/17/archives/carrotjuice-addiction-cited-in-britons-death.html

    Golden rice has been made by GM to avoid problems in the third world.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_rice
    Carrots don't contain vitamin A, they have carotenes. The rate of conversion to vitamin A in humans is close to zero.
    fake

    Actually, carrots are pretty rich in carotenoids. 100g contain 8,280 mcg of beta-carotene and 3,480 of alpha-carotene. Practically, a medium carrot has about 500 mcg RAE of vitamin A, or 56% of the recommended daily intake! Furthermore, you could drink
    carrot juice to really boost your vitamin A intake.
    How much vitamin A in carrots? - LazyPlant lazyplant.com/vegan-diet/vitamin-a-in-carrots/ lazyplant.com/vegan-diet/vitamin-a-in-carrots/


    Is Vitamin A In Carrots - TheSuperHealthyFood https://thesuperhealthyfood.com/is-vitamin-a-in-carrots

    12.06.2022 · Carrots are an excellent source of vitamin A in the form of beta carotene. They are also a good source of several B vitamins, as well as vitamin K and potassium. Other plant


    What are the benefits of vitamin A in carrots?
    Vitamin A is a fat-soluble vitamin that increases body immunity, organ function, and eye health. Vitamin A also increases visual acuity to adjust your eyes in dimming light. One cup of raw carrots gives 50 calories and 430% of the daily value for
    vitamin A and cooked carrots provide 530% of the recommended daily value per cup.

    10 Vitamin in Carrots: Nutrition Facts and Health Benefits https://thesuperhealthyfood.com/is-vitamin-a-in-carrots

    your refs are simplistic misinformation. Read studies if you want to know.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From rbowman@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Wed Jun 15 22:14:29 2022
    On 06/15/2022 02:45 PM, John Larkin wrote:
    On Wed, 15 Jun 2022 08:15:42 -0600, rbowman <bowman@montana.com>
    wrote:

    On 06/14/2022 10:10 PM, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    I had cataract surgery on my right eye. Followed by a tear, a massive
    retinal detach, vitrectomy, retina repair, laser spot welding,
    secondary cataract, two laser fixes for that. Everything went wrong
    but it's fine now. It's stunning how good opthomologists are these
    days.

    I had a little welding done prior to the hole repair. The shrinking
    vitreous resulted in a little bleeder and I suddenly had floaters from
    hell.

    Some people say that the inverted human retina is a mistake of
    evolution. I disagree: virtuous humor is the mistake. Eyes are much
    better off with liquid inside than with gummy gel.

    It's not a mistake, just optics. I recall an experiment where the
    subject wore prismatic glasses that would invert the image. In a few
    days the brain adapted. The optic chiasm is another design feature,
    sort of a signal splitter followed by a mixer.


    I'm going for nearsighted in both eyes, for reading and computing and
    close work.

    I'll probably go nearsighted for my right eye since it naturally is more
    nearsighted than my left.


    If you skew the focal lengths, your brain will merge the images and
    you can get sharp vision over a pretty wide distance range. My fake
    lens focusses at about 17", so the new one might be 10 or 12. I'm
    going to talk to the cataract surgeon about how far that concept can
    be pushed. 17 works for computing and most reading but is marginal for
    fine print.


    That's my current problem. My right eye is corrected as much as possible
    given the cataract but there is some distortion. It is also my dominant
    eye so the merging can get strange.

    I used to wear multifocal contacts that worked really well but didn't go
    back to them after the repair job. They don't work for all people though.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From rbowman@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Wed Jun 15 22:16:28 2022
    On 06/15/2022 02:49 PM, John Larkin wrote:
    On Wed, 15 Jun 2022 10:34:22 +1000, David Eather
    <eatREMOVEher@tpg.com.au> wrote:

    On 15/06/2022 3:29 am, John Larkin wrote:
    Eyesight is important in this biz.

    Make sure you get lots of vitamin A, but not too much. It's good for
    your retinas and can help prevent macular degeneration.


    You might also like to try Taurine which has heaps of research showing a
    positive (albeit sometimes small) benefit. And Lutein which has a long
    history of use to prevent and treat MD.

    I might be on JL's shit list so can someone who isn't respond so he
    see's this - nothing worse than sitting in the dark if you don't have to.

    There are a few people here who are not worth reading, much less
    responding to, but you're not one of them.

    Eyesight is not a very far off-topic issue for electronic designers.
    Our biz is very visual and often the parts are hard to see.



    SMC was the end of my hacking hardware for the most part. Resistor? What resistor?

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com@21:1/5 to All on Wed Jun 15 21:24:49 2022
    On Wed, 15 Jun 2022 22:14:29 -0600, rbowman <bowman@montana.com>
    wrote:

    On 06/15/2022 02:45 PM, John Larkin wrote:
    On Wed, 15 Jun 2022 08:15:42 -0600, rbowman <bowman@montana.com>
    wrote:

    On 06/14/2022 10:10 PM, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    I had cataract surgery on my right eye. Followed by a tear, a massive
    retinal detach, vitrectomy, retina repair, laser spot welding,
    secondary cataract, two laser fixes for that. Everything went wrong
    but it's fine now. It's stunning how good opthomologists are these
    days.

    I had a little welding done prior to the hole repair. The shrinking
    vitreous resulted in a little bleeder and I suddenly had floaters from
    hell.

    Some people say that the inverted human retina is a mistake of
    evolution. I disagree: virtuous humor is the mistake. Eyes are much
    better off with liquid inside than with gummy gel.

    It's not a mistake, just optics. I recall an experiment where the
    subject wore prismatic glasses that would invert the image. In a few
    days the brain adapted. The optic chiasm is another design feature,
    sort of a signal splitter followed by a mixer.


    I'm going for nearsighted in both eyes, for reading and computing and
    close work.

    I'll probably go nearsighted for my right eye since it naturally is more >>> nearsighted than my left.


    If you skew the focal lengths, your brain will merge the images and
    you can get sharp vision over a pretty wide distance range. My fake
    lens focusses at about 17", so the new one might be 10 or 12. I'm
    going to talk to the cataract surgeon about how far that concept can
    be pushed. 17 works for computing and most reading but is marginal for
    fine print.


    That's my current problem. My right eye is corrected as much as possible >given the cataract but there is some distortion. It is also my dominant
    eye so the merging can get strange.

    I used to wear multifocal contacts that worked really well but didn't go
    back to them after the repair job. They don't work for all people though.

    Get the cataract fixed. It's fairly easy and makes an enormous
    difference.



    --

    Anybody can count to one.

    - Robert Widlar

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com@21:1/5 to All on Wed Jun 15 21:29:43 2022
    On Wed, 15 Jun 2022 22:16:28 -0600, rbowman <bowman@montana.com>
    wrote:

    On 06/15/2022 02:49 PM, John Larkin wrote:
    On Wed, 15 Jun 2022 10:34:22 +1000, David Eather
    <eatREMOVEher@tpg.com.au> wrote:

    On 15/06/2022 3:29 am, John Larkin wrote:
    Eyesight is important in this biz.

    Make sure you get lots of vitamin A, but not too much. It's good for
    your retinas and can help prevent macular degeneration.


    You might also like to try Taurine which has heaps of research showing a >>> positive (albeit sometimes small) benefit. And Lutein which has a long
    history of use to prevent and treat MD.

    I might be on JL's shit list so can someone who isn't respond so he
    see's this - nothing worse than sitting in the dark if you don't have to. >>
    There are a few people here who are not worth reading, much less
    responding to, but you're not one of them.

    Eyesight is not a very far off-topic issue for electronic designers.
    Our biz is very visual and often the parts are hard to see.



    SMC was the end of my hacking hardware for the most part. Resistor? What >resistor?

    Once I thought a 1206 was small. But I still hate 0402s and US8
    packages.

    Some great parts come in US8, but they are terrible to probe.

    https://www.dropbox.com/s/8oefk1v8avr6l7a/Probe_Slips.jpg?raw=1



    --

    Anybody can count to one.

    - Robert Widlar

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  • From Ricky@21:1/5 to John Doe on Wed Jun 15 23:50:24 2022
    On Tuesday, June 14, 2022 at 7:48:21 PM UTC-4, John Doe wrote:
    John Larkin <jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote:

    Eyesight is important in this biz.

    Make sure you get lots of vitamin A, but not too much. It's good for
    your retinas and can help prevent macular degeneration.
    I doubt anything besides maybe a good diet helps prevent macular degeneration. I never got any such advice before cataract surgery.

    Nothing against vitamins, I have always taken ordinary multivitamin multimineral supplements like One-A-Day or Centrum (regular).

    You don't know how bad your eyesight is until they stick new lenses in
    there. I was in-line street skating ("rollerblading" to the layman) for years, often at nighttime. Might have been even more fun with clear
    vision. DEFINITELY would have been more fun with a modern, lightweight, extremely bright headlamp.

    Someone explain to me why the John Doe troll marks some threads as OFF TOPIC vehemently, while participating in other off topic threads?

    In other words, what the f**k is wrong with this guy? Daine Bramage?

    --

    Rick C.

    - Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
    - Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Doe@21:1/5 to Ricky on Thu Jun 16 12:54:42 2022
    XPost: free.spam

    Here Ricksy is pretending like he doesn't know that the idiot stalker
    "Edward Hernandez" is forging my ID while flagging threads "off topic".

    Probably was drunk again...

    --
    Ricky <gnuarm.deletethisbit@gmail.com> wrote:

    X-Received: by 2002:a5d:4a88:0:b0:214:1e17:9993 with SMTP id o8-20020a5d4a88000000b002141e179993mr3074830wrq.608.1655362225790; Wed, 15 Jun 2022 23:50:25 -0700 (PDT)
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    Path: eternal-september.org!reader02.eternal-september.org!usenet.blueworldhosting.com!feed1.usenet.blueworldhosting.com!peer01.iad!feed-me.highwinds-media.com!news.highwinds-media.com!news-out.google.com!nntp.google.com!postnews.google.com!google-
    groups.googlegroups.com!not-for-mail
    Newsgroups: sci.electronics.design
    Date: Wed, 15 Jun 2022 23:50:24 -0700 (PDT)
    In-Reply-To: <t8b6nt$rm9$2@dont-email.me>
    Injection-Info: google-groups.googlegroups.com; posting-host=63.114.57.174; posting-account=I-_H_woAAAA9zzro6crtEpUAyIvzd19b
    NNTP-Posting-Host: 63.114.57.174
    References: <1mghahdoile5rpv5uln4e1nct4c0k3lqk6@4ax.com> <t8b6nt$rm9$2@dont-email.me>
    User-Agent: G2/1.0
    MIME-Version: 1.0
    Message-ID: <b7b6f8bb-75ee-44ab-9d27-836ae341e7d9n@googlegroups.com>
    Subject: Re: vitamin A
    From: Ricky <gnuarm.deletethisbit@gmail.com>
    Injection-Date: Thu, 16 Jun 2022 06:50:25 +0000
    Content-Type: text/plain; charset="UTF-8"
    X-Received-Bytes: 2363
    Xref: reader02.eternal-september.org sci.electronics.design:671771

    On Tuesday, June 14, 2022 at 7:48:21 PM UTC-4, John Doe wrote:
    John Larkin <jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote:

    Eyesight is important in this biz.

    Make sure you get lots of vitamin A, but not too much. It's good for
    your retinas and can help prevent macular degeneration.
    I doubt anything besides maybe a good diet helps prevent macular
    degeneration. I never got any such advice before cataract surgery.

    Nothing against vitamins, I have always taken ordinary multivitamin
    multimineral supplements like One-A-Day or Centrum (regular).

    You don't know how bad your eyesight is until they stick new lenses in
    there. I was in-line street skating ("rollerblading" to the layman) for
    years, often at nighttime. Might have been even more fun with clear
    vision. DEFINITELY would have been more fun with a modern, lightweight,
    extremely bright headlamp.

    Someone explain to me why the John Doe troll marks some threads as OFF TOPIC vehemently, while participating in other off topic threads?

    In other words, what the f**k is wrong with this guy? Daine Bramage?

    --

    Rick C.

    - Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
    - Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209



    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Edward Hernandez@21:1/5 to All on Thu Jun 16 12:56:10 2022
    XPost: free.spam

    In message-id <t6nt3e$7bp$3@dont-email.me> (http://al.howardknight.net/?ID=165357273000) posted Thu, 26 May 2022
    12:50:54 -0000 (UTC) John Dope stated:

    Always Wrong, the utterly foulmouthed group idiot, adding absolutely
    NOTHING but insults to this thread, as usual...

    Yet, since Wed, 5 Jan 2022 04:10:38 -0000 (UTC) John Dope's post ratio
    to USENET (**) has been 59.3% of its posts contributing "nothing except insults" to USENET.

    ** Since Wed, 5 Jan 2022 04:10:38 -0000 (UTC) John Dope has posted at
    least 1785 articles to USENET. Of which 173 have been pure insults and
    885 have been John Dope "troll format" postings.

    The John Dope troll stated the following in message-id <sdhn7c$pkp$4@dont-email.me>:

    The troll doesn't even know how to format a USENET post...

    And the John Dope troll stated the following in message-id <sg3kr7$qt5$1@dont-email.me>:

    The reason Bozo cannot figure out how to get Google to keep from
    breaking its lines in inappropriate places is because Bozo is
    CLUELESS...

    And yet, the clueless John Dope troll has itself posted yet another
    incorrectly formatted USENET posting on Thu, 16 Jun 2022 12:54:42 -0000
    (UTC) in message-id <t8f96i$n4h$4@dont-email.me>.

    This posting is a public service announcement for any google groups
    readers who happen by to point out that Troll Doe does not even follow
    the rules it uses to troll other posters.

    svYzwuUeaXR7

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Fred Bloggs@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Thu Jun 16 11:08:11 2022
    On Tuesday, June 14, 2022 at 3:17:06 PM UTC-4, John Larkin wrote:
    On Tue, 14 Jun 2022 13:28:39 -0500, John S <Sop...@invalid.org>
    wrote:
    On 6/14/2022 12:29 PM, John Larkin wrote:
    Eyesight is important in this biz.

    Make sure you get lots of vitamin A, but not too much. It's good for
    your retinas and can help prevent macular degeneration.


    Bausch and Lomb make PreserVision AREDS pills for that purpose. I take >them because I have the early stage of macular degeneration.

    tinyurl.com/rchzazrc
    That stuff looks good.

    Not to me it doesn't. I just took a closer look at the label and see the Vitamin A content is 100% beta carotene at 4296 mcg 2-tablet single serving dose, over 400% RDA. That's outright high risk, too much actually for no restorative effect at all, and
    modest effectiveness of preventing MD progression.

    If you take a look at Centrum, a GlaxoSmithKline product, people who know about all there is to know about pharmaceuticals and actually make major breakthroughs in the science, their product is 1050 mcg daily, 117% RDA, and only 29% is derived from beta-
    carotene. That is a much saner product that will help you without sending you to any early grave.

    https://www.centrum.com/learn/vitamins-minerals/vitamin-a/

    There're a bunch of ill-health problems that impair absorption of Vitamin A. Liver disease is a big one:

    What are the causes of vitamin A deficiency?
    Coeliac disease.
    Crohn's disease.
    Giardiasis - an infection of the gut (bowel).
    Cystic fibrosis.
    Diseases affecting the pancreas.
    Liver cirrhosis.
    Obstruction of the flow of bile from your liver and gallbladder into your gut thyroid dysfunction
    others

    Another thing to watch for is deficiency due to medication.
    Here's an exhaustive list of everything: https://lpi.oregonstate.edu/mic/drug-nutrient-interactions

    Another way to kill yourself:
    Some products that may interact with this vitamin [A] include: acitretin, alitretinoin, bexarotene, cholestyramine, isotretinoin, tretinoin, other products that contain vitamin A (such as multivitamins), warfarin. Avoid taking vitamin A at the same time
    as you take neomycin, orlistat, and mineral oil. https://www.webmd.com/drugs/2/drug-1259/vitamin-a-oral/details


    I was disgnosed with major MD and got a pretty gloomy lecture about my future. Then they did a retinal tomograph just for fun and found a
    macular hole, not MD. That can probably be repaired, but the scare
    made me amp up on Vitamin A.

    My eyesight is horrible anyhow. My Mantis is indispensable when
    probing or soldering or hacking small stuff.
    --

    If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end with doubts,
    but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties. Francis Bacon

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From bitrex@21:1/5 to bitrex on Sun Jun 19 09:35:45 2022
    On 6/19/2022 9:29 AM, bitrex wrote:
    On 6/15/2022 4:49 PM, John Larkin wrote:
    On Wed, 15 Jun 2022 10:34:22 +1000, David Eather
    <eatREMOVEher@tpg.com.au> wrote:

    On 15/06/2022 3:29 am, John Larkin wrote:
    Eyesight is important in this biz.

    Make sure you get lots of vitamin A, but not too much. It's good for
    your retinas and can help prevent macular degeneration.


    You might also like to try Taurine which has heaps of research showing a >>> positive (albeit sometimes small) benefit. And Lutein which has a long
    history of use to prevent and treat MD.

    I might be on JL's shit list so can someone who isn't respond so he
    see's this - nothing worse than sitting in the dark if you don't have
    to.

    There are a few people here who are not worth reading, much less
    responding to, but you're not one of them.

    Eyesight is not a very far off-topic issue for electronic designers.
    Our biz is very visual and often the parts are hard to see.


    My problem at 43 such as it is at 43 y/o is my distance vision is
    excellent, 20/15, but I'm just starting to notice the effects of
    presbyopia enough for some small labels to be troublesome...


    Please substitute "My problem such as it is at 43 y/o", technical
    difficulties unrelated to age I hope

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Anthony William Sloman@21:1/5 to bitrex on Sun Jun 19 06:41:17 2022
    On Sunday, June 19, 2022 at 3:29:44 PM UTC+2, bitrex wrote:
    On 6/15/2022 4:49 PM, John Larkin wrote:
    On Wed, 15 Jun 2022 10:34:22 +1000, David Eather <eatREM...@tpg.com.au> wrote:
    On 15/06/2022 3:29 am, John Larkin wrote:
    Eyesight is important in this biz.

    Make sure you get lots of vitamin A, but not too much. It's good for
    your retinas and can help prevent macular degeneration.


    You might also like to try Taurine which has heaps of research showing a >> positive (albeit sometimes small) benefit. And Lutein which has a long
    history of use to prevent and treat MD.

    I might be on JL's shit list so can someone who isn't respond so he
    see's this - nothing worse than sitting in the dark if you don't have to.

    There are a few people here who are not worth reading, much less responding to, but you're not one of them.

    By which John Larkin means that you haven't pointed out that he's been an idiot all that often.

    Eyesight is not a very far off-topic issue for electronic designers.

    Our biz is very visual and often the parts are hard to see.

    Not if you have the right optical tools. Low power long working distance microscopes can be very useful.

    My problem at 43 such as it is at 43 y/o is my distance vision is excellent, 20/15, but I'm just starting to notice the effects of presbyopia enough for some small labels to be troublesome...

    Starting off short-sighted in at least one eye can be very handy. For years I just took off my spectacles.

    --
    Bill Sloman, Sydney

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From bitrex@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Sun Jun 19 09:29:31 2022
    On 6/15/2022 4:49 PM, John Larkin wrote:
    On Wed, 15 Jun 2022 10:34:22 +1000, David Eather
    <eatREMOVEher@tpg.com.au> wrote:

    On 15/06/2022 3:29 am, John Larkin wrote:
    Eyesight is important in this biz.

    Make sure you get lots of vitamin A, but not too much. It's good for
    your retinas and can help prevent macular degeneration.


    You might also like to try Taurine which has heaps of research showing a
    positive (albeit sometimes small) benefit. And Lutein which has a long
    history of use to prevent and treat MD.

    I might be on JL's shit list so can someone who isn't respond so he
    see's this - nothing worse than sitting in the dark if you don't have to.

    There are a few people here who are not worth reading, much less
    responding to, but you're not one of them.

    Eyesight is not a very far off-topic issue for electronic designers.
    Our biz is very visual and often the parts are hard to see.


    My problem at 43 such as it is at 43 y/o is my distance vision is
    excellent, 20/15, but I'm just starting to notice the effects of
    presbyopia enough for some small labels to be troublesome...

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Anthony William Sloman@21:1/5 to bitrex on Sun Jun 19 06:46:03 2022
    On Sunday, June 19, 2022 at 3:35:53 PM UTC+2, bitrex wrote:
    On 6/19/2022 9:29 AM, bitrex wrote:
    On 6/15/2022 4:49 PM, John Larkin wrote:
    On Wed, 15 Jun 2022 10:34:22 +1000, David Eather
    <eatREM...@tpg.com.au> wrote:

    On 15/06/2022 3:29 am, John Larkin wrote:
    Eyesight is important in this biz.

    Make sure you get lots of vitamin A, but not too much. It's good for >>>> your retinas and can help prevent macular degeneration.


    You might also like to try Taurine which has heaps of research showing a >>> positive (albeit sometimes small) benefit. And Lutein which has a long >>> history of use to prevent and treat MD.

    I might be on JL's shit list so can someone who isn't respond so he
    see's this - nothing worse than sitting in the dark if you don't have
    to.

    There are a few people here who are not worth reading, much less
    responding to, but you're not one of them.

    Eyesight is not a very far off-topic issue for electronic designers.
    Our biz is very visual and often the parts are hard to see.


    My problem at 43 such as it is at 43 y/o is my distance vision is excellent, 20/15, but I'm just starting to notice the effects of
    presbyopia enough for some small labels to be troublesome...

    Please substitute "My problem such as it is at 43 y/o", technical difficulties unrelated to age I hope.

    The lens hardens up as you get older, and you lose accommodation. Bringing small print closer to your eyes doesn't help the way it used to.

    Bifocals used to be the solution, but they advertise the fact that you are getting old. Continuous grind lenses are more expensive but you get a continuously variable focus, and they look just like regular spectacles (until you look very carefully).

    --
    Bill Sloman, Sydney

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From bitrex@21:1/5 to Anthony William Sloman on Sun Jun 19 19:30:35 2022
    On 6/19/2022 9:41 AM, Anthony William Sloman wrote:
    On Sunday, June 19, 2022 at 3:29:44 PM UTC+2, bitrex wrote:
    On 6/15/2022 4:49 PM, John Larkin wrote:
    On Wed, 15 Jun 2022 10:34:22 +1000, David Eather <eatREM...@tpg.com.au> wrote:
    On 15/06/2022 3:29 am, John Larkin wrote:
    Eyesight is important in this biz.

    Make sure you get lots of vitamin A, but not too much. It's good for >>>>> your retinas and can help prevent macular degeneration.


    You might also like to try Taurine which has heaps of research showing a >>>> positive (albeit sometimes small) benefit. And Lutein which has a long >>>> history of use to prevent and treat MD.

    I might be on JL's shit list so can someone who isn't respond so he
    see's this - nothing worse than sitting in the dark if you don't have to. >>>
    There are a few people here who are not worth reading, much less responding to, but you're not one of them.

    By which John Larkin means that you haven't pointed out that he's been an idiot all that often.

    Eyesight is not a very far off-topic issue for electronic designers.

    Our biz is very visual and often the parts are hard to see.

    Not if you have the right optical tools. Low power long working distance microscopes can be very useful.

    My problem at 43 such as it is at 43 y/o is my distance vision is excellent, 20/15, but I'm just starting to notice the effects of presbyopia enough for some small labels to be troublesome...

    Starting off short-sighted in at least one eye can be very handy. For years I just took off my spectacles.


    Never needed glasses before but I think it's definitely time for a pair
    of readers. My girlfriend who's worn specs most of her life has little
    sympathy 8-)

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Fred Bloggs@21:1/5 to bitrex on Tue Jun 21 06:56:45 2022
    On Sunday, June 19, 2022 at 7:30:42 PM UTC-4, bitrex wrote:
    On 6/19/2022 9:41 AM, Anthony William Sloman wrote:
    On Sunday, June 19, 2022 at 3:29:44 PM UTC+2, bitrex wrote:
    On 6/15/2022 4:49 PM, John Larkin wrote:
    On Wed, 15 Jun 2022 10:34:22 +1000, David Eather <eatREM...@tpg.com.au> wrote:
    On 15/06/2022 3:29 am, John Larkin wrote:
    Eyesight is important in this biz.

    Make sure you get lots of vitamin A, but not too much. It's good for >>>>> your retinas and can help prevent macular degeneration.


    You might also like to try Taurine which has heaps of research showing a >>>> positive (albeit sometimes small) benefit. And Lutein which has a long >>>> history of use to prevent and treat MD.

    I might be on JL's shit list so can someone who isn't respond so he
    see's this - nothing worse than sitting in the dark if you don't have to.

    There are a few people here who are not worth reading, much less responding to, but you're not one of them.

    By which John Larkin means that you haven't pointed out that he's been an idiot all that often.

    Eyesight is not a very far off-topic issue for electronic designers.

    Our biz is very visual and often the parts are hard to see.

    Not if you have the right optical tools. Low power long working distance microscopes can be very useful.

    My problem at 43 such as it is at 43 y/o is my distance vision is excellent, 20/15, but I'm just starting to notice the effects of presbyopia enough for some small labels to be troublesome...

    Starting off short-sighted in at least one eye can be very handy. For years I just took off my spectacles.

    Never needed glasses before but I think it's definitely time for a pair
    of readers. My girlfriend who's worn specs most of her life has little sympathy 8-)

    Go into any department store with a pharmacy aisle and buy a 4-pack of readers for ten bucks. No need to make a big deal out of it.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Phil Hobbs@21:1/5 to Fred Bloggs on Tue Jun 21 12:54:47 2022
    Fred Bloggs wrote:
    On Sunday, June 19, 2022 at 7:30:42 PM UTC-4, bitrex wrote:
    On 6/19/2022 9:41 AM, Anthony William Sloman wrote:
    On Sunday, June 19, 2022 at 3:29:44 PM UTC+2, bitrex wrote:
    On 6/15/2022 4:49 PM, John Larkin wrote:
    On Wed, 15 Jun 2022 10:34:22 +1000, David Eather
    <eatREM...@tpg.com.au> wrote:
    On 15/06/2022 3:29 am, John Larkin wrote:
    Eyesight is important in this biz.

    Make sure you get lots of vitamin A, but not too much.
    It's good for your retinas and can help prevent macular
    degeneration.


    You might also like to try Taurine which has heaps of
    research showing a positive (albeit sometimes small)
    benefit. And Lutein which has a long history of use to
    prevent and treat MD.

    I might be on JL's shit list so can someone who isn't
    respond so he see's this - nothing worse than sitting in
    the dark if you don't have to.

    There are a few people here who are not worth reading, much
    less responding to, but you're not one of them.

    By which John Larkin means that you haven't pointed out that he's
    been an idiot all that often.

    Eyesight is not a very far off-topic issue for electronic
    designers.

    Our biz is very visual and often the parts are hard to see.

    Not if you have the right optical tools. Low power long working
    distance microscopes can be very useful.

    My problem at 43 such as it is at 43 y/o is my distance vision
    is excellent, 20/15, but I'm just starting to notice the
    effects of presbyopia enough for some small labels to be
    troublesome...

    Starting off short-sighted in at least one eye can be very handy.
    For years I just took off my spectacles.

    Never needed glasses before but I think it's definitely time for a
    pair of readers. My girlfriend who's worn specs most of her life
    has little sympathy 8-)

    Go into any department store with a pharmacy aisle and buy a 4-pack
    of readers for ten bucks. No need to make a big deal out of it.


    If your eyes are sufficiently close together. ;)

    Men's readers all come with 65-mm inter-pupillary distance, I believe,
    which will reliably give me a headache in 5 minutes.

    Zenni Optical will make custom single-vision glasses for a very few
    bucks. I measured my IPD with a ruler and a mirror, then ordered
    glasses with that +- 1 mm and picked the one that produced the least eye
    strain (69 mm in my case).

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs

    --
    Dr Philip C D Hobbs
    Principal Consultant
    ElectroOptical Innovations LLC / Hobbs ElectroOptics
    Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics
    Briarcliff Manor NY 10510

    http://electrooptical.net
    http://hobbs-eo.com

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Joe Gwinn@21:1/5 to pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical. on Tue Jun 21 15:19:34 2022
    On Tue, 21 Jun 2022 12:54:47 -0400, Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    Fred Bloggs wrote:
    On Sunday, June 19, 2022 at 7:30:42 PM UTC-4, bitrex wrote:
    On 6/19/2022 9:41 AM, Anthony William Sloman wrote:
    On Sunday, June 19, 2022 at 3:29:44 PM UTC+2, bitrex wrote:
    On 6/15/2022 4:49 PM, John Larkin wrote:
    On Wed, 15 Jun 2022 10:34:22 +1000, David Eather
    <eatREM...@tpg.com.au> wrote:
    On 15/06/2022 3:29 am, John Larkin wrote:
    Eyesight is important in this biz.

    Make sure you get lots of vitamin A, but not too much.
    It's good for your retinas and can help prevent macular
    degeneration.


    You might also like to try Taurine which has heaps of
    research showing a positive (albeit sometimes small)
    benefit. And Lutein which has a long history of use to
    prevent and treat MD.

    I might be on JL's shit list so can someone who isn't
    respond so he see's this - nothing worse than sitting in
    the dark if you don't have to.

    There are a few people here who are not worth reading, much
    less responding to, but you're not one of them.

    By which John Larkin means that you haven't pointed out that he's
    been an idiot all that often.

    Eyesight is not a very far off-topic issue for electronic
    designers.

    Our biz is very visual and often the parts are hard to see.

    Not if you have the right optical tools. Low power long working
    distance microscopes can be very useful.

    My problem at 43 such as it is at 43 y/o is my distance vision
    is excellent, 20/15, but I'm just starting to notice the
    effects of presbyopia enough for some small labels to be
    troublesome...

    Starting off short-sighted in at least one eye can be very handy.
    For years I just took off my spectacles.

    Never needed glasses before but I think it's definitely time for a
    pair of readers. My girlfriend who's worn specs most of her life
    has little sympathy 8-)

    Go into any department store with a pharmacy aisle and buy a 4-pack
    of readers for ten bucks. No need to make a big deal out of it.


    If your eyes are sufficiently close together. ;)

    Men's readers all come with 65-mm inter-pupillary distance, I believe,
    which will reliably give me a headache in 5 minutes.

    Zenni Optical will make custom single-vision glasses for a very few
    bucks. I measured my IPD with a ruler and a mirror, then ordered
    glasses with that +- 1 mm and picked the one that produced the least eye >strain (69 mm in my case).

    For that wide-eyed ingenue look?

    Joe Gwinn

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Phil Hobbs@21:1/5 to Joe Gwinn on Tue Jun 21 15:34:55 2022
    Joe Gwinn wrote:
    On Tue, 21 Jun 2022 12:54:47 -0400, Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    Fred Bloggs wrote:
    <sniiip>
    Go into any department store with a pharmacy aisle and buy a 4-pack
    of readers for ten bucks. No need to make a big deal out of it.


    If your eyes are sufficiently close together. ;)

    Men's readers all come with 65-mm inter-pupillary distance, I believe,
    which will reliably give me a headache in 5 minutes.

    Zenni Optical will make custom single-vision glasses for a very few
    bucks. I measured my IPD with a ruler and a mirror, then ordered
    glasses with that +- 1 mm and picked the one that produced the least eye
    strain (69 mm in my case).

    For that wide-eyed ingenue look?

    Joe Gwinn


    That must be it. Or possibly I'm getting in touch with my inner codfish. ;)


    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Larkin@21:1/5 to pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical. on Tue Jun 21 17:17:12 2022
    On Tue, 21 Jun 2022 12:54:47 -0400, Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    Fred Bloggs wrote:
    On Sunday, June 19, 2022 at 7:30:42 PM UTC-4, bitrex wrote:
    On 6/19/2022 9:41 AM, Anthony William Sloman wrote:
    On Sunday, June 19, 2022 at 3:29:44 PM UTC+2, bitrex wrote:
    On 6/15/2022 4:49 PM, John Larkin wrote:
    On Wed, 15 Jun 2022 10:34:22 +1000, David Eather
    <eatREM...@tpg.com.au> wrote:
    On 15/06/2022 3:29 am, John Larkin wrote:
    Eyesight is important in this biz.

    Make sure you get lots of vitamin A, but not too much.
    It's good for your retinas and can help prevent macular
    degeneration.


    You might also like to try Taurine which has heaps of
    research showing a positive (albeit sometimes small)
    benefit. And Lutein which has a long history of use to
    prevent and treat MD.

    I might be on JL's shit list so can someone who isn't
    respond so he see's this - nothing worse than sitting in
    the dark if you don't have to.

    There are a few people here who are not worth reading, much
    less responding to, but you're not one of them.

    By which John Larkin means that you haven't pointed out that he's
    been an idiot all that often.

    Eyesight is not a very far off-topic issue for electronic
    designers.

    Our biz is very visual and often the parts are hard to see.

    Not if you have the right optical tools. Low power long working
    distance microscopes can be very useful.

    My problem at 43 such as it is at 43 y/o is my distance vision
    is excellent, 20/15, but I'm just starting to notice the
    effects of presbyopia enough for some small labels to be
    troublesome...

    Starting off short-sighted in at least one eye can be very handy.
    For years I just took off my spectacles.

    Never needed glasses before but I think it's definitely time for a
    pair of readers. My girlfriend who's worn specs most of her life
    has little sympathy 8-)

    Go into any department store with a pharmacy aisle and buy a 4-pack
    of readers for ten bucks. No need to make a big deal out of it.


    If your eyes are sufficiently close together. ;)

    Men's readers all come with 65-mm inter-pupillary distance, I believe,
    which will reliably give me a headache in 5 minutes.

    Zenni Optical will make custom single-vision glasses for a very few
    bucks. I measured my IPD with a ruler and a mirror, then ordered
    glasses with that +- 1 mm and picked the one that produced the least eye >strain (69 mm in my case).

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs

    I'm 69 mm too. I've seen the recommendation that reading glasses
    should be a few mm closer.

    --

    If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end with doubts,
    but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties. Francis Bacon

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Fred Bloggs@21:1/5 to Phil Hobbs on Tue Jun 21 18:55:58 2022
    On Tuesday, June 21, 2022 at 12:55:04 PM UTC-4, Phil Hobbs wrote:
    Fred Bloggs wrote:
    On Sunday, June 19, 2022 at 7:30:42 PM UTC-4, bitrex wrote:
    On 6/19/2022 9:41 AM, Anthony William Sloman wrote:
    On Sunday, June 19, 2022 at 3:29:44 PM UTC+2, bitrex wrote:
    On 6/15/2022 4:49 PM, John Larkin wrote:
    On Wed, 15 Jun 2022 10:34:22 +1000, David Eather
    <eatREM...@tpg.com.au> wrote:
    On 15/06/2022 3:29 am, John Larkin wrote:
    Eyesight is important in this biz.

    Make sure you get lots of vitamin A, but not too much.
    It's good for your retinas and can help prevent macular
    degeneration.


    You might also like to try Taurine which has heaps of
    research showing a positive (albeit sometimes small)
    benefit. And Lutein which has a long history of use to
    prevent and treat MD.

    I might be on JL's shit list so can someone who isn't
    respond so he see's this - nothing worse than sitting in
    the dark if you don't have to.

    There are a few people here who are not worth reading, much
    less responding to, but you're not one of them.

    By which John Larkin means that you haven't pointed out that he's
    been an idiot all that often.

    Eyesight is not a very far off-topic issue for electronic
    designers.

    Our biz is very visual and often the parts are hard to see.

    Not if you have the right optical tools. Low power long working
    distance microscopes can be very useful.

    My problem at 43 such as it is at 43 y/o is my distance vision
    is excellent, 20/15, but I'm just starting to notice the
    effects of presbyopia enough for some small labels to be
    troublesome...

    Starting off short-sighted in at least one eye can be very handy.
    For years I just took off my spectacles.

    Never needed glasses before but I think it's definitely time for a
    pair of readers. My girlfriend who's worn specs most of her life
    has little sympathy 8-)

    Go into any department store with a pharmacy aisle and buy a 4-pack
    of readers for ten bucks. No need to make a big deal out of it.

    If your eyes are sufficiently close together. ;)

    Men's readers all come with 65-mm inter-pupillary distance, I believe,
    which will reliably give me a headache in 5 minutes.

    Zenni Optical will make custom single-vision glasses for a very few
    bucks. I measured my IPD with a ruler and a mirror, then ordered
    glasses with that +- 1 mm and picked the one that produced the least eye strain (69 mm in my case).

    That must not be very critical for most people since the manufacturers sell gazillions of them. Many places let you try them on and read a test chart to determine the best magnification. If the glasses don't feel right, don't buy them. The real headache
    comes from requiring different magnifications for the two eyes. Readers don't accommodate that.
    The one stop shop is WalMart. If your $2.00 readers aren't working for you they will refund your money no questions asked. And they have a vision and glasses center in store to schedule an eye exam, obtain a prescription, and buy your prescription
    glasses. Actually once you have your prescription you can do everything else online and get your glasses delivered to you next day. I never see a long line of people waiting a long time to be seen as with the franchise vision centers. A lot of people
    equate low price with low quality, then they end up paying a high price for a low price frame from those sickening franchise vision centers. WalMart is the same quality of product and service as any of the overprice glitz vision franchises out there.
    https://www.walmart.com/cp/vision-centers/1078944



    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs

    --
    Dr Philip C D Hobbs
    Principal Consultant
    ElectroOptical Innovations LLC / Hobbs ElectroOptics
    Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics
    Briarcliff Manor NY 10510

    http://electrooptical.net
    http://hobbs-eo.com

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Joe Gwinn@21:1/5 to jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology. on Wed Jun 22 12:54:04 2022
    On Tue, 21 Jun 2022 17:17:12 -0700, John Larkin <jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote:

    On Tue, 21 Jun 2022 12:54:47 -0400, Phil Hobbs ><pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    Fred Bloggs wrote:
    On Sunday, June 19, 2022 at 7:30:42 PM UTC-4, bitrex wrote:
    On 6/19/2022 9:41 AM, Anthony William Sloman wrote:
    On Sunday, June 19, 2022 at 3:29:44 PM UTC+2, bitrex wrote:
    On 6/15/2022 4:49 PM, John Larkin wrote:
    On Wed, 15 Jun 2022 10:34:22 +1000, David Eather
    <eatREM...@tpg.com.au> wrote:
    On 15/06/2022 3:29 am, John Larkin wrote:
    Eyesight is important in this biz.

    Make sure you get lots of vitamin A, but not too much.
    It's good for your retinas and can help prevent macular
    degeneration.


    You might also like to try Taurine which has heaps of
    research showing a positive (albeit sometimes small)
    benefit. And Lutein which has a long history of use to
    prevent and treat MD.

    I might be on JL's shit list so can someone who isn't
    respond so he see's this - nothing worse than sitting in
    the dark if you don't have to.

    There are a few people here who are not worth reading, much
    less responding to, but you're not one of them.

    By which John Larkin means that you haven't pointed out that he's
    been an idiot all that often.

    Eyesight is not a very far off-topic issue for electronic
    designers.

    Our biz is very visual and often the parts are hard to see.

    Not if you have the right optical tools. Low power long working
    distance microscopes can be very useful.

    My problem at 43 such as it is at 43 y/o is my distance vision
    is excellent, 20/15, but I'm just starting to notice the
    effects of presbyopia enough for some small labels to be
    troublesome...

    Starting off short-sighted in at least one eye can be very handy.
    For years I just took off my spectacles.

    Never needed glasses before but I think it's definitely time for a
    pair of readers. My girlfriend who's worn specs most of her life
    has little sympathy 8-)

    Go into any department store with a pharmacy aisle and buy a 4-pack
    of readers for ten bucks. No need to make a big deal out of it.


    If your eyes are sufficiently close together. ;)

    Men's readers all come with 65-mm inter-pupillary distance, I believe, >>which will reliably give me a headache in 5 minutes.

    Zenni Optical will make custom single-vision glasses for a very few
    bucks. I measured my IPD with a ruler and a mirror, then ordered
    glasses with that +- 1 mm and picked the one that produced the least eye >>strain (69 mm in my case).

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs

    I'm 69 mm too. I've seen the recommendation that reading glasses
    should be a few mm closer.

    Yes, to handle convergence at close distances. IPD is measured for
    targets at infinity.

    Joe Gwinn

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)