• Re: (OT) How did those old gas station bells work?

    From Kathy Kehoe@21:1/5 to Foxs Mercantile on Mon May 23 19:36:41 2022
    On Friday, September 22, 2017 at 8:13:45 AM UTC-4, Foxs Mercantile wrote:
    On 9/22/2017 2:16 AM, rickman wrote:
    Might have run off the air compressor which remains pressurized for
    some time after a power failure. It's hard to imagine such a small
    change in volume producing enough work to ring a bell.
    In the 4 stations I worked at as a gopher in the late '60s, NONE of
    them had electric bells.

    And NO, the hose wasn't full of air. It was full of oil.

    The striker would hit the bell going up when someone rolled over the
    hose, and again on the way down when they rolled off the hose.

    Hence the da-ding every time.




    --
    Jeff-1.0
    wa6fwi
    http://www.foxsmercantile.com

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  • From DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno@decadenc@21:1/5 to Kathy Kehoe on Tue May 24 16:19:20 2022
    Kathy Kehoe <kathyckehoe@gmail.com> wrote in news:120a0591-fd50-45b6-80ec-79a46c9a7456n@googlegroups.com:

    On Friday, September 22, 2017 at 8:13:45 AM UTC-4, Foxs Mercantile
    wrote:
    On 9/22/2017 2:16 AM, rickman wrote:
    Might have run off the air compressor which remains pressurized
    for some time after a power failure. It's hard to imagine such
    a small change in volume producing enough work to ring a bell.
    In the 4 stations I worked at as a gopher in the late '60s, NONE
    of them had electric bells.

    And NO, the hose wasn't full of air. It was full of oil.

    The striker would hit the bell going up when someone rolled over
    the hose, and again on the way down when they rolled off the
    hose.

    Hence the da-ding every time.

    The hoses were air filled with capped ends, and the pressure
    differential flipped a switch and that powered a solenoid which then
    struck the bell.

    Same thing for road lane vehicle counting machines which cops put
    out in place to place from time to time.

    Air works just fine.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Lasse Langwadt Christensen@21:1/5 to All on Tue May 24 09:41:02 2022
    tirsdag den 24. maj 2022 kl. 18.19.28 UTC+2 skrev DecadentLinux...@decadence.org:
    Kathy Kehoe <kathy...@gmail.com> wrote in news:120a0591-fd50-45b6...@googlegroups.com:

    On Friday, September 22, 2017 at 8:13:45 AM UTC-4, Foxs Mercantile
    wrote:
    On 9/22/2017 2:16 AM, rickman wrote:
    Might have run off the air compressor which remains pressurized
    for some time after a power failure. It's hard to imagine such
    a small change in volume producing enough work to ring a bell.
    In the 4 stations I worked at as a gopher in the late '60s, NONE
    of them had electric bells.

    And NO, the hose wasn't full of air. It was full of oil.

    The striker would hit the bell going up when someone rolled over
    the hose, and again on the way down when they rolled off the
    hose.

    Hence the da-ding every time.
    The hoses were air filled with capped ends, and the pressure
    differential flipped a switch and that powered a solenoid which then
    struck the bell.

    Same thing for road lane vehicle counting machines which cops put
    out in place to place from time to time.

    Air works just fine.

    https://youtu.be/mjVz-72r44g

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