• alarm clocks

    From RichD@21:1/5 to All on Mon Jun 13 13:27:55 2022
    Why is the alarm in an analog mechanical clock louder than
    a digital clock?

    --
    Rich

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  • From Jeff Liebermann@21:1/5 to r_delaney2001@yahoo.com on Mon Jun 13 14:49:58 2022
    On Mon, 13 Jun 2022 13:27:55 -0700 (PDT), RichD
    <r_delaney2001@yahoo.com> wrote:

    Why is the alarm in an analog mechanical clock louder than
    a digital clock?

    Because a small piezoelectric transducer is cheaper than two brass
    bells and a solenoid. The same is true for the ringers in POTS
    telephones versus modern electronic phones. Even those phones that
    have a built in loudspeaker (for speakerphone) aren't very loud.

    You can buy modern alarm clocks that will wake the deaf (and possibly
    the dead). I have several friend and customers who need hearing aids.
    Their houses are full or extra loud doorbells, phones, alarm clocks,
    smoke alarms, CO alarms, motion detectors, burglar alarms, appliances
    etc. As a concession to the neighbors, they usually wear cordless
    headphones while watching TV or listening to the hi-fi. I setup an
    IFTTT recipe to flash some of their house lights when some trigger
    wants attention, but nobody seems to like or use it much.

    This alarm clock includes a bed shaking vibrator: <https://www.amazon.com/Sonic-Alarm-Clock-Vibrating-Shaker/dp/B01N2HDOR6>
    More loud alarm clocks: <https://www.google.com/search?q=extra+loud+alarm+clock&tbm=isch>

    Note that "extra loud" is much like chicken eggs, which are sold in supermarkets as large, extra-large and jumbo, where the sizes are
    relative. Todays extra loud alarm clock is likely to have the same
    alarm sound level as the older mechanical bell ringers.

    --
    Jeff Liebermann jeffl@cruzio.com
    PO Box 272 http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
    Ben Lomond CA 95005-0272
    Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558

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  • From bitrex@21:1/5 to Jeff Liebermann on Mon Jun 13 18:35:25 2022
    On 6/13/2022 5:49 PM, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
    On Mon, 13 Jun 2022 13:27:55 -0700 (PDT), RichD
    <r_delaney2001@yahoo.com> wrote:

    Why is the alarm in an analog mechanical clock louder than
    a digital clock?

    Because a small piezoelectric transducer is cheaper than two brass
    bells and a solenoid. The same is true for the ringers in POTS
    telephones versus modern electronic phones. Even those phones that
    have a built in loudspeaker (for speakerphone) aren't very loud.

    You can buy modern alarm clocks that will wake the deaf (and possibly
    the dead). I have several friend and customers who need hearing aids.
    Their houses are full or extra loud doorbells, phones, alarm clocks,
    smoke alarms, CO alarms, motion detectors, burglar alarms, appliances
    etc. As a concession to the neighbors, they usually wear cordless
    headphones while watching TV or listening to the hi-fi. I setup an
    IFTTT recipe to flash some of their house lights when some trigger
    wants attention, but nobody seems to like or use it much.

    This alarm clock includes a bed shaking vibrator: <https://www.amazon.com/Sonic-Alarm-Clock-Vibrating-Shaker/dp/B01N2HDOR6> More loud alarm clocks: <https://www.google.com/search?q=extra+loud+alarm+clock&tbm=isch>

    Note that "extra loud" is much like chicken eggs, which are sold in supermarkets as large, extra-large and jumbo, where the sizes are
    relative. Todays extra loud alarm clock is likely to have the same
    alarm sound level as the older mechanical bell ringers.


    I have an old Westclox USA-made wind-up I keep around in case there's a
    long power-outage. Hasn't been one in recent memory that needed it, though..

    looks just like this one, IDK when it was made maybe late 70s or 80s?

    <https://www.ebay.com/itm/144595465109?hash=item21aa8fb395:g:jyYAAOSwTFNiaeTk>

    I just wound it to make sure it still runs and rings, seems OK. I'll
    check back tomorrow to see how accurate it is!

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  • From bitrex@21:1/5 to bitrex on Mon Jun 13 18:41:04 2022
    On 6/13/2022 6:35 PM, bitrex wrote:
    On 6/13/2022 5:49 PM, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
    On Mon, 13 Jun 2022 13:27:55 -0700 (PDT), RichD
    <r_delaney2001@yahoo.com> wrote:

    Why is the alarm in an analog mechanical clock louder than
    a digital clock?

    Because a small piezoelectric transducer is cheaper than two brass
    bells and a solenoid.  The same is true for the ringers in POTS
    telephones versus modern electronic phones.  Even those phones that
    have a built in loudspeaker (for speakerphone) aren't very loud.

    You can buy modern alarm clocks that will wake the deaf (and possibly
    the dead).  I have several friend and customers who need hearing aids.
    Their houses are full or extra loud doorbells, phones, alarm clocks,
    smoke alarms, CO alarms, motion detectors, burglar alarms, appliances
    etc.  As a concession to the neighbors, they usually wear cordless
    headphones while watching TV or listening to the hi-fi.  I setup an
    IFTTT recipe to flash some of their house lights when some trigger
    wants attention, but nobody seems to like or use it much.

    This alarm clock includes a bed shaking vibrator:
    <https://www.amazon.com/Sonic-Alarm-Clock-Vibrating-Shaker/dp/B01N2HDOR6>
    More loud alarm clocks:
    <https://www.google.com/search?q=extra+loud+alarm+clock&tbm=isch>

    Note that "extra loud" is much like chicken eggs, which are sold in
    supermarkets as large, extra-large and jumbo, where the sizes are
    relative.  Todays extra loud alarm clock is likely to have the same
    alarm sound level as the older mechanical bell ringers.


    I have an old Westclox USA-made wind-up I keep around in case there's a
    long power-outage. Hasn't been one in recent memory that needed it,
    though..

    looks just like this one, IDK when it was made maybe late 70s or 80s?

    <https://www.ebay.com/itm/144595465109?hash=item21aa8fb395:g:jyYAAOSwTFNiaeTk>


    I just wound it to make sure it still runs and rings, seems OK. I'll
    check back tomorrow to see how accurate it is!

    Ah, the alarm sounds just like the first one from Pink Floyd's "Time":

    <https://youtu.be/JwYX52BP2Sk>

    I think this is where the Miss Gulch comes riding in on a bicycle.
    "Digging away, the moments that make up a dull day..."

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  • From Jan Panteltje@21:1/5 to r_delaney2001@yahoo.com on Tue Jun 14 08:29:33 2022
    On a sunny day (Mon, 13 Jun 2022 13:27:55 -0700 (PDT)) it happened RichD <r_delaney2001@yahoo.com> wrote in <23d5f582-db95-4c50-901e-3cfa4c34471an@googlegroups.com>:

    Why is the alarm in an analog mechanical clock louder than
    a digital clock?

    Am testing some Chinse piezo beeper on my home RF motion sensor alarm system Maybe you could solder one (3V) to your alrm clock ;-)
    Very hard not to notice that beep!

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  • From Tabby@21:1/5 to jeff.li...@gmail.com on Thu Jun 16 02:50:28 2022
    On Monday, 13 June 2022 at 22:50:12 UTC+1, jeff.li...@gmail.com wrote:
    On Mon, 13 Jun 2022 13:27:55 -0700 (PDT), RichD
    <r_dela...@yahoo.com> wrote:

    Why is the alarm in an analog mechanical clock louder than
    a digital clock?
    Because a small piezoelectric transducer is cheaper than two brass
    bells and a solenoid. The same is true for the ringers in POTS
    telephones versus modern electronic phones. Even those phones that
    have a built in loudspeaker (for speakerphone) aren't very loud.

    You can buy modern alarm clocks that will wake the deaf (and possibly
    the dead). I have several friend and customers who need hearing aids.
    Their houses are full or extra loud doorbells, phones, alarm clocks,
    smoke alarms, CO alarms, motion detectors, burglar alarms, appliances
    etc. As a concession to the neighbors, they usually wear cordless
    headphones while watching TV or listening to the hi-fi. I setup an
    IFTTT recipe to flash some of their house lights when some trigger
    wants attention, but nobody seems to like or use it much.

    This alarm clock includes a bed shaking vibrator: <https://www.amazon.com/Sonic-Alarm-Clock-Vibrating-Shaker/dp/B01N2HDOR6> More loud alarm clocks: <https://www.google.com/search?q=extra+loud+alarm+clock&tbm=isch>

    Note that "extra loud" is much like chicken eggs, which are sold in supermarkets as large, extra-large and jumbo, where the sizes are
    relative. Todays extra loud alarm clock is likely to have the same
    alarm sound level as the older mechanical bell ringers.

    Adding a tiny plastic horn to a piezo can make it massively louder, see any smoke alarm, but no-one wants to spend the extra 5p these days.

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  • From amdx@21:1/5 to Jeff Liebermann on Thu Jun 16 06:34:17 2022
    On 6/13/2022 4:49 PM, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
    On Mon, 13 Jun 2022 13:27:55 -0700 (PDT), RichD
    <r_delaney2001@yahoo.com> wrote:

    Why is the alarm in an analog mechanical clock louder than
    a digital clock?
    Because a small piezoelectric transducer is cheaper than two brass
    bells and a solenoid. The same is true for the ringers in POTS
    telephones versus modern electronic phones. Even those phones that
    have a built in loudspeaker (for speakerphone) aren't very loud.

    You can buy modern alarm clocks that will wake the deaf (and possibly
    the dead). I have several friend and customers who need hearing aids.
    Their houses are full or extra loud doorbells, phones, alarm clocks,
    smoke alarms, CO alarms, motion detectors, burglar alarms, appliances
    etc. As a concession to the neighbors, they usually wear cordless
    headphones while watching TV or listening to the hi-fi. I setup an
    IFTTT recipe to flash some of their house lights when some trigger
    wants attention, but nobody seems to like or use it much.

    This alarm clock includes a bed shaking vibrator: <https://www.amazon.com/Sonic-Alarm-Clock-Vibrating-Shaker/dp/B01N2HDOR6> More loud alarm clocks: <https://www.google.com/search?q=extra+loud+alarm+clock&tbm=isch>

    Note that "extra loud" is much like chicken eggs, which are sold in supermarkets as large, extra-large and jumbo, where the sizes are
    relative. Todays extra loud alarm clock is likely to have the same
    alarm sound level as the older mechanical bell ringers.

    As a young teenager I had to get up early for some scout camping trip,
    and I was worried I wouldn't hear my alarm clock. I had a sound activated
    relay kit from Radio Shack, built on the perforated Red Plastic boxes. I connected
    a radio to the sound activated relay and an 8" horn speaker to a the
    Radio output.
    I turned the volume high and in the morning, my alarm clock sounded,
    triggered the relay,
    turning on the radio, and I woke up for the camping trip.!
      Won't most digital clock radios, turn on the radio as the alarm, put
    it on a Rap station,
    and crank the audio level.

    --
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