• Re: TI new products

    From Jan Panteltje@21:1/5 to jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com on Sat Apr 23 15:01:10 2022
    On a sunny day (Sat, 23 Apr 2022 07:21:10 -0700) it happened jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in <1p286h126b5jr3km7052fjuaugmb8scvrl@4ax.com>:



    https://www.ti.com/prod-list/new-products?releasePeriod=364


    And that's just TI. Boggling.

    Not sure how serious I take that
    I downloaded the 'datasheet' for the 'AFE8092 Octal-Channel RF Transceiver with Feedback Paths'

    Not even a block diagram, and big pictures of ballgrid array but no pin function list.
    so 4 Giggle samples per second ADCs... (after figuring out what GSPS stood for).

    Not usable with that data.

    But more and more integration indeed.

    Too many pins...
    Maybe just for thermal...

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com@21:1/5 to All on Sat Apr 23 07:21:10 2022
    https://www.ti.com/prod-list/new-products?releasePeriod=364


    And that's just TI. Boggling.



    --

    I yam what I yam - Popeye

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Jan Panteltje@21:1/5 to pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com on Sat Apr 23 15:36:06 2022
    On a sunny day (Sat, 23 Apr 2022 15:01:10 GMT) it happened Jan Panteltje <pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote in <t414hf$qah$1@dont-email.me>:

    On a sunny day (Sat, 23 Apr 2022 07:21:10 -0700) it happened >jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in ><1p286h126b5jr3km7052fjuaugmb8scvrl@4ax.com>:



    https://www.ti.com/prod-list/new-products?releasePeriod=364


    And that's just TI. Boggling.

    Not sure how serious I take that
    I downloaded the 'datasheet' for the 'AFE8092 Octal-Channel RF Transceiver with Feedback Paths'

    Not even a block diagram, and big pictures of ballgrid array but no pin function list.
    so 4 Giggle samples per second ADCs... (after figuring out what GSPS stood for).

    Not usable with that data.

    But more and more integration indeed.

    Too many pins...
    Maybe just for thermal...

    My opinion
    dataheet written by complete electronics moron
    He explains ADC (but everybody doing electronics knows that)
    but GSPS in capitals is the wrong notation for Gsamples/second.
    No block diagram is a FAILURE!
    Why bother to check the rest of the crap blurbs they publish.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From David Brown@21:1/5 to jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com on Sat Apr 23 18:58:59 2022
    On 23/04/2022 16:21, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:


    https://www.ti.com/prod-list/new-products?releasePeriod=364


    And that's just TI. Boggling.


    Agreed - there's lots of interesting things there.

    But can they actually deliver them? That's the big challenge these days.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From bitrex@21:1/5 to jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com on Sat Apr 23 13:20:39 2022
    On 4/23/2022 10:21 AM, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:


    https://www.ti.com/prod-list/new-products?releasePeriod=364


    And that's just TI. Boggling.




    But sadly no quantity of OPA4322 until into 2023, 1.8 volt CMOS op amp
    with 20 MHz GBW and 10uS slew rate.

    <https://www.mouser.com/c/?q=OPA4322>

    Hmpf! I used that one a lot pre-pandemic, IIRC AD didn't have anything
    near as nice in the low voltage/CMOS department for the price a few
    years back.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Klaus Kragelund@21:1/5 to jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com on Sat Apr 23 20:22:14 2022
    23.04.22 17:21, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:


    https://www.ti.com/prod-list/new-products?releasePeriod=364


    And that's just TI. Boggling.



    There was an episode of The Amp Hour a while back, interviewing a guy doings ASICs. He did over 50 designs per year, one guy

    --
    Klaus

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Jeroen Belleman@21:1/5 to David Brown on Sat Apr 23 19:50:58 2022
    On 2022-04-23 18:58, David Brown wrote:
    On 23/04/2022 16:21, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:


    https://www.ti.com/prod-list/new-products?releasePeriod=364


    And that's just TI. Boggling.


    Agreed - there's lots of interesting things there.

    But can they actually deliver them? That's the big challenge these days.



    More likely they're waiting to see who will order a few million.

    Jeroen Belleman

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Jeroen Belleman@21:1/5 to Ricky on Sat Apr 23 23:47:27 2022
    On 2022-04-23 23:34, Ricky wrote:
    On Saturday, April 23, 2022 at 11:39:09 AM UTC-4, Jan Panteltje wrote:
    On a sunny day (Sat, 23 Apr 2022 15:01:10 GMT) it happened Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonSt...@yahoo.com> wrote in <t414hf$qah$1...@dont-email.me>:
    On a sunny day (Sat, 23 Apr 2022 07:21:10 -0700) it happened
    jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in
    <1p286h126b5jr3km7...@4ax.com>:



    https://www.ti.com/prod-list/new-products?releasePeriod=364


    And that's just TI. Boggling.

    Not sure how serious I take that
    I downloaded the 'datasheet' for the 'AFE8092 Octal-Channel RF Transceiver with Feedback Paths'

    Not even a block diagram, and big pictures of ballgrid array but no pin function list.
    so 4 Giggle samples per second ADCs... (after figuring out what GSPS stood for).

    Not usable with that data.

    But more and more integration indeed.

    Too many pins...
    Maybe just for thermal...
    My opinion
    dataheet written by complete electronics moron
    He explains ADC (but everybody doing electronics knows that)
    but GSPS in capitals is the wrong notation for Gsamples/second.

    What is the correct notation for giga samples/second?


    I'd go with Gsamples/s. In a sufficiently unambiguous context,
    maybe GS/s will do. (They wouldn't be talking about the rate of
    change of conductance in a treatise on ADCs, now, would they?)

    'Samples' is the only unit without a universally accepted
    abbreviation.

    Jeroen Belleman

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ricky@21:1/5 to Jan Panteltje on Sat Apr 23 14:34:27 2022
    On Saturday, April 23, 2022 at 11:39:09 AM UTC-4, Jan Panteltje wrote:
    On a sunny day (Sat, 23 Apr 2022 15:01:10 GMT) it happened Jan Panteltje <pNaonSt...@yahoo.com> wrote in <t414hf$qah$1...@dont-email.me>:
    On a sunny day (Sat, 23 Apr 2022 07:21:10 -0700) it happened >jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in
    <1p286h126b5jr3km7...@4ax.com>:



    https://www.ti.com/prod-list/new-products?releasePeriod=364


    And that's just TI. Boggling.

    Not sure how serious I take that
    I downloaded the 'datasheet' for the 'AFE8092 Octal-Channel RF Transceiver with Feedback Paths'

    Not even a block diagram, and big pictures of ballgrid array but no pin function list.
    so 4 Giggle samples per second ADCs... (after figuring out what GSPS stood for).

    Not usable with that data.

    But more and more integration indeed.

    Too many pins...
    Maybe just for thermal...
    My opinion
    dataheet written by complete electronics moron
    He explains ADC (but everybody doing electronics knows that)
    but GSPS in capitals is the wrong notation for Gsamples/second.

    What is the correct notation for giga samples/second?

    --

    Rick C.

    - Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
    - Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Joe Gwinn@21:1/5 to jeroen@nospam.please on Sat Apr 23 20:03:13 2022
    On Sat, 23 Apr 2022 23:47:27 +0200, Jeroen Belleman
    <jeroen@nospam.please> wrote:

    On 2022-04-23 23:34, Ricky wrote:
    On Saturday, April 23, 2022 at 11:39:09 AM UTC-4, Jan Panteltje wrote:
    On a sunny day (Sat, 23 Apr 2022 15:01:10 GMT) it happened Jan Panteltje >>> <pNaonSt...@yahoo.com> wrote in <t414hf$qah$1...@dont-email.me>:
    On a sunny day (Sat, 23 Apr 2022 07:21:10 -0700) it happened
    jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in
    <1p286h126b5jr3km7...@4ax.com>:



    https://www.ti.com/prod-list/new-products?releasePeriod=364


    And that's just TI. Boggling.

    Not sure how serious I take that
    I downloaded the 'datasheet' for the 'AFE8092 Octal-Channel RF Transceiver with Feedback Paths'

    Not even a block diagram, and big pictures of ballgrid array but no pin function list.
    so 4 Giggle samples per second ADCs... (after figuring out what GSPS stood for).

    Not usable with that data.

    But more and more integration indeed.

    Too many pins...
    Maybe just for thermal...
    My opinion
    dataheet written by complete electronics moron
    He explains ADC (but everybody doing electronics knows that)
    but GSPS in capitals is the wrong notation for Gsamples/second.

    What is the correct notation for giga samples/second?


    I'd go with Gsamples/s. In a sufficiently unambiguous context,
    maybe GS/s will do. (They wouldn't be talking about the rate of
    change of conductance in a treatise on ADCs, now, would they?)

    'Samples' is the only unit without a universally accepted
    abbreviation.

    Yes, because there are no units associated with a sample in the
    abstract, the units being those of whatever is being sampled.

    Mathematically, a sample is what one gets when multiplying a function
    of time by a Dirac Delta function.

    Joe Gwinn

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ricky@21:1/5 to Jeroen Belleman on Sat Apr 23 16:39:55 2022
    On Saturday, April 23, 2022 at 5:47:36 PM UTC-4, Jeroen Belleman wrote:
    On 2022-04-23 23:34, Ricky wrote:
    On Saturday, April 23, 2022 at 11:39:09 AM UTC-4, Jan Panteltje wrote:
    On a sunny day (Sat, 23 Apr 2022 15:01:10 GMT) it happened Jan Panteltje >> <pNaonSt...@yahoo.com> wrote in <t414hf$qah$1...@dont-email.me>:
    On a sunny day (Sat, 23 Apr 2022 07:21:10 -0700) it happened
    jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in
    <1p286h126b5jr3km7...@4ax.com>:



    https://www.ti.com/prod-list/new-products?releasePeriod=364


    And that's just TI. Boggling.

    Not sure how serious I take that
    I downloaded the 'datasheet' for the 'AFE8092 Octal-Channel RF Transceiver with Feedback Paths'

    Not even a block diagram, and big pictures of ballgrid array but no pin function list.
    so 4 Giggle samples per second ADCs... (after figuring out what GSPS stood for).

    Not usable with that data.

    But more and more integration indeed.

    Too many pins...
    Maybe just for thermal...
    My opinion
    dataheet written by complete electronics moron
    He explains ADC (but everybody doing electronics knows that)
    but GSPS in capitals is the wrong notation for Gsamples/second.

    What is the correct notation for giga samples/second?

    I'd go with Gsamples/s. In a sufficiently unambiguous context,
    maybe GS/s will do. (They wouldn't be talking about the rate of
    change of conductance in a treatise on ADCs, now, would they?)

    'Samples' is the only unit without a universally accepted
    abbreviation.

    I'm not following the thinking. Everyone I've met is comfortable with the MSPS or even just SPS notation. Why is GSPS the odd duck? Why is S not an accepted abbreviation for "samples"? Because it's not an SI unit? Neither is HP, but in very common
    usage.

    --

    Rick C.

    + Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
    + Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com@21:1/5 to klauskvik@hotmail.com on Sat Apr 23 16:46:11 2022
    On Sat, 23 Apr 2022 20:22:14 +0300, Klaus Kragelund
    <klauskvik@hotmail.com> wrote:

    23.04.22 17:21, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:


    https://www.ti.com/prod-list/new-products?releasePeriod=364


    And that's just TI. Boggling.



    There was an episode of The Amp Hour a while back, interviewing a guy doings ASICs. He did over 50 designs per year, one guy

    If TI introduces, say, one new part per day, can they support them?
    Will they still be in production 10 years from now?

    I tried to get some support for one TI part. The guy said "that's a
    Burr-Brown part, nobody knows much about that."



    --

    I yam what I yam - Popeye

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From John Miles, KE5FX@21:1/5 to jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com on Sat Apr 23 17:47:32 2022
    On Saturday, April 23, 2022 at 4:46:20 PM UTC-7, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    I tried to get some support for one TI part. The guy said "that's a Burr-Brown part, nobody knows much about that."
    --

    And they're still using Burr-Brown branding for their newly-introduced
    JFETs (JFE2140). I thought that was odd.

    -- john, KE5FX

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Sergey Kubushyn@21:1/5 to jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com on Sun Apr 24 01:41:36 2022
    jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:


    https://www.ti.com/prod-list/new-products?releasePeriod=364


    And that's just TI. Boggling.

    And EVERYTING is out of stock. Vaporware for all practical purposes. How do
    you design something with some part that is "new" and unobtanium at the same time?

    I can make a thousand such "new parts" per month, all better than anything
    else and several times cheaper than existing best parts. The only problem is that those "new parts" don't really exist but who cares?

    ---
    ******************************************************************
    * KSI@home KOI8 Net < > The impossible we do immediately. *
    * Las Vegas NV, USA < > Miracles require 24-hour notice. * ******************************************************************

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Anthony William Sloman@21:1/5 to Jeroen Belleman on Sat Apr 23 20:03:59 2022
    On Sunday, April 24, 2022 at 3:51:11 AM UTC+10, Jeroen Belleman wrote:
    On 2022-04-23 18:58, David Brown wrote:
    On 23/04/2022 16:21, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:


    https://www.ti.com/prod-list/new-products?releasePeriod=364


    And that's just TI. Boggling.


    Agreed - there's lots of interesting things there.

    But can they actually deliver them? That's the big challenge these days.


    More likely they're waiting to see who will order a few million.

    When I was much younger - in the 1970's - TI was known to publish a data sheet before they'd done the detailed design of the part. If it didn't generate enough orders, they didn't bother to complete the design or put it into production. They could be
    waiting to see if *anybody* will order a few million.

    --
    Bill Sloman, Sydney

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Phil Allison@21:1/5 to Sergey Kubushyn on Sat Apr 23 19:31:23 2022
    Sergey Kubushyn wrote:
    ====================


    https://www.ti.com/prod-list/new-products?releasePeriod=364

    And that's just TI. Boggling.

    And EVERYTING is out of stock. Vaporware for all practical purposes. How do you design something with some part that is "new" and unobtanium at the same time?

    ** A lot of the new parts were described as "automotive".
    Guess that is a a really big market area for such tech lately.

    So designers are specing them for new car designs all over the place.
    Then the expected stock fails to appear.
    Hence the shortage of a great many new cars models - if even just one chip is missing.



    ..... Phil

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Ricky@21:1/5 to bill....@ieee.org on Sat Apr 23 21:17:25 2022
    On Saturday, April 23, 2022 at 11:04:03 PM UTC-4, bill....@ieee.org wrote:
    On Sunday, April 24, 2022 at 3:51:11 AM UTC+10, Jeroen Belleman wrote:
    On 2022-04-23 18:58, David Brown wrote:
    On 23/04/2022 16:21, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:


    https://www.ti.com/prod-list/new-products?releasePeriod=364


    And that's just TI. Boggling.


    Agreed - there's lots of interesting things there.

    But can they actually deliver them? That's the big challenge these days.


    More likely they're waiting to see who will order a few million.
    When I was much younger - in the 1970's - TI was known to publish a data sheet before they'd done the detailed design of the part. If it didn't generate enough orders, they didn't bother to complete the design or put it into production. They could be
    waiting to see if *anybody* will order a few million.

    I thought that was Maxim! lol

    --

    Rick C.

    -- Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
    -- Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Gerhard Hoffmann@21:1/5 to All on Sun Apr 24 09:00:07 2022
    Am 23.04.22 um 17:01 schrieb Jan Panteltje:
    On a sunny day (Sat, 23 Apr 2022 07:21:10 -0700) it happened jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in <1p286h126b5jr3km7052fjuaugmb8scvrl@4ax.com>:



    https://www.ti.com/prod-list/new-products?releasePeriod=364


    And that's just TI. Boggling.

    Not sure how serious I take that
    I downloaded the 'datasheet' for the 'AFE8092 Octal-Channel RF Transceiver with Feedback Paths'

    Not even a block diagram, and big pictures of ballgrid array but no pin function list.
    so 4 Giggle samples per second ADCs... (after figuring out what GSPS stood for).

    If you have to google what GSPS stands for, you obviously have
    no use for the full data sheet.

    MSPS and GSPS is absolutely common.

    < https://www.analog.com/en/parametricsearch/10826#/ >


    Not usable with that data.

    But more and more integration indeed.

    Too many pins...
    Maybe just for thermal...

    blafasel.

    Gerhard

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Jan Panteltje@21:1/5 to dk4xp@arcor.de on Sun Apr 24 08:22:27 2022
    On a sunny day (Sun, 24 Apr 2022 09:00:07 +0200) it happened Gerhard Hoffmann <dk4xp@arcor.de> wrote in <t42shn$1b52f$1@solani.org>:

    Am 23.04.22 um 17:01 schrieb Jan Panteltje:
    On a sunny day (Sat, 23 Apr 2022 07:21:10 -0700) it happened
    jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in
    <1p286h126b5jr3km7052fjuaugmb8scvrl@4ax.com>:



    https://www.ti.com/prod-list/new-products?releasePeriod=364


    And that's just TI. Boggling.

    Not sure how serious I take that
    I downloaded the 'datasheet' for the 'AFE8092 Octal-Channel RF Transceiver with Feedback Paths'

    Not even a block diagram, and big pictures of ballgrid array but no pin function list.
    so 4 Giggle samples per second ADCs... (after figuring out what GSPS stood for).

    If you have to google what GSPS stands for, you obviously have
    no use for the full data sheet.

    Oh, you know it all asshole


    MSPS and GSPS is absolutely common.

    < https://www.analog.com/en/parametricsearch/10826#/ >


    Not usable with that data.

    But more and more integration indeed.

    Too many pins...
    Maybe just for thermal...

    blafasel.

    Its a crap 'datasheet' makes no sense whatsoever, maybe some intern training for sales droid made it
    Best of luck with it,
    and you seem to not know the difference between ground penetrating radar and metal coil detectors either.

    Lots of things are common that are wrong, like soem of your postings for example.

    :-)

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Dimiter_Popoff@21:1/5 to Gerhard Hoffmann on Sun Apr 24 14:29:44 2022
    On 4/24/2022 10:00, Gerhard Hoffmann wrote:
    Am 23.04.22 um 17:01 schrieb Jan Panteltje:
    On a sunny day (Sat, 23 Apr 2022 07:21:10 -0700) it happened
    jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in
    <1p286h126b5jr3km7052fjuaugmb8scvrl@4ax.com>:



    https://www.ti.com/prod-list/new-products?releasePeriod=364


    And that's just TI. Boggling.

    Not sure how serious I take that
    I downloaded the 'datasheet' for the 'AFE8092 Octal-Channel RF
    Transceiver with Feedback Paths'

    Not even a block diagram, and big pictures of ballgrid array but no
    pin function list.
    so 4 Giggle samples per second ADCs... (after figuring out what GSPS
    stood for).

    If you have to google what GSPS stands for, you obviously have
    no use for the full data sheet.

    MSPS and GSPS is absolutely common.


    Common and have been that for decades of course. When I designed our
    first HPGe MCA acquisition front end with direct digitizing
    ( http://tgi-sci.com/tgi/hstb.htm ), DSP etc. MSPS was already common,
    that was late 90-s.
    And of course you are right that someone who does not understand the
    term has no use for a complete datasheet, but the lack of a decent
    datasheet (which I did not bother to look at so I just accept it
    is crap from what was said in other posts) speaks a lot about the
    state of the product. Or about the willingness to sell it to
    anyone, things get worse by the day in that respect...

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Johann Klammer@21:1/5 to Sergey Kubushyn on Sun Apr 24 13:38:07 2022
    On 04/24/2022 03:41 AM, Sergey Kubushyn wrote:

    I can make a thousand such "new parts" per month, all better than anything else and several times cheaper than existing best parts. The only problem is that those "new parts" don't really exist but who cares?

    I guess they're mimicking the financial Industry, now.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From bitrex@21:1/5 to Johann Klammer on Sun Apr 24 10:10:06 2022
    On 4/24/2022 7:38 AM, Johann Klammer wrote:
    On 04/24/2022 03:41 AM, Sergey Kubushyn wrote:

    I can make a thousand such "new parts" per month, all better than anything >> else and several times cheaper than existing best parts. The only problem is >> that those "new parts" don't really exist but who cares?

    I guess they're mimicking the financial Industry, now.


    Publish or perish mentality "What has your R&D department been doing?"
    "Well not much really except pitching in in other departments to be
    ready to best support our extant product lines, while we wait on the
    supply chain to stabilize"

    Yeah, share holders don't wanna hear that.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Dimiter_Popoff@21:1/5 to Johann Klammer on Sun Apr 24 16:29:41 2022
    On 4/24/2022 14:38, Johann Klammer wrote:
    On 04/24/2022 03:41 AM, Sergey Kubushyn wrote:

    I can make a thousand such "new parts" per month, all better than anything >> else and several times cheaper than existing best parts. The only problem is >> that those "new parts" don't really exist but who cares?

    I guess they're mimicking the financial Industry, now.


    It has grown into new, seemingly huge proportions but it is not anything
    new.
    Back in 1992/1993 I had designed in a SCSI interface part from a
    catalog (naive beginner), I think the firms was called Emulex
    or something like that.
    When I got the first version of the PCB I had already understood the
    error I had made (the part had never been produced, not even in
    prototype quantities I think); so I had to redesign the board with an NCR53CF96, a real part...
    The first unit ( http://tgi-sci.com/tgi/fr64.gif ) had a huge
    230 megabytes of a 2.5" SCSI HDD inside, which cost me a fortune
    (no www to search for bargains, bought it from Apple at something
    close to $1k IIRC). Shortly after magnetoresistive R/W heads came
    into being, 2.5" SCSI peaked at 810 MB and among other things made
    life easier in terms of magnetic field interference compared to life
    with inductive heads. And forced me into doing ATA, now SATA, into
    further products...

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Jeroen Belleman@21:1/5 to Ricky on Sun Apr 24 16:01:25 2022
    On 2022-04-24 01:39, Ricky wrote:
    On Saturday, April 23, 2022 at 5:47:36 PM UTC-4, Jeroen Belleman
    wrote:
    On 2022-04-23 23:34, Ricky wrote:
    On Saturday, April 23, 2022 at 11:39:09 AM UTC-4, Jan Panteltje
    wrote:
    On a sunny day (Sat, 23 Apr 2022 15:01:10 GMT) it happened Jan
    Panteltje <pNaonSt...@yahoo.com> wrote in
    <t414hf$qah$1...@dont-email.me>:
    On a sunny day (Sat, 23 Apr 2022 07:21:10 -0700) it happened
    jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in
    <1p286h126b5jr3km7...@4ax.com>:



    https://www.ti.com/prod-list/new-products?releasePeriod=364




    And that's just TI. Boggling.

    Not sure how serious I take that I downloaded the 'datasheet'
    for the 'AFE8092 Octal-Channel RF Transceiver with Feedback
    Paths'

    Not even a block diagram, and big pictures of ballgrid array
    but no pin function list. so 4 Giggle samples per second
    ADCs... (after figuring out what GSPS stood for).

    Not usable with that data.

    But more and more integration indeed.

    Too many pins... Maybe just for thermal...
    My opinion dataheet written by complete electronics moron He
    explains ADC (but everybody doing electronics knows that) but
    GSPS in capitals is the wrong notation for Gsamples/second.

    What is the correct notation for giga samples/second?

    I'd go with Gsamples/s. In a sufficiently unambiguous context,
    maybe GS/s will do. (They wouldn't be talking about the rate of
    change of conductance in a treatise on ADCs, now, would they?)

    'Samples' is the only unit without a universally accepted
    abbreviation.

    I'm not following the thinking. Everyone I've met is comfortable
    with the MSPS or even just SPS notation. Why is GSPS the odd duck?
    Why is S not an accepted abbreviation for "samples"? Because it's
    not an SI unit? Neither is HP, but in very common usage.


    Oh, I understand it, but _I_ would write Gsamples/s, Msamples/s,
    ksamples/s, etc. I'm OK with 'S' for 'samples' if the context
    makes it unambiguous, I already said. I'm _not_ OK with 'S' for
    'seconds'. It should be lower case 's'.

    HP should be stamped out altogether. Use kW.

    I'm a bit of a purist when it comes to units.

    Jeroen Belleman

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Dimiter_Popoff@21:1/5 to Jeroen Belleman on Sun Apr 24 18:37:00 2022
    On 4/24/2022 17:01, Jeroen Belleman wrote:
    On 2022-04-24 01:39, Ricky wrote:
    On Saturday, April 23, 2022 at 5:47:36 PM UTC-4, Jeroen Belleman
    wrote:
    On 2022-04-23 23:34, Ricky wrote:
    On Saturday, April 23, 2022 at 11:39:09 AM UTC-4, Jan Panteltje
    wrote:
    On a sunny day (Sat, 23 Apr 2022 15:01:10 GMT) it happened Jan
    Panteltje <pNaonSt...@yahoo.com> wrote in
    <t414hf$qah$1...@dont-email.me>:
    On a sunny day (Sat, 23 Apr 2022 07:21:10 -0700) it happened
    jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in
    <1p286h126b5jr3km7...@4ax.com>:



    https://www.ti.com/prod-list/new-products?releasePeriod=364




    And that's just TI. Boggling.

    Not sure how serious I take that I downloaded the 'datasheet'
    for the 'AFE8092 Octal-Channel RF Transceiver with Feedback
    Paths'

    Not even a block diagram, and big pictures of ballgrid array
    but no pin function list. so 4 Giggle samples per second
    ADCs... (after figuring out what GSPS stood for).

    Not usable with that data.

    But more and more integration indeed.

    Too many pins... Maybe just for thermal...
    My opinion dataheet written by complete electronics moron He
    explains ADC (but everybody doing electronics knows that) but
    GSPS in capitals is the wrong notation for Gsamples/second.

    What is the correct notation for giga samples/second?

    I'd go with Gsamples/s. In a sufficiently unambiguous context,
    maybe GS/s will do. (They wouldn't be talking about the rate of
    change of conductance in a treatise on ADCs, now, would they?)

    'Samples' is the only unit without a universally accepted
    abbreviation.

    I'm not following the thinking.  Everyone I've met is comfortable
    with the MSPS or even just SPS notation.  Why is GSPS the odd duck?
    Why is S not an accepted abbreviation for "samples"?  Because it's
    not an SI unit?  Neither is HP, but in very common usage.


    Oh, I understand it, but _I_ would write Gsamples/s, Msamples/s,
    ksamples/s, etc. I'm OK with 'S' for 'samples' if the context
    makes it unambiguous, I already said. I'm _not_ OK with 'S' for
    'seconds'. It should be lower case 's'.

    Come on, MSPS is OK (of course I know you understand it).
    BTW someone pointed me to the fact that I was wrongly using S for
    seconds (had been doing so for ages) just 2-3 years ago, I
    changed since - never too late to mend :-).
    But I keep MSPS, somewhat resisting the temptation to write
    MSPs, it is sort of an old idiom to me.


    HP should be stamped out altogether. Use kW.

    Hah! I thought he meant Hewlet-Packard...(I really did).
    I do think in Watts when it comes to power obviously, like
    pretty much all of us, but when it comes to car/engine power
    I think horse powers... (but in Bulgarian, so HP did not
    speak to me).


    I'm a bit of a purist when it comes to units.

    I am lax about it as long as things are clear enough, ambiguity
    can be a killer. May be being a purist is better than my
    attitude but, like John says, "we are what we are" :-).
    And of course I hate inches, I always have to convert to mm
    to grasp it. And for pounds, pints, gallons etc. I still have to
    use the web...

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ricky@21:1/5 to Jeroen Belleman on Sun Apr 24 08:29:26 2022
    On Sunday, April 24, 2022 at 10:01:33 AM UTC-4, Jeroen Belleman wrote:
    On 2022-04-24 01:39, Ricky wrote:
    On Saturday, April 23, 2022 at 5:47:36 PM UTC-4, Jeroen Belleman
    wrote:
    On 2022-04-23 23:34, Ricky wrote:
    On Saturday, April 23, 2022 at 11:39:09 AM UTC-4, Jan Panteltje
    wrote:
    On a sunny day (Sat, 23 Apr 2022 15:01:10 GMT) it happened Jan
    Panteltje <pNaonSt...@yahoo.com> wrote in
    <t414hf$qah$1...@dont-email.me>:
    On a sunny day (Sat, 23 Apr 2022 07:21:10 -0700) it happened
    jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in
    <1p286h126b5jr3km7...@4ax.com>:



    https://www.ti.com/prod-list/new-products?releasePeriod=364




    And that's just TI. Boggling.

    Not sure how serious I take that I downloaded the 'datasheet'
    for the 'AFE8092 Octal-Channel RF Transceiver with Feedback
    Paths'

    Not even a block diagram, and big pictures of ballgrid array
    but no pin function list. so 4 Giggle samples per second
    ADCs... (after figuring out what GSPS stood for).

    Not usable with that data.

    But more and more integration indeed.

    Too many pins... Maybe just for thermal...
    My opinion dataheet written by complete electronics moron He
    explains ADC (but everybody doing electronics knows that) but
    GSPS in capitals is the wrong notation for Gsamples/second.

    What is the correct notation for giga samples/second?

    I'd go with Gsamples/s. In a sufficiently unambiguous context,
    maybe GS/s will do. (They wouldn't be talking about the rate of
    change of conductance in a treatise on ADCs, now, would they?)

    'Samples' is the only unit without a universally accepted
    abbreviation.

    I'm not following the thinking. Everyone I've met is comfortable
    with the MSPS or even just SPS notation. Why is GSPS the odd duck?
    Why is S not an accepted abbreviation for "samples"? Because it's
    not an SI unit? Neither is HP, but in very common usage.

    Oh, I understand it, but _I_ would write Gsamples/s, Msamples/s,
    ksamples/s, etc. I'm OK with 'S' for 'samples' if the context
    makes it unambiguous, I already said. I'm _not_ OK with 'S' for
    'seconds'. It should be lower case 's'.

    HP should be stamped out altogether. Use kW.

    I'm a bit of a purist when it comes to units.

    You are trying to treat this as if it were something akin to SI units. It's nothing like that. It is just an abbreviation, in such common usage that no one with any experience at all should know the usage.

    If you don't want to write what the rest of the world writes, that's fine, but don't expect to never have to read it. That's like wanting to hear "get" instead of "git". When I pay attention, it is surprising how few people say "get". I can say "get"
    all day long and others are not going to change.

    --

    Rick C.

    -+ Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
    -+ Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ricky@21:1/5 to Dimiter Popoff on Sun Apr 24 10:58:13 2022
    On Sunday, April 24, 2022 at 11:37:08 AM UTC-4, Dimiter Popoff wrote:
    On 4/24/2022 17:01, Jeroen Belleman wrote:
    On 2022-04-24 01:39, Ricky wrote:
    On Saturday, April 23, 2022 at 5:47:36 PM UTC-4, Jeroen Belleman
    wrote:
    On 2022-04-23 23:34, Ricky wrote:
    On Saturday, April 23, 2022 at 11:39:09 AM UTC-4, Jan Panteltje
    wrote:
    On a sunny day (Sat, 23 Apr 2022 15:01:10 GMT) it happened Jan
    Panteltje <pNaonSt...@yahoo.com> wrote in
    <t414hf$qah$1...@dont-email.me>:
    On a sunny day (Sat, 23 Apr 2022 07:21:10 -0700) it happened
    jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in
    <1p286h126b5jr3km7...@4ax.com>:



    https://www.ti.com/prod-list/new-products?releasePeriod=364




    And that's just TI. Boggling.

    Not sure how serious I take that I downloaded the 'datasheet'
    for the 'AFE8092 Octal-Channel RF Transceiver with Feedback
    Paths'

    Not even a block diagram, and big pictures of ballgrid array
    but no pin function list. so 4 Giggle samples per second
    ADCs... (after figuring out what GSPS stood for).

    Not usable with that data.

    But more and more integration indeed.

    Too many pins... Maybe just for thermal...
    My opinion dataheet written by complete electronics moron He
    explains ADC (but everybody doing electronics knows that) but
    GSPS in capitals is the wrong notation for Gsamples/second.

    What is the correct notation for giga samples/second?

    I'd go with Gsamples/s. In a sufficiently unambiguous context,
    maybe GS/s will do. (They wouldn't be talking about the rate of
    change of conductance in a treatise on ADCs, now, would they?)

    'Samples' is the only unit without a universally accepted
    abbreviation.

    I'm not following the thinking. Everyone I've met is comfortable
    with the MSPS or even just SPS notation. Why is GSPS the odd duck?
    Why is S not an accepted abbreviation for "samples"? Because it's
    not an SI unit? Neither is HP, but in very common usage.


    Oh, I understand it, but _I_ would write Gsamples/s, Msamples/s, ksamples/s, etc. I'm OK with 'S' for 'samples' if the context
    makes it unambiguous, I already said. I'm _not_ OK with 'S' for
    'seconds'. It should be lower case 's'.
    Come on, MSPS is OK (of course I know you understand it).
    BTW someone pointed me to the fact that I was wrongly using S for
    seconds (had been doing so for ages) just 2-3 years ago, I
    changed since - never too late to mend :-).
    But I keep MSPS, somewhat resisting the temptation to write
    MSPs, it is sort of an old idiom to me.

    HP should be stamped out altogether. Use kW.
    Hah! I thought he meant Hewlet-Packard...(I really did).
    I do think in Watts when it comes to power obviously, like
    pretty much all of us, but when it comes to car/engine power
    I think horse powers... (but in Bulgarian, so HP did not
    speak to me).

    I'm a bit of a purist when it comes to units.
    I am lax about it as long as things are clear enough, ambiguity
    can be a killer. May be being a purist is better than my
    attitude but, like John says, "we are what we are" :-).
    And of course I hate inches, I always have to convert to mm
    to grasp it. And for pounds, pints, gallons etc. I still have to
    use the web...

    I agree that HP can be abandoned without too much pain. I'd like to see kWh go away, but would be replaced with Joules, a rather much smaller unit. I believe there are 3,600 J to a Wh, so 3.6e6 J to a kWh. Grid level values are often MWh which is 3.
    6e9 J. So J is not a convenient unit for electrical stuff. The battery in my car is nominally 360 MJ... I think. Did I do the conversion right? One of the nice features of kWh in my car, is the battery is 100 kWh, making the conversion to/from %
    rather easy.

    --

    Rick C.

    +- Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
    +- Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Flyguy@21:1/5 to jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com on Sun Apr 24 14:52:07 2022
    On Saturday, April 23, 2022 at 7:21:19 AM UTC-7, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    https://www.ti.com/prod-list/new-products?releasePeriod=364


    And that's just TI. Boggling.



    --

    I yam what I yam - Popeye

    Example: the AFE7903 does direct conversion at GHz speeds, mind boggling:

    'With operation up to 7.4 GHz, this device
    enables direct RF sampling in the HF, VHF, UHF,
    L, S and C-band frequency ranges without the need
    for additional frequency conversions stages."

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Flyguy@21:1/5 to Jan Panteltje on Sun Apr 24 14:47:31 2022
    On Saturday, April 23, 2022 at 8:04:22 AM UTC-7, Jan Panteltje wrote:
    On a sunny day (Sat, 23 Apr 2022 07:21:10 -0700) it happened jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in
    <1p286h126b5jr3km7...@4ax.com>:


    https://www.ti.com/prod-list/new-products?releasePeriod=364


    And that's just TI. Boggling.
    Not sure how serious I take that
    I downloaded the 'datasheet' for the 'AFE8092 Octal-Channel RF Transceiver with Feedback Paths'

    Not even a block diagram, and big pictures of ballgrid array but no pin function list.
    so 4 Giggle samples per second ADCs... (after figuring out what GSPS stood for).

    Not usable with that data.

    But more and more integration indeed.

    Too many pins...
    Maybe just for thermal...

    You have to click on Technical Documentation (or scroll down to it), which produces a list of items including a datasheet, app notes, and tech notes. Some people just aren't cut out to be engineers...

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Doe@21:1/5 to Ricky on Mon Apr 25 01:12:47 2022
    Ricky <gnuarm.deletethisbit@gmail.com> wrote:

    I agree that HP can be abandoned without too much pain. I'd like to see
    kWh go away, but would be replaced with Joules, a rather much smaller
    unit. I believe there are 3,600 J to a Wh, so 3.6e6 J to a kWh. Grid
    level values are often MWh which is 3.6e9 J. So J is not a convenient
    unit for electrical stuff. The battery in my car is nominally 360 MJ...
    I think. Did I do the conversion right? One of the nice features of
    kWh in my car, is the battery is 100 kWh, making the conversion to/from
    % rather easy.

    Is your car in Puerto Rico with you?

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ricky@21:1/5 to John Doe on Sun Apr 24 19:30:27 2022
    On Sunday, April 24, 2022 at 9:12:54 PM UTC-4, John Doe wrote:
    Ricky <gnuarm.del...@gmail.com> wrote:

    I agree that HP can be abandoned without too much pain. I'd like to see kWh go away, but would be replaced with Joules, a rather much smaller unit. I believe there are 3,600 J to a Wh, so 3.6e6 J to a kWh. Grid
    level values are often MWh which is 3.6e9 J. So J is not a convenient
    unit for electrical stuff. The battery in my car is nominally 360 MJ...
    I think. Did I do the conversion right? One of the nice features of
    kWh in my car, is the battery is 100 kWh, making the conversion to/from
    % rather easy.
    Is your car in Puerto Rico with you?

    Which car? I have the Tesla in the states (mostly at the airport) and a Kia in Puerto Rico. A BEV is not practical in Puerto Rico unless you charge at home and I'm living in Airbnb until I decide where to buy. I'm hoping I have some better choices by
    the time I'm ready to buy a BEV in Puerto Rico. Whatever it is, it has to be small. A big car in Puerto Rico is a PITA! They have narrow lanes and some roads are really narrow.

    --

    Rick C.

    ++ Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
    ++ Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From whit3rd@21:1/5 to Flyguy on Sun Apr 24 20:58:04 2022
    On Sunday, April 24, 2022 at 2:52:11 PM UTC-7, Flyguy wrote:

    Example: the AFE7903 does direct conversion at GHz speeds, mind boggling:

    'With operation up to 7.4 GHz, this device
    enables direct RF sampling in the HF, VHF, UHF,
    L, S and C-band frequency ranges without the need
    for additional frequency conversions stages."

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From whit3rd@21:1/5 to Flyguy on Sun Apr 24 21:02:34 2022
    On Sunday, April 24, 2022 at 2:52:11 PM UTC-7, Flyguy wrote:

    Example: the AFE7903 does direct conversion at GHz speeds, mind boggling:

    'With operation up to 7.4 GHz, this device
    enables direct RF sampling in the HF, VHF, UHF,
    L, S and C-band frequency ranges without the need
    for additional frequency conversions stages."

    Boggling, but worthless, unless you have GHz bandwidth requirements
    in addition to GHz carrier requirements. Aperture time being small
    also gives you GHz noise capability... not sure it's worth examining all
    the bits in that firehose of a bit stream.

    So, how much data does a channel-plate multiplier and streak camera output,
    per second? More, or less?

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Flyguy@21:1/5 to All on Sun Apr 24 22:01:40 2022
    On Sunday, April 24, 2022 at 9:02:38 PM UTC-7, whit3rd wrote:
    On Sunday, April 24, 2022 at 2:52:11 PM UTC-7, Flyguy wrote:

    Example: the AFE7903 does direct conversion at GHz speeds, mind boggling:

    'With operation up to 7.4 GHz, this device
    enables direct RF sampling in the HF, VHF, UHF,
    L, S and C-band frequency ranges without the need
    for additional frequency conversions stages."
    Boggling, but worthless, unless you have GHz bandwidth requirements
    in addition to GHz carrier requirements. Aperture time being small
    also gives you GHz noise capability... not sure it's worth examining all
    the bits in that firehose of a bit stream.

    So, how much data does a channel-plate multiplier and streak camera output, per second? More, or less?

    That would be most of the RF industry.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Anthony William Sloman@21:1/5 to Flyguy on Sun Apr 24 23:31:54 2022
    On Monday, April 25, 2022 at 3:01:44 PM UTC+10, Flyguy wrote:
    On Sunday, April 24, 2022 at 9:02:38 PM UTC-7, whit3rd wrote:
    On Sunday, April 24, 2022 at 2:52:11 PM UTC-7, Flyguy wrote:

    Example: the AFE7903 does direct conversion at GHz speeds, mind boggling:

    'With operation up to 7.4 GHz, this device
    enables direct RF sampling in the HF, VHF, UHF,
    L, S and C-band frequency ranges without the need
    for additional frequency conversions stages."
    Boggling, but worthless, unless you have GHz bandwidth requirements
    in addition to GHz carrier requirements. Aperture time being small
    also gives you GHz noise capability... not sure it's worth examining all the bits in that firehose of a bit stream.

    So, how much data does a channel-plate multiplier and streak camera output,
    per second? More, or less?

    That would be most of the RF industry.

    Flyguy missed the point by a country mile. He doesn't miss many opportunities to remind us how dim and ill-informed he is, but this effort is more comical than most.

    A channel plate multiplier and a streak camera do have a lot of bandwidth, but once you captured a screen's worth of data you have to scan the screen, and digitise and store the result before you can collect another. Unlike Flygyuy, I do know what they
    were, but I'd have to do quite a bit of digging to find out how fast current versions (if they still exist) can collect data or transfer it into mass memory.

    Cambridge Instruments did use a channel plate multiplier in the EBMF 10.5 electron beam microfabricator, but it was used as a thin electron multiplier. It was bit faster than regular photomultiplier tubes but only because the electrons didn't have as
    far to go. The streak camera would have been the quick bit.

    --
    Bill Sloman, Sydney

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Doe@21:1/5 to All on Mon Apr 25 07:16:16 2022
    Is there some clinical name for a person who insults others in
    conversation. Maybe that is Australian etiquette and protocol.


    Bozo Bill Sloman, the most frequent troll in this group, is an attention-craving chronic liar who cannot be reasoned with...

    "the user has posted under the same name in other places, so not
    nym-shifting" (Bozo sucks at logic)

    "the Mueller investigation was about Trump only because Trump made it so"
    (Bozo lying)

    "the concepts "male" and "female" are essentially social constructions"
    (Bozo being weird)

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Anthony William Sloman@21:1/5 to John Doe on Mon Apr 25 00:55:25 2022
    On Monday, April 25, 2022 at 5:16:23 PM UTC+10, John Doe wrote:
    Is there some clinical name for a person who insults others in
    conversation. Maybe that is Australian etiquette and protocol.

    Someone who doesn't suffer fools gladly. Technically speaking, pointing out that somebody has got something grossly wrong is correcting them rather than insulting them, but with Flyguy you have to be very explicit or he won't notice that he has been
    corrected.

    <snipped the rest. John Doe isn't very bright either and does feel the need to recycle old insults>

    --
    Bill Sloman, Sydney

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Walliker@21:1/5 to Dimiter Popoff on Mon Apr 25 02:29:58 2022
    On Sunday, 24 April 2022 at 16:37:08 UTC+1, Dimiter Popoff wrote:
    On 4/24/2022 17:01, Jeroen Belleman wrote:

    What is the correct notation for giga samples/second?

    I'd go with Gsamples/s. In a sufficiently unambiguous context,
    maybe GS/s will do. (They wouldn't be talking about the rate of
    change of conductance in a treatise on ADCs, now, would they?)

    'Samples' is the only unit without a universally accepted
    abbreviation.

    I'm not following the thinking. Everyone I've met is comfortable
    with the MSPS or even just SPS notation. Why is GSPS the odd duck?
    Why is S not an accepted abbreviation for "samples"? Because it's
    not an SI unit? Neither is HP, but in very common usage.


    Oh, I understand it, but _I_ would write Gsamples/s, Msamples/s, ksamples/s, etc. I'm OK with 'S' for 'samples' if the context
    makes it unambiguous, I already said. I'm _not_ OK with 'S' for
    'seconds'. It should be lower case 's'.
    Come on, MSPS is OK (of course I know you understand it).
    BTW someone pointed me to the fact that I was wrongly using S for
    seconds (had been doing so for ages) just 2-3 years ago, I
    changed since - never too late to mend :-).
    But I keep MSPS, somewhat resisting the temptation to write
    MSPs, it is sort of an old idiom to me.

    I prefer sa/s.

    John

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Michal@21:1/5 to All on Tue Apr 26 22:57:52 2022
    W dniu 2022-04-24 o 01:46, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com pisze:

    If TI introduces, say, one new part per day, can they support them?

    yes, of course as usual through their forum..

    --
    Best Regards
    Michal

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Larkin@21:1/5 to ksi@koi8.net on Tue Apr 26 14:16:22 2022
    On Sun, 24 Apr 2022 01:41:36 -0000 (UTC), Sergey Kubushyn
    <ksi@koi8.net> wrote:

    jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:


    https://www.ti.com/prod-list/new-products?releasePeriod=364


    And that's just TI. Boggling.

    And EVERYTING is out of stock. Vaporware for all practical purposes. How do >you design something with some part that is "new" and unobtanium at the same >time?

    I can make a thousand such "new parts" per month, all better than anything >else and several times cheaper than existing best parts. The only problem is >that those "new parts" don't really exist but who cares?

    ---
    ******************************************************************
    * KSI@home KOI8 Net < > The impossible we do immediately. *
    * Las Vegas NV, USA < > Miracles require 24-hour notice. * >******************************************************************

    I assume that they usually have a launch customer, which at least
    shows that somebody likes the idea.

    --

    If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end with doubts,
    but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties. Francis Bacon

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Flyguy@21:1/5 to bill....@ieee.org on Tue Apr 26 21:54:43 2022
    On Sunday, April 24, 2022 at 11:31:58 PM UTC-7, bill....@ieee.org wrote:
    On Monday, April 25, 2022 at 3:01:44 PM UTC+10, Flyguy wrote:
    On Sunday, April 24, 2022 at 9:02:38 PM UTC-7, whit3rd wrote:
    On Sunday, April 24, 2022 at 2:52:11 PM UTC-7, Flyguy wrote:

    Example: the AFE7903 does direct conversion at GHz speeds, mind boggling:

    'With operation up to 7.4 GHz, this device
    enables direct RF sampling in the HF, VHF, UHF,
    L, S and C-band frequency ranges without the need
    for additional frequency conversions stages."
    Boggling, but worthless, unless you have GHz bandwidth requirements
    in addition to GHz carrier requirements. Aperture time being small
    also gives you GHz noise capability... not sure it's worth examining all the bits in that firehose of a bit stream.

    So, how much data does a channel-plate multiplier and streak camera output,
    per second? More, or less?

    That would be most of the RF industry.
    Flyguy missed the point by a country mile. He doesn't miss many opportunities to remind us how dim and ill-informed he is, but this effort is more comical than most.

    A channel plate multiplier and a streak camera do have a lot of bandwidth, but once you captured a screen's worth of data you have to scan the screen, and digitise and store the result before you can collect another. Unlike Flygyuy, I do know what they
    were, but I'd have to do quite a bit of digging to find out how fast current versions (if they still exist) can collect data or transfer it into mass memory.

    Cambridge Instruments did use a channel plate multiplier in the EBMF 10.5 electron beam microfabricator, but it was used as a thin electron multiplier. It was bit faster than regular photomultiplier tubes but only because the electrons didn't have as
    far to go. The streak camera would have been the quick bit.

    --
    SNIPPERMAN, Sydney

    Hey SNIPPERMAN, have you LOST YOUR MIND? You just responded to the WRONG GUY, you IDIOT!!!

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Phil Hobbs@21:1/5 to All on Wed Apr 27 04:07:17 2022
    whit3rd wrote:
    On Sunday, April 24, 2022 at 2:52:11 PM UTC-7, Flyguy wrote:

    Example: the AFE7903 does direct conversion at GHz speeds, mind
    boggling:

    'With operation up to 7.4 GHz, this device enables direct RF
    sampling in the HF, VHF, UHF, L, S and C-band frequency ranges
    without the need for additional frequency conversions stages."

    Boggling, but worthless, unless you have GHz bandwidth requirements
    in addition to GHz carrier requirements. Aperture time being small
    also gives you GHz noise capability... not sure it's worth examining
    all the bits in that firehose of a bit stream.

    Nah, from that POV it's no worse than a wideband amplifier. You just
    need to filter afterwards to select the desired bandwidth. It's an
    advantage of very fast sampling that the quantization noise gets spread
    out over a very wide bandwidth so that most of it gets filtered out.

    The main issues with RF sampling are: (1) DSP complexity and (2) phase
    noise. For a fixed-tuned or narrowband application, a single-conversion superhet saves a lot of FPGA resources, clocking hardware, and RTL code.

    There are quite a lot of software-defined radio (SDR) libraries out
    there to reduce the coding burden, but you still need some reasonably hairy-chested hardware to run them on.

    So, how much data does a channel-plate multiplier and streak camera
    output, per second? More, or less?

    A lens will do Fourier transforms with aggregate bandwidths of 1E20 Hz
    for a few bucks, if you can collect the data. (Say 300k pixels times 300
    THz temporal bandwidth.) There's this little problem of collecting it
    all, of course.

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs


    --
    Dr Philip C D Hobbs
    Principal Consultant
    ElectroOptical Innovations LLC / Hobbs ElectroOptics
    Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics
    Briarcliff Manor NY 10510

    http://electrooptical.net
    http://hobbs-eo.com

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Larkin@21:1/5 to All on Wed Apr 27 11:47:00 2022
    On Sun, 24 Apr 2022 21:02:34 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Sunday, April 24, 2022 at 2:52:11 PM UTC-7, Flyguy wrote:

    Example: the AFE7903 does direct conversion at GHz speeds, mind boggling:

    'With operation up to 7.4 GHz, this device
    enables direct RF sampling in the HF, VHF, UHF,
    L, S and C-band frequency ranges without the need
    for additional frequency conversions stages."

    Boggling, but worthless, unless you have GHz bandwidth requirements
    in addition to GHz carrier requirements. Aperture time being small
    also gives you GHz noise capability... not sure it's worth examining all
    the bits in that firehose of a bit stream.

    So, how much data does a channel-plate multiplier and streak camera output, >per second? More, or less?

    Next-gen wireless networks will have frequency hopping, radical
    constellation coding, synthetic antenna aiming, all sorts of nasty
    stuff. It makes sense to digitize the antenna signal and do all the
    fancy stuff digitally.

    The market will be enormous. Envision hundreds of millions of little
    6G boxes on telephone poles all over the world.

    --

    If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end with doubts,
    but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties. Francis Bacon

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Phil Hobbs@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Wed Apr 27 15:16:25 2022
    John Larkin wrote:
    On Sun, 24 Apr 2022 21:02:34 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Sunday, April 24, 2022 at 2:52:11 PM UTC-7, Flyguy wrote:

    Example: the AFE7903 does direct conversion at GHz speeds, mind boggling: >>>
    'With operation up to 7.4 GHz, this device
    enables direct RF sampling in the HF, VHF, UHF,
    L, S and C-band frequency ranges without the need
    for additional frequency conversions stages."

    Boggling, but worthless, unless you have GHz bandwidth requirements
    in addition to GHz carrier requirements. Aperture time being small
    also gives you GHz noise capability... not sure it's worth examining all
    the bits in that firehose of a bit stream.

    So, how much data does a channel-plate multiplier and streak camera output, >> per second? More, or less?

    Next-gen wireless networks will have frequency hopping, radical
    constellation coding, synthetic antenna aiming, all sorts of nasty
    stuff. It makes sense to digitize the antenna signal and do all the
    fancy stuff digitally.

    The market will be enormous. Envision hundreds of millions of little
    6G boxes on telephone poles all over the world.


    Bringing streaming 16K videos of cute kittens to everybody's car.

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs

    --
    Dr Philip C D Hobbs
    Principal Consultant
    ElectroOptical Innovations LLC / Hobbs ElectroOptics
    Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics
    Briarcliff Manor NY 10510

    http://electrooptical.net
    http://hobbs-eo.com

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Phil Hobbs@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Wed Apr 27 16:04:49 2022
    John Larkin wrote:
    On Wed, 27 Apr 2022 15:16:25 -0400, Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    John Larkin wrote:
    On Sun, 24 Apr 2022 21:02:34 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Sunday, April 24, 2022 at 2:52:11 PM UTC-7, Flyguy wrote:

    Example: the AFE7903 does direct conversion at GHz speeds, mind boggling: >>>>>
    'With operation up to 7.4 GHz, this device
    enables direct RF sampling in the HF, VHF, UHF,
    L, S and C-band frequency ranges without the need
    for additional frequency conversions stages."

    Boggling, but worthless, unless you have GHz bandwidth requirements
    in addition to GHz carrier requirements. Aperture time being small
    also gives you GHz noise capability... not sure it's worth examining all >>>> the bits in that firehose of a bit stream.

    So, how much data does a channel-plate multiplier and streak camera output,
    per second? More, or less?

    Next-gen wireless networks will have frequency hopping, radical
    constellation coding, synthetic antenna aiming, all sorts of nasty
    stuff. It makes sense to digitize the antenna signal and do all the
    fancy stuff digitally.

    The market will be enormous. Envision hundreds of millions of little
    6G boxes on telephone poles all over the world.


    Bringing streaming 16K videos of cute kittens to everybody's car.

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs

    I want everything on one wireless network. Internet, phones, TV, wifi,
    home automation, cars, utility meters, security, webcams, everything.

    Privacy is over-rated.

    Until your social credit score gets too low and they punt you from
    everything at once.

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Larkin@21:1/5 to pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical. on Wed Apr 27 12:56:31 2022
    On Wed, 27 Apr 2022 15:16:25 -0400, Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    John Larkin wrote:
    On Sun, 24 Apr 2022 21:02:34 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Sunday, April 24, 2022 at 2:52:11 PM UTC-7, Flyguy wrote:

    Example: the AFE7903 does direct conversion at GHz speeds, mind boggling: >>>>
    'With operation up to 7.4 GHz, this device
    enables direct RF sampling in the HF, VHF, UHF,
    L, S and C-band frequency ranges without the need
    for additional frequency conversions stages."

    Boggling, but worthless, unless you have GHz bandwidth requirements
    in addition to GHz carrier requirements. Aperture time being small
    also gives you GHz noise capability... not sure it's worth examining all >>> the bits in that firehose of a bit stream.

    So, how much data does a channel-plate multiplier and streak camera output, >>> per second? More, or less?

    Next-gen wireless networks will have frequency hopping, radical
    constellation coding, synthetic antenna aiming, all sorts of nasty
    stuff. It makes sense to digitize the antenna signal and do all the
    fancy stuff digitally.

    The market will be enormous. Envision hundreds of millions of little
    6G boxes on telephone poles all over the world.


    Bringing streaming 16K videos of cute kittens to everybody's car.

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs

    I want everything on one wireless network. Internet, phones, TV, wifi,
    home automation, cars, utility meters, security, webcams, everything.

    Privacy is over-rated.

    --

    If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end with doubts,
    but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties. Francis Bacon

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Larkin@21:1/5 to pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical. on Wed Apr 27 13:51:51 2022
    On Wed, 27 Apr 2022 16:04:49 -0400, Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    John Larkin wrote:
    On Wed, 27 Apr 2022 15:16:25 -0400, Phil Hobbs
    <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    John Larkin wrote:
    On Sun, 24 Apr 2022 21:02:34 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Sunday, April 24, 2022 at 2:52:11 PM UTC-7, Flyguy wrote:

    Example: the AFE7903 does direct conversion at GHz speeds, mind boggling:

    'With operation up to 7.4 GHz, this device
    enables direct RF sampling in the HF, VHF, UHF,
    L, S and C-band frequency ranges without the need
    for additional frequency conversions stages."

    Boggling, but worthless, unless you have GHz bandwidth requirements
    in addition to GHz carrier requirements. Aperture time being small >>>>> also gives you GHz noise capability... not sure it's worth examining all >>>>> the bits in that firehose of a bit stream.

    So, how much data does a channel-plate multiplier and streak camera output,
    per second? More, or less?

    Next-gen wireless networks will have frequency hopping, radical
    constellation coding, synthetic antenna aiming, all sorts of nasty
    stuff. It makes sense to digitize the antenna signal and do all the
    fancy stuff digitally.

    The market will be enormous. Envision hundreds of millions of little
    6G boxes on telephone poles all over the world.


    Bringing streaming 16K videos of cute kittens to everybody's car.

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs

    I want everything on one wireless network. Internet, phones, TV, wifi,
    home automation, cars, utility meters, security, webcams, everything.

    Privacy is over-rated.

    Until your social credit score gets too low and they punt you from
    everything at once.

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs

    But they can't punt everyone. In the USA at least, people would still
    pay someone for the service and for bandwidth (I guess) so nobody
    would be in charge and someone loses revenue if they lose a customer.

    Capitalism will find a way.

    I'm killing time until a design review, which should be fun. It's a
    Z-series test board with all sorts of mixed experiments for various
    people. New Trion FPGA, my dummy load with the CPU cooler, various
    switching supplies, power resistors and inductors to test in our air
    stream, new tricolor LED, all kinds of stuff.

    I want to test the Trion for pin-pin delays, LVDS electrical details, delay-vs-temp and delay-vs-Ccc_core, jitter, power consumption, things
    like that.

    --

    If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end with doubts,
    but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties. Francis Bacon

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Tabby@21:1/5 to John Doe on Wed Apr 27 22:14:47 2022
    On Monday, 25 April 2022 at 08:16:23 UTC+1, John Doe wrote:
    Is there some clinical name for a person who insults others in
    conversation. Maybe that is Australian etiquette and protocol.

    one of the PD clusters. (they really don't like people mentioning it)

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Tabby@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Wed Apr 27 22:18:20 2022
    On Wednesday, 27 April 2022 at 21:52:04 UTC+1, John Larkin wrote:

    I want everything on one wireless network. Internet, phones, TV, wifi,
    home automation, cars, utility meters, security, webcams, everything.

    Privacy is over-rated.

    Until your social credit score gets too low and they punt you from >everything at once.

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs
    But they can't punt everyone. In the USA at least, people would still
    pay someone for the service and for bandwidth (I guess) so nobody
    would be in charge and someone loses revenue if they lose a customer.

    Capitalism will find a way.

    Dictatorship outranks capitalism.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Jan Panteltje@21:1/5 to pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical. on Thu Apr 28 06:24:09 2022
    On a sunny day (Wed, 27 Apr 2022 16:04:49 -0400) it happened Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote in <14b0630b-0e0a-0e71-a3ed-a80692cbb705@electrooptical.net>:

    John Larkin wrote:
    I want everything on one wireless network. Internet, phones, TV, wifi,
    home automation, cars, utility meters, security, webcams, everything.

    Privacy is over-rated.

    Until your social credit score gets too low and they punt you from
    everything at once.

    They just send the KILL signal to your chip implant.
    No need for external 'tronics like a TV screen,
    just at birth a brain implant.


    Few errors with todays software and coders :-)

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From whit3rd@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Thu Apr 28 02:00:41 2022
    On Wednesday, April 27, 2022 at 12:56:42 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:

    I want everything on one wireless network. Internet, phones, TV, wifi,
    home automation, cars, utility meters, security, webcams, everything.

    Privacy is over-rated.

    That's a laugh; Internet range is out to near Earth orbit, and you want your utility meters to compete for that against your TV remote control? One network
    isn't the answer, any more than one TV channel is the answer.

    Maybe bluetooth/WiFi/Cat5 routing is a good thing, though. I want, if possible,
    long-range signals in a wired or fiber network, but a tablet or cellphone is SO convenient.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Anthony William Sloman@21:1/5 to Tabby on Thu Apr 28 08:31:02 2022
    On Thursday, April 28, 2022 at 3:18:24 PM UTC+10, Tabby wrote:
    On Wednesday, 27 April 2022 at 21:52:04 UTC+1, John Larkin wrote:

    <snip>

    But they can't punt everyone. In the USA at least, people would still
    pay someone for the service and for bandwidth (I guess) so nobody
    would be in charge and someone loses revenue if they lose a customer.

    Capitalism will find a way.

    Dictatorship outranks capitalism.

    Tabby would think that, on the basis that he would be the dictator, and he's too silly to notice that dictatorships never work all that well at all, because the people in charge have the same kinds of delusions about their competence that he does.

    --
    Bill Sloman, Sydney

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com@21:1/5 to All on Thu Apr 28 09:33:48 2022
    On Wed, 27 Apr 2022 22:18:20 -0700 (PDT), Tabby <tabbypurr@gmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Wednesday, 27 April 2022 at 21:52:04 UTC+1, John Larkin wrote:

    I want everything on one wireless network. Internet, phones, TV, wifi,
    home automation, cars, utility meters, security, webcams, everything.

    Privacy is over-rated.

    Until your social credit score gets too low and they punt you from
    everything at once.

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs
    But they can't punt everyone. In the USA at least, people would still
    pay someone for the service and for bandwidth (I guess) so nobody
    would be in charge and someone loses revenue if they lose a customer.

    Capitalism will find a way.

    Dictatorship outranks capitalism.

    Dictators, like Stalin, Mao, Hitler, Putin, think they understand
    everything and then want to control everything. They kill hundreds of
    millions.

    "Capitalism" really means pluralism, letting lots of sane and crazy
    people try things to see what actually works.



    --

    Anybody can count to one.

    - Robert Widlar

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Jan Panteltje@21:1/5 to jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com on Thu Apr 28 17:05:59 2022
    On a sunny day (Thu, 28 Apr 2022 09:33:48 -0700) it happened jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in <o8gl6hpqq0s2truck4h0380vqa9kr1i8b1@4ax.com>:

    On Wed, 27 Apr 2022 22:18:20 -0700 (PDT), Tabby <tabbypurr@gmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Wednesday, 27 April 2022 at 21:52:04 UTC+1, John Larkin wrote:

    I want everything on one wireless network. Internet, phones, TV, wifi, >>> >> home automation, cars, utility meters, security, webcams, everything. >>> >>
    Privacy is over-rated.

    Until your social credit score gets too low and they punt you from
    everything at once.

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs
    But they can't punt everyone. In the USA at least, people would still
    pay someone for the service and for bandwidth (I guess) so nobody
    would be in charge and someone loses revenue if they lose a customer.

    Capitalism will find a way.

    Dictatorship outranks capitalism.

    Dictators, like Stalin, Mao, Hitler, Putin, think they understand
    everything and then want to control everything. They kill hundreds of >millions.

    Yes you US have a milli-tairy Industrial Complex that killed millions recently with covid they designed.
    As you did in Vietnam with Agent Orange, the list is much longer.
    As you did in the war Bill Clignon, an other deamon crate, started in Europe ByeThen is not even original
    I think Putin is merely defending his people.



    "Capitalism" really means pluralism, letting lots of sane and crazy
    people try things to see what actually works.

    That is not capitalism, that is happening everywhere.

    Your dictator is the Military Industrial Complex and the political pawns in its game
    Selling death for profit.

    Seen that movie, 'Planet of the Apes' where they find the remains of that Statute of Liberty?
    How many years..
    No Empire Yet has persisted.

    Or is it for you also "whos bread one eats whos word one speaks?"
    Not hero mister
    pussy

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Larkin@21:1/5 to pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com on Thu Apr 28 12:05:36 2022
    On Thu, 28 Apr 2022 17:05:59 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote:

    On a sunny day (Thu, 28 Apr 2022 09:33:48 -0700) it happened >jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in ><o8gl6hpqq0s2truck4h0380vqa9kr1i8b1@4ax.com>:

    On Wed, 27 Apr 2022 22:18:20 -0700 (PDT), Tabby <tabbypurr@gmail.com> >>wrote:

    On Wednesday, 27 April 2022 at 21:52:04 UTC+1, John Larkin wrote:

    I want everything on one wireless network. Internet, phones, TV, wifi, >>>> >> home automation, cars, utility meters, security, webcams, everything. >>>> >>
    Privacy is over-rated.

    Until your social credit score gets too low and they punt you from
    everything at once.

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs
    But they can't punt everyone. In the USA at least, people would still
    pay someone for the service and for bandwidth (I guess) so nobody
    would be in charge and someone loses revenue if they lose a customer.

    Capitalism will find a way.

    Dictatorship outranks capitalism.

    Dictators, like Stalin, Mao, Hitler, Putin, think they understand >>everything and then want to control everything. They kill hundreds of >>millions.

    Yes you US have a milli-tairy Industrial Complex that killed millions recently >with covid they designed.

    It started at the lab in china.


    As you did in Vietnam with Agent Orange, the list is much longer.
    As you did in the war Bill Clignon, an other deamon crate, started in Europe >ByeThen is not even original
    I think Putin is merely defending his people.

    Defending? Against what?

    --

    If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end with doubts,
    but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties. Francis Bacon

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Larkin@21:1/5 to All on Thu Apr 28 12:16:21 2022
    On Thu, 28 Apr 2022 02:00:41 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Wednesday, April 27, 2022 at 12:56:42 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:

    I want everything on one wireless network. Internet, phones, TV, wifi,
    home automation, cars, utility meters, security, webcams, everything.

    Privacy is over-rated.

    That's a laugh; Internet range is out to near Earth orbit, and you want your >utility meters to compete for that against your TV remote control? One network
    isn't the answer, any more than one TV channel is the answer.

    What we have is a mess. Many cell companies have various spotty
    coverage. Ditto cable TV and internet providers. Once people manage to
    get an internet provider, they have to install their own cables and
    wifi. Wires are strung on poles, sidewalks are dug up, dishes point
    everywhere and rust or get blown away. People pay for multiple
    services.

    One uniform microcell mesh system would eliminate all that.

    Imagine progress.

    --

    If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end with doubts,
    but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties. Francis Bacon

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Dimiter_Popoff@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Thu Apr 28 22:43:35 2022
    On 4/28/2022 22:16, John Larkin wrote:
    On Thu, 28 Apr 2022 02:00:41 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Wednesday, April 27, 2022 at 12:56:42 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:

    I want everything on one wireless network. Internet, phones, TV, wifi,
    home automation, cars, utility meters, security, webcams, everything.

    Privacy is over-rated.

    That's a laugh; Internet range is out to near Earth orbit, and you want your >> utility meters to compete for that against your TV remote control? One network
    isn't the answer, any more than one TV channel is the answer.

    What we have is a mess. Many cell companies have various spotty
    coverage. Ditto cable TV and internet providers. Once people manage to
    get an internet provider, they have to install their own cables and
    wifi. Wires are strung on poles, sidewalks are dug up, dishes point everywhere and rust or get blown away. People pay for multiple
    services.

    One uniform microcell mesh system would eliminate all that.

    Imagine progress.


    It would be nice for things to evolve this way but - and it is a huge
    BUT - the standards need to be public. They are anything but at the
    moment - the layers above IP and perhaps PPP are completely secret.

    Privacy is overrated, as you say - I'd go a step further and say
    privacy will disappear completely before we know, however it has to
    disappear for *everyone*, *zero* exceptions.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Jasen Betts@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Thu Apr 28 20:06:46 2022
    On 2022-04-28, John Larkin <jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote:
    On Thu, 28 Apr 2022 02:00:41 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Wednesday, April 27, 2022 at 12:56:42 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:

    I want everything on one wireless network. Internet, phones, TV, wifi,
    home automation, cars, utility meters, security, webcams, everything.

    Privacy is over-rated.

    That's a laugh; Internet range is out to near Earth orbit, and you want your >>utility meters to compete for that against your TV remote control? One network
    isn't the answer, any more than one TV channel is the answer.

    What we have is a mess. Many cell companies have various spotty
    coverage. Ditto cable TV and internet providers. Once people manage to
    get an internet provider, they have to install their own cables and
    wifi. Wires are strung on poles, sidewalks are dug up, dishes point everywhere and rust or get blown away. People pay for multiple
    services.

    One uniform microcell mesh system would eliminate all that.


    The liberals will never go for that, the current mess is too
    proffitable, those further to the right even more so.

    --
    Jasen.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Larkin@21:1/5 to usenet@revmaps.no-ip.org on Thu Apr 28 16:27:20 2022
    On Thu, 28 Apr 2022 20:06:46 -0000 (UTC), Jasen Betts <usenet@revmaps.no-ip.org> wrote:

    On 2022-04-28, John Larkin <jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote:
    On Thu, 28 Apr 2022 02:00:41 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Wednesday, April 27, 2022 at 12:56:42 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:

    I want everything on one wireless network. Internet, phones, TV, wifi, >>>> home automation, cars, utility meters, security, webcams, everything.

    Privacy is over-rated.

    That's a laugh; Internet range is out to near Earth orbit, and you want your >>>utility meters to compete for that against your TV remote control? One network
    isn't the answer, any more than one TV channel is the answer.

    What we have is a mess. Many cell companies have various spotty
    coverage. Ditto cable TV and internet providers. Once people manage to
    get an internet provider, they have to install their own cables and
    wifi. Wires are strung on poles, sidewalks are dug up, dishes point
    everywhere and rust or get blown away. People pay for multiple
    services.

    One uniform microcell mesh system would eliminate all that.


    The liberals will never go for that, the current mess is too
    proffitable, those further to the right even more so.

    Then nothing will ever change. Progress has stopped.



    --

    If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end with doubts,
    but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties. Francis Bacon

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Anthony William Sloman@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Thu Apr 28 20:56:06 2022
    On Friday, April 29, 2022 at 5:16:32 AM UTC+10, John Larkin wrote:
    On Thu, 28 Apr 2022 02:00:41 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whi...@gmail.com>
    wrote:
    On Wednesday, April 27, 2022 at 12:56:42 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:

    I want everything on one wireless network. Internet, phones, TV, wifi,
    home automation, cars, utility meters, security, webcams, everything.

    Privacy is over-rated.

    That's a laugh; Internet range is out to near Earth orbit, and you want your >utility meters to compete for that against your TV remote control? One network
    isn't the answer, any more than one TV channel is the answer.

    What we have is a mess. Many cell companies have various spotty
    coverage. Ditto cable TV and internet providers. Once people manage to
    get an internet provider, they have to install their own cables and
    wifi. Wires are strung on poles, sidewalks are dug up, dishes point everywhere and rust or get blown away. People pay for multiple
    services.

    One uniform microcell mesh system would eliminate all that.

    Imagine progress.

    Just don't let John Larkin do it for you. One uniform microcell mesh system that was fast enough to satisfy the greediest bandwidth hog would be too expensive for anybody else to pay for.

    --
    Bill Sloman, Sydney

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Anthony William Sloman@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Thu Apr 28 21:03:53 2022
    On Friday, April 29, 2022 at 9:27:32 AM UTC+10, John Larkin wrote:
    On Thu, 28 Apr 2022 20:06:46 -0000 (UTC), Jasen Betts <use...@revmaps.no-ip.org> wrote:

    On 2022-04-28, John Larkin <jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote: >> On Thu, 28 Apr 2022 02:00:41 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whi...@gmail.com> wrote:
    On Wednesday, April 27, 2022 at 12:56:42 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:

    <snip>

    One uniform microcell mesh system would eliminate all that.

    The liberals will never go for that, the current mess is too profitable, those further to the right even more so.

    Then nothing will ever change. Progress has stopped.

    Except that it hasn't. The Linux program illustrates that commercially motivated (and paid for) development isn't the only way to make progress.

    Profit is where you can find it, and if some impractical researcher comes up with a scheme that some entrepreneur can make money out of you can still get progress. Serendipity works.

    --
    Bill Sloman, Sydney

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Jan Panteltje@21:1/5 to jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology. on Fri Apr 29 05:50:31 2022
    On a sunny day (Thu, 28 Apr 2022 12:05:36 -0700) it happened John Larkin <jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote in <4apl6hlk37vd1381ddnod84vfq4bv44gr1@4ax.com>:

    On Thu, 28 Apr 2022 17:05:59 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote:

    On a sunny day (Thu, 28 Apr 2022 09:33:48 -0700) it happened >>jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in >><o8gl6hpqq0s2truck4h0380vqa9kr1i8b1@4ax.com>:

    On Wed, 27 Apr 2022 22:18:20 -0700 (PDT), Tabby <tabbypurr@gmail.com> >>>wrote:

    On Wednesday, 27 April 2022 at 21:52:04 UTC+1, John Larkin wrote:

    I want everything on one wireless network. Internet, phones, TV, wifi, >>>>> >> home automation, cars, utility meters, security, webcams, everything. >>>>> >>
    Privacy is over-rated.

    Until your social credit score gets too low and they punt you from
    everything at once.

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs
    But they can't punt everyone. In the USA at least, people would still >>>>> pay someone for the service and for bandwidth (I guess) so nobody
    would be in charge and someone loses revenue if they lose a customer. >>>>>
    Capitalism will find a way.

    Dictatorship outranks capitalism.

    Dictators, like Stalin, Mao, Hitler, Putin, think they understand >>>everything and then want to control everything. They kill hundreds of >>>millions.

    Yes you US have a milli-tairy Industrial Complex that killed millions recently
    with covid they designed.

    It started at the lab in china.

    US mini-tary Industrial Complex has dangerous research done in labs they finance all over the world,
    far away from their own bed.
    Backfired in this case, as it did wih HIV.


    As you did in Vietnam with Agent Orange, the list is much longer.
    As you did in the war Bill Clignon, an other deamon crate, started in Europe >>ByeThen is not even original
    I think Putin is merely defending his people.

    Defending? Against what?

    Against what you called quote:
    "Capitalism" really means pluralism,
    letting lots of sane and crazy people try things to see what actually works."
    _______________^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

    The crazy part is strong these days, Fauci a mass murderer,
    Biden -the one with vacuum bubbles in his brain and his imported slaves- a dictator.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Anthony William Sloman@21:1/5 to Jan Panteltje on Fri Apr 29 00:32:09 2022
    On Friday, April 29, 2022 at 3:50:39 PM UTC+10, Jan Panteltje wrote:
    On a sunny day (Thu, 28 Apr 2022 12:05:36 -0700) it happened John Larkin <jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote in
    <4apl6hlk37vd1381d...@4ax.com>:
    On Thu, 28 Apr 2022 17:05:59 GMT, Jan Panteltje <pNaonSt...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    On a sunny day (Thu, 28 Apr 2022 09:33:48 -0700) it happened >>jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in <o8gl6hpqq0s2truck...@4ax.com>: >>>On Wed, 27 Apr 2022 22:18:20 -0700 (PDT), Tabby <tabb...@gmail.com> wrote: >>>>On Wednesday, 27 April 2022 at 21:52:04 UTC+1, John Larkin wrote:

    <snip>

    Capitalism will find a way.

    Dictatorship outranks capitalism.

    Dictators, like Stalin, Mao, Hitler, Putin, think they understand everything and then want to control everything. They kill hundreds of millions.

    Yes you US have a millitary Industrial Complex that killed millions recently with covid they designed.

    Or so Jan Panteltje claims to believe. It's hard to believe he really is that silly.

    It started at the lab in china.

    Actually in some bats in a cave in China.

    US mini-tary Industrial Complex has dangerous research done in labs they finance all over the world, far away from their own bed.

    The "gain of function" research that Jan deludedly imagines to have lead to Covid-19 was financed by the US health system.

    Backfired in this case, as it did with HIV.

    Or so Jan wants to believe. It's one more lunatic conspiracy theory, even sillier than most of them.

    As you did in Vietnam with Agent Orange, the list is much longer.

    And entirely imaginary.

    As you did in the war Bill Clinton, an other Democrat started in Europe.

    Bill Clinton didn't have anything to do with starting the wars in former Yugoslavia. He did play a part in getting them to stop.

    Biden is not even original.

    Jan is entirely confused.

    I think Putin is merely defending his people.

    If you are as bad at thinking as Jan clearly is, I suppose you could think that. It ought to mean that you need to get checked out by a psychiatrist, but Jan is probably already a certified lunatic nitwit, so they probably don't need to bother.

    Defending? Against what?

    Against what you called quote:
    "Capitalism" really means pluralism, letting lots of sane and crazy people try things to see what actually works."

    The crazy part is strong these days, Fauci a mass murderer,

    Ask anybody who is at least as crazy as Jan. There are still lunatic asylums around, so it shouldn't be hard to find a few people as far gone as he is.

    Biden -the one with vacuum bubbles in his brain and his imported slaves- a dictator.

    Right. And the F35's that fly low over Jan's house keep on colliding with pigs that also fly over it. No wonder they don't last.

    --
    Bill Sloman, Sydney

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Jan Panteltje@21:1/5 to All on Fri Apr 29 11:02:26 2022
    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 00:32:09 -0700 (PDT)) it happened
    Billy Slowman spit crap again

    You are a waste of time!
    Mental age < 10
    IQ=

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Anthony William Sloman@21:1/5 to Jan Panteltje on Fri Apr 29 05:03:31 2022
    On Friday, April 29, 2022 at 9:02:35 PM UTC+10, Jan Panteltje wrote:
    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 00:32:09 -0700 (PDT)) it happened
    Bill Sloman expressed scepticism

    You are a waste of time!

    Sadly, that's you.

    Mental age < 10
    IQ=

    In Jan's totally reliable opinion. It's just one more of his many very silly ideas.

    --
    Bill Sloman, sydney

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ricky@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Fri Apr 29 06:51:41 2022
    On Wednesday, April 27, 2022 at 4:52:04 PM UTC-4, John Larkin wrote:

    But they can't punt everyone. In the USA at least, people would still
    pay someone for the service and for bandwidth (I guess) so nobody
    would be in charge and someone loses revenue if they lose a customer.

    Capitalism will find a way.

    But it will be impossible to charge BEVs and impossible to figure out how to prevent global warming. I guess we need to tie it into capitalism, oh, wait, it already is!

    --

    Rick C.

    --- Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
    --- Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ricky@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Fri Apr 29 06:57:52 2022
    On Thursday, April 28, 2022 at 3:05:48 PM UTC-4, John Larkin wrote:
    On Thu, 28 Apr 2022 17:05:59 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonSt...@yahoo.com> wrote:

    Yes you US have a milli-tairy Industrial Complex that killed millions recently
    with covid they designed.
    It started at the lab in china.

    Sometimes this group is too funny. One conspiracy theory vs. another conspiracy theory. I guess you can tell which one is right by noting who is abducted in the middle of the night by the black helicopter guys.

    Lol!

    --

    Rick C.

    --+ Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
    --+ Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ricky@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Fri Apr 29 07:00:01 2022
    On Thursday, April 28, 2022 at 3:16:32 PM UTC-4, John Larkin wrote:
    On Thu, 28 Apr 2022 02:00:41 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whi...@gmail.com>
    wrote:
    On Wednesday, April 27, 2022 at 12:56:42 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:

    I want everything on one wireless network. Internet, phones, TV, wifi,
    home automation, cars, utility meters, security, webcams, everything.

    Privacy is over-rated.

    That's a laugh; Internet range is out to near Earth orbit, and you want your >utility meters to compete for that against your TV remote control? One network
    isn't the answer, any more than one TV channel is the answer.
    What we have is a mess. Many cell companies have various spotty
    coverage. Ditto cable TV and internet providers. Once people manage to
    get an internet provider, they have to install their own cables and
    wifi. Wires are strung on poles, sidewalks are dug up, dishes point everywhere and rust or get blown away. People pay for multiple
    services.

    And this guy thinks those concerned about climate change are alarmists! "The world is coming to an end! My cable is out!!!"

    --

    Rick C.

    -+- Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
    -+- Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ricky@21:1/5 to Jan Panteltje on Fri Apr 29 07:03:24 2022
    On Friday, April 29, 2022 at 7:02:35 AM UTC-4, Jan Panteltje wrote:
    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 00:32:09 -0700 (PDT)) it happened
    Billy Slowman spit crap again

    You are a waste of time!
    Mental age < 10
    IQ=

    Google Translate: Jan >>> What everyone else speaks

    "I can't debate Bill's rational arguments, so I'll call names."

    Sometimes this group is better than watching Buddy Hacket or Rodney Dangerfield.

    --

    Rick C.

    -++ Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
    -++ Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com@21:1/5 to pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com on Fri Apr 29 07:26:11 2022
    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 05:50:31 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote:

    On a sunny day (Thu, 28 Apr 2022 12:05:36 -0700) it happened John Larkin ><jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote in ><4apl6hlk37vd1381ddnod84vfq4bv44gr1@4ax.com>:

    On Thu, 28 Apr 2022 17:05:59 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote:

    On a sunny day (Thu, 28 Apr 2022 09:33:48 -0700) it happened >>>jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in >>><o8gl6hpqq0s2truck4h0380vqa9kr1i8b1@4ax.com>:

    On Wed, 27 Apr 2022 22:18:20 -0700 (PDT), Tabby <tabbypurr@gmail.com> >>>>wrote:

    On Wednesday, 27 April 2022 at 21:52:04 UTC+1, John Larkin wrote:

    I want everything on one wireless network. Internet, phones, TV, wifi,
    home automation, cars, utility meters, security, webcams, everything. >>>>>> >>
    Privacy is over-rated.

    Until your social credit score gets too low and they punt you from >>>>>> >everything at once.

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs
    But they can't punt everyone. In the USA at least, people would still >>>>>> pay someone for the service and for bandwidth (I guess) so nobody
    would be in charge and someone loses revenue if they lose a customer. >>>>>>
    Capitalism will find a way.

    Dictatorship outranks capitalism.

    Dictators, like Stalin, Mao, Hitler, Putin, think they understand >>>>everything and then want to control everything. They kill hundreds of >>>>millions.

    Yes you US have a milli-tairy Industrial Complex that killed millions recently
    with covid they designed.

    It started at the lab in china.

    US mini-tary Industrial Complex has dangerous research done in labs they finance all over the world,
    far away from their own bed.
    Backfired in this case, as it did wih HIV.


    As you did in Vietnam with Agent Orange, the list is much longer.
    As you did in the war Bill Clignon, an other deamon crate, started in Europe >>>ByeThen is not even original
    I think Putin is merely defending his people.

    Defending? Against what?

    Against what you called quote:
    "Capitalism" really means pluralism,
    letting lots of sane and crazy people try things to see what actually works."
    _______________^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

    The crazy part is strong these days, Fauci a mass murderer,
    Biden -the one with vacuum bubbles in his brain and his imported slaves- a dictator.


    Russia has one insane person in charge. Millions will die.



    --

    Anybody can count to one.

    - Robert Widlar

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Jan Panteltje@21:1/5 to jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com on Fri Apr 29 14:46:18 2022
    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 07:26:11 -0700) it happened jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in <iatn6hlijku89m4aoo1hvanqlfc28im5c7@4ax.com>:

    Russia has one insane person in charge. Millions will die.

    Well, that could be you.
    Hey, maybe you were right about life from space
    https://www.space.com/meteorites-brought-dna-blocks-to-early-earth
    ?
    More likely it formed here, but ALIEN could have stuffed some balls too :-)

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com@21:1/5 to pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com on Fri Apr 29 08:33:45 2022
    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 14:46:18 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote:

    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 07:26:11 -0700) it happened >jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in ><iatn6hlijku89m4aoo1hvanqlfc28im5c7@4ax.com>:

    Russia has one insane person in charge. Millions will die.

    Well, that could be you.

    Unikely. The deaths will be from disease and starvation in poor
    countries. They are already suffering from covid lockdown side
    effects.

    https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-021-01022-x



    --

    Anybody can count to one.

    - Robert Widlar

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Jan Panteltje@21:1/5 to jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com on Fri Apr 29 16:49:42 2022
    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 08:33:45 -0700) it happened jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in <j31o6hhsnroa0mm1bgqja8osaamn55luhs@4ax.com>:

    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 14:46:18 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote:

    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 07:26:11 -0700) it happened >>jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in >><iatn6hlijku89m4aoo1hvanqlfc28im5c7@4ax.com>:

    Russia has one insane person in charge. Millions will die.

    Well, that could be you.

    Unikely. The deaths will be from disease and starvation in poor
    countries. They are already suffering from covid lockdown side
    effects.

    https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-021-01022-x

    The war ByeThen provoked in Ukraine brings many Ukrainians here
    and hopefully also to the US that have not had shots against measles and other common illnesses
    most of us have been inoculated against.
    Russia is one of the biggest grain producers and now you have to get it elsewhere
    so the poor no longer have bread (more expensive).
    As US seems to try to pester Russia to the maximum
    a good chance that you get nuked and not only by Russia, many may join in, think China, N Korea, who has NO nukes these days?
    Biden with the stuff missing in the ball on his shoulders may indeed trigger WW3.
    Take a globe, look a the size of N America, can hardly find it... ;-0
    All your so called allies will flee, leave you and your polly -tics, prefer to survive.
    Big Mafia gone

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Larkin@21:1/5 to pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com on Fri Apr 29 10:02:25 2022
    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 16:49:42 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote:

    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 08:33:45 -0700) it happened >jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in ><j31o6hhsnroa0mm1bgqja8osaamn55luhs@4ax.com>:

    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 14:46:18 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote:

    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 07:26:11 -0700) it happened >>>jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in >>><iatn6hlijku89m4aoo1hvanqlfc28im5c7@4ax.com>:

    Russia has one insane person in charge. Millions will die.

    Well, that could be you.

    Unikely. The deaths will be from disease and starvation in poor
    countries. They are already suffering from covid lockdown side
    effects.

    https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-021-01022-x

    The war ByeThen provoked in Ukraine

    How did he do that?

    Did the US and Ukraine attack Russia?

    --

    If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end with doubts,
    but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties. Francis Bacon

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Jan Panteltje@21:1/5 to jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology. on Fri Apr 29 17:14:43 2022
    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 10:02:25 -0700) it happened John Larkin <jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote in <ve6o6hp5q5bet379q1lt5u53v5t2gasq4n@4ax.com>:

    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 16:49:42 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote:

    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 08:33:45 -0700) it happened >>jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in >><j31o6hhsnroa0mm1bgqja8osaamn55luhs@4ax.com>:

    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 14:46:18 GMT, Jan Panteltje >>><pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote:

    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 07:26:11 -0700) it happened >>>>jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in >>>><iatn6hlijku89m4aoo1hvanqlfc28im5c7@4ax.com>:

    Russia has one insane person in charge. Millions will die.

    Well, that could be you.

    Unikely. The deaths will be from disease and starvation in poor >>>countries. They are already suffering from covid lockdown side
    effects.

    https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-021-01022-x

    The war ByeThen provoked in Ukraine

    How did he do that?

    Did the US and Ukraine attack Russia?

    By breaking the 2014 peace deal by stuffing more weapons directly on the Russian border
    supporting Ukraine in making Donbas its own, the usual CIA shit
    with shitlensky their sad puppet.
    US does that everywhere: sanctions, Cuba, Venezuela, steal their money
    break deals (Iran), force injustice (International court in the Hague here should now sue Russia for war crimes, but Bushman threatened to invade here when it
    wanted to sue US soldiers for war crimes.
    I was just reading this:
    https://www.rt.com/russia/554720-china-us-goals-ukraine/
    that site has the views you should also check, not only what ByeThen and his puppet press spews at you.


    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Larkin@21:1/5 to pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com on Fri Apr 29 10:43:44 2022
    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 17:14:43 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote:

    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 10:02:25 -0700) it happened John Larkin ><jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote in ><ve6o6hp5q5bet379q1lt5u53v5t2gasq4n@4ax.com>:

    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 16:49:42 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote:

    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 08:33:45 -0700) it happened >>>jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in >>><j31o6hhsnroa0mm1bgqja8osaamn55luhs@4ax.com>:

    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 14:46:18 GMT, Jan Panteltje >>>><pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote:

    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 07:26:11 -0700) it happened >>>>>jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in >>>>><iatn6hlijku89m4aoo1hvanqlfc28im5c7@4ax.com>:

    Russia has one insane person in charge. Millions will die.

    Well, that could be you.

    Unikely. The deaths will be from disease and starvation in poor >>>>countries. They are already suffering from covid lockdown side
    effects.

    https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-021-01022-x

    The war ByeThen provoked in Ukraine

    How did he do that?

    Did the US and Ukraine attack Russia?

    By breaking the 2014 peace deal by stuffing more weapons directly on the Russian border
    supporting Ukraine in making Donbas its own, the usual CIA shit
    with shitlensky their sad puppet.
    US does that everywhere: sanctions, Cuba, Venezuela, steal their money
    break deals (Iran), force injustice (International court in the Hague here >should now sue Russia for war crimes, but Bushman threatened to invade here when it
    wanted to sue US soldiers for war crimes.
    I was just reading this:
    https://www.rt.com/russia/554720-china-us-goals-ukraine/
    that site has the views you should also check, not only what ByeThen and his puppet press spews at you.


    Putin has pounded Ukrainian cities to rubble. And created millions of
    refugees. And damaged the food supply to millions in other countries.

    Any you blame the US?

    --

    If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end with doubts,
    but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties. Francis Bacon

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From whit3rd@21:1/5 to Jan Panteltje on Fri Apr 29 11:27:10 2022
    On Friday, April 29, 2022 at 10:14:51 AM UTC-7, Jan Panteltje wrote:
    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 10:02:25 -0700) it happened John Larkin <jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote in <ve6o6hp5q5bet379q...@4ax.com>:
    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 16:49:42 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonSt...@yahoo.com> wrote:

    The war ByeThen provoked in Ukraine

    How did he do that?

    Did the US and Ukraine attack Russia?

    By breaking the 2014 peace deal by stuffing more weapons directly on the Russian border

    ... well, that 'more weapons' thing is in the news, but it happened AFTER Russia attacked.
    As a cause-and=effect theory, that's backward.

    supporting Ukraine in making Donbas its own, the usual CIA shit

    Donbas was invaded, and Ukraine response was relatively mild; as for CIA,
    US intelligence did note that Russia was about to invade Ukraine; isn't that a good
    thing? European wars always spread, the rest of the world HAS to have good intelligence to cope intelligently.

    with shitlensky their sad puppet.

    The 'puppet' word is either a baseless insult, or a bit of propoganda, but not in correspondence with the reality of an elected leader of a democratic nation.

    US does that everywhere:

    If Jan smells excrement everywhere he goes, I know what the source
    of that odor is.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Dimiter_Popoff@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Fri Apr 29 21:36:37 2022
    On 4/29/2022 20:43, John Larkin wrote:
    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 17:14:43 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote:

    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 10:02:25 -0700) it happened John Larkin
    <jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote in
    <ve6o6hp5q5bet379q1lt5u53v5t2gasq4n@4ax.com>:

    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 16:49:42 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote:

    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 08:33:45 -0700) it happened
    jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in
    <j31o6hhsnroa0mm1bgqja8osaamn55luhs@4ax.com>:

    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 14:46:18 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote:

    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 07:26:11 -0700) it happened
    jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in
    <iatn6hlijku89m4aoo1hvanqlfc28im5c7@4ax.com>:

    Russia has one insane person in charge. Millions will die.

    Well, that could be you.

    Unikely. The deaths will be from disease and starvation in poor
    countries. They are already suffering from covid lockdown side
    effects.

    https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-021-01022-x

    The war ByeThen provoked in Ukraine

    How did he do that?

    Did the US and Ukraine attack Russia?

    By breaking the 2014 peace deal by stuffing more weapons directly on the Russian border
    supporting Ukraine in making Donbas its own, the usual CIA shit
    with shitlensky their sad puppet.
    US does that everywhere: sanctions, Cuba, Venezuela, steal their money
    break deals (Iran), force injustice (International court in the Hague here >> should now sue Russia for war crimes, but Bushman threatened to invade here when it
    wanted to sue US soldiers for war crimes.
    I was just reading this:
    https://www.rt.com/russia/554720-china-us-goals-ukraine/
    that site has the views you should also check, not only what ByeThen and his puppet press spews at you.


    Putin has pounded Ukrainian cities to rubble. And created millions of refugees. And damaged the food supply to millions in other countries.

    Any you blame the US?


    What do you expect of someone following Russian media.
    You won't believe the sort of utter nonsense they pour all the time
    and yes, there are people who do believe it - not because it is not
    laughable, it is of course, but because there are people wanting to
    believe it out of hatred to the US, EU etc.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Larkin@21:1/5 to All on Fri Apr 29 12:26:38 2022
    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 21:36:37 +0300, Dimiter_Popoff <dp@tgi-sci.com>
    wrote:

    On 4/29/2022 20:43, John Larkin wrote:
    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 17:14:43 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote:

    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 10:02:25 -0700) it happened John Larkin >>> <jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote in
    <ve6o6hp5q5bet379q1lt5u53v5t2gasq4n@4ax.com>:

    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 16:49:42 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote:

    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 08:33:45 -0700) it happened
    jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in
    <j31o6hhsnroa0mm1bgqja8osaamn55luhs@4ax.com>:

    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 14:46:18 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote:

    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 07:26:11 -0700) it happened
    jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in
    <iatn6hlijku89m4aoo1hvanqlfc28im5c7@4ax.com>:

    Russia has one insane person in charge. Millions will die.

    Well, that could be you.

    Unikely. The deaths will be from disease and starvation in poor
    countries. They are already suffering from covid lockdown side
    effects.

    https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-021-01022-x

    The war ByeThen provoked in Ukraine

    How did he do that?

    Did the US and Ukraine attack Russia?

    By breaking the 2014 peace deal by stuffing more weapons directly on the Russian border
    supporting Ukraine in making Donbas its own, the usual CIA shit
    with shitlensky their sad puppet.
    US does that everywhere: sanctions, Cuba, Venezuela, steal their money
    break deals (Iran), force injustice (International court in the Hague here >>> should now sue Russia for war crimes, but Bushman threatened to invade here when it
    wanted to sue US soldiers for war crimes.
    I was just reading this:
    https://www.rt.com/russia/554720-china-us-goals-ukraine/
    that site has the views you should also check, not only what ByeThen and his puppet press spews at you.


    Putin has pounded Ukrainian cities to rubble. And created millions of
    refugees. And damaged the food supply to millions in other countries.

    Any you blame the US?


    What do you expect of someone following Russian media.
    You won't believe the sort of utter nonsense they pour all the time
    and yes, there are people who do believe it - not because it is not >laughable, it is of course, but because there are people wanting to
    believe it out of hatred to the US, EU etc.

    Why do so many people hate the US?

    Maybe it's the chinese proverb: If you save someone's life, they will
    hate you forever.

    A lot of USians hate California. They fear that it's as wonderful as
    the rumors suggest. It is.

    --

    If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end with doubts,
    but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties. Francis Bacon

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Phil Hobbs@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Fri Apr 29 20:40:15 2022
    John Larkin wrote:
    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 17:14:43 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote:

    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 10:02:25 -0700) it happened John Larkin
    <jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote in
    <ve6o6hp5q5bet379q1lt5u53v5t2gasq4n@4ax.com>:

    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 16:49:42 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote:

    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 08:33:45 -0700) it happened
    jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in
    <j31o6hhsnroa0mm1bgqja8osaamn55luhs@4ax.com>:

    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 14:46:18 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote:

    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 07:26:11 -0700) it happened
    jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in
    <iatn6hlijku89m4aoo1hvanqlfc28im5c7@4ax.com>:

    Russia has one insane person in charge. Millions will die.

    Well, that could be you.

    Unikely. The deaths will be from disease and starvation in poor
    countries. They are already suffering from covid lockdown side
    effects.

    https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-021-01022-x

    The war ByeThen provoked in Ukraine

    How did he do that?

    Did the US and Ukraine attack Russia?

    By breaking the 2014 peace deal by stuffing more weapons directly on the Russian border
    supporting Ukraine in making Donbas its own, the usual CIA shit
    with shitlensky their sad puppet.
    US does that everywhere: sanctions, Cuba, Venezuela, steal their money
    break deals (Iran), force injustice (International court in the Hague here >> should now sue Russia for war crimes, but Bushman threatened to invade here when it
    wanted to sue US soldiers for war crimes.
    I was just reading this:
    https://www.rt.com/russia/554720-china-us-goals-ukraine/
    that site has the views you should also check, not only what ByeThen and his puppet press spews at you.


    Putin has pounded Ukrainian cities to rubble. And created millions of refugees. And damaged the food supply to millions in other countries.

    Any you blame the US?


    This is SED, after all--half the fun is winding up other folks about
    anything they care about. I've been guilty of doing that to Collins
    regarding FORTH, for instance. ;)

    Not everybody here is super careful about confining that sport to topics
    that don't involve suffering and death, unfortunately. But the pieties
    of our various patriotisms are reasonably fair game, ISTM.

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs

    (Who doesn't get tired of teasing either the French or the radiometry/photometry crowd about their grandiose schemes for world
    domination of one sort or another.)



    --
    Dr Philip C D Hobbs
    Principal Consultant
    ElectroOptical Innovations LLC / Hobbs ElectroOptics
    Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics
    Briarcliff Manor NY 10510

    http://electrooptical.net
    http://hobbs-eo.com

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Phil Hobbs@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Fri Apr 29 20:47:30 2022
    John Larkin wrote:
    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 21:36:37 +0300, Dimiter_Popoff <dp@tgi-sci.com>
    wrote:

    On 4/29/2022 20:43, John Larkin wrote:
    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 17:14:43 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote:

    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 10:02:25 -0700) it happened John Larkin >>>> <jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote in
    <ve6o6hp5q5bet379q1lt5u53v5t2gasq4n@4ax.com>:

    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 16:49:42 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote:

    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 08:33:45 -0700) it happened
    jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in
    <j31o6hhsnroa0mm1bgqja8osaamn55luhs@4ax.com>:

    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 14:46:18 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote:

    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 07:26:11 -0700) it happened
    jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in
    <iatn6hlijku89m4aoo1hvanqlfc28im5c7@4ax.com>:

    Russia has one insane person in charge. Millions will die.

    Well, that could be you.

    Unikely. The deaths will be from disease and starvation in poor
    countries. They are already suffering from covid lockdown side
    effects.

    https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-021-01022-x

    The war ByeThen provoked in Ukraine

    How did he do that?

    Did the US and Ukraine attack Russia?

    By breaking the 2014 peace deal by stuffing more weapons directly on the Russian border
    supporting Ukraine in making Donbas its own, the usual CIA shit
    with shitlensky their sad puppet.
    US does that everywhere: sanctions, Cuba, Venezuela, steal their money >>>> break deals (Iran), force injustice (International court in the Hague here >>>> should now sue Russia for war crimes, but Bushman threatened to invade here when it
    wanted to sue US soldiers for war crimes.
    I was just reading this:
    https://www.rt.com/russia/554720-china-us-goals-ukraine/
    that site has the views you should also check, not only what ByeThen and his puppet press spews at you.


    Putin has pounded Ukrainian cities to rubble. And created millions of
    refugees. And damaged the food supply to millions in other countries.

    Any you blame the US?


    What do you expect of someone following Russian media.
    You won't believe the sort of utter nonsense they pour all the time
    and yes, there are people who do believe it - not because it is not
    laughable, it is of course, but because there are people wanting to
    believe it out of hatred to the US, EU etc.

    Why do so many people hate the US?

    Maybe it's the chinese proverb: If you save someone's life, they will
    hate you forever.

    A lot of USians hate California. They fear that it's as wonderful as
    the rumors suggest. It is.

    Nah, I've lived in California and I dislike it too. It's not the
    individual people, just the plastic ambiance and the relentless brown of
    the vegetation for most of the year.

    Nice enough place to visit, and of course I still have some good friends
    there, which makes it reasonably OK in small-to-medium doses. ;)

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs

    --
    Dr Philip C D Hobbs
    Principal Consultant
    ElectroOptical Innovations LLC / Hobbs ElectroOptics
    Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics
    Briarcliff Manor NY 10510

    http://electrooptical.net
    http://hobbs-eo.com

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Anthony William Sloman@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Fri Apr 29 20:51:42 2022
    On Saturday, April 30, 2022 at 5:26:49 AM UTC+10, John Larkin wrote:
    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 21:36:37 +0300, Dimiter_Popoff <d...@tgi-sci.com> wrote: >On 4/29/2022 20:43, John Larkin wrote:
    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 17:14:43 GMT, Jan Panteltje <pNaonSt...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 10:02:25 -0700) it happened John Larkin <jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote in <ve6o6hp5q5bet379q...@4ax.com>:
    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 16:49:42 GMT, Jan Panteltje <pNaonSt...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 08:33:45 -0700) it happened jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in <j31o6hhsnroa0mm1b...@4ax.com>:
    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 14:46:18 GMT, Jan Panteltje <pNaonSt...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 07:26:11 -0700) it happened jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in <iatn6hlijku89m4ao...@4ax.com>:

    Russia has one insane person in charge. Millions will die.

    Well, that could be you.

    Unikely. The deaths will be from disease and starvation in poor countries. They are already suffering from covid lockdown side effects.

    https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-021-01022-x

    The war ByeThen provoked in Ukraine

    How did he do that?

    Did the US and Ukraine attack Russia?

    By breaking the 2014 peace deal by stuffing more weapons directly on the Russian border.

    They didn't.

    supporting Ukraine in making Donbas its own,

    Donbas was always part of the Ukraine. It's got a large Russian-speaking population, but the "separatists" campaign seems to have been mostly element of the Russian army posjng as separatist.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malaysia_Airlines_Flight_17

    was shot down by a Buk surface-to-air missile launched from pro-Russian separatist-controlled territory in Ukraine. The missile was fired by the 53rd Anti-Aircraft Missile Brigade of the Russian Federation and had been transported from Russia on the day
    of the crash, and fired from a field in a rebel-controlled area. The launch system returned to Russia afterwards. It killed 193 Dutch passengers.

    the usual CIA shit with Zelensky their sad puppet.

    The CIA doesn't seem to have had anything to do with it. and Zelensky isn't anybody's puppet.

    <snipped more of the same kind of nonsense>

    Putin has pounded Ukrainian cities to rubble. And created millions of
    refugees. And damaged the food supply to millions in other countries.

    Any you blame the US?

    What do you expect of someone following Russian media.
    You won't believe the sort of utter nonsense they pour all the time
    and yes, there are people who do believe it - not because it is not >laughable, it is of course, but because there are people wanting to >believe it out of hatred to the US, EU etc.

    Why do so many people hate the US?

    Very few people hate the US. People like the late Jim Thompson seemed to think that any suggestion that the US wasn't as entirely perfect as he had been taught in primary school implied an active hatred of the US. John Larkin seems to be just as silly.

    Maybe it's the chinese proverb: If you save someone's life, they will hate you forever.

    Except that the US hasn't "saved anybodies' life". John Larkin seems to think that the US single-handedly won WW2. It lost 416,800 soldiers on the conflict - not much more than the UK which is a lot smaller and lost 383,600. Russia lost between 8,800,
    000-10,700,000 and Germany 5,533,000. The US was a minor participant.

    <snip>

    --
    Bill Sloman, Sydney

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com@21:1/5 to pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical. on Fri Apr 29 21:14:31 2022
    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 20:47:30 -0400, Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    John Larkin wrote:
    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 21:36:37 +0300, Dimiter_Popoff <dp@tgi-sci.com>
    wrote:

    On 4/29/2022 20:43, John Larkin wrote:
    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 17:14:43 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote:

    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 10:02:25 -0700) it happened John Larkin >>>>> <jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote in
    <ve6o6hp5q5bet379q1lt5u53v5t2gasq4n@4ax.com>:

    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 16:49:42 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote:

    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 08:33:45 -0700) it happened
    jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in
    <j31o6hhsnroa0mm1bgqja8osaamn55luhs@4ax.com>:

    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 14:46:18 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote:

    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 07:26:11 -0700) it happened >>>>>>>>> jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in
    <iatn6hlijku89m4aoo1hvanqlfc28im5c7@4ax.com>:

    Russia has one insane person in charge. Millions will die.

    Well, that could be you.

    Unikely. The deaths will be from disease and starvation in poor >>>>>>>> countries. They are already suffering from covid lockdown side >>>>>>>> effects.

    https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-021-01022-x

    The war ByeThen provoked in Ukraine

    How did he do that?

    Did the US and Ukraine attack Russia?

    By breaking the 2014 peace deal by stuffing more weapons directly on the Russian border
    supporting Ukraine in making Donbas its own, the usual CIA shit
    with shitlensky their sad puppet.
    US does that everywhere: sanctions, Cuba, Venezuela, steal their money >>>>> break deals (Iran), force injustice (International court in the Hague here
    should now sue Russia for war crimes, but Bushman threatened to invade here when it
    wanted to sue US soldiers for war crimes.
    I was just reading this:
    https://www.rt.com/russia/554720-china-us-goals-ukraine/
    that site has the views you should also check, not only what ByeThen and his puppet press spews at you.


    Putin has pounded Ukrainian cities to rubble. And created millions of
    refugees. And damaged the food supply to millions in other countries.

    Any you blame the US?


    What do you expect of someone following Russian media.
    You won't believe the sort of utter nonsense they pour all the time
    and yes, there are people who do believe it - not because it is not
    laughable, it is of course, but because there are people wanting to
    believe it out of hatred to the US, EU etc.

    Why do so many people hate the US?

    Maybe it's the chinese proverb: If you save someone's life, they will
    hate you forever.

    A lot of USians hate California. They fear that it's as wonderful as
    the rumors suggest. It is.

    Nah, I've lived in California and I dislike it too. It's not the
    individual people, just the plastic ambiance and the relentless brown of
    the vegetation for most of the year.

    Well, just hang out on the coast and the mountains, and drive through
    the middle fast.

    I studied America for 6 months. Traveled, researched, subscribed to
    newspapers. I decided it would be Portland or San Francisco, and the
    pollen counts favored SF. It's wonderful is you just ignore the
    people.



    Nice enough place to visit, and of course I still have some good friends >there, which makes it reasonably OK in small-to-medium doses. ;)

    I'm small-to-medium.



    --

    Anybody can count to one.

    - Robert Widlar

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Anthony William Sloman@21:1/5 to jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com on Fri Apr 29 20:27:31 2022
    On Saturday, April 30, 2022 at 1:33:56 AM UTC+10, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 14:46:18 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonSt...@yahoo.com> wrote:

    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 07:26:11 -0700) it happened >jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in
    <iatn6hlijku89m4ao...@4ax.com>:

    Russia has one insane person in charge. Millions will die.

    Well, that could be you.

    Unlikely. The deaths will be from disease and starvation in poor
    countries. They are already suffering from covid lockdown side
    effects.

    https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-021-01022-x

    https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/

    The US is at eighteenth on the list of deaths per million inhabitants from Covid-19. It's now at 3051 per million, with 1,020,660 people dead.

    Australia is at 146th with 278, and Japan is at 149th at 235.

    John Larkin isn't all that realistic about the risks he runs.One of the side effects of Covid19 lock-downs is fewer people dead of Covid-19

    --
    Bill Sloman, Sydney

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Jan Panteltje@21:1/5 to whit3rd@gmail.com on Sat Apr 30 06:05:36 2022
    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 11:27:10 -0700 (PDT)) it happened whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com> wrote in <d57fd738-17cc-4b21-b49f-603d41bd51bcn@googlegroups.com>:

    On Friday, April 29, 2022 at 10:14:51 AM UTC-7, Jan Panteltje wrote:
    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 10:02:25 -0700) it happened John Larkin
    <jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote in
    <ve6o6hp5q5bet379q...@4ax.com>:
    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 16:49:42 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonSt...@yahoo.com> wrote:

    The war ByeThen provoked in Ukraine

    How did he do that?

    Did the US and Ukraine attack Russia?

    By breaking the 2014 peace deal by stuffing more weapons directly on the Russian border

    ... well, that 'more weapons' thing is in the news, but it happened AFTER Russia attacked.
    As a cause-and=effect theory, that's backward.

    supporting Ukraine in making Donbas its own, the usual CIA shit

    Donbas was invaded, and Ukraine response was relatively mild; as for CIA,
    US intelligence did note that Russia was about to invade Ukraine; isn't that a good
    thing? European wars always spread, the rest of the world HAS to have good >intelligence to cope intelligently.

    with shitlensky their sad puppet.

    The 'puppet' word is either a baseless insult, or a bit of propoganda, but not >in correspondence with the reality of an elected leader of a democratic nation.

    US does that everywhere:

    If Jan smells excrement everywhere he goes, I know what the source
    of that odor is.

    Interesting to perhaps your kind that you fall back in the excrement here.
    But really the 2014 agreement was broken.
    Ukraine was taken from Russia by a revolt.

    Its probably no use arguing with people who have been indoctrinated from birth by US media.
    'US intelligence did note that Russia was about to invade Ukraine'
    ha, and some US news[tissue ;-)]paper announced that prematurely, its just a script,
    written by the puppeteers.

    You have no idea how CIA works.

    But the US Empire is on its return, the IQ is falling, the debt is rising, the infrastructure is collapsing,
    the products are worsening, the crime in increasing, the inflation is rising, the homelessness in increasing
    and you want top EXPORT that to other parts of the world? By FORCE AND OR deceit?
    Come on!

    Nobody wants the US dream ehh NIGHTMARE.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Jan Panteltje@21:1/5 to jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology. on Sat Apr 30 06:13:41 2022
    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 10:43:44 -0700) it happened John Larkin <jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote in <eq8o6htehhqt03esl729sjoot12p127sk9@4ax.com>:

    Putin has pounded Ukrainian cities to rubble. And created millions of >refugees. And damaged the food supply to millions in other countries.

    That is is what you get for your interference.

    Any you blame the US?

    Of course :-)
    Was not that trying to present itself as world police?
    Oh wait defund the police

    US milli-tary Destructing Complex NEEDS war
    so after Afghanistan (where they left billions of their war tools)
    they new do the Europe thing again.

    And you pay for it with taxes.
    Fix your own shit at home! Or get nuked into oblivion.

    Oh wait, then you can 'Build Back Better'.

    More and more countries are moving away from the US dollar...
    You cannot let thieves keep your safe....

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Jan Panteltje@21:1/5 to jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com on Sat Apr 30 06:29:21 2022
    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 21:14:31 -0700) it happened jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in <kjdp6h93hp9mcnjt09osm214hnh2b17mud@4ax.com>:

    I studied America for 6 months. Traveled, researched, subscribed to >newspapers. I decided it would be Portland or San Francisco, and the
    pollen counts favored SF. It's wonderful is you just ignore the
    people.



    Nice enough place to visit, and of course I still have some good friends >>there, which makes it reasonably OK in small-to-medium doses. ;)

    I'm small-to-medium.

    I have traveled US, lived there, worked there,
    very familiar with California,
    been with the very rich in Malibu and the very poor in Miami,
    the gangs in NY, been in Denver, Atlanta, Portland, east coast Atlantic City, up north to Canadian
    border hiking, living in the wild, probably knew more about the US than
    most hillbillies...
    Been with the blacks picking fruits to make some money, been in hightech making some money,
    been thrown in jail with some Mexicans close to El Paso ...
    The works.
    I have nothing against 'merrica , or its people. But the way it makes wars.
    CIA asked me and I pissed somebody of to hysteria when I refused and told everybody he asked me
    What a place, they should have known me better :-)

    What an adventure in retrospect!
    Different from 'East of Eden' I did read in school once.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/East_of_Eden_(novel)

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From boB@21:1/5 to All on Sat Apr 30 00:12:13 2022
    On Sat, 23 Apr 2022 07:21:10 -0700, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com
    wrote:



    https://www.ti.com/prod-list/new-products?releasePeriod=364


    And that's just TI. Boggling.

    How about just trying to build and ship IC's that are already designed
    in this day of chip shortages !

    boB

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From whit3rd@21:1/5 to Jan Panteltje on Sat Apr 30 02:22:34 2022
    On Friday, April 29, 2022 at 11:05:48 PM UTC-7, Jan Panteltje wrote:
    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 11:27:10 -0700 (PDT)) it happened whit3rd <whi...@gmail.com> wrote in
    <d57fd738-17cc-4b21...@googlegroups.com>:
    On Friday, April 29, 2022 at 10:14:51 AM UTC-7, Jan Panteltje wrote:
    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 10:02:25 -0700) it happened John Larkin >> <jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote in
    <ve6o6hp5q5bet379q...@4ax.com>:
    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 16:49:42 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonSt...@yahoo.com> wrote:

    The war ByeThen provoked in Ukraine

    How did he do that?

    Did the US and Ukraine attack Russia?

    By breaking the 2014 peace deal by stuffing more weapons directly on the Russian border

    ... well, that 'more weapons' thing is in the news, but it happened AFTER Russia attacked.
    As a cause-and=effect theory, that's backward.

    supporting Ukraine in making Donbas its own, the usual CIA shit

    Donbas was invaded, and Ukraine response was relatively mild; as for CIA, >US intelligence did note that Russia was about to invade Ukraine; isn't that a good
    thing? European wars always spread, the rest of the world HAS to have good >intelligence to cope intelligently.

    with shitlensky their sad puppet.

    The 'puppet' word is either a baseless insult, or a bit of propoganda, but not
    in correspondence with the reality of an elected leader of a democratic nation.

    US does that everywhere:

    If Jan smells excrement everywhere he goes, I know what the source
    of that odor is.
    Interesting to perhaps your kind that you fall back in the excrement here. But really the 2014 agreement was broken.

    What 'agreement' in writing and acknowledged by two or more parties
    are you talking about? The taking of Crimea was NOT agreed upon.

    Ukraine was taken from Russia by a revolt.

    Ukraine was detached from the USSR just when Russia was, and not by revolt.
    It was never 'taken from' anyone, or anywhere. The region is self-ruling,
    not owned (or ruled) by neighbors.

    Its probably no use arguing with people who have been indoctrinated from birth by US media.

    That's not your problem, rather it's the lack of historic knowledge and logic that
    makes your postings look like ravings.

    'US intelligence did note that Russia was about to invade Ukraine'
    ha, and some US news[tissue ;-)]paper announced that prematurely, its just a script,
    written by the puppeteers.

    You have no idea how CIA works.

    But it DID work, and its reports through President Biden gave warning that Russian assault
    was imminent. That's a good thing.
    Did you have a credible source elsewhere that told of the recent invasion in advance?

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com@21:1/5 to pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com on Sat Apr 30 07:26:44 2022
    On Sat, 30 Apr 2022 06:29:21 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote:

    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 21:14:31 -0700) it happened >jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in ><kjdp6h93hp9mcnjt09osm214hnh2b17mud@4ax.com>:

    I studied America for 6 months. Traveled, researched, subscribed to >>newspapers. I decided it would be Portland or San Francisco, and the
    pollen counts favored SF. It's wonderful is you just ignore the
    people.



    Nice enough place to visit, and of course I still have some good friends >>>there, which makes it reasonably OK in small-to-medium doses. ;)

    I'm small-to-medium.

    I have traveled US, lived there, worked there,
    very familiar with California,

    Ca is 900 miles long, 164,000 square miles. It's all sorts of things.

    been with the very rich in Malibu and the very poor in Miami,
    the gangs in NY, been in Denver, Atlanta, Portland, east coast Atlantic City, up north to Canadian
    border hiking, living in the wild, probably knew more about the US than
    most hillbillies...
    Been with the blacks picking fruits to make some money, been in hightech making some money,
    been thrown in jail with some Mexicans close to El Paso ...
    The works.

    A criminal! I should have known!

    I have nothing against 'merrica , or its people. But the way it makes wars.

    The US was traditionally isolationist, but was dragged reluctantly
    into two european wars and forced to defend a bunch of the planet
    against various genocidal regimes. Not over yet.

    CIA asked me and I pissed somebody of to hysteria when I refused and told everybody he asked me
    What a place, they should have known me better :-)

    I was recruited too. Declined.


    What an adventure in retrospect!

    Yeah, life is cool.

    Different from 'East of Eden' I did read in school once.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/East_of_Eden_(novel)



    --

    Anybody can count to one.

    - Robert Widlar

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Anthony William Sloman@21:1/5 to jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com on Sat Apr 30 08:04:31 2022
    On Sunday, May 1, 2022 at 12:26:59 AM UTC+10, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Sat, 30 Apr 2022 06:29:21 GMT, Jan Panteltje <pNaonSt...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 21:14:31 -0700) it happened jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in <kjdp6h93hp9mcnjt0...@4ax.com>:

    <snip>

    The US was traditionally isolationist, but was dragged reluctantly into two european wars and forced to defend a bunch of the planet against various genocidal regimes. Not over yet.

    The general population of the US was isolationist - they didn't know much about the rest of the world and didn't really want to know, or worry about, what was going on there.

    People with money in the US have always been interested in the rest of the world. Henry Ford admired Hitler's rabid antisemitism and gave him quite a lot of money early in his political career.

    These sorts of people are quite politically influential in the US, and the real motives that got the US into both world wars was the realisation that they'd lose export markets if the wrong people won.

    Getting the cannon-fodder motivated involved quite a lot of propaganda about defending other people against genocidal regimes, but that wasn't the actual motivation.

    CIA asked me and I pissed somebody of to hysteria when I refused and told everybody he asked me
    What a place, they should have known me better :-)

    Didn't flatter you as enthusiastically as they should have done? They probably figured that the actual offer should have been flattering enough, and didn't put enough effort into telling you how wonderful you would have been as a CIA agent.

    I was recruited too. Declined.

    What an adventure in retrospect!
    Yeah, life is cool.

    Spooks are strange. "Spycatcher" suggests that it's a form of care in the community for people who are hopelessly nuts, though that wasn't the impression the author intended to convey

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spycatcher

    --
    Bill Sloman, Sydney

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Jan Panteltje@21:1/5 to jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com on Sat Apr 30 14:58:41 2022
    On a sunny day (Sat, 30 Apr 2022 07:26:44 -0700) it happened jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in <8ehq6h9qtvi4vdegnsjmja71dk2q1b0ttd@4ax.com>:

    On Sat, 30 Apr 2022 06:29:21 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote:

    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 21:14:31 -0700) it happened >>jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in >><kjdp6h93hp9mcnjt09osm214hnh2b17mud@4ax.com>:

    I studied America for 6 months. Traveled, researched, subscribed to >>>newspapers. I decided it would be Portland or San Francisco, and the >>>pollen counts favored SF. It's wonderful is you just ignore the
    people.



    Nice enough place to visit, and of course I still have some good friends >>>>there, which makes it reasonably OK in small-to-medium doses. ;)

    I'm small-to-medium.

    I have traveled US, lived there, worked there,
    very familiar with California,

    Ca is 900 miles long, 164,000 square miles. It's all sorts of things.

    been with the very rich in Malibu and the very poor in Miami,
    the gangs in NY, been in Denver, Atlanta, Portland, east coast Atlantic City, up north to Canadian
    border hiking, living in the wild, probably knew more about the US than >>most hillbillies...
    Been with the blacks picking fruits to make some money, been in hightech making some money,
    been thrown in jail with some Mexicans close to El Paso ...
    The works.

    A criminal! I should have known!

    LOL,
    sheriff let me out, told me he would send bounty hunters after me if I had lied to him.
    That sort of thing lingers a while, was watching some stuff in Miami later and 2 cops behind me
    'Is that not the guy they are looking for?'
    'Oh I dunno they all look alike'
    (long hair hippy in jeans I was)
    Turned around slowly and looked at them..

    That is before the guy with the big sword.. anyways
    And I forgot Vegas where I tried fake money I made and set of the alarms. Walked out of there looking innocent..
    Yea man, you gotta live.



    I have nothing against 'merrica , or its people. But the way it makes wars.

    The US was traditionally isolationist, but was dragged reluctantly
    into two european wars and forced to defend a bunch of the planet
    against various genocidal regimes. Not over yet.

    CIA asked me and I pissed somebody of to hysteria when I refused and told everybody he asked me
    What a place, they should have known me better :-)

    I was recruited too. Declined.


    What an adventure in retrospect!

    Yeah, life is cool.

    Different from 'East of Eden' I did read in school once.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/East_of_Eden_(novel)


    Not sure I will ever write book about it, but who knows?
    ;-)

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Dimiter_Popoff@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Sat Apr 30 20:06:25 2022
    On 4/29/2022 22:26, John Larkin wrote:
    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 21:36:37 +0300, Dimiter_Popoff <dp@tgi-sci.com>
    wrote:

    On 4/29/2022 20:43, John Larkin wrote:
    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 17:14:43 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote:

    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 10:02:25 -0700) it happened John Larkin >>>> <jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote in
    <ve6o6hp5q5bet379q1lt5u53v5t2gasq4n@4ax.com>:

    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 16:49:42 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote:

    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 08:33:45 -0700) it happened
    jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in
    <j31o6hhsnroa0mm1bgqja8osaamn55luhs@4ax.com>:

    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 14:46:18 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote:

    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 07:26:11 -0700) it happened
    jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in
    <iatn6hlijku89m4aoo1hvanqlfc28im5c7@4ax.com>:

    Russia has one insane person in charge. Millions will die.

    Well, that could be you.

    Unikely. The deaths will be from disease and starvation in poor
    countries. They are already suffering from covid lockdown side
    effects.

    https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-021-01022-x

    The war ByeThen provoked in Ukraine

    How did he do that?

    Did the US and Ukraine attack Russia?

    By breaking the 2014 peace deal by stuffing more weapons directly on the Russian border
    supporting Ukraine in making Donbas its own, the usual CIA shit
    with shitlensky their sad puppet.
    US does that everywhere: sanctions, Cuba, Venezuela, steal their money >>>> break deals (Iran), force injustice (International court in the Hague here >>>> should now sue Russia for war crimes, but Bushman threatened to invade here when it
    wanted to sue US soldiers for war crimes.
    I was just reading this:
    https://www.rt.com/russia/554720-china-us-goals-ukraine/
    that site has the views you should also check, not only what ByeThen and his puppet press spews at you.


    Putin has pounded Ukrainian cities to rubble. And created millions of
    refugees. And damaged the food supply to millions in other countries.

    Any you blame the US?


    What do you expect of someone following Russian media.
    You won't believe the sort of utter nonsense they pour all the time
    and yes, there are people who do believe it - not because it is not
    laughable, it is of course, but because there are people wanting to
    believe it out of hatred to the US, EU etc.

    Why do so many people hate the US?

    Maybe it's the chinese proverb: If you save someone's life, they will
    hate you forever.

    A lot of USians hate California. They fear that it's as wonderful as
    the rumors suggest. It is.


    I think it is sheer envy. Or perhaps they perceive the US as being in
    control of their lives. Might vary from person to person I suppose.
    But those most vocal I have seen are clearly envious, they just hate
    a civilization into which they know they don't have it to be a
    significant part of.
    I remember hating the USSR/Russia while Bulgaria was under its rule
    because I felt being held prisoner - we all were, just some of us
    would not have it, like myself, so I "defected". Clearly this does
    not apply to US haters, nobody is holding them prisoners.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From rbowman@21:1/5 to jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com on Sat Apr 30 12:58:29 2022
    On 04/30/2022 08:26 AM, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    The US was traditionally isolationist, but was dragged reluctantly
    into two european wars and forced to defend a bunch of the planet
    against various genocidal regimes. Not over yet.

    "From the Halls of Montezuma
    To the shores of Tripoli;
    We fight our country's battles
    In the air, on land, and sea;"

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marines'_Hymn#Lyrics

    The Tripoli line dates to 1805, Montezuma to 1847.

    Jefferson sent 3 frigates of the US Navy to the Mediterranean in 1801 to protect US merchant ships. The decision was of doubtful
    constitutionality and resulted in the First Barbary War.

    The Mexican-American War was a result of the US annexing Texas, a part
    of Mexico. Mexico, after achieving independence, unwisely allowed US
    citizens to settle in the area as long as they obeyed the law and
    converted to Catholicism. They did neither and became a breakaway
    province which the US scooped up under 'manifest destiny'.

    Things were relatively quiet after the US tried to destroy itself
    mid-century. By 1898 it had recovered enough to go to war with Spain
    over a falsified event. The outcome was a chain of stepping stones
    across the Pacific to what was anticipated to be a Chinese market ripe
    for exploiting. That led to the Philippines wars and the actions during
    the Boxer Rebellion.

    General Smedley Butler wrote 'War is a Racket' describing his
    experiences making Central America and the Caribbean safe for the United
    Fruit Company starting in 1903.

    Wilson was elected on the slogan 'He Kept Us Out of War'. Not for very
    long. Supposedly a neutral country the US was supplying war materiel to Britain. When the Germans sank the Lusitania, which was carrying
    munitions, it was a convenient casus belli. There was no reluctance.

    FDR went through some amazing machinations to find his casus belli, but
    Japan was finally provoked enough by sanctions and US activity in the
    South China Sea to bite.

    The US has never been isolationist. It played second fiddle to Britain
    until Britain lost its bottle.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Piotr Wyderski@21:1/5 to All on Sat Apr 30 22:04:29 2022
    Dimiter_Popoff wrote:

    Hah! I thought he meant Hewlet-Packard...(I really did).
    I do think in Watts when it comes to power obviously, like
    pretty much all of us, but when it comes to car/engine power
    I think horse powers...

    Gasoline consumption should properly be expressed in square meters.

    Best regards, Piotr

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Piotr Wyderski@21:1/5 to Jeroen Belleman on Sat Apr 30 22:01:21 2022
    Jeroen Belleman wrote:

    Oh, I understand it, but _I_ would write Gsamples/s, Msamples/s,
    ksamples/s, etc. I'm OK with 'S' for 'samples' if the context
    makes it unambiguous

    When one deals with ADC/DAC, the "samples" is implied, so why bother
    writing that? It's s^-1 or Hz if you wish. Heck, we could even use Bq to
    make the number of sampling events per second look distinct from what
    otherwise would suggest a clock line. :->

    HP should be stamped out altogether. Use kW.

    +1.

    Best regards, Piotr

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Piotr Wyderski@21:1/5 to Klaus Kragelund on Sat Apr 30 22:11:18 2022
    Klaus Kragelund wrote:

    There was an episode of The Amp Hour a while back, interviewing a guy
    doings ASICs. He did over 50 designs per year, one guy

    It depends on how application-specific the ASIC is. If most of the subcomponents come from a library, that would make it easier to grasp.
    With what he started is another matter -- was it an FPGA-tested HDL code intended for hardening or verbal poetry?

    Best regards, Piotr

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Piotr Wyderski@21:1/5 to Sergey Kubushyn on Sat Apr 30 22:13:53 2022
    Sergey Kubushyn wrote:

    I can make a thousand such "new parts" per month, all better than anything else and several times cheaper than existing best parts. The only problem is that those "new parts" don't really exist but who cares?

    I care. Patiently waiting for INA296.

    Best regards, Piotr

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com@21:1/5 to bombald@protonmail.com on Sat Apr 30 14:43:38 2022
    On Sat, 30 Apr 2022 22:13:53 +0200, Piotr Wyderski
    <bombald@protonmail.com> wrote:

    Sergey Kubushyn wrote:

    I can make a thousand such "new parts" per month, all better than anything >> else and several times cheaper than existing best parts. The only problem is >> that those "new parts" don't really exist but who cares?

    I care. Patiently waiting for INA296.

    Best regards, Piotr

    INA281 is available. That's the unipolar current version.



    --

    Anybody can count to one.

    - Robert Widlar

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ricky@21:1/5 to Piotr Wyderski on Sat Apr 30 15:30:21 2022
    On Saturday, April 30, 2022 at 4:04:36 PM UTC-4, Piotr Wyderski wrote:
    Dimiter_Popoff wrote:

    Hah! I thought he meant Hewlet-Packard...(I really did).
    I do think in Watts when it comes to power obviously, like
    pretty much all of us, but when it comes to car/engine power
    I think horse powers...

    Gasoline consumption should properly be expressed in square meters.

    And electron consumption? Don't tell me, N. Joule is the unit of work, consumption is J per meter where a joule is N·m, so J/m is just N.

    Did I do that right?

    It always bugs me that they use kWh for BEVs as it is a bastard unit. Converting to J/m uses a multiplier of 2.24, so at 300 Wh/mi you get 671 J/m or N. Not a bad unit and it becomes 671 kJ/km (still N) which is still workable if a bit awkward to write.
    So rounding off, I shoot to get 700 kJ/km or about 1100 kJ/mi if you must use miles. But no matter how I calculate the consumption, I still pay for electricity by the kWh which is 3.6 MJ.

    --

    Rick C.

    +-- Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
    +-- Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Clifford Heath@21:1/5 to Ricky on Sun May 1 09:39:30 2022
    On 1/5/22 8:30 am, Ricky wrote:
    On Saturday, April 30, 2022 at 4:04:36 PM UTC-4, Piotr Wyderski wrote:
    Dimiter_Popoff wrote:

    Hah! I thought he meant Hewlet-Packard...(I really did).
    I do think in Watts when it comes to power obviously, like
    pretty much all of us, but when it comes to car/engine power
    I think horse powers...

    Gasoline consumption should properly be expressed in square meters.

    And electron consumption? Don't tell me, N. Joule is the unit of work, consumption is J per meter where a joule is N·m, so J/m is just N.

    Did I do that right?

    It always bugs me that they use kWh for BEVs as it is a bastard unit. Converting to J/m uses a multiplier of 2.24, so at 300 Wh/mi you get 671 J/m or N. Not a bad unit and it becomes 671 kJ/km (still N) which is still workable if a bit awkward to
    write. So rounding off, I shoot to get 700 kJ/km or about 1100 kJ/mi if you must use miles. But no matter how I calculate the consumption, I still pay for electricity by the kWh which is 3.6 MJ.


    E-bike advertisements are the worst! Batteries in AH, or V, anything but
    WHr or kJ. Motors specified in Whr... sigh.

    CH

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Flyguy@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Sat Apr 30 17:09:31 2022
    On Friday, April 29, 2022 at 12:26:49 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:
    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 21:36:37 +0300, Dimiter_Popoff <d...@tgi-sci.com>
    wrote:
    On 4/29/2022 20:43, John Larkin wrote:
    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 17:14:43 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonSt...@yahoo.com> wrote:

    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 10:02:25 -0700) it happened John Larkin >>> <jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote in
    <ve6o6hp5q5bet379q...@4ax.com>:

    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 16:49:42 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonSt...@yahoo.com> wrote:

    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 08:33:45 -0700) it happened
    jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in
    <j31o6hhsnroa0mm1b...@4ax.com>:

    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 14:46:18 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonSt...@yahoo.com> wrote:

    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 07:26:11 -0700) it happened
    jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in
    <iatn6hlijku89m4ao...@4ax.com>:

    Russia has one insane person in charge. Millions will die.

    Well, that could be you.

    Unikely. The deaths will be from disease and starvation in poor
    countries. They are already suffering from covid lockdown side
    effects.

    https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-021-01022-x

    The war ByeThen provoked in Ukraine

    How did he do that?

    Did the US and Ukraine attack Russia?

    By breaking the 2014 peace deal by stuffing more weapons directly on the Russian border
    supporting Ukraine in making Donbas its own, the usual CIA shit
    with shitlensky their sad puppet.
    US does that everywhere: sanctions, Cuba, Venezuela, steal their money >>> break deals (Iran), force injustice (International court in the Hague here
    should now sue Russia for war crimes, but Bushman threatened to invade here when it
    wanted to sue US soldiers for war crimes.
    I was just reading this:
    https://www.rt.com/russia/554720-china-us-goals-ukraine/
    that site has the views you should also check, not only what ByeThen and his puppet press spews at you.


    Putin has pounded Ukrainian cities to rubble. And created millions of
    refugees. And damaged the food supply to millions in other countries.

    Any you blame the US?


    What do you expect of someone following Russian media.
    You won't believe the sort of utter nonsense they pour all the time
    and yes, there are people who do believe it - not because it is not >laughable, it is of course, but because there are people wanting to
    believe it out of hatred to the US, EU etc.
    Why do so many people hate the US?

    Maybe it's the chinese proverb: If you save someone's life, they will
    hate you forever.

    A lot of USians hate California. They fear that it's as wonderful as
    the rumors suggest. It is.
    --

    If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end with doubts,
    but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties. Francis Bacon

    Then why are people (and companies) leaving CA? https://taxfoundation.org/state-population-change-2021/#:~:text=Whereas%20the%20District%20of%20Columbia's,gaining%203.4%20percent%2C%20while%20Utah

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From whit3rd@21:1/5 to rbowman on Sat Apr 30 16:56:07 2022
    On Saturday, April 30, 2022 at 11:58:34 AM UTC-7, rbowman wrote:
    On 04/30/2022 08:26 AM, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    The US was traditionally isolationist, but was dragged reluctantly
    into two european wars and forced to defend a bunch of the planet
    against various genocidal regimes. Not over yet.
    "From the Halls of Montezuma
    To the shores of Tripoli;
    We fight our country's battles
    In the air, on land, and sea;"

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marines'_Hymn#Lyrics

    The Tripoli line dates to 1805, Montezuma to 1847.

    Jefferson sent 3 frigates of the US Navy to the Mediterranean in 1801 to protect US merchant ships. The decision was of doubtful
    constitutionality and resulted in the First Barbary War.

    Yeah; the 'Barbary pirates' weren't suppressed by more local regimes (England, for instance, needed north African ports to resupply their blockade against Napoleon),
    so got very assertive. Ships and goods weren't safe, and were taken by those pirates, along with their crews and passengers (for ransom, or sold as slaves if they weren't good Moslems). The public was on board with the
    operation, slogan was "Millions for defense, not one cent for tribute".


    The Mexican-American War was a result of the US annexing Texas, a part
    of Mexico.
    ... well, CLAIMED by Mexico, the locals had revolted beforehand,
    without any US assistance.

    Mexico, after achieving independence, unwisely allowed US
    citizens to settle in the area as long as they obeyed the law and
    converted to Catholicism. They did neither and became a breakaway
    province which the US scooped up under 'manifest destiny'.

    ... and because of principles, like freedom of religion

    Things were relatively quiet after the US tried to destroy itself mid-century. By 1898 it had recovered enough to go to war with Spain
    over a falsified event.

    The event (sinking of a battleship) wasn't falsified, it was investigated
    five or six times, with mixed conclusions. Probably it was a mistake, amplified by hysterical press reporting. Falsified implies knowing
    assertions of a non-fact.

    Wilson was elected on the slogan 'He Kept Us Out of War'. Not for very
    long. Supposedly a neutral country the US was supplying war materiel to Britain. When the Germans sank the Lusitania, which was carrying
    munitions, it was a convenient casus belli. There was no reluctance.

    Hell yes, there was reluctance! Lusitania sank in May 1915; Wilson knew that the Black Tom explosion was a German sabotage in summer 1916.
    After the Zimmerman note of January 1917, the US declared war in April 1917.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com@21:1/5 to All on Sat Apr 30 18:12:53 2022
    On Sat, 30 Apr 2022 12:58:29 -0600, rbowman <bowman@montana.com>
    wrote:

    On 04/30/2022 08:26 AM, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    The US was traditionally isolationist, but was dragged reluctantly
    into two european wars and forced to defend a bunch of the planet
    against various genocidal regimes. Not over yet.

    "From the Halls of Montezuma
    To the shores of Tripoli;
    We fight our country's battles
    In the air, on land, and sea;"

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marines'_Hymn#Lyrics

    That's their job. They are pretty good at it.


    The Tripoli line dates to 1805, Montezuma to 1847.

    Jefferson sent 3 frigates of the US Navy to the Mediterranean in 1801 to >protect US merchant ships. The decision was of doubtful
    constitutionality and resulted in the First Barbary War.

    Some folks have a tradition of piracy. You can't just sue them.

    Check youtube for Somali Pirates.


    The Mexican-American War was a result of the US annexing Texas, a part
    of Mexico. Mexico, after achieving independence, unwisely allowed US
    citizens to settle in the area as long as they obeyed the law and
    converted to Catholicism. They did neither and became a breakaway
    province which the US scooped up under 'manifest destiny'.

    Mexico didn't "own" Texas or the Texans. And Texas is now a much
    better place than Mexico.



    --

    Anybody can count to one.

    - Robert Widlar

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From rbowman@21:1/5 to All on Sat Apr 30 20:02:55 2022
    On 04/30/2022 05:56 PM, whit3rd wrote:
    Mexico, after achieving independence, unwisely allowed US
    citizens to settle in the area as long as they obeyed the law and
    converted to Catholicism. They did neither and became a breakaway
    province which the US scooped up under 'manifest destiny'.
    ... and because of principles, like freedom of religion


    How about principles like chattel slavery?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Old_Three_Hundred

    So you go to a colony in a foreign country where slavery is illegal and
    the only recognized religion is Catholicism, knowing both factors
    beforehand, and proceed to whine about freedom of religion? Then you
    revolt and claim independence.

    You want freedom of religion and legal slavery? Stay in Louisiana.

    Ilhan Omar is like Stephen Austin in a burqa except she hasn't gotten to
    the revolt part yet.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com@21:1/5 to soar2morrow@yahoo.com on Sat Apr 30 18:27:39 2022
    On Sat, 30 Apr 2022 17:09:31 -0700 (PDT), Flyguy
    <soar2morrow@yahoo.com> wrote:

    On Friday, April 29, 2022 at 12:26:49 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:
    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 21:36:37 +0300, Dimiter_Popoff <d...@tgi-sci.com>
    wrote:
    On 4/29/2022 20:43, John Larkin wrote:
    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 17:14:43 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonSt...@yahoo.com> wrote:

    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 10:02:25 -0700) it happened John Larkin >> >>> <jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote in
    <ve6o6hp5q5bet379q...@4ax.com>:

    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 16:49:42 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonSt...@yahoo.com> wrote:

    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 08:33:45 -0700) it happened
    jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in
    <j31o6hhsnroa0mm1b...@4ax.com>:

    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 14:46:18 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonSt...@yahoo.com> wrote:

    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 07:26:11 -0700) it happened
    jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in
    <iatn6hlijku89m4ao...@4ax.com>:

    Russia has one insane person in charge. Millions will die.

    Well, that could be you.

    Unikely. The deaths will be from disease and starvation in poor
    countries. They are already suffering from covid lockdown side
    effects.

    https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-021-01022-x

    The war ByeThen provoked in Ukraine

    How did he do that?

    Did the US and Ukraine attack Russia?

    By breaking the 2014 peace deal by stuffing more weapons directly on the Russian border
    supporting Ukraine in making Donbas its own, the usual CIA shit
    with shitlensky their sad puppet.
    US does that everywhere: sanctions, Cuba, Venezuela, steal their money >> >>> break deals (Iran), force injustice (International court in the Hague here
    should now sue Russia for war crimes, but Bushman threatened to invade here when it
    wanted to sue US soldiers for war crimes.
    I was just reading this:
    https://www.rt.com/russia/554720-china-us-goals-ukraine/
    that site has the views you should also check, not only what ByeThen and his puppet press spews at you.


    Putin has pounded Ukrainian cities to rubble. And created millions of
    refugees. And damaged the food supply to millions in other countries.

    Any you blame the US?


    What do you expect of someone following Russian media.
    You won't believe the sort of utter nonsense they pour all the time
    and yes, there are people who do believe it - not because it is not
    laughable, it is of course, but because there are people wanting to
    believe it out of hatred to the US, EU etc.
    Why do so many people hate the US?

    Maybe it's the chinese proverb: If you save someone's life, they will
    hate you forever.

    A lot of USians hate California. They fear that it's as wonderful as
    the rumors suggest. It is.
    --

    If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end with doubts,
    but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties. >> Francis Bacon

    Then why are people (and companies) leaving CA? >https://taxfoundation.org/state-population-change-2021/#:~:text=Whereas%20the%20District%20of%20Columbia's,gaining%203.4%20percent%2C%20while%20Utah

    CA -0.8%. NY -1.8. DC -2.8.

    Companies go where they can make more profit, or lose business to
    competitors in cheaper places. Texas, China, Mexico, Ireland.

    Some people find California too expensive, or follow the jobs. That's
    their choice. It is expensive, but people always select what they are
    willing to pay for. The cost of living is low in Alabama, so some
    people move there.

    My nephew is staying with us for a while. He just moved here from
    Madison and found a very nice affordable apartment in a few days, in
    San Mateo. I was kind of surprised. I think the work-from-home thing
    has taken some of the pressure off housing costs.

    Where do you live?



    --

    Anybody can count to one.

    - Robert Widlar

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From rbowman@21:1/5 to All on Sat Apr 30 19:39:46 2022
    On 04/30/2022 05:56 PM, whit3rd wrote:
    The event (sinking of a battleship) wasn't falsified, it was investigated five or six times, with mixed conclusions. Probably it was a mistake, amplified by hysterical press reporting. Falsified implies knowing assertions of a non-fact.

    https://wenicholas.weebly.com/uploads/3/8/3/5/38356911/hearst_on_the_maine_sinking.pdf

    Journalism hasn't changed all that much.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From rbowman@21:1/5 to jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com on Sat Apr 30 20:12:50 2022
    On 04/30/2022 07:12 PM, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Sat, 30 Apr 2022 12:58:29 -0600, rbowman <bowman@montana.com>
    wrote:

    On 04/30/2022 08:26 AM, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    The US was traditionally isolationist, but was dragged reluctantly
    into two european wars and forced to defend a bunch of the planet
    against various genocidal regimes. Not over yet.

    "From the Halls of Montezuma
    To the shores of Tripoli;
    We fight our country's battles
    In the air, on land, and sea;"

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marines'_Hymn#Lyrics

    That's their job. They are pretty good at it.


    The Tripoli line dates to 1805, Montezuma to 1847.

    Jefferson sent 3 frigates of the US Navy to the Mediterranean in 1801 to
    protect US merchant ships. The decision was of doubtful
    constitutionality and resulted in the First Barbary War.

    Some folks have a tradition of piracy. You can't just sue them.

    Check youtube for Somali Pirates.

    Does an isolationist country think its merchants have some god-given
    right to conduct business in the Mediterranean?

    The Mexican-American War was a result of the US annexing Texas, a part
    of Mexico. Mexico, after achieving independence, unwisely allowed US
    citizens to settle in the area as long as they obeyed the law and
    converted to Catholicism. They did neither and became a breakaway
    province which the US scooped up under 'manifest destiny'.

    Mexico didn't "own" Texas or the Texans. And Texas is now a much
    better place than Mexico.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coahuila_y_Tejas

    It was a constituent state. Perhaps 'own' is the wrong word. The US
    doesn't 'own' Texas but it would be upset if it declared independence.

    If by 'Texans' you mean Austin's Old 300, they were colonists who were
    allowed to settle in Mexico.

    Biden is working hard to fix the Texan problem and return it to par with Mexico.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com@21:1/5 to All on Sat Apr 30 19:30:43 2022
    On Sat, 30 Apr 2022 20:12:50 -0600, rbowman <bowman@montana.com>
    wrote:

    On 04/30/2022 07:12 PM, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Sat, 30 Apr 2022 12:58:29 -0600, rbowman <bowman@montana.com>
    wrote:

    On 04/30/2022 08:26 AM, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    The US was traditionally isolationist, but was dragged reluctantly
    into two european wars and forced to defend a bunch of the planet
    against various genocidal regimes. Not over yet.

    "From the Halls of Montezuma
    To the shores of Tripoli;
    We fight our country's battles
    In the air, on land, and sea;"

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marines'_Hymn#Lyrics

    That's their job. They are pretty good at it.


    The Tripoli line dates to 1805, Montezuma to 1847.

    Jefferson sent 3 frigates of the US Navy to the Mediterranean in 1801 to >>> protect US merchant ships. The decision was of doubtful
    constitutionality and resulted in the First Barbary War.

    Some folks have a tradition of piracy. You can't just sue them.

    Check youtube for Somali Pirates.

    Does an isolationist country think its merchants have some god-given
    right to conduct business in the Mediterranean?


    Who owns the ocean?



    --

    Anybody can count to one.

    - Robert Widlar

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ricky@21:1/5 to Clifford Heath on Sat Apr 30 19:33:05 2022
    On Saturday, April 30, 2022 at 7:39:37 PM UTC-4, Clifford Heath wrote:
    On 1/5/22 8:30 am, Ricky wrote:
    On Saturday, April 30, 2022 at 4:04:36 PM UTC-4, Piotr Wyderski wrote:
    Dimiter_Popoff wrote:

    Hah! I thought he meant Hewlet-Packard...(I really did).
    I do think in Watts when it comes to power obviously, like
    pretty much all of us, but when it comes to car/engine power
    I think horse powers...

    Gasoline consumption should properly be expressed in square meters.

    And electron consumption? Don't tell me, N. Joule is the unit of work, consumption is J per meter where a joule is N·m, so J/m is just N.

    Did I do that right?

    It always bugs me that they use kWh for BEVs as it is a bastard unit. Converting to J/m uses a multiplier of 2.24, so at 300 Wh/mi you get 671 J/m or N. Not a bad unit and it becomes 671 kJ/km (still N) which is still workable if a bit awkward to
    write. So rounding off, I shoot to get 700 kJ/km or about 1100 kJ/mi if you must use miles. But no matter how I calculate the consumption, I still pay for electricity by the kWh which is 3.6 MJ.


    E-bike advertisements are the worst! Batteries in AH, or V, anything but
    WHr or kJ. Motors specified in Whr... sigh.

    I missed something. How can a motor be specified in Wh? Watts, yes, but watt-hours? That makes no sense.

    --

    Rick C.

    +-+ Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
    +-+ Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Anthony William Sloman@21:1/5 to Flyguy on Sat Apr 30 19:34:11 2022
    On Sunday, May 1, 2022 at 10:09:35 AM UTC+10, Flyguy wrote:
    On Friday, April 29, 2022 at 12:26:49 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:
    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 21:36:37 +0300, Dimiter_Popoff <d...@tgi-sci.com> wrote:
    On 4/29/2022 20:43, John Larkin wrote:
    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 17:14:43 GMT, Jan Panteltje <pNaonSt...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 10:02:25 -0700) it happened John Larkin <jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote in
    <ve6o6hp5q5bet379q...@4ax.com>:
    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 16:49:42 GMT, Jan Panteltje <pNaonSt...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 08:33:45 -0700) it happened jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in <j31o6hhsnroa0mm1b...@4ax.com>:
    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 14:46:18 GMT, Jan Panteltje <pNaonSt...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 07:26:11 -0700) it happened jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in <iatn6hlijku89m4ao...@4ax.com>:

    <snip>

    A lot of USians hate California. They fear that it's as wonderful as the rumors suggest. It is.

    Then why are people (and companies) leaving CA? https://taxfoundation.org/state-population-change-2021/#:~:text=Whereas%20the%20District%20of%20Columbia's,gaining%203.4%20percent%2C%20while%20Utah

    The article spells it out.

    "The picture painted by this population shift is a clear one of people leaving high-tax, high-cost states for lower-tax, lower-cost alternatives."

    If you aren't exploiting the better services offered by higher cost states, it pays you to move out. If you aren't exploiting the services you probably aren't all that productive, so who is going to care?

    --
    Bill Sloman, Sydney

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ricky@21:1/5 to jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com on Sat Apr 30 19:37:39 2022
    On Saturday, April 30, 2022 at 10:30:57 PM UTC-4, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Sat, 30 Apr 2022 20:12:50 -0600, rbowman <bow...@montana.com>
    wrote:

    On 04/30/2022 07:12 PM, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Sat, 30 Apr 2022 12:58:29 -0600, rbowman <bow...@montana.com>
    wrote:

    On 04/30/2022 08:26 AM, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    The US was traditionally isolationist, but was dragged reluctantly
    into two european wars and forced to defend a bunch of the planet
    against various genocidal regimes. Not over yet.

    "From the Halls of Montezuma
    To the shores of Tripoli;
    We fight our country's battles
    In the air, on land, and sea;"

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marines'_Hymn#Lyrics

    That's their job. They are pretty good at it.


    The Tripoli line dates to 1805, Montezuma to 1847.

    Jefferson sent 3 frigates of the US Navy to the Mediterranean in 1801 to >>> protect US merchant ships. The decision was of doubtful
    constitutionality and resulted in the First Barbary War.

    Some folks have a tradition of piracy. You can't just sue them.

    Check youtube for Somali Pirates.

    Does an isolationist country think its merchants have some god-given
    right to conduct business in the Mediterranean?
    Who owns the ocean?

    Whoever has the biggest guns. Duh!

    --

    Rick C.

    ++- Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
    ++- Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From whit3rd@21:1/5 to rbowman on Sat Apr 30 21:30:53 2022
    On Saturday, April 30, 2022 at 7:03:00 PM UTC-7, rbowman wrote:
    On 04/30/2022 05:56 PM, whit3rd wrote:
    [Texas] became a breakaway
    province which the US scooped up under 'manifest destiny'.
    ... and because of principles, like freedom of religion

    How about principles like chattel slavery?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Old_Three_Hundred

    So you go to a colony in a foreign country where slavery is illegal ...

    Mexico legalized slavery in that region... not an issue for Texas
    at the time of revolt and annexation.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Flyguy@21:1/5 to jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com on Sat Apr 30 21:26:47 2022
    On Saturday, April 30, 2022 at 6:28:05 PM UTC-7, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Sat, 30 Apr 2022 17:09:31 -0700 (PDT), Flyguy
    <soar2...@yahoo.com> wrote:

    On Friday, April 29, 2022 at 12:26:49 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:
    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 21:36:37 +0300, Dimiter_Popoff <d...@tgi-sci.com>
    wrote:
    On 4/29/2022 20:43, John Larkin wrote:
    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 17:14:43 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonSt...@yahoo.com> wrote:

    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 10:02:25 -0700) it happened John Larkin
    <jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote in
    <ve6o6hp5q5bet379q...@4ax.com>:

    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 16:49:42 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonSt...@yahoo.com> wrote:

    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 08:33:45 -0700) it happened
    jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in
    <j31o6hhsnroa0mm1b...@4ax.com>:

    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 14:46:18 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonSt...@yahoo.com> wrote:

    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 07:26:11 -0700) it happened
    jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in
    <iatn6hlijku89m4ao...@4ax.com>:

    Russia has one insane person in charge. Millions will die.

    Well, that could be you.

    Unikely. The deaths will be from disease and starvation in poor
    countries. They are already suffering from covid lockdown side
    effects.

    https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-021-01022-x

    The war ByeThen provoked in Ukraine

    How did he do that?

    Did the US and Ukraine attack Russia?

    By breaking the 2014 peace deal by stuffing more weapons directly on the Russian border
    supporting Ukraine in making Donbas its own, the usual CIA shit
    with shitlensky their sad puppet.
    US does that everywhere: sanctions, Cuba, Venezuela, steal their money
    break deals (Iran), force injustice (International court in the Hague here
    should now sue Russia for war crimes, but Bushman threatened to invade here when it
    wanted to sue US soldiers for war crimes.
    I was just reading this:
    https://www.rt.com/russia/554720-china-us-goals-ukraine/
    that site has the views you should also check, not only what ByeThen and his puppet press spews at you.


    Putin has pounded Ukrainian cities to rubble. And created millions of >> >> refugees. And damaged the food supply to millions in other countries. >> >>
    Any you blame the US?


    What do you expect of someone following Russian media.
    You won't believe the sort of utter nonsense they pour all the time
    and yes, there are people who do believe it - not because it is not
    laughable, it is of course, but because there are people wanting to
    believe it out of hatred to the US, EU etc.
    Why do so many people hate the US?

    Maybe it's the chinese proverb: If you save someone's life, they will
    hate you forever.

    A lot of USians hate California. They fear that it's as wonderful as
    the rumors suggest. It is.
    --

    If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end with doubts,
    but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties.
    Francis Bacon

    Then why are people (and companies) leaving CA? >https://taxfoundation.org/state-population-change-2021/#:~:text=Whereas%20the%20District%20of%20Columbia's,gaining%203.4%20percent%2C%20while%20Utah
    CA -0.8%. NY -1.8. DC -2.8.

    Companies go where they can make more profit, or lose business to competitors in cheaper places. Texas, China, Mexico, Ireland.

    Some people find California too expensive, or follow the jobs. That's
    their choice. It is expensive, but people always select what they are willing to pay for. The cost of living is low in Alabama, so some
    people move there.

    My nephew is staying with us for a while. He just moved here from
    Madison and found a very nice affordable apartment in a few days, in
    San Mateo. I was kind of surprised. I think the work-from-home thing
    has taken some of the pressure off housing costs.

    Where do you live?
    --

    Anybody can count to one.

    - Robert Widlar

    Eastern Washington State. Our daughter is moving back here from Seattle (after saying she never would) because she can build a brand new house for $600k that would cost $2M+ in Seattle. A golfing buddy recently sold two rental homes in that area, 1200
    and 1500 sq ft, for $1.5M and $1.8M.

    CA is becoming the land of the very poor and ultra-rich - the middle class are running for the hills. If you live in SF you need a poop app to navigate the sidewalks (if you can).

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From rbowman@21:1/5 to Ricky on Sat Apr 30 23:28:40 2022
    On 04/30/2022 08:37 PM, Ricky wrote:
    On Saturday, April 30, 2022 at 10:30:57 PM UTC-4, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Sat, 30 Apr 2022 20:12:50 -0600, rbowman <bow...@montana.com>
    wrote:

    On 04/30/2022 07:12 PM, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Sat, 30 Apr 2022 12:58:29 -0600, rbowman <bow...@montana.com>
    wrote:

    On 04/30/2022 08:26 AM, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    The US was traditionally isolationist, but was dragged reluctantly >>>>>> into two european wars and forced to defend a bunch of the planet
    against various genocidal regimes. Not over yet.

    "From the Halls of Montezuma
    To the shores of Tripoli;
    We fight our country's battles
    In the air, on land, and sea;"

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marines'_Hymn#Lyrics

    That's their job. They are pretty good at it.


    The Tripoli line dates to 1805, Montezuma to 1847.

    Jefferson sent 3 frigates of the US Navy to the Mediterranean in 1801 to >>>>> protect US merchant ships. The decision was of doubtful
    constitutionality and resulted in the First Barbary War.

    Some folks have a tradition of piracy. You can't just sue them.

    Check youtube for Somali Pirates.

    Does an isolationist country think its merchants have some god-given
    right to conduct business in the Mediterranean?
    Who owns the ocean?

    Whoever has the biggest guns. Duh!

    Or the smartest missiles. I think the days of Horatio Hornblower are over.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From rbowman@21:1/5 to jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com on Sat Apr 30 23:26:15 2022
    On 04/30/2022 08:30 PM, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Sat, 30 Apr 2022 20:12:50 -0600, rbowman <bowman@montana.com>
    wrote:

    On 04/30/2022 07:12 PM, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Sat, 30 Apr 2022 12:58:29 -0600, rbowman <bowman@montana.com>
    wrote:

    On 04/30/2022 08:26 AM, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    The US was traditionally isolationist, but was dragged reluctantly
    into two european wars and forced to defend a bunch of the planet
    against various genocidal regimes. Not over yet.

    "From the Halls of Montezuma
    To the shores of Tripoli;
    We fight our country's battles
    In the air, on land, and sea;"

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marines'_Hymn#Lyrics

    That's their job. They are pretty good at it.


    The Tripoli line dates to 1805, Montezuma to 1847.

    Jefferson sent 3 frigates of the US Navy to the Mediterranean in 1801 to >>>> protect US merchant ships. The decision was of doubtful
    constitutionality and resulted in the First Barbary War.

    Some folks have a tradition of piracy. You can't just sue them.

    Check youtube for Somali Pirates.

    Does an isolationist country think its merchants have some god-given
    right to conduct business in the Mediterranean?


    Who owns the ocean?



    Britannia thought it did. Whatever the rationale it was the first
    instance of the US Navy and Marines operating a long way from home. I've
    never been able to ferret out why US merchant vessels were there in the
    first place. Hopefully they weren't buying slaves at the North African
    markets.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Jan Panteltje@21:1/5 to bombald@protonmail.com on Sun May 1 06:11:21 2022
    On a sunny day (Sat, 30 Apr 2022 22:01:21 +0200) it happened Piotr Wyderski <bombald@protonmail.com> wrote in <t4k4it$21cqo$1@portraits.wsisiz.edu.pl>:

    Jeroen Belleman wrote:

    Oh, I understand it, but _I_ would write Gsamples/s, Msamples/s,
    ksamples/s, etc. I'm OK with 'S' for 'samples' if the context
    makes it unambiguous

    When one deals with ADC/DAC, the "samples" is implied, so why bother
    writing that? It's s^-1 or Hz if you wish. Heck, we could even use Bq to
    make the number of sampling events per second look distinct from what >otherwise would suggest a clock line. :->

    It all depends, you asume 'experts' know it all
    I do remember a US spacecraft crashing on Mars as for the insertion burn they used the wrong units

    http://edition.cnn.com/TECH/space/9909/30/mars.metric.02/#:~:text=(CNN)%20%2D%2D%20NASA%20lost%20a,a%20review%20finding%20released%20Thursday.

    its CNN, so its true ;-)
    Anyways one would expect thsoe 'experts' to notice.
    Does not cause anything to be clear...

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Gerhard Hoffmann@21:1/5 to All on Sun May 1 13:13:10 2022
    Am 01.05.22 um 07:26 schrieb rbowman:
    On 04/30/2022 08:30 PM, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Sat, 30 Apr 2022 20:12:50 -0600, rbowman <bowman@montana.com>
    wrote:

    Some folks have a tradition of piracy. You can't just sue them.

    It's a cultural characteristic. You've got to respect this,
    and don't you dare to commit cultural appropriation!

    Check youtube for Somali Pirates.

    Does an isolationist country think its merchants have some god-given
    right to conduct business in the Mediterranean?


    Who owns the ocean?



    Britannia thought it did.  Whatever the rationale it was the first
    instance of the US Navy and Marines operating a long way from home. I've never been able to ferret out why US merchant vessels were there in the
    first place. Hopefully they weren't buying slaves at the North African markets.

    No, it was the other way around.

    Slaves FOR the North African markets.

    Piratery in the Mediterranian was a big thing,
    including raids to the southern French and Italian shores.
    Blondes preferred. They even sacked an entire village on
    Iceland. That used to be a core competence of the Vikings.

    The Corsairs were the offspring of the Arabs who had occupied
    Spain for > 400 Years. They needed a new finance concept, badly.


    Or that the American slave biz worked so smoothly because
    the African tribes were used to sell their fellow African
    tribes. So there wasn't much slave hunting involved, just
    transport capacity.

    But, of course, it is politically incorrect to mention that.

    Gerhard

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com@21:1/5 to All on Sun May 1 07:25:46 2022
    On Sun, 1 May 2022 13:13:10 +0200, Gerhard Hoffmann <dk4xp@arcor.de>
    wrote:

    Am 01.05.22 um 07:26 schrieb rbowman:
    On 04/30/2022 08:30 PM, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Sat, 30 Apr 2022 20:12:50 -0600, rbowman <bowman@montana.com>
    wrote:

    Some folks have a tradition of piracy. You can't just sue them.

    It's a cultural characteristic. You've got to respect this,
    and don't you dare to commit cultural appropriation!

    Check youtube for Somali Pirates.

    Does an isolationist country think its merchants have some god-given
    right to conduct business in the Mediterranean?


    Who owns the ocean?



    Britannia thought it did. Whatever the rationale it was the first
    instance of the US Navy and Marines operating a long way from home. I've
    never been able to ferret out why US merchant vessels were there in the
    first place. Hopefully they weren't buying slaves at the North African
    markets.

    No, it was the other way around.

    Slaves FOR the North African markets.

    Piratery in the Mediterranian was a big thing,
    including raids to the southern French and Italian shores.
    Blondes preferred. They even sacked an entire village on
    Iceland. That used to be a core competence of the Vikings.

    The Corsairs were the offspring of the Arabs who had occupied
    Spain for > 400 Years. They needed a new finance concept, badly.


    Or that the American slave biz worked so smoothly because
    the African tribes were used to sell their fellow African
    tribes. So there wasn't much slave hunting involved, just
    transport capacity.

    But, of course, it is politically incorrect to mention that.

    Gerhard

    Slavery was universal throughout recorded history so certainly before
    that. It's not remarkable that the US and England participated in
    slavery. What's remarkable is that they ended it.

    This is a great movie:

    https://www.amazon.com/Belle-Blu-ray-Gugu-Mbatha-Raw/dp/B00KO10QH2/ref=sr_1_10_sspa?crid=EHKLGESRA3I1&keywords=dvd+belle&qid=1651415101&sprefix=dvd+belle%2Caps%2C130&sr=8-10-spons&psc=1&smid=ABLI0FL268ZL4&spLa=
    ZW5jcnlwdGVkUXVhbGlmaWVyPUEyRjJPVkhRMENZOVU2JmVuY3J5cHRlZElkPUEwNjQwODMyMVhKWEYySU5DQ045NyZlbmNyeXB0ZWRBZElkPUEwMjE0NDI3MUZKVjhCNlJHOU1QTyZ3aWRnZXROYW1lPXNwX210ZiZhY3Rpb249Y2xpY2tSZWRpcmVjdCZkb05vdExvZ0NsaWNrPXRydWU=




    --

    Anybody can count to one.

    - Robert Widlar

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ricky@21:1/5 to Jan Panteltje on Sun May 1 10:44:38 2022
    On Sunday, May 1, 2022 at 2:11:29 AM UTC-4, Jan Panteltje wrote:
    On a sunny day (Sat, 30 Apr 2022 22:01:21 +0200) it happened Piotr Wyderski <bom...@protonmail.com> wrote in <t4k4it$21cqo$1...@portraits.wsisiz.edu.pl>: >Jeroen Belleman wrote:

    Oh, I understand it, but _I_ would write Gsamples/s, Msamples/s,
    ksamples/s, etc. I'm OK with 'S' for 'samples' if the context
    makes it unambiguous

    When one deals with ADC/DAC, the "samples" is implied, so why bother >writing that? It's s^-1 or Hz if you wish. Heck, we could even use Bq to >make the number of sampling events per second look distinct from what >otherwise would suggest a clock line. :->
    It all depends, you asume 'experts' know it all
    I do remember a US spacecraft crashing on Mars as for the insertion burn they used the wrong units

    http://edition.cnn.com/TECH/space/9909/30/mars.metric.02/#:~:text=(CNN)%20%2D%2D%20NASA%20lost%20a,a%20review%20finding%20released%20Thursday.

    It is true, sort of. The problem was a software interface specification was not followed by a subcontractor. Worse, the testing that should have been done to verify the interface was not done. This problem was nothing like the issue being discussed
    here. It was a systems design failure and the continued use by government contractors of antiquated measurement units.

    You are discussing a simple choice of how to abbreviate a specification term. On any project, this would be standardized, even if the engineering community does not use a consistent term.

    --

    Rick C.

    +++ Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
    +++ Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From rbowman@21:1/5 to jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com on Sun May 1 12:26:01 2022
    On 05/01/2022 08:25 AM, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    Slavery was universal throughout recorded history so certainly before
    that. It's not remarkable that the US and England participated in
    slavery. What's remarkable is that they ended it.

    The Industrial Revolution made wage slaves a much more attractive
    proposition. You didn't have to feed, clothe, or doctor them, and you
    could fire them when you didn't need them anymore.

    Even better, in current times the slaves provide their own
    transportation. When Germany started the Gastarbeiterprogramm in '55
    they didn't need to go round up Turks and others. Somehow the original
    plan for the people to work for two years and go home with a pocket full
    of DM's and new skill didn't work out.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com@21:1/5 to rbowman on Sun May 1 12:45:30 2022
    On Sun, 1 May 2022 12:26:01 -0600, rbowman <bowman@montana.com> wrote:

    On 05/01/2022 08:25 AM, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    Slavery was universal throughout recorded history so certainly before
    that. It's not remarkable that the US and England participated in
    slavery. What's remarkable is that they ended it.

    The Industrial Revolution made wage slaves a much more attractive >proposition. You didn't have to feed, clothe, or doctor them, and you
    could fire them when you didn't need them anymore.

    The "wage slaves" got heated homes, cars, refrigerators, electric
    lights, good and reliable food, literacy, affordable clothing, the
    right to vote for their government.

    They could quit any time if someone made them a better offer. They
    could elect to stay in the countryside and struggle to grow enough
    food to get their families through the winter. They could watch their
    kids die young if they didn't want to be exploited.

    The industrial revolution made the average citizen far more productive
    and far better off than any population had ever been.



    --

    Anybody can count to one.

    - Robert Widlar

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Jeroen Belleman@21:1/5 to Piotr Wyderski on Sun May 1 22:46:18 2022
    On 2022-05-01 22:41, Piotr Wyderski wrote:
    Ricky wrote:

    And electron consumption? Don't tell me, N. Joule is the unit of work, consumption is J per meter where a joule is N·m, so J/m is just N.

    If dimensional analysis says it is newton, then... it is newton, whether you like it or not.


    Best regards, Piotr

    It makes sense, no? It's just how hard it needs to be pushed to
    keep it going.

    Jeroen Belleman

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Piotr Wyderski@21:1/5 to Ricky on Sun May 1 22:41:32 2022
    Ricky wrote:

    And electron consumption? Don't tell me, N. Joule is the unit of work, consumption is J per meter where a joule is N·m, so J/m is just N.

    If dimensional analysis says it is newton, then... it is newton, whether
    you like it or not.


    Best regards, Piotr

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From whit3rd@21:1/5 to rbowman on Sun May 1 13:48:30 2022
    On Saturday, April 30, 2022 at 10:26:20 PM UTC-7, rbowman wrote:
    On 04/30/2022 08:30 PM, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    [about the Barbaby War]
    Who owns the ocean?

    Britannia thought it did. Whatever the rationale it was the first
    instance of the US Navy and Marines operating a long way from home. I've never been able to ferret out why US merchant vessels were there in the
    first place. Hopefully they weren't buying slaves at the North African markets.

    Cash crops (tobacco, mainly) were major US exports; there was no good reason
    to let foreign ships do all of that. As for the slave trade, that was heaviest
    on the Gold Coast; Yankee ships there were at less piracy risk than the ones which
    sailed into the Mediterranean.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Piotr Wyderski@21:1/5 to Jeroen Belleman on Mon May 2 00:32:10 2022
    Jeroen Belleman wrote:

    It makes sense, no? It's just how hard it needs to be pushed to
    keep it going.

    In the case of fuel consumption it is simply the cross-sectional area of
    the imaginary stream of fuel that runs along the moving vehicle. The
    bigger the consumption, the bigger the pipe. Very picturesque and
    intuitive IMO.

    Best regards, Piotr

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Clifford Heath@21:1/5 to Ricky on Mon May 2 10:08:24 2022
    On 1/5/22 12:33 pm, Ricky wrote:
    On Saturday, April 30, 2022 at 7:39:37 PM UTC-4, Clifford Heath wrote:
    On 1/5/22 8:30 am, Ricky wrote:
    On Saturday, April 30, 2022 at 4:04:36 PM UTC-4, Piotr Wyderski wrote:
    Dimiter_Popoff wrote:

    Hah! I thought he meant Hewlet-Packard...(I really did).
    I do think in Watts when it comes to power obviously, like
    pretty much all of us, but when it comes to car/engine power
    I think horse powers...

    Gasoline consumption should properly be expressed in square meters.

    And electron consumption? Don't tell me, N. Joule is the unit of work, consumption is J per meter where a joule is N·m, so J/m is just N.

    Did I do that right?

    It always bugs me that they use kWh for BEVs as it is a bastard unit. Converting to J/m uses a multiplier of 2.24, so at 300 Wh/mi you get 671 J/m or N. Not a bad unit and it becomes 671 kJ/km (still N) which is still workable if a bit awkward to
    write. So rounding off, I shoot to get 700 kJ/km or about 1100 kJ/mi if you must use miles. But no matter how I calculate the consumption, I still pay for electricity by the kWh which is 3.6 MJ.


    E-bike advertisements are the worst! Batteries in AH, or V, anything but
    WHr or kJ. Motors specified in Whr... sigh.

    I missed something. How can a motor be specified in Wh? Watts, yes, but watt-hours? That makes no sense.


    Exactly my point. The people writing these advertisements are not
    physicists and do not understand units.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Piotr Wyderski@21:1/5 to Clifford Heath on Mon May 2 06:24:37 2022
    Clifford Heath wrote:

    Exactly my point. The people writing these advertisements are not
    physicists and do not understand units.

    Or they are actually smarter and we don't understand the message: a 1Whr
    motor might consume 1 watt and die after an hour of operation. My recent shredder that lasted 20 minutes appears to be powered by such a motor.

    Best regards, Piotr

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ricky@21:1/5 to Piotr Wyderski on Sun May 1 21:22:01 2022
    On Sunday, May 1, 2022 at 6:32:29 PM UTC-4, Piotr Wyderski wrote:
    Jeroen Belleman wrote:

    It makes sense, no? It's just how hard it needs to be pushed to
    keep it going.
    In the case of fuel consumption it is simply the cross-sectional area of
    the imaginary stream of fuel that runs along the moving vehicle. The
    bigger the consumption, the bigger the pipe. Very picturesque and
    intuitive IMO.

    The point is, the units of Wh/mi or Wh/km can be turned directly into Newtons. Not sure how to turn any of that into a cross section of an electricity stream. I suppose it could be equated to the gauge of wire that would safely carry the current once a
    voltage is specified. Maybe assume a 240 volt, single phase AC source. But that's still not the same thing. The wire doesn't get consumed.

    For an electric vehicle, maybe the number of AA alkaline cells per mile? For my car, it would be around 80 AA/mi.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AA_battery#Comparison

    https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=200452841739689

    --

    Rick C.

    ---- Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
    ---- Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Piotr Wyderski@21:1/5 to All on Mon May 2 06:56:22 2022
    whit3rd wrote:

    But it DID work, and its reports through President Biden gave warning that Russian assault
    was imminent. That's a good thing.
    Did you have a credible source elsewhere that told of the recent invasion in advance?

    It had been in the air here for quite a long time. The CIA warnings
    resonated well with that, but I wouldn't give the CIA all the credit.
    A distant friend serving in a military logistics unit had given me many
    hints about "unusual events" long before the war started and I don't
    claim to be exceptionally well-connected. "Everybody" knew.

    Best regards, Piotr

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Anthony William Sloman@21:1/5 to jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com on Sun May 1 21:36:59 2022
    On Monday, May 2, 2022 at 5:45:45 AM UTC+10, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Sun, 1 May 2022 12:26:01 -0600, rbowman <bow...@montana.com> wrote:

    On 05/01/2022 08:25 AM, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    Slavery was universal throughout recorded history so certainly before
    that. It's not remarkable that the US and England participated in
    slavery. What's remarkable is that they ended it.

    The Industrial Revolution made wage slaves a much more attractive >proposition. You didn't have to feed, clothe, or doctor them, and you >could fire them when you didn't need them anymore.

    The "wage slaves" got heated homes, cars, refrigerators, electric
    lights, good and reliable food, literacy, affordable clothing, the
    right to vote for their government.

    Long after the industrial Revolution got started. The Trade Union movement had something to do with that, and that is definitely post-industrial revolution.
    Universal suffrage, was even slower.

    They could quit any time if someone made them a better offer. They
    could elect to stay in the countryside and struggle to grow enough
    food to get their families through the winter. They could watch their
    kids die young if they didn't want to be exploited.

    Kids died young back then even when their parents were rich.

    https://ourworldindata.org/child-mortality-in-the-past

    The recent decline in child mortality started quite a while after the industrial revolution got under way. The agricultural revolution had made it possible to grow enough food to feed the factory labourers as well as the agricultural labourers who grew
    it. Canals and then railways got it into the cities.

    The industrial revolution made the average citizen far more productive and far better off than any population had ever been.

    And the agricultural revolution made it possible. Neither happened overnight, and the societies that emerged from the changes that these revolutions made possible were rather different from the ones that even the US started off with.

    To some extent the fact that the US had started off with a reasonably advanced political system put them at a disadvantage because they could get by with smaller changes than - say - the UK. Post-1900 constitutions work better than political arrangements
    that got more or less fixed at earlier dates.

    Germany's 1948 constitution is probably the best around. The French 1956 constitution was devised by de Gaulle to suit himself, and it has it's defects. The French president doesn't have the executive powers of an American president, but the position is
    still more powerful than it ought to be.

    --
    Bill Sloman, Sydney

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From John Larkin@21:1/5 to pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com on Mon May 2 09:40:44 2022
    On Sat, 30 Apr 2022 06:13:41 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote:

    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 10:43:44 -0700) it happened John Larkin ><jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote in ><eq8o6htehhqt03esl729sjoot12p127sk9@4ax.com>:

    Putin has pounded Ukrainian cities to rubble. And created millions of >>refugees. And damaged the food supply to millions in other countries.

    That is is what you get for your interference.

    Putin is shelling cities and slaughtering possibly millions, and
    setting his people back decades, and it's our fault?


    Any you blame the US?

    Of course :-)
    Was not that trying to present itself as world police?

    No. Certainly not in Ukreaine.


    Oh wait defund the police

    US milli-tary Destructing Complex NEEDS war
    so after Afghanistan (where they left billions of their war tools)
    they new do the Europe thing again.

    911 upset some people.

    --

    If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end with doubts,
    but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties. Francis Bacon

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Jan Panteltje@21:1/5 to jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology. on Mon May 2 17:46:03 2022
    On a sunny day (Mon, 02 May 2022 09:40:44 -0700) it happened John Larkin <jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote in <k7207ht2jh2kplncf5pmeti83o9hl3g834@4ax.com>:

    On Sat, 30 Apr 2022 06:13:41 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote:

    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 10:43:44 -0700) it happened John Larkin >><jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote in >><eq8o6htehhqt03esl729sjoot12p127sk9@4ax.com>:

    Putin has pounded Ukrainian cities to rubble. And created millions of >>>refugees. And damaged the food supply to millions in other countries.

    That is is what you get for your interference.

    Putin is shelling cities and slaughtering possibly millions, and
    setting his people back decades, and it's our fault?

    US provoked it, using NATO slaves
    its the same old song, make war, make money.
    Everywhere where even a little bit of uprising is, is the CIA immediately present.
    They will put petrol on the fire if possible. Not at home of course.
    Euro a threat, EU economy a threat, nothing to lose make war again
    (as Bil Clignon did).



    Any you blame the US?

    Of course :-)
    Was not that trying to present itself as world police?

    No. Certainly not in Ukreaine.

    Worse than that sending billions of weapons there.


    Oh wait defund the police

    US milli-tary Destructing Complex NEEDS war
    so after Afghanistan (where they left billions of their war tools)
    they new do the Europe thing again.

    911 upset some people.

    What US did in Iraq (false 'weapons of mass destruction' claim) -> total destruction
    use depleted Uranium ammo, what you did in Afghanistan (targeting civilians with drones),
    what you did in Vietnam (Agent Orange), etc etc
    Oh and what you did in Japan targeting civilians in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, well the list is sooo long.
    Your little high-rise is insignificant compared to all that.
    The tide is now turning, the more I think about it the more nu-cu-lear becomes likely
    Everybody and their cat has now nukes, there are other weapons too you have never heard of.

    Any luck with those new transistors?
    I bought a LNB in year 2000, still using it in a sat dish,
    it has seen temperatures from about -30 C to ??? very hot with the sun directly on it
    It has seen St Elmo's fire, and it is still very low noise with good frequency stability.
    Wonder how those transistors will react to such environments.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From whit3rd@21:1/5 to Jan Panteltje on Mon May 2 11:26:26 2022
    On Monday, May 2, 2022 at 10:46:19 AM UTC-7, Jan Panteltje wrote:
    On a sunny day (Mon, 02 May 2022 09:40:44 -0700) it happened John Larkin <jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote in <k7207ht2jh2kplncf...@4ax.com>:
    911 upset some people.

    What US did in Iraq (false 'weapons of mass destruction' claim) -> total destruction

    Of what? A regime, not a nation. That regime had mass graves before the US arrived,
    used chemical weapons against its own citizens.

    use depleted Uranium ammo,

    Yeah, against tanks. So, there's a few ounces of toxic dust residue; not a big problem,
    compared to the explosive ammo also in the damaged vehicle. It's
    an oddball kind of weapon, but not a remarkable one.

    what you did in Afghanistan (targeting civilians with drones),

    Target selection at a distance is not perfect. It's the nature of the weapon, and not a policy, nor a war crime.

    what you did in Vietnam (Agent Orange), etc etc

    Killed weeds? Again, not remarkable.

    Oh and what you did in Japan targeting civilians in Hiroshima and Nagasaki,

    Targets for area weapons are always... areas. Can't ever exclude collateral casualties. Lusitania had civilians aboard, but... that, too, isn't a war crime.

    well the list is sooo long.

    And, it's a list of PRATT, points-refuted-a-thousand-times.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From whit3rd@21:1/5 to Dimiter Popoff on Mon May 2 11:59:28 2022
    On Thursday, April 28, 2022 at 12:43:44 PM UTC-7, Dimiter Popoff wrote:
    On 4/28/2022 22:16, John Larkin wrote:
    On Thu, 28 Apr 2022 02:00:41 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whi...@gmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Wednesday, April 27, 2022 at 12:56:42 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:

    I want everything on one wireless network. Internet, phones, TV, wifi, >>> home automation, cars, utility meters, security, webcams, everything.

    What we have is a mess. Many cell companies have various spotty
    coverage. Ditto cable TV and internet providers....
    One uniform microcell mesh system would eliminate all that.

    Imagine progress.

    It would be nice for things to evolve this way but - and it is a huge
    BUT - the standards need to be public. They are anything but at the
    moment - the layers above IP and perhaps PPP are completely secret.

    And, like old railways (incompatible track spacing) negotiation
    of interoperability requires an overall authority (federal, in the US) to write up
    a specification, and apply carrot (land grants for development of track) and stick (we'll yank this subsidy if you don't meet this standard) pressure.

    Network neutrality is one essential. Internet is an interoperability imperative, also essential.
    Auctioning bandwidth and expecting the buyers to magically evolve an integrated whole... not compatible with application of stick, nor a usably aimed carrot.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Larkin@21:1/5 to All on Mon May 2 12:49:34 2022
    On Thu, 28 Apr 2022 22:43:35 +0300, Dimiter_Popoff <dp@tgi-sci.com>
    wrote:

    On 4/28/2022 22:16, John Larkin wrote:
    On Thu, 28 Apr 2022 02:00:41 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Wednesday, April 27, 2022 at 12:56:42 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:

    I want everything on one wireless network. Internet, phones, TV, wifi, >>>> home automation, cars, utility meters, security, webcams, everything.

    Privacy is over-rated.

    That's a laugh; Internet range is out to near Earth orbit, and you want your
    utility meters to compete for that against your TV remote control? One network
    isn't the answer, any more than one TV channel is the answer.

    What we have is a mess. Many cell companies have various spotty
    coverage. Ditto cable TV and internet providers. Once people manage to
    get an internet provider, they have to install their own cables and
    wifi. Wires are strung on poles, sidewalks are dug up, dishes point
    everywhere and rust or get blown away. People pay for multiple
    services.

    One uniform microcell mesh system would eliminate all that.

    Imagine progress.


    It would be nice for things to evolve this way but - and it is a huge
    BUT - the standards need to be public. They are anything but at the
    moment - the layers above IP and perhaps PPP are completely secret.


    We have compatible, competitive TV and cell phone and internet
    networks. It's not hard.

    --

    If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end with doubts,
    but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties. Francis Bacon

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Larkin@21:1/5 to pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com on Mon May 2 12:46:15 2022
    On Mon, 02 May 2022 17:46:03 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote:

    On a sunny day (Mon, 02 May 2022 09:40:44 -0700) it happened John Larkin ><jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote in ><k7207ht2jh2kplncf5pmeti83o9hl3g834@4ax.com>:

    On Sat, 30 Apr 2022 06:13:41 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote:

    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 10:43:44 -0700) it happened John Larkin >>><jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote in >>><eq8o6htehhqt03esl729sjoot12p127sk9@4ax.com>:

    Putin has pounded Ukrainian cities to rubble. And created millions of >>>>refugees. And damaged the food supply to millions in other countries.

    That is is what you get for your interference.

    Putin is shelling cities and slaughtering possibly millions, and
    setting his people back decades, and it's our fault?

    US provoked it, using NATO slaves
    its the same old song, make war, make money.

    The US has paid to defend europe from the Russians since WWII.

    As T said, it's time for them to pay for their own defense.

    --

    If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end with doubts,
    but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties. Francis Bacon

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Gerhard Hoffmann@21:1/5 to All on Mon May 2 22:22:38 2022
    Am 02.05.22 um 21:46 schrieb John Larkin:
    On Mon, 02 May 2022 17:46:03 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote:


    Putin is shelling cities and slaughtering possibly millions, and
    setting his people back decades, and it's our fault?

    US provoked it, using NATO slaves
    its the same old song, make war, make money.

    The US has paid to defend europe from the Russians since WWII.

    As T said, it's time for them to pay for their own defense.

    No, you invested a bit to ensure your share of the prey.

    Just the lesser evil.

    Gerhard

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Larkin@21:1/5 to All on Mon May 2 13:36:00 2022
    On Mon, 2 May 2022 22:22:38 +0200, Gerhard Hoffmann <dk4xp@arcor.de>
    wrote:

    Am 02.05.22 um 21:46 schrieb John Larkin:
    On Mon, 02 May 2022 17:46:03 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote:


    Putin is shelling cities and slaughtering possibly millions, and
    setting his people back decades, and it's our fault?

    US provoked it, using NATO slaves
    its the same old song, make war, make money.

    The US has paid to defend europe from the Russians since WWII.

    As T said, it's time for them to pay for their own defense.

    No, you invested a bit to ensure your share of the prey.

    The europeans find excuses to be ungrateful and cheap. We should have
    let the Russian Empire grow all the way.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russian_world


    Just the lesser evil.

    Take your choice.
    --

    If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end with doubts,
    but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties. Francis Bacon

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Joe Gwinn@21:1/5 to jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology. on Mon May 2 16:44:06 2022
    On Mon, 02 May 2022 12:49:34 -0700, John Larkin <jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote:

    On Thu, 28 Apr 2022 22:43:35 +0300, Dimiter_Popoff <dp@tgi-sci.com>
    wrote:

    On 4/28/2022 22:16, John Larkin wrote:
    On Thu, 28 Apr 2022 02:00:41 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Wednesday, April 27, 2022 at 12:56:42 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:

    I want everything on one wireless network. Internet, phones, TV, wifi, >>>>> home automation, cars, utility meters, security, webcams, everything. >>>>>
    Privacy is over-rated.

    That's a laugh; Internet range is out to near Earth orbit, and you want your
    utility meters to compete for that against your TV remote control? One network
    isn't the answer, any more than one TV channel is the answer.

    What we have is a mess. Many cell companies have various spotty
    coverage. Ditto cable TV and internet providers. Once people manage to
    get an internet provider, they have to install their own cables and
    wifi. Wires are strung on poles, sidewalks are dug up, dishes point
    everywhere and rust or get blown away. People pay for multiple
    services.

    One uniform microcell mesh system would eliminate all that.

    Imagine progress.


    It would be nice for things to evolve this way but - and it is a huge
    BUT - the standards need to be public. They are anything but at the
    moment - the layers above IP and perhaps PPP are completely secret.


    We have compatible, competitive TV and cell phone and internet
    networks. It's not hard.

    Well I've spent thirty years on standards, and actually it *is* hard.
    Not to mention glacial.

    While the government can push for standards, absent a real shooting
    war, the pleas will generally fall on deaf ears. With a shooting war,
    there are usually large procurement contract on offer, and time is of
    the essence.

    Whitworth Screw Threads are a classic example.

    .<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_Standard_Whitworth>

    And it doesn't happen until at least a few big companies decide that
    they will gain far more from a standard than (bigger total pie) they
    will gain from no standard (my pie is smaller, but I have it all).

    Once there is a standard, other companies are eventually forced to
    comply.

    Nor does maturity and interoperability just happen. Taking Ethernet
    as the example, the industry supports and independent test facility
    and lab at the University of New Hampshire where various vendors
    connect into big "plugfests" where prototypes are cobbled into a
    network and the whole system is integrated. And even so, it usually
    takes two major revisions of a new standard to achieve reasonable
    maturity.

    This is done under the aegis of a de-jure standards development
    organization (like the IEEE) for exception to anti-trust statutes that
    would otherwise forbid such things.

    .<https://www.iol.unh.edu/>


    Joe Gwinn






    But the dark secret of the standards world is that 90% of all
    standards fail in the market.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ricky@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Mon May 2 13:45:44 2022
    On Monday, May 2, 2022 at 3:46:27 PM UTC-4, John Larkin wrote:
    On Mon, 02 May 2022 17:46:03 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonSt...@yahoo.com> wrote:

    On a sunny day (Mon, 02 May 2022 09:40:44 -0700) it happened John Larkin ><jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote in ><k7207ht2jh2kplncf...@4ax.com>:

    On Sat, 30 Apr 2022 06:13:41 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonSt...@yahoo.com> wrote:

    On a sunny day (Fri, 29 Apr 2022 10:43:44 -0700) it happened John Larkin >>><jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote in >>><eq8o6htehhqt03esl...@4ax.com>:

    Putin has pounded Ukrainian cities to rubble. And created millions of >>>>refugees. And damaged the food supply to millions in other countries.

    That is is what you get for your interference.

    Putin is shelling cities and slaughtering possibly millions, and
    setting his people back decades, and it's our fault?

    US provoked it, using NATO slaves
    its the same old song, make war, make money.
    The US has paid to defend europe from the Russians since WWII.

    As T said, it's time for them to pay for their own defense.

    Oh, they've been paying. Yeah, they have been paying ever since.

    --

    Rick C.

    ---+ Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
    ---+ Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Gerhard Hoffmann@21:1/5 to All on Mon May 2 23:25:50 2022
    Am 02.05.22 um 22:36 schrieb John Larkin:
    On Mon, 2 May 2022 22:22:38 +0200, Gerhard Hoffmann <dk4xp@arcor.de>
    wrote:

    Am 02.05.22 um 21:46 schrieb John Larkin:
    On Mon, 02 May 2022 17:46:03 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote:


    Putin is shelling cities and slaughtering possibly millions, and
    setting his people back decades, and it's our fault?

    US provoked it, using NATO slaves
    its the same old song, make war, make money.

    The US has paid to defend europe from the Russians since WWII.

    As T said, it's time for them to pay for their own defense.

    No, you invested a bit to ensure your share of the prey.

    The europeans find excuses to be ungrateful and cheap. We should have
    let the Russian Empire grow all the way.

    There is no such thing as a Russian empire. Russia has a
    gross national product the size of Italy, and Italy needed
    loans from the EU in the previous years. Plus Russia needs
    twice as many people as Italy to reach this rank. Lives
    from selling mineral resources / gas, like black Africa.

    Just like the "Scheinriese" of the Augsburg puppet box.
    The closer you come, the more the giant shrinks.


    All that Russia has is some nukes, and with their track
    record from the cold war, half of them don't exist and
    another quarter is probably defunct, because the money for
    keeping them operational trickled into the kleptocracy.
    Just note the excellent performance of their tanks.


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russian_world


    Just the lesser evil.

    Take your choice.

    My choice is Europe. We WILL grow together.
    Number 2 after China in 10 years. Just count the noses.

    Gerhard

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From whit3rd@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Mon May 2 15:50:41 2022
    On Monday, May 2, 2022 at 12:49:46 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:

    We have compatible, competitive TV and cell phone and internet
    networks. It's not hard.

    TV satellite, TV cable, and TV broadcast are NOT compatible.
    Neither is Blu-Ray and DVD completely compatible with region
    and hardware-license restrictions. Cell phones interconnect,
    but the networks aren't 'compatible' hardwares.
    As for internet, YES, that's a compatibility layer for networks. It isn't generally the one phones, utility meters, and TV broadcast use, though.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Larkin@21:1/5 to All on Mon May 2 16:45:41 2022
    On Mon, 2 May 2022 23:25:50 +0200, Gerhard Hoffmann <dk4xp@arcor.de>
    wrote:

    Am 02.05.22 um 22:36 schrieb John Larkin:
    On Mon, 2 May 2022 22:22:38 +0200, Gerhard Hoffmann <dk4xp@arcor.de>
    wrote:

    Am 02.05.22 um 21:46 schrieb John Larkin:
    On Mon, 02 May 2022 17:46:03 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote:


    Putin is shelling cities and slaughtering possibly millions, and
    setting his people back decades, and it's our fault?

    US provoked it, using NATO slaves
    its the same old song, make war, make money.

    The US has paid to defend europe from the Russians since WWII.

    As T said, it's time for them to pay for their own defense.

    No, you invested a bit to ensure your share of the prey.

    The europeans find excuses to be ungrateful and cheap. We should have
    let the Russian Empire grow all the way.

    There is no such thing as a Russian empire. Russia has a
    gross national product the size of Italy, and Italy needed
    loans from the EU in the previous years. Plus Russia needs
    twice as many people as Italy to reach this rank. Lives
    from selling mineral resources / gas, like black Africa.

    Just like the "Scheinriese" of the Augsburg puppet box.
    The closer you come, the more the giant shrinks.

    The Russians have tanks, planes, helicopters, nukes, and a pretty big
    army. Ukrainian towns are rubble, refugees number millions, and the
    giant is still hungry.

    This is an alphabet war, Latin/English vs Cyrillic. Really, it is.



    All that Russia has is some nukes, and with their track
    record from the cold war, half of them don't exist and
    another quarter is probably defunct, because the money for
    keeping them operational trickled into the kleptocracy.
    Just note the excellent performance of their tanks.


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russian_world


    Just the lesser evil.

    Take your choice.

    My choice is Europe. We WILL grow together.

    Russia could be part of europe. But they'd rather be Russian and poor.

    Number 2 after China in 10 years. Just count the noses.

    Gerhard


    Those noses won't be all traditional European noses.

    --

    If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end with doubts,
    but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties. Francis Bacon

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Larkin@21:1/5 to All on Mon May 2 16:51:38 2022
    On Mon, 2 May 2022 15:50:41 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Monday, May 2, 2022 at 12:49:46 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:

    We have compatible, competitive TV and cell phone and internet
    networks. It's not hard.

    TV satellite, TV cable, and TV broadcast are NOT compatible.

    My TV works with all of them. I can switch any time.

    Neither is Blu-Ray and DVD completely compatible with region
    and hardware-license restrictions. Cell phones interconnect,
    but the networks aren't 'compatible' hardwares.

    I can switch cell providers and my Samsung and my wife's iPhone will
    keep working. Over the air and wi-fi.

    As for internet, YES, that's a compatibility layer for networks. It isn't >generally the one phones, utility meters, and TV broadcast use, though.

    I project that one day not too far off we'll have one wireless network
    for everything. It makes too much sense to not do.

    --

    If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end with doubts,
    but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties. Francis Bacon

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Anthony William Sloman@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Mon May 2 17:43:09 2022
    On Tuesday, May 3, 2022 at 9:45:53 AM UTC+10, John Larkin wrote:
    On Mon, 2 May 2022 23:25:50 +0200, Gerhard Hoffmann <dk...@arcor.de> wrote: >Am 02.05.22 um 22:36 schrieb John Larkin:
    On Mon, 2 May 2022 22:22:38 +0200, Gerhard Hoffmann <dk...@arcor.de> wrote:
    Am 02.05.22 um 21:46 schrieb John Larkin:
    On Mon, 02 May 2022 17:46:03 GMT, Jan Panteltje <pNaonSt...@yahoo.com> wrote:

    <snip>

    There is no such thing as a Russian empire. Russia has a
    gross national product the size of Italy, and Italy needed
    loans from the EU in the previous years. Plus Russia needs
    twice as many people as Italy to reach this rank. Lives
    from selling mineral resources / gas, like black Africa.

    Just like the "Scheinriese" of the Augsburg puppet box.
    The closer you come, the more the giant shrinks.

    The Russians have tanks, planes, helicopters, nukes, and a pretty big army. Ukrainian towns are rubble, refugees number millions, and the giant is still hungry.

    It's got quite a lot fewer tanks, planes, helicopters and soldiers than it had when it started trying to invade the Ukraine. It may still have the same number of nukes, but it won't if it tries to use any of them.

    This is an alphabet war, Latin/English vs Cyrillic. Really, it is.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ukrainian_alphabet

    Really, it isn't. The Ukraine uses a Cyrillic alphabet.

    All that Russia has is some nukes, and with their track
    record from the cold war, half of them don't exist and
    another quarter is probably defunct, because the money for
    keeping them operational trickled into the kleptocracy.
    Just note the excellent performance of their tanks.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russian_world

    Just the lesser evil.

    Take your choice.

    My choice is Europe. We WILL grow together.

    Russia could be part of Europe. But they'd rather be Russian and poor.

    The kleptocrats like Russia the way it is. The rest of the population doesn't, but don't have a lot of influence.

    Number 2 after China in 10 years. Just count the noses.

    Those noses won't be all traditional European noses.

    But they will have democratic governments, which will count them when working out what to do next. And do a better job of it than the American governments does.

    --
    Bill Sloman, Sydney

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Jan Panteltje@21:1/5 to jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology. on Tue May 3 05:40:41 2022
    On a sunny day (Mon, 02 May 2022 16:51:38 -0700) it happened John Larkin <jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote in <7cr07hp81i2qmgeoef7sj9od6p5ho7fdll@4ax.com>:

    On Mon, 2 May 2022 15:50:41 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Monday, May 2, 2022 at 12:49:46 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:

    We have compatible, competitive TV and cell phone and internet
    networks. It's not hard.

    TV satellite, TV cable, and TV broadcast are NOT compatible.

    My TV works with all of them. I can switch any time.

    Neither is Blu-Ray and DVD completely compatible with region
    and hardware-license restrictions. Cell phones interconnect,
    but the networks aren't 'compatible' hardwares.

    I can switch cell providers and my Samsung and my wife's iPhone will
    keep working. Over the air and wi-fi.

    As for internet, YES, that's a compatibility layer for networks. It isn't >>generally the one phones, utility meters, and TV broadcast use, though.

    I project that one day not too far off we'll have one wireless network
    for everything. It makes too much sense to not do.

    Make no sense whatsoever.
    First there is diversity for security
    if your one for all thing is down, nothing works.
    Then there are radio frequencies like used by aircraft, ships,
    and other services that have totally different requirements.
    Use the best system for the required purpose and frequency.
    Make sure there is redundancy.
    You are just dreaming. Mindless babble, no in depth knowledge, no experience. US itself always wants to be 'different' we came with DVB-T for terrestrial,
    US wanted ATSC.
    Market protection really, same way other way around, we had PAL but France wanted Secam.
    PAL was better (and better than NTSC).

    Over-standardization, forcing things by law, like EU now does force Apple(and I am no Apple fan)
    to give up whats it called they have for some USB connector hinders innovation.

    Once your same for all system is in place that is like pouring you in concrete :-)
    Man where do I get all this after 4 hour sleep early in the morning.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From whit3rd@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Mon May 2 23:53:05 2022
    On Monday, May 2, 2022 at 4:51:49 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:
    On Mon, 2 May 2022 15:50:41 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whi...@gmail.com>
    wrote:
    On Monday, May 2, 2022 at 12:49:46 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:

    We have compatible, competitive TV and cell phone and internet
    networks. It's not hard.

    TV satellite, TV cable, and TV broadcast are NOT compatible.
    My TV works with all of them. I can switch any time.

    Yeah, but the TV isn't cable-ready, nor satellite-ready, you need a leased
    or purchased translation box. You cannot switch without a
    proprietary box and some license restrictions.

    Neither is Blu-Ray and DVD completely compatible with region
    and hardware-license restrictions. Cell phones interconnect,
    but the networks aren't 'compatible' hardwares.

    I can switch cell providers and my Samsung and my wife's iPhone will
    keep working. Over the air and wi-fi.

    It was hard (took legislation) to get phones unlocked, but your phones are still unlikely to
    support using two SIMs at the same time. Unless software-SIM gets a boost, it'll never go to three or more. Buying into ONE at a time, that's supported.

    As for internet, YES, that's a compatibility layer for networks. It isn't >generally the one phones, utility meters, and TV broadcast use, though.

    I project that one day not too far off we'll have one wireless network
    for everything. It makes too much sense to not do.

    If it makes sense, someone will claim they have it. And that someone is
    a salesman you might not want to do business with.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com@21:1/5 to pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com on Tue May 3 07:16:15 2022
    On Tue, 03 May 2022 05:40:41 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote:

    On a sunny day (Mon, 02 May 2022 16:51:38 -0700) it happened John Larkin ><jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote in ><7cr07hp81i2qmgeoef7sj9od6p5ho7fdll@4ax.com>:

    On Mon, 2 May 2022 15:50:41 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Monday, May 2, 2022 at 12:49:46 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:

    We have compatible, competitive TV and cell phone and internet
    networks. It's not hard.

    TV satellite, TV cable, and TV broadcast are NOT compatible.

    My TV works with all of them. I can switch any time.

    Neither is Blu-Ray and DVD completely compatible with region
    and hardware-license restrictions. Cell phones interconnect,
    but the networks aren't 'compatible' hardwares.

    I can switch cell providers and my Samsung and my wife's iPhone will
    keep working. Over the air and wi-fi.

    As for internet, YES, that's a compatibility layer for networks. It isn't >>>generally the one phones, utility meters, and TV broadcast use, though.

    I project that one day not too far off we'll have one wireless network
    for everything. It makes too much sense to not do.

    Make no sense whatsoever.
    First there is diversity for security
    if your one for all thing is down, nothing works.

    A microcell mesh can have redundancy at all levels. It would be better
    than a mess of various services.


    Then there are radio frequencies like used by aircraft, ships,
    and other services that have totally different requirements.

    The RF spectrum is chopped up amongst many services. A common band
    would be much more efficient.


    Use the best system for the required purpose and frequency.
    Make sure there is redundancy.
    You are just dreaming. Mindless babble, no in depth knowledge, no experience.

    Why do so many people refuse to imagine progress? 100 years ago you
    would have refused to believe that there could ever be TVs or
    computers.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/6G_(network)




    --

    Anybody can count to one.

    - Robert Widlar

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Jan Panteltje@21:1/5 to jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com on Tue May 3 16:27:29 2022
    On a sunny day (Tue, 03 May 2022 07:16:15 -0700) it happened jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in <mrd27h99ochpb3ougpkko45esjg17f38bi@4ax.com>:

    On Tue, 03 May 2022 05:40:41 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote:

    On a sunny day (Mon, 02 May 2022 16:51:38 -0700) it happened John Larkin >><jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote in >><7cr07hp81i2qmgeoef7sj9od6p5ho7fdll@4ax.com>:

    On Mon, 2 May 2022 15:50:41 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com> >>>wrote:

    On Monday, May 2, 2022 at 12:49:46 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:

    We have compatible, competitive TV and cell phone and internet
    networks. It's not hard.

    TV satellite, TV cable, and TV broadcast are NOT compatible.

    My TV works with all of them. I can switch any time.

    Neither is Blu-Ray and DVD completely compatible with region
    and hardware-license restrictions. Cell phones interconnect,
    but the networks aren't 'compatible' hardwares.

    I can switch cell providers and my Samsung and my wife's iPhone will
    keep working. Over the air and wi-fi.

    As for internet, YES, that's a compatibility layer for networks. It isn't >>>>generally the one phones, utility meters, and TV broadcast use, though.

    I project that one day not too far off we'll have one wireless network >>>for everything. It makes too much sense to not do.

    Make no sense whatsoever.
    First there is diversity for security
    if your one for all thing is down, nothing works.

    A microcell mesh can have redundancy at all levels. It would be better
    than a mess of various services.


    Then there are radio frequencies like used by aircraft, ships,
    and other services that have totally different requirements.

    The RF spectrum is chopped up amongst many services. A common band
    would be much more efficient.


    Use the best system for the required purpose and frequency.
    Make sure there is redundancy.
    You are just dreaming. Mindless babble, no in depth knowledge, no experience.

    Why do so many people refuse to imagine progress? 100 years ago you
    would have refused to believe that there could ever be TVs or
    computers.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/6G_(network)

    Strawman
    Look dude, if you just wannabe right why not start a twitter account where your devotees can praise your genius while you play with your teddy bear

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Larkin@21:1/5 to pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com on Tue May 3 09:56:16 2022
    On Tue, 03 May 2022 16:27:29 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote:

    On a sunny day (Tue, 03 May 2022 07:16:15 -0700) it happened >jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in ><mrd27h99ochpb3ougpkko45esjg17f38bi@4ax.com>:

    On Tue, 03 May 2022 05:40:41 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote:

    On a sunny day (Mon, 02 May 2022 16:51:38 -0700) it happened John Larkin >>><jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote in >>><7cr07hp81i2qmgeoef7sj9od6p5ho7fdll@4ax.com>:

    On Mon, 2 May 2022 15:50:41 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com> >>>>wrote:

    On Monday, May 2, 2022 at 12:49:46 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:

    We have compatible, competitive TV and cell phone and internet
    networks. It's not hard.

    TV satellite, TV cable, and TV broadcast are NOT compatible.

    My TV works with all of them. I can switch any time.

    Neither is Blu-Ray and DVD completely compatible with region
    and hardware-license restrictions. Cell phones interconnect,
    but the networks aren't 'compatible' hardwares.

    I can switch cell providers and my Samsung and my wife's iPhone will >>>>keep working. Over the air and wi-fi.

    As for internet, YES, that's a compatibility layer for networks. It isn't
    generally the one phones, utility meters, and TV broadcast use, though. >>>>
    I project that one day not too far off we'll have one wireless network >>>>for everything. It makes too much sense to not do.

    Make no sense whatsoever.
    First there is diversity for security
    if your one for all thing is down, nothing works.

    A microcell mesh can have redundancy at all levels. It would be better
    than a mess of various services.


    Then there are radio frequencies like used by aircraft, ships,
    and other services that have totally different requirements.

    The RF spectrum is chopped up amongst many services. A common band
    would be much more efficient.


    Use the best system for the required purpose and frequency.
    Make sure there is redundancy.
    You are just dreaming. Mindless babble, no in depth knowledge, no experience.

    Why do so many people refuse to imagine progress? 100 years ago you
    would have refused to believe that there could ever be TVs or
    computers.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/6G_(network)

    Strawman
    Look dude, if you just wannabe right why not start a twitter account where your devotees can praise your genius while you play with your teddy bear

    You would not have believed that twitter was possible either.

    I guess the US Mail delivery and classified ads in newspapers was all
    anyone needed.

    --

    If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end with doubts,
    but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties. Francis Bacon

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Larkin@21:1/5 to All on Tue May 3 09:58:53 2022
    On Mon, 2 May 2022 23:53:05 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Monday, May 2, 2022 at 4:51:49 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:
    On Mon, 2 May 2022 15:50:41 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whi...@gmail.com>
    wrote:
    On Monday, May 2, 2022 at 12:49:46 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:

    We have compatible, competitive TV and cell phone and internet
    networks. It's not hard.

    TV satellite, TV cable, and TV broadcast are NOT compatible.
    My TV works with all of them. I can switch any time.

    Yeah, but the TV isn't cable-ready, nor satellite-ready, you need a leased >or purchased translation box. You cannot switch without a
    proprietary box and some license restrictions.

    Neither is Blu-Ray and DVD completely compatible with region
    and hardware-license restrictions. Cell phones interconnect,
    but the networks aren't 'compatible' hardwares.

    I can switch cell providers and my Samsung and my wife's iPhone will
    keep working. Over the air and wi-fi.

    It was hard (took legislation) to get phones unlocked, but your phones are still unlikely to
    support using two SIMs at the same time. Unless software-SIM gets a boost, >it'll never go to three or more. Buying into ONE at a time, that's supported.

    As for internet, YES, that's a compatibility layer for networks. It isn't >> >generally the one phones, utility meters, and TV broadcast use, though.

    I project that one day not too far off we'll have one wireless network
    for everything. It makes too much sense to not do.

    If it makes sense, someone will claim they have it. And that someone is
    a salesman you might not want to do business with.

    I think things are possible. Some people insist that things are
    impossible. It's more likely that I'm right.

    --

    If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end with doubts,
    but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties. Francis Bacon

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Dimiter_Popoff@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Tue May 3 21:14:31 2022
    On 5/3/2022 19:58, John Larkin wrote:
    On Mon, 2 May 2022 23:53:05 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Monday, May 2, 2022 at 4:51:49 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:
    On Mon, 2 May 2022 15:50:41 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whi...@gmail.com>
    wrote:
    On Monday, May 2, 2022 at 12:49:46 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:

    We have compatible, competitive TV and cell phone and internet
    networks. It's not hard.

    TV satellite, TV cable, and TV broadcast are NOT compatible.
    My TV works with all of them. I can switch any time.

    Yeah, but the TV isn't cable-ready, nor satellite-ready, you need a leased >> or purchased translation box. You cannot switch without a
    proprietary box and some license restrictions.

    Neither is Blu-Ray and DVD completely compatible with region
    and hardware-license restrictions. Cell phones interconnect,
    but the networks aren't 'compatible' hardwares.

    I can switch cell providers and my Samsung and my wife's iPhone will
    keep working. Over the air and wi-fi.

    It was hard (took legislation) to get phones unlocked, but your phones are still unlikely to
    support using two SIMs at the same time. Unless software-SIM gets a boost, >> it'll never go to three or more. Buying into ONE at a time, that's supported.

    As for internet, YES, that's a compatibility layer for networks. It isn't >>>> generally the one phones, utility meters, and TV broadcast use, though.

    I project that one day not too far off we'll have one wireless network
    for everything. It makes too much sense to not do.

    If it makes sense, someone will claim they have it. And that someone is
    a salesman you might not want to do business with.

    I think things are possible. Some people insist that things are
    impossible. It's more likely that I'm right.


    I don't think humans have the capacity to imagine the impossible.
    What we deem impossible is just what we are unable to do at the current
    stage of our knowledge. There probably is a limit to how far our
    knowledge can go so there will always be impossible things - for us...
    :)

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Larkin@21:1/5 to All on Tue May 3 11:41:59 2022
    On Tue, 3 May 2022 21:14:31 +0300, Dimiter_Popoff <dp@tgi-sci.com>
    wrote:

    On 5/3/2022 19:58, John Larkin wrote:
    On Mon, 2 May 2022 23:53:05 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Monday, May 2, 2022 at 4:51:49 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:
    On Mon, 2 May 2022 15:50:41 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whi...@gmail.com>
    wrote:
    On Monday, May 2, 2022 at 12:49:46 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:

    We have compatible, competitive TV and cell phone and internet
    networks. It's not hard.

    TV satellite, TV cable, and TV broadcast are NOT compatible.
    My TV works with all of them. I can switch any time.

    Yeah, but the TV isn't cable-ready, nor satellite-ready, you need a leased >>> or purchased translation box. You cannot switch without a
    proprietary box and some license restrictions.

    Neither is Blu-Ray and DVD completely compatible with region
    and hardware-license restrictions. Cell phones interconnect,
    but the networks aren't 'compatible' hardwares.

    I can switch cell providers and my Samsung and my wife's iPhone will
    keep working. Over the air and wi-fi.

    It was hard (took legislation) to get phones unlocked, but your phones are still unlikely to
    support using two SIMs at the same time. Unless software-SIM gets a boost, >>> it'll never go to three or more. Buying into ONE at a time, that's supported.

    As for internet, YES, that's a compatibility layer for networks. It isn't >>>>> generally the one phones, utility meters, and TV broadcast use, though. >>>
    I project that one day not too far off we'll have one wireless network >>>> for everything. It makes too much sense to not do.

    If it makes sense, someone will claim they have it. And that someone is >>> a salesman you might not want to do business with.

    I think things are possible. Some people insist that things are
    impossible. It's more likely that I'm right.


    I don't think humans have the capacity to imagine the impossible.

    But that's a basic part of electronic design, imagining things that
    haven't been done, or can't be done.



    Why, sometimes I've believed as many as six impossible things before
    breakfast.

    - The Red Queen


    --

    If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end with doubts,
    but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties. Francis Bacon

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Phil Hobbs@21:1/5 to All on Tue May 3 15:49:00 2022
    Dimiter_Popoff wrote:
    On 5/3/2022 19:58, John Larkin wrote:
    On Mon, 2 May 2022 23:53:05 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Monday, May 2, 2022 at 4:51:49 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:
    On Mon, 2 May 2022 15:50:41 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whi...@gmail.com>
    wrote:
    On Monday, May 2, 2022 at 12:49:46 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:

    We have compatible, competitive TV and cell phone and internet
    networks. It's not hard.

    TV satellite, TV cable, and TV broadcast are NOT compatible.
    My TV works with all of them. I can switch any time.

    Yeah, but the TV  isn't cable-ready, nor satellite-ready, you need a
    leased
    or purchased translation box.  You cannot switch without a
    proprietary box and some license restrictions.

    Neither is Blu-Ray and DVD completely compatible with region
    and hardware-license restrictions. Cell phones interconnect,
    but the networks aren't 'compatible' hardwares.

    I can switch cell providers and my Samsung and my wife's iPhone will
    keep working. Over the air and wi-fi.

    It was  hard (took legislation) to get phones unlocked, but your
    phones are still unlikely to
    support using two SIMs at the same time.  Unless software-SIM gets a
    boost,
    it'll never go to three or more.  Buying into ONE at a time, that's
    supported.

    As for internet, YES, that's a compatibility layer for networks. It
    isn't
    generally the one phones, utility meters, and TV broadcast use,
    though.

    I project that one day not too far off we'll have one wireless network >>>> for everything. It makes too much sense to not do.

    If it makes sense, someone will claim they have it.   And that
    someone is
    a salesman you might not want to do business with.

    I think things are possible. Some people insist that things are
    impossible. It's more likely that I'm right.


    I don't think humans have the capacity to imagine the impossible.

    You can't imagine a perpetual motion machine, or a lens that forms an
    image hotter than the (thermal) source?


    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs

    --
    Dr Philip C D Hobbs
    Principal Consultant
    ElectroOptical Innovations LLC / Hobbs ElectroOptics
    Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics
    Briarcliff Manor NY 10510

    http://electrooptical.net
    http://hobbs-eo.com

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Dimiter_Popoff@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Wed May 4 00:46:59 2022
    On 5/3/2022 21:41, John Larkin wrote:
    On Tue, 3 May 2022 21:14:31 +0300, Dimiter_Popoff <dp@tgi-sci.com>
    wrote:

    On 5/3/2022 19:58, John Larkin wrote:
    On Mon, 2 May 2022 23:53:05 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Monday, May 2, 2022 at 4:51:49 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:
    On Mon, 2 May 2022 15:50:41 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whi...@gmail.com>
    wrote:
    On Monday, May 2, 2022 at 12:49:46 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:

    We have compatible, competitive TV and cell phone and internet
    networks. It's not hard.

    TV satellite, TV cable, and TV broadcast are NOT compatible.
    My TV works with all of them. I can switch any time.

    Yeah, but the TV isn't cable-ready, nor satellite-ready, you need a leased
    or purchased translation box. You cannot switch without a
    proprietary box and some license restrictions.

    Neither is Blu-Ray and DVD completely compatible with region
    and hardware-license restrictions. Cell phones interconnect,
    but the networks aren't 'compatible' hardwares.

    I can switch cell providers and my Samsung and my wife's iPhone will >>>>> keep working. Over the air and wi-fi.

    It was hard (took legislation) to get phones unlocked, but your phones are still unlikely to
    support using two SIMs at the same time. Unless software-SIM gets a boost,
    it'll never go to three or more. Buying into ONE at a time, that's supported.

    As for internet, YES, that's a compatibility layer for networks. It isn't
    generally the one phones, utility meters, and TV broadcast use, though. >>>>
    I project that one day not too far off we'll have one wireless network >>>>> for everything. It makes too much sense to not do.

    If it makes sense, someone will claim they have it. And that someone is >>>> a salesman you might not want to do business with.

    I think things are possible. Some people insist that things are
    impossible. It's more likely that I'm right.


    I don't think humans have the capacity to imagine the impossible.

    But that's a basic part of electronic design, imagining things that
    haven't been done, or can't be done.

    If you can imagine it it is possible, this is my point.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Dimiter_Popoff@21:1/5 to Phil Hobbs on Wed May 4 00:48:59 2022
    On 5/3/2022 22:49, Phil Hobbs wrote:
    Dimiter_Popoff wrote:
    On 5/3/2022 19:58, John Larkin wrote:
    On Mon, 2 May 2022 23:53:05 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Monday, May 2, 2022 at 4:51:49 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:
    On Mon, 2 May 2022 15:50:41 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whi...@gmail.com>
    wrote:
    On Monday, May 2, 2022 at 12:49:46 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:

    We have compatible, competitive TV and cell phone and internet
    networks. It's not hard.

    TV satellite, TV cable, and TV broadcast are NOT compatible.
    My TV works with all of them. I can switch any time.

    Yeah, but the TV  isn't cable-ready, nor satellite-ready, you need a
    leased
    or purchased translation box.  You cannot switch without a
    proprietary box and some license restrictions.

    Neither is Blu-Ray and DVD completely compatible with region
    and hardware-license restrictions. Cell phones interconnect,
    but the networks aren't 'compatible' hardwares.

    I can switch cell providers and my Samsung and my wife's iPhone will >>>>> keep working. Over the air and wi-fi.

    It was  hard (took legislation) to get phones unlocked, but your
    phones are still unlikely to
    support using two SIMs at the same time.  Unless software-SIM gets a
    boost,
    it'll never go to three or more.  Buying into ONE at a time, that's
    supported.

    As for internet, YES, that's a compatibility layer for networks.
    It isn't
    generally the one phones, utility meters, and TV broadcast use,
    though.

    I project that one day not too far off we'll have one wireless network >>>>> for everything. It makes too much sense to not do.

    If it makes sense, someone will claim they have it.   And that
    someone is
    a salesman you might not want to do business with.

    I think things are possible. Some people insist that things are
    impossible. It's more likely that I'm right.


    I don't think humans have the capacity to imagine the impossible.

    You can't imagine a perpetual motion machine, or a lens that forms an
    image hotter than the (thermal) source?


    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs


    These are impossible only in our realm. The point is, if we can think
    of something it is doable, not necessarily by us or in our reality :).

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Larkin@21:1/5 to pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com on Tue May 3 17:06:26 2022
    On Tue, 03 May 2022 16:27:29 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote:

    On a sunny day (Tue, 03 May 2022 07:16:15 -0700) it happened >jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote in ><mrd27h99ochpb3ougpkko45esjg17f38bi@4ax.com>:

    On Tue, 03 May 2022 05:40:41 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote:

    On a sunny day (Mon, 02 May 2022 16:51:38 -0700) it happened John Larkin >>><jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote in >>><7cr07hp81i2qmgeoef7sj9od6p5ho7fdll@4ax.com>:

    On Mon, 2 May 2022 15:50:41 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com> >>>>wrote:

    On Monday, May 2, 2022 at 12:49:46 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:

    We have compatible, competitive TV and cell phone and internet
    networks. It's not hard.

    TV satellite, TV cable, and TV broadcast are NOT compatible.

    My TV works with all of them. I can switch any time.

    Neither is Blu-Ray and DVD completely compatible with region
    and hardware-license restrictions. Cell phones interconnect,
    but the networks aren't 'compatible' hardwares.

    I can switch cell providers and my Samsung and my wife's iPhone will >>>>keep working. Over the air and wi-fi.

    As for internet, YES, that's a compatibility layer for networks. It isn't
    generally the one phones, utility meters, and TV broadcast use, though. >>>>
    I project that one day not too far off we'll have one wireless network >>>>for everything. It makes too much sense to not do.

    Make no sense whatsoever.
    First there is diversity for security
    if your one for all thing is down, nothing works.

    A microcell mesh can have redundancy at all levels. It would be better
    than a mess of various services.


    Then there are radio frequencies like used by aircraft, ships,
    and other services that have totally different requirements.

    The RF spectrum is chopped up amongst many services. A common band
    would be much more efficient.


    Use the best system for the required purpose and frequency.
    Make sure there is redundancy.
    You are just dreaming. Mindless babble, no in depth knowledge, no experience.

    Why do so many people refuse to imagine progress? 100 years ago you
    would have refused to believe that there could ever be TVs or
    computers.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/6G_(network)

    Strawman
    Look dude, if you just wannabe right why not start a twitter account where your devotees can praise your genius while you play with your teddy bear

    It's coming a bit sooner than I expected:

    https://techxplore.com/news/2022-05-wi-fi-lamppost.html

    60 GHz Wifi everywhere.

    --

    If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end with doubts,
    but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties. Francis Bacon

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From whit3rd@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Tue May 3 17:40:38 2022
    On Tuesday, May 3, 2022 at 9:59:06 AM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:
    On Mon, 2 May 2022 23:53:05 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whi...@gmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Monday, May 2, 2022 at 4:51:49 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:

    I project that one day not too far off we'll have one wireless network
    for everything. It makes too much sense to not do.

    If it makes sense, someone will claim they have it. And that someone is
    a salesman you might not want to do business with.

    I think things are possible. Some people insist that things are
    impossible. It's more likely that I'm right.

    Aha! You said 'likely'; that's not a good sign, when John Larkin gets statistical. As for me, I'm not eager to let the world have access to
    my alarm clock's controls. Short-range access is my best plan.

    Global unlimited connection may be possible, but is unworthy of support.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Larkin@21:1/5 to All on Tue May 3 17:56:34 2022
    On Tue, 3 May 2022 17:40:38 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Tuesday, May 3, 2022 at 9:59:06 AM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:
    On Mon, 2 May 2022 23:53:05 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whi...@gmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Monday, May 2, 2022 at 4:51:49 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:

    I project that one day not too far off we'll have one wireless network
    for everything. It makes too much sense to not do.

    If it makes sense, someone will claim they have it. And that someone is
    a salesman you might not want to do business with.

    I think things are possible. Some people insist that things are
    impossible. It's more likely that I'm right.

    Aha! You said 'likely'; that's not a good sign, when John Larkin gets >statistical. As for me, I'm not eager to let the world have access to
    my alarm clock's controls. Short-range access is my best plan.

    Global unlimited connection may be possible, but is unworthy of support.

    More likely every day.

    https://techxplore.com/news/2022-05-wi-fi-lamppost.html

    --

    If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end with doubts,
    but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties. Francis Bacon

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Phil Hobbs@21:1/5 to All on Tue May 3 22:10:46 2022
    Dimiter_Popoff wrote:
    On 5/3/2022 22:49, Phil Hobbs wrote:
    Dimiter_Popoff wrote:
    On 5/3/2022 19:58, John Larkin wrote:
    On Mon, 2 May 2022 23:53:05 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd
    <whit3rd@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Monday, May 2, 2022 at 4:51:49 PM UTC-7, John Larkin
    wrote:
    On Mon, 2 May 2022 15:50:41 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd
    <whi...@gmail.com> wrote:
    On Monday, May 2, 2022 at 12:49:46 PM UTC-7, John Larkin
    wrote:

    We have compatible, competitive TV and cell phone and
    internet networks. It's not hard.

    TV satellite, TV cable, and TV broadcast are NOT
    compatible.
    My TV works with all of them. I can switch any time.

    Yeah, but the TV isn't cable-ready, nor satellite-ready, you
    need a leased or purchased translation box. You cannot
    switch without a proprietary box and some license
    restrictions.

    Neither is Blu-Ray and DVD completely compatible with
    region and hardware-license restrictions. Cell phones
    interconnect, but the networks aren't 'compatible'
    hardwares.

    I can switch cell providers and my Samsung and my wife's
    iPhone will keep working. Over the air and wi-fi.

    It was hard (took legislation) to get phones unlocked, but
    your phones are still unlikely to support using two SIMs at
    the same time. Unless software-SIM gets a boost, it'll never
    go to three or more. Buying into ONE at a time, that's
    supported.

    As for internet, YES, that's a compatibility layer for
    networks. It isn't generally the one phones, utility
    meters, and TV broadcast use, though.

    I project that one day not too far off we'll have one
    wireless network for everything. It makes too much sense to
    not do.

    If it makes sense, someone will claim they have it. And
    that someone is a salesman you might not want to do business
    with.

    I think things are possible. Some people insist that things
    are impossible. It's more likely that I'm right.


    I don't think humans have the capacity to imagine the
    impossible.

    You can't imagine a perpetual motion machine, or a lens that forms
    an image hotter than the (thermal) source?


    These are impossible only in our realm.

    I.e. in the real world.

    The point is, if we can think of something it is doable, not
    necessarily by us or in our reality :).

    Ah. Thanks, that explains a lot about your pragmatic outlook. ;)

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From rbowman@21:1/5 to jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com on Tue May 3 20:16:26 2022
    On 05/03/2022 08:16 AM, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    Why do so many people refuse to imagine progress? 100 years ago you
    would have refused to believe that there could ever be TVs or
    computers.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YxDTeoeWZeI

    Where the hell is my flying car? My baseline is the 1964 World's Fair. I
    was in high school so maybe I was young and naive but there was a
    feeling in the air of optimism. There have been plenty of technological advances but that optimism didn't even make it through the '60s.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Anthony William Sloman@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Tue May 3 19:43:33 2022
    On Wednesday, May 4, 2022 at 4:42:12 AM UTC+10, John Larkin wrote:
    On Tue, 3 May 2022 21:14:31 +0300, Dimiter_Popoff <d...@tgi-sci.com>
    wrote:
    On 5/3/2022 19:58, John Larkin wrote:
    On Mon, 2 May 2022 23:53:05 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whi...@gmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Monday, May 2, 2022 at 4:51:49 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:
    On Mon, 2 May 2022 15:50:41 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whi...@gmail.com>
    wrote:
    On Monday, May 2, 2022 at 12:49:46 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:

    We have compatible, competitive TV and cell phone and internet
    networks. It's not hard.

    TV satellite, TV cable, and TV broadcast are NOT compatible.
    My TV works with all of them. I can switch any time.

    Yeah, but the TV isn't cable-ready, nor satellite-ready, you need a leased
    or purchased translation box. You cannot switch without a
    proprietary box and some license restrictions.

    Neither is Blu-Ray and DVD completely compatible with region
    and hardware-license restrictions. Cell phones interconnect,
    but the networks aren't 'compatible' hardwares.

    I can switch cell providers and my Samsung and my wife's iPhone will >>>> keep working. Over the air and wi-fi.

    It was hard (took legislation) to get phones unlocked, but your phones are still unlikely to
    support using two SIMs at the same time. Unless software-SIM gets a boost,
    it'll never go to three or more. Buying into ONE at a time, that's supported.

    As for internet, YES, that's a compatibility layer for networks. It isn't
    generally the one phones, utility meters, and TV broadcast use, though. >>>
    I project that one day not too far off we'll have one wireless network >>>> for everything. It makes too much sense to not do.

    If it makes sense, someone will claim they have it. And that someone is >>> a salesman you might not want to do business with.

    I think things are possible. Some people insist that things are
    impossible. It's more likely that I'm right.

    John Larkin has an exaggerated idea of his own expertise. So do a lot of the people who insist that stuff is impossible.

    I don't think humans have the capacity to imagine the impossible.

    But that's a basic part of electronic design, imagining things that haven't been done, or can't be done.

    There's a big gap between imagining things that haven't been done - the unexpected - and imagining things that can't be done - the impossible.

    The first gets you patents - and I've got a couple (while John Larkin has his name on one) and the other is a great way of getting stuck with a project that can't be made to work. I had to work quite hard to get myself out of one of them

    Why, sometimes I've believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast.

    - The Red Queen

    It's probably not a particularly useful mental exercise.

    --
    Bill Sloman, Sydney

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From whit3rd@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Tue May 3 20:51:56 2022
    On Tuesday, May 3, 2022 at 11:42:12 AM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:
    On Tue, 3 May 2022 21:14:31 +0300, Dimiter_Popoff <d...@tgi-sci.com>
    wrote:

    I don't think humans have the capacity to imagine the impossible.

    But that's a basic part of electronic design, imagining things that
    haven't been done, or can't be done.

    But neither of those categories is 'impossible'.

    There's many uses of imagination, but fewer for imagining impossibilities.
    The most important, the reductio ad absurdam proof, is ... not so
    important that most people would recognize the phrase.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com@21:1/5 to All on Wed May 4 06:14:59 2022
    On Tue, 3 May 2022 20:51:56 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Tuesday, May 3, 2022 at 11:42:12 AM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:
    On Tue, 3 May 2022 21:14:31 +0300, Dimiter_Popoff <d...@tgi-sci.com>
    wrote:

    I don't think humans have the capacity to imagine the impossible.

    But that's a basic part of electronic design, imagining things that
    haven't been done, or can't be done.

    But neither of those categories is 'impossible'.

    There's many uses of imagination, but fewer for imagining impossibilities. >The most important, the reductio ad absurdam proof, is ... not so
    important that most people would recognize the phrase.

    1. Imagining impossibilities exercizes the imagine muscles.

    2. Sometimes a great idea is out in the solution space hiding among
    impossible ideas. Go poke around out there.

    3. Rejecting new ideas is endemic to humanity, for several reasons.
    Fight that tendency if you want to design cool stuff.

    4. Respect one or two solid conservation principles, but otherwise
    mock "good engineering practice."

    5. Doodle a lot. Paper is cheap.





    --

    Anybody can count to one.

    - Robert Widlar

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Anthony William Sloman@21:1/5 to jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com on Wed May 4 07:50:13 2022
    On Wednesday, May 4, 2022 at 11:15:14 PM UTC+10, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Tue, 3 May 2022 20:51:56 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whi...@gmail.com>
    wrote:
    On Tuesday, May 3, 2022 at 11:42:12 AM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:
    On Tue, 3 May 2022 21:14:31 +0300, Dimiter_Popoff <d...@tgi-sci.com>
    wrote:

    I don't think humans have the capacity to imagine the impossible.

    But that's a basic part of electronic design, imagining things that
    haven't been done, or can't be done.

    But neither of those categories is 'impossible'.

    There's many uses of imagination, but fewer for imagining impossibilities. >The most important, the reductio ad absurdam proof, is ... not so >important that most people would recognize the phrase.

    1. Imagining impossibilities exercizes the imagine muscles.

    There aren't any. Absurd analogies aren't in the least useful.

    2. Sometimes a great idea is out in the solution space hiding among impossible ideas. Go poke around out there.

    Don't be silly.

    3. Rejecting new ideas is endemic to humanity, for several reasons.
    Fight that tendency if you want to design cool stuff.

    "Not invented here" isn't a good attitude. Objecting to other people's new ideas, even if the other people are part of the same organsiation, does happen quite a lot too. Quite a few people do think that their own ideas are insanely good, and reject
    anything that anybody else comes up with because it competes with their brain children.

    Quite a few people have quite a few new ideas, none of which are ever any good. When I worked at EMI Central research, one of our colleagues made more patent applications per year than anybody else. None of them seemed to turn into patents. When I was
    working there I had what struck me as fairly obvious idea. After a number of people had told me that it couldn't possibly be right, and I'd repeatedly had to go to the trouble of explaining why it couldn't possibly be wrong, we turned it into a patent
    application (and - in due course - a patent). There were a couple of others, but we got to them rather more conventionally.

    Making a fuss about whether an idea is "new" isn't a useful way of spending your time. Worrying whether it will work is much more useful.

    4. Respect one or two solid conservation principles, but otherwise mock "good engineering practice."

    Not a good idea. Do try to understand why people did things that way in the past, but keep in mind that new approaches don't have to work the same way as the old one did.

    5. Doodle a lot. Paper is cheap.

    Calculate a lot. Computer time is pretty cheap too, and you can be a bit more rigorous with computer models than you can with pencil scribbles.

    --
    Bill Sloman, Sydney

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Larkin@21:1/5 to rbowman on Wed May 4 11:09:52 2022
    On Tue, 3 May 2022 20:16:26 -0600, rbowman <bowman@montana.com> wrote:

    On 05/03/2022 08:16 AM, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    Why do so many people refuse to imagine progress? 100 years ago you
    would have refused to believe that there could ever be TVs or
    computers.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YxDTeoeWZeI

    Where the hell is my flying car? My baseline is the 1964 World's Fair. I
    was in high school so maybe I was young and naive but there was a
    feeling in the air of optimism. There have been plenty of technological >advances but that optimism didn't even make it through the '60s.

    I was at the '64 fair!

    We got PCs, internet, drones, cell phones, LCD and Oled color TVs,
    fiberoptics, nanometer ICs, medical advances, SUVs, social media, all
    sorts of great-ish stuff.

    What the great things have in common is that they were *not*
    anticipated at the World's Fair. Futurism ain't what it used to be.

    I'm still optimistic. There is plenty of stuff left to invent.

    --

    If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end with doubts,
    but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties. Francis Bacon

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Lasse Langwadt Christensen@21:1/5 to All on Wed May 4 11:17:44 2022
    onsdag den 4. maj 2022 kl. 20.10.05 UTC+2 skrev John Larkin:
    On Tue, 3 May 2022 20:16:26 -0600, rbowman <bow...@montana.com> wrote:

    On 05/03/2022 08:16 AM, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    Why do so many people refuse to imagine progress? 100 years ago you
    would have refused to believe that there could ever be TVs or
    computers.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YxDTeoeWZeI

    Where the hell is my flying car? My baseline is the 1964 World's Fair. I >was in high school so maybe I was young and naive but there was a
    feeling in the air of optimism. There have been plenty of technological >advances but that optimism didn't even make it through the '60s.
    I was at the '64 fair!

    We got PCs, internet, drones, cell phones, LCD and Oled color TVs, fiberoptics, nanometer ICs, medical advances, SUVs, social media, all
    sorts of great-ish stuff.

    What the great things have in common is that they were *not*
    anticipated at the World's Fair. Futurism ain't what it used to be.

    I'm still optimistic. There is plenty of stuff left to invent.

    https://medium.com/swlh/everything-that-can-be-invented-has-been-invented-49c4376f548b

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From whit3rd@21:1/5 to jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com on Wed May 4 11:16:52 2022
    On Wednesday, May 4, 2022 at 6:15:14 AM UTC-7, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:

    3. Rejecting new ideas is endemic to humanity, for several reasons.
    Fight that tendency if you want to design cool stuff.

    Nonsense. One cannot appreciate a good idea without discerning the
    faults of a bad idea. The word 'idea' covers all the contents of a conscious mind, no one rejects 'new ideas' who IS connected to reality.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Larkin@21:1/5 to All on Wed May 4 12:43:00 2022
    On Wed, 4 May 2022 11:16:52 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Wednesday, May 4, 2022 at 6:15:14 AM UTC-7, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:

    3. Rejecting new ideas is endemic to humanity, for several reasons.
    Fight that tendency if you want to design cool stuff.

    Nonsense.

    You reject my idea! Obviously for one of the "several reasons."

    Thanks for making my point.

    --

    If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end with doubts,
    but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties. Francis Bacon

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From rbowman@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Wed May 4 21:25:21 2022
    On 05/04/2022 12:09 PM, John Larkin wrote:
    On Tue, 3 May 2022 20:16:26 -0600, rbowman <bowman@montana.com> wrote:

    On 05/03/2022 08:16 AM, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    Why do so many people refuse to imagine progress? 100 years ago you
    would have refused to believe that there could ever be TVs or
    computers.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YxDTeoeWZeI

    Where the hell is my flying car? My baseline is the 1964 World's Fair. I
    was in high school so maybe I was young and naive but there was a
    feeling in the air of optimism. There have been plenty of technological
    advances but that optimism didn't even make it through the '60s.

    I was at the '64 fair!

    We got PCs, internet, drones, cell phones, LCD and Oled color TVs, fiberoptics, nanometer ICs, medical advances, SUVs, social media, all
    sorts of great-ish stuff.

    What the great things have in common is that they were *not*
    anticipated at the World's Fair. Futurism ain't what it used to be.

    I'm still optimistic. There is plenty of stuff left to invent.


    Oddly one thing I have always remembered was a hands on exhibit in Ma
    Bell's pavilion. There were timers connected to a rotary dial and to the
    new touch tone keypad so you could see how much faster the future was
    going to be. Ma Bell is long gone but their keypad layout lives on.

    Trivia: JFK kicked the fair countdown off by keying in '1964'. Not quite
    'text 1964 to...'

    I'm optimistic in the technical sense, not so much in the societal
    sense. That seems to be SSDD, to use Stephen King's acronym which has
    nothing to do with solid state drives.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com@21:1/5 to rbowman on Wed May 4 21:41:25 2022
    On Wed, 4 May 2022 21:25:21 -0600, rbowman <bowman@montana.com> wrote:

    On 05/04/2022 12:09 PM, John Larkin wrote:
    On Tue, 3 May 2022 20:16:26 -0600, rbowman <bowman@montana.com> wrote:

    On 05/03/2022 08:16 AM, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    Why do so many people refuse to imagine progress? 100 years ago you
    would have refused to believe that there could ever be TVs or
    computers.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YxDTeoeWZeI

    Where the hell is my flying car? My baseline is the 1964 World's Fair. I >>> was in high school so maybe I was young and naive but there was a
    feeling in the air of optimism. There have been plenty of technological
    advances but that optimism didn't even make it through the '60s.

    I was at the '64 fair!

    We got PCs, internet, drones, cell phones, LCD and Oled color TVs,
    fiberoptics, nanometer ICs, medical advances, SUVs, social media, all
    sorts of great-ish stuff.

    What the great things have in common is that they were *not*
    anticipated at the World's Fair. Futurism ain't what it used to be.

    I'm still optimistic. There is plenty of stuff left to invent.


    Oddly one thing I have always remembered was a hands on exhibit in Ma
    Bell's pavilion. There were timers connected to a rotary dial and to the
    new touch tone keypad so you could see how much faster the future was
    going to be. Ma Bell is long gone but their keypad layout lives on.

    Trivia: JFK kicked the fair countdown off by keying in '1964'. Not quite >'text 1964 to...'

    I'm optimistic in the technical sense, not so much in the societal
    sense. That seems to be SSDD, to use Stephen King's acronym which has >nothing to do with solid state drives.

    I think there was a Bell demo of using light for communications,
    specifically shooting light through a long pipe that used thermal
    gradients to keep it confined. This sort of anticipated fiberoptics.

    There was a cool monorail sort of ride.



    --

    Anybody can count to one.

    - Robert Widlar

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Anthony William Sloman@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Wed May 4 21:56:32 2022
    On Thursday, May 5, 2022 at 4:10:05 AM UTC+10, John Larkin wrote:
    On Tue, 3 May 2022 20:16:26 -0600, rbowman <bow...@montana.com> wrote:

    On 05/03/2022 08:16 AM, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    Why do so many people refuse to imagine progress? 100 years ago you
    would have refused to believe that there could ever be TVs or
    computers.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YxDTeoeWZeI

    Where the hell is my flying car? My baseline is the 1964 World's Fair. I >was in high school so maybe I was young and naive but there was a
    feeling in the air of optimism. There have been plenty of technological >advances but that optimism didn't even make it through the '60s.
    I was at the '64 fair!

    We got PCs, internet, drones, cell phones, LCD and Oled color TVs, fiberoptics, nanometer ICs, medical advances, SUVs, social media, all
    sorts of great-ish stuff.

    What the great things have in common is that they were *not*
    anticipated at the World's Fair. Futurism ain't what it used to be.

    It never was. Read old science fiction to find out how bad it was back then.

    I'm still optimistic. There is plenty of stuff left to invent.

    If you are as under-informed as John Larkin is , you can be a lot more optimistic. The woods are full of people reinventing the wheel and concocting media releases about how it is going to revolutionise the world after they get around to inventing spokes
    and axles.

    --
    Bill Sloman, Sydney

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From rbowman@21:1/5 to jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com on Thu May 5 08:23:32 2022
    On 05/04/2022 10:41 PM, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    I think there was a Bell demo of using light for communications,
    specifically shooting light through a long pipe that used thermal
    gradients to keep it confined. This sort of anticipated fiberoptics.


    The concept had been around for a long time.

    https://www.olympus-global.com/technology/museum/endo/?page=technology_museum

    Glass tubes were also used to illuminate tight spots. Developing the
    technology to create bundles of very thin fibers was the trick.

    A lot of ideas are like that. The concept of an airplane had to wait for relatively lightweight IC engines to happen.

    There was a cool monorail sort of ride.

    Now for cool monorails -- in the early 1900's some people were working
    on a monorail with gyroscopic stabilization. The big problem was each
    car would need a gyroscope.

    The idea never took off in the US. Other countries have impressive
    systems including maglev designed. Most US monorails are basically
    tourist attractions like Seattle, the Disney parks, Jacksonville, and
    Las Vegas. Detroit's is much more expensive per passenger mile than buses.

    I don't think the people mover at the Detroit airport qualifies as a
    monorail. It's never been operating when I was there unfortunately.
    Invariably my connections are between the two furthest apart gates.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Phil Hobbs@21:1/5 to rbowman on Thu May 5 14:17:34 2022
    rbowman wrote:
    On 05/04/2022 10:41 PM, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    I think there was a Bell demo of using light for communications,
    specifically shooting light through a long pipe that used thermal
    gradients to keep it confined. This sort of anticipated fiberoptics.


    The concept had been around for a long time.

    https://www.olympus-global.com/technology/museum/endo/?page=technology_museum


    Glass tubes were also used to illuminate tight spots. Developing the technology to create bundles of very thin fibers was the trick.

    A lot of ideas are like that. The concept of an airplane had to wait for relatively lightweight IC engines to happen.

    There was a cool monorail sort of ride.

    Now for cool monorails -- in the early 1900's some people were working
    on a monorail with gyroscopic stabilization. The big problem was each
    car would need a gyroscope.

    The idea never took off in the US. Other countries have impressive
    systems including maglev designed. Most US monorails are basically
    tourist attractions like Seattle, the Disney parks, Jacksonville, and
    Las Vegas. Detroit's is much more expensive per passenger mile than buses.

    I don't think the people mover at the Detroit airport qualifies as a monorail. It's never been operating when I was there unfortunately. Invariably my connections are between the two furthest apart gates.




    I have no idea why anybody would use a monorail for anything real.
    They're fun toys, but just toys.

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs

    --
    Dr Philip C D Hobbs
    Principal Consultant
    ElectroOptical Innovations LLC / Hobbs ElectroOptics
    Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics
    Briarcliff Manor NY 10510

    http://electrooptical.net
    http://hobbs-eo.com

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Tabby@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Sun May 8 13:50:50 2022
    On Thursday, 28 April 2022 at 20:16:32 UTC+1, John Larkin wrote:
    On Thu, 28 Apr 2022 02:00:41 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whi...@gmail.com>
    wrote:
    On Wednesday, April 27, 2022 at 12:56:42 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:

    I want everything on one wireless network. Internet, phones, TV, wifi,
    home automation, cars, utility meters, security, webcams, everything.

    Privacy is over-rated.

    That's a laugh; Internet range is out to near Earth orbit, and you want your >utility meters to compete for that against your TV remote control? One network
    isn't the answer, any more than one TV channel is the answer.
    What we have is a mess. Many cell companies have various spotty
    coverage. Ditto cable TV and internet providers. Once people manage to
    get an internet provider, they have to install their own cables and
    wifi. Wires are strung on poles, sidewalks are dug up, dishes point everywhere and rust or get blown away. People pay for multiple
    services.

    One uniform microcell mesh system would eliminate all that.

    Imagine progress.

    History consistently teaches us that one system means lack of competition or investment equals worse service.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Tabby@21:1/5 to Dimiter Popoff on Sun May 8 13:52:45 2022
    On Thursday, 28 April 2022 at 20:43:44 UTC+1, Dimiter Popoff wrote:
    On 4/28/2022 22:16, John Larkin wrote:
    On Thu, 28 Apr 2022 02:00:41 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whi...@gmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Wednesday, April 27, 2022 at 12:56:42 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:

    I want everything on one wireless network. Internet, phones, TV, wifi, >>> home automation, cars, utility meters, security, webcams, everything.

    Privacy is over-rated.

    That's a laugh; Internet range is out to near Earth orbit, and you want your
    utility meters to compete for that against your TV remote control? One network
    isn't the answer, any more than one TV channel is the answer.

    What we have is a mess. Many cell companies have various spotty
    coverage. Ditto cable TV and internet providers. Once people manage to
    get an internet provider, they have to install their own cables and
    wifi. Wires are strung on poles, sidewalks are dug up, dishes point everywhere and rust or get blown away. People pay for multiple
    services.

    One uniform microcell mesh system would eliminate all that.

    Imagine progress.

    It would be nice for things to evolve this way but - and it is a huge
    BUT - the standards need to be public. They are anything but at the
    moment - the layers above IP and perhaps PPP are completely secret.

    Privacy is overrated, as you say

    Privacy is what stops governments harrassing us with endless false accusations

    - I'd go a step further and say
    privacy will disappear completely before we know, however it has to
    disappear for *everyone*, *zero* exceptions.

    It's already mostly gone.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Tabby@21:1/5 to jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com on Sun May 8 13:47:48 2022
    On Thursday, 28 April 2022 at 17:33:59 UTC+1, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Wed, 27 Apr 2022 22:18:20 -0700 (PDT), Tabby <tabb...@gmail.com>
    wrote:
    On Wednesday, 27 April 2022 at 21:52:04 UTC+1, John Larkin wrote:

    I want everything on one wireless network. Internet, phones, TV, wifi, >> >> home automation, cars, utility meters, security, webcams, everything. >> >>
    Privacy is over-rated.

    Until your social credit score gets too low and they punt you from
    everything at once.

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs
    But they can't punt everyone. In the USA at least, people would still
    pay someone for the service and for bandwidth (I guess) so nobody
    would be in charge and someone loses revenue if they lose a customer.

    Capitalism will find a way.

    Dictatorship outranks capitalism.
    Dictators, like Stalin, Mao, Hitler, Putin, think they understand
    everything and then want to control everything. They kill hundreds of millions.

    "Capitalism" really means pluralism, letting lots of sane and crazy
    people try things to see what actually works.

    Despite believing their own folly, dictators still outrank capitalism. Hence dictatorships are poorer.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Tabby@21:1/5 to rbowman on Sun May 8 14:24:05 2022
    On Thursday, 5 May 2022 at 15:23:37 UTC+1, rbowman wrote:
    On 05/04/2022 10:41 PM, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    I think there was a Bell demo of using light for communications, specifically shooting light through a long pipe that used thermal
    gradients to keep it confined. This sort of anticipated fiberoptics.

    The concept had been around for a long time.

    https://www.olympus-global.com/technology/museum/endo/?page=technology_museum

    Glass tubes were also used to illuminate tight spots. Developing the technology to create bundles of very thin fibers was the trick.

    A lot of ideas are like that. The concept of an airplane had to wait for relatively lightweight IC engines to happen.
    There was a cool monorail sort of ride.
    Now for cool monorails -- in the early 1900's some people were working
    on a monorail with gyroscopic stabilization. The big problem was each
    car would need a gyroscope.

    The idea never took off in the US. Other countries have impressive
    systems including maglev designed. Most US monorails are basically
    tourist attractions like Seattle, the Disney parks, Jacksonville, and
    Las Vegas. Detroit's is much more expensive per passenger mile than buses.

    I don't think the people mover at the Detroit airport qualifies as a monorail. It's never been operating when I was there unfortunately. Invariably my connections are between the two furthest apart gates.

    Monorails have a lot of problems. The need for a gyroscope is not one of them.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From whit3rd@21:1/5 to Phil Hobbs on Sun May 8 16:25:12 2022
    On Thursday, May 5, 2022 at 11:17:45 AM UTC-7, Phil Hobbs wrote:

    I have no idea why anybody would use a monorail for anything real.

    Why? Because the ones you've seen are small? Hero's steam turbine was small, too.

    As a horizontal-elevator system, both tunnels/subways (The Boring Company) and elevated rail seem suitable for transportation in cities. Automobiles and ever-wider highways with long commutes are NOT likely to dominate the future. In a city core already full of streets, an elevated rail, monorail or standard gage,
    doesn't take a lot of demolition footprint to install.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Anthony William Sloman@21:1/5 to All on Sun May 8 17:51:48 2022
    On Monday, May 9, 2022 at 9:25:16 AM UTC+10, whit3rd wrote:
    On Thursday, May 5, 2022 at 11:17:45 AM UTC-7, Phil Hobbs wrote:

    I have no idea why anybody would use a monorail for anything real.
    Why? Because the ones you've seen are small? Hero's steam turbine was small, too.

    As a horizontal-elevator system, both tunnels/subways (The Boring Company) and
    elevated rail seem suitable for transportation in cities. Automobiles and ever-wider highways with long commutes are NOT likely to dominate the future. In a city core already full of streets, an elevated rail, monorail or standard gauge,
    doesn't take a lot of demolition footprint to install.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sydney_Monorail

    It ran from 1988 to 2013, only got about 40% of the customers it had been designed for and never broke even.

    Putting back the original tram lines would have been cheaper and would have served more travellers.

    --
    Bill Sloman, Sydney

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Anthony William Sloman@21:1/5 to Tabby on Sun May 8 17:42:10 2022
    On Monday, May 9, 2022 at 6:50:53 AM UTC+10, Tabby wrote:
    On Thursday, 28 April 2022 at 20:16:32 UTC+1, John Larkin wrote:
    On Thu, 28 Apr 2022 02:00:41 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whi...@gmail.com> wrote:
    On Wednesday, April 27, 2022 at 12:56:42 PM UTC-7, John Larkin wrote:

    I want everything on one wireless network. Internet, phones, TV, wifi, >> home automation, cars, utility meters, security, webcams, everything. >>
    Privacy is over-rated.

    That's a laugh; Internet range is out to near Earth orbit, and you want your
    utility meters to compete for that against your TV remote control? One network
    isn't the answer, any more than one TV channel is the answer.
    What we have is a mess. Many cell companies have various spotty
    coverage. Ditto cable TV and internet providers. Once people manage to
    get an internet provider, they have to install their own cables and
    wifi. Wires are strung on poles, sidewalks are dug up, dishes point everywhere and rust or get blown away. People pay for multiple
    services.

    One uniform microcell mesh system would eliminate all that.

    Imagine progress.

    History consistently teaches us that one system means lack of competition or investment equals worse service.

    Thatcher managed to come up with a counter-example. Her privatised British Rail skimped on maintenance (and killed a few people in consequence) and generally delivered a poorer service. Natural monopolies work better as publicly owned public services, as
    has been known since Victorian times. Thatcherites ignored the history and did a Putin-like job of giving previously publicly-owned assets to their friends for nowhere near enough money.

    --
    Bill Sloman, Sydney

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Phil Hobbs@21:1/5 to All on Sun May 8 22:26:35 2022
    whit3rd wrote:
    On Thursday, May 5, 2022 at 11:17:45 AM UTC-7, Phil Hobbs wrote:

    I have no idea why anybody would use a monorail for anything real.

    Why? Because the ones you've seen are small? Hero's steam turbine was small, too.

    No, because in order to get static stability your one track has to be
    huge and therefore expensive.

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs


    --
    Dr Philip C D Hobbs
    Principal Consultant
    ElectroOptical Innovations LLC / Hobbs ElectroOptics
    Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics
    Briarcliff Manor NY 10510

    http://electrooptical.net
    http://hobbs-eo.com

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From whit3rd@21:1/5 to Phil Hobbs on Sun May 8 20:07:09 2022
    On Sunday, May 8, 2022 at 7:26:44 PM UTC-7, Phil Hobbs wrote:
    whit3rd wrote:
    On Thursday, May 5, 2022 at 11:17:45 AM UTC-7, Phil Hobbs wrote:

    I have no idea why anybody would use a monorail for anything real.

    Why? Because the ones you've seen are small? Hero's steam turbine was small, too.

    No, because in order to get static stability your one track has to be
    huge and therefore expensive.

    Ouniculars f that line of reasoning, we'd see f

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From whit3rd@21:1/5 to Phil Hobbs on Sun May 8 20:15:04 2022
    rOn Sunday, May 8, 2022 at 7:26:44 PM UTC-7, Phil Hobbs wrote:
    whit3rd wrote:
    On Thursday, May 5, 2022 at 11:17:45 AM UTC-7, Phil Hobbs wrote:

    I have no idea why anybody would use a monorail for anything real.

    Why? Because the ones you've seen are small? Hero's steam turbine was small, too.

    No, because in order to get static stability your one track has to be
    huge and therefore expensive.

    Following that reasoning, we'd expect funiculars for intraurban transit.

    The rigid elevated systems use less airspace than a guyed tower (there's HUGE lateral cable-tension loads in a funicular). A dovetail monorail is practical and less derail-able
    than standard twin-track.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Clifford Heath@21:1/5 to Phil Hobbs on Mon May 9 13:25:12 2022
    On 9/5/22 12:26 pm, Phil Hobbs wrote:
    whit3rd wrote:
    On Thursday, May 5, 2022 at 11:17:45 AM UTC-7, Phil Hobbs wrote:

    I have no idea why anybody would use a monorail for anything real.

    Why?   Because the ones you've seen are small?   Hero's steam turbine
    was small, too.

    No, because in order to get static stability your one track has to be
    huge and therefore expensive.

    Only if the train rides on the track, instead of under it.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Phil Hobbs@21:1/5 to All on Mon May 9 11:10:25 2022
    whit3rd wrote:
    rOn Sunday, May 8, 2022 at 7:26:44 PM UTC-7, Phil Hobbs wrote:
    whit3rd wrote:
    On Thursday, May 5, 2022 at 11:17:45 AM UTC-7, Phil Hobbs wrote:

    I have no idea why anybody would use a monorail for anything
    real.

    Why? Because the ones you've seen are small? Hero's steam turbine
    was small, too.

    No, because in order to get static stability your one track has to
    be huge and therefore expensive.

    Following that reasoning, we'd expect funiculars for intraurban
    transit.

    Do tell. Cable suspension and all those towers are cheaper than train
    tracks? And funiculars are as fast as trains?

    The rigid elevated systems use less airspace than a guyed tower
    (there's HUGE lateral cable-tension loads in a funicular). A
    dovetail monorail is practical and less derail-able than standard
    twin-track.

    Most derailments are caused by maintenance failures, IIRC. With the
    same standard of maintenance, your dovetail gizmos are less likely to
    fail, and/or easier to repair?

    Don't think so.

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs

    --
    Dr Philip C D Hobbs
    Principal Consultant
    ElectroOptical Innovations LLC / Hobbs ElectroOptics
    Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics
    Briarcliff Manor NY 10510

    http://electrooptical.net
    http://hobbs-eo.com

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Phil Hobbs@21:1/5 to Clifford Heath on Mon May 9 11:11:56 2022
    Clifford Heath wrote:
    On 9/5/22 12:26 pm, Phil Hobbs wrote:
    whit3rd wrote:
    On Thursday, May 5, 2022 at 11:17:45 AM UTC-7, Phil Hobbs wrote:

    I have no idea why anybody would use a monorail for anything real.

    Why?   Because the ones you've seen are small?   Hero's steam turbine >>> was small, too.

    No, because in order to get static stability your one track has to be
    huge and therefore expensive.

    Only if the train rides on the track, instead of under it.

    Sure, and running it upside down like a chairlift will be so much
    cheaper than train tracks.

    Fanboi alert.

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs

    --
    Dr Philip C D Hobbs
    Principal Consultant
    ElectroOptical Innovations LLC / Hobbs ElectroOptics
    Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics
    Briarcliff Manor NY 10510

    http://electrooptical.net
    http://hobbs-eo.com

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com@21:1/5 to pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical. on Mon May 9 08:43:24 2022
    On Mon, 9 May 2022 11:10:25 -0400, Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    whit3rd wrote:
    rOn Sunday, May 8, 2022 at 7:26:44 PM UTC-7, Phil Hobbs wrote:
    whit3rd wrote:
    On Thursday, May 5, 2022 at 11:17:45 AM UTC-7, Phil Hobbs wrote:

    I have no idea why anybody would use a monorail for anything
    real.

    Why? Because the ones you've seen are small? Hero's steam turbine
    was small, too.

    No, because in order to get static stability your one track has to
    be huge and therefore expensive.

    Following that reasoning, we'd expect funiculars for intraurban
    transit.

    Do tell. Cable suspension and all those towers are cheaper than train >tracks? And funiculars are as fast as trains?

    The rigid elevated systems use less airspace than a guyed tower
    (there's HUGE lateral cable-tension loads in a funicular). A
    dovetail monorail is practical and less derail-able than standard
    twin-track.

    Most derailments are caused by maintenance failures, IIRC. With the
    same standard of maintenance, your dovetail gizmos are less likely to
    fail, and/or easier to repair?

    Don't think so.

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs

    I think our underground systems, MUNI and BART, should tear up their
    tracks and pave the tubes and run electric busses in them.



    --

    Anybody can count to one.

    - Robert Widlar

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Anthony William Sloman@21:1/5 to jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com on Mon May 9 09:26:58 2022
    On Tuesday, May 10, 2022 at 1:43:36 AM UTC+10, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Mon, 9 May 2022 11:10:25 -0400, Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamM...@electrooptical.net> wrote:
    whit3rd wrote:
    On Sunday, May 8, 2022 at 7:26:44 PM UTC-7, Phil Hobbs wrote:
    whit3rd wrote:
    On Thursday, May 5, 2022 at 11:17:45 AM UTC-7, Phil Hobbs wrote:

    I think our underground systems, MUNI and BART, should tear up their tracks and pave the tubes and run electric busses in them.

    Bus systems move rather fewer passengers per driver, and you can get many more people on and off a train in thirty seconds than you can with a bus.
    For some reason, trains have a lot more door per unit length than a bus does, and it is easier to step off onto a platform than it is to step up into a bus, or down again to get off it

    Train, trams. and light rail can shift a lot more people along the same area of track as a bus system.

    You were deliberately joking? You didn't signal it all that well.

    --
    Bill Sloman, Sydney

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From whit3rd@21:1/5 to Phil Hobbs on Mon May 9 10:37:20 2022
    On Monday, May 9, 2022 at 8:10:38 AM UTC-7, Phil Hobbs wrote:
    whit3rd wrote:

    Following that reasoning, we'd expect funiculars for intraurban
    transit.

    Do tell. Cable suspension and all those towers are cheaper than train
    tracks? And funiculars are as fast as trains?

    This is about INTRAURBAN transit; real estate for more roads (or surface rail) is
    completely unavailable, but the inner cities need traffic to flow.

    So, tracked vehicles are added either in tunnels, or overhead.
    Neither of those solutions works well for individual passenger cars.

    The rigid elevated systems use less airspace than a guyed tower
    (there's HUGE lateral cable-tension loads in a funicular). A
    dovetail monorail is practical and less derail-able than standard twin-track.

    Most derailments are caused by maintenance failures, IIRC. With the
    same standard of maintenance, your dovetail gizmos are less likely to
    fail, and/or easier to repair?

    Huh? To the best of my knowledge, the monorail here in Seattle has had some cars in need of maintenance, but the track has been in continuous use since half a century ago. For mechanical stability, classic two-track rail allows derailment,
    but a monorail on a dovetail track cannot lift off (though it can still be removed in a
    maintenance bay). The suspension of a train depends critically on track spacing, the
    suspension of a monorail has lots of allowed variation (wide tires) and lower contact forces (rubber on concrete, not steel-on-steel). Track maintenance for
    concrete... well, the Pantheon is made of concrete.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Clifford Heath@21:1/5 to Phil Hobbs on Tue May 10 08:41:36 2022
    On 10/5/22 1:11 am, Phil Hobbs wrote:
    Clifford Heath wrote:
    On 9/5/22 12:26 pm, Phil Hobbs wrote:
    whit3rd wrote:
    On Thursday, May 5, 2022 at 11:17:45 AM UTC-7, Phil Hobbs wrote:

    I have no idea why anybody would use a monorail for anything real.

    Why?   Because the ones you've seen are small?   Hero's steam
    turbine was small, too.

    No, because in order to get static stability your one track has to be
    huge and therefore expensive.

    Only if the train rides on the track, instead of under it.

    Sure, and running it upside down like a chairlift will be so much
    cheaper than train tracks.

    Fanboi alert.

    Not at all a fan of monorails, they have all kinds of problems. Just
    pointing out that your statement assumed the train rides on top of a
    rail. Not that much extra strength is needed to support a rail it can
    hang from, and if you use one pillar each side, you can still run a road underneath

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From rbowman@21:1/5 to jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com on Mon May 9 20:39:18 2022
    On 05/09/2022 09:43 AM, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Mon, 9 May 2022 11:10:25 -0400, Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    whit3rd wrote:
    rOn Sunday, May 8, 2022 at 7:26:44 PM UTC-7, Phil Hobbs wrote:
    whit3rd wrote:
    On Thursday, May 5, 2022 at 11:17:45 AM UTC-7, Phil Hobbs wrote:

    I have no idea why anybody would use a monorail for anything
    real.

    Why? Because the ones you've seen are small? Hero's steam turbine
    was small, too.

    No, because in order to get static stability your one track has to
    be huge and therefore expensive.

    Following that reasoning, we'd expect funiculars for intraurban
    transit.

    Do tell. Cable suspension and all those towers are cheaper than train
    tracks? And funiculars are as fast as trains?

    The rigid elevated systems use less airspace than a guyed tower
    (there's HUGE lateral cable-tension loads in a funicular). A
    dovetail monorail is practical and less derail-able than standard
    twin-track.

    Most derailments are caused by maintenance failures, IIRC. With the
    same standard of maintenance, your dovetail gizmos are less likely to
    fail, and/or easier to repair?

    Don't think so.

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs

    I think our underground systems, MUNI and BART, should tear up their
    tracks and pave the tubes and run electric busses in them.




    I only rode BART once back in the '80s but it seemed rather nice
    compared to NYC or Boston. Boston's Green Line is the oldest subway in
    the US and it looks it.

    The local bus company is phasing in electric buses.

    https://mountainline.com/introduces-new-electric-buses

    One of these days I'll have to go for a ride. They're zero fare so it
    will be a cheap date. I've got to admit I'd rather be behind one of them
    on a motorcycle than the aging diesel models. For me, the problem is
    getting into town. If I arrive by car, motorcycle, or bicycle there's
    little incentive to switch to a bus.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From rbowman@21:1/5 to Ricky on Mon May 9 23:11:17 2022
    On 05/09/2022 10:44 PM, Ricky wrote:
    On Monday, May 9, 2022 at 11:43:36 AM UTC-4, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Mon, 9 May 2022 11:10:25 -0400, Phil Hobbs
    <pcdhSpamM...@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    whit3rd wrote:
    rOn Sunday, May 8, 2022 at 7:26:44 PM UTC-7, Phil Hobbs wrote:
    whit3rd wrote:
    On Thursday, May 5, 2022 at 11:17:45 AM UTC-7, Phil Hobbs wrote:

    I have no idea why anybody would use a monorail for anything
    real.

    Why? Because the ones you've seen are small? Hero's steam turbine
    was small, too.

    No, because in order to get static stability your one track has to
    be huge and therefore expensive.

    Following that reasoning, we'd expect funiculars for intraurban
    transit.

    Do tell. Cable suspension and all those towers are cheaper than train
    tracks? And funiculars are as fast as trains?

    The rigid elevated systems use less airspace than a guyed tower
    (there's HUGE lateral cable-tension loads in a funicular). A
    dovetail monorail is practical and less derail-able than standard
    twin-track.

    Most derailments are caused by maintenance failures, IIRC. With the
    same standard of maintenance, your dovetail gizmos are less likely to
    fail, and/or easier to repair?

    Don't think so.

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs
    I think our underground systems, MUNI and BART, should tear up their
    tracks and pave the tubes and run electric busses in them.

    Isn't that Elon Musk's idea? The Boring Company.


    Teslas in Tunnels.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ricky@21:1/5 to jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com on Mon May 9 21:44:59 2022
    On Monday, May 9, 2022 at 11:43:36 AM UTC-4, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Mon, 9 May 2022 11:10:25 -0400, Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamM...@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    whit3rd wrote:
    rOn Sunday, May 8, 2022 at 7:26:44 PM UTC-7, Phil Hobbs wrote:
    whit3rd wrote:
    On Thursday, May 5, 2022 at 11:17:45 AM UTC-7, Phil Hobbs wrote:

    I have no idea why anybody would use a monorail for anything
    real.

    Why? Because the ones you've seen are small? Hero's steam turbine
    was small, too.

    No, because in order to get static stability your one track has to
    be huge and therefore expensive.

    Following that reasoning, we'd expect funiculars for intraurban
    transit.

    Do tell. Cable suspension and all those towers are cheaper than train >tracks? And funiculars are as fast as trains?

    The rigid elevated systems use less airspace than a guyed tower
    (there's HUGE lateral cable-tension loads in a funicular). A
    dovetail monorail is practical and less derail-able than standard
    twin-track.

    Most derailments are caused by maintenance failures, IIRC. With the
    same standard of maintenance, your dovetail gizmos are less likely to
    fail, and/or easier to repair?

    Don't think so.

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs
    I think our underground systems, MUNI and BART, should tear up their
    tracks and pave the tubes and run electric busses in them.

    Isn't that Elon Musk's idea? The Boring Company.

    --

    Rick C.

    --+- Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
    --+- Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Larkin@21:1/5 to rbowman on Tue May 10 09:49:45 2022
    On Mon, 9 May 2022 23:11:17 -0600, rbowman <bowman@montana.com> wrote:

    On 05/09/2022 10:44 PM, Ricky wrote:
    On Monday, May 9, 2022 at 11:43:36 AM UTC-4, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Mon, 9 May 2022 11:10:25 -0400, Phil Hobbs
    <pcdhSpamM...@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    whit3rd wrote:
    rOn Sunday, May 8, 2022 at 7:26:44 PM UTC-7, Phil Hobbs wrote:
    whit3rd wrote:
    On Thursday, May 5, 2022 at 11:17:45 AM UTC-7, Phil Hobbs wrote: >>>>>>>
    I have no idea why anybody would use a monorail for anything
    real.

    Why? Because the ones you've seen are small? Hero's steam turbine >>>>>>> was small, too.

    No, because in order to get static stability your one track has to >>>>>> be huge and therefore expensive.

    Following that reasoning, we'd expect funiculars for intraurban
    transit.

    Do tell. Cable suspension and all those towers are cheaper than train
    tracks? And funiculars are as fast as trains?

    The rigid elevated systems use less airspace than a guyed tower
    (there's HUGE lateral cable-tension loads in a funicular). A
    dovetail monorail is practical and less derail-able than standard
    twin-track.

    Most derailments are caused by maintenance failures, IIRC. With the
    same standard of maintenance, your dovetail gizmos are less likely to
    fail, and/or easier to repair?

    Don't think so.

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs
    I think our underground systems, MUNI and BART, should tear up their
    tracks and pave the tubes and run electric busses in them.

    Isn't that Elon Musk's idea? The Boring Company.


    Teslas in Tunnels.

    Boring emphasizes speed but needs gigabuck tunnels to get that speed.
    It probably won't happen.

    Most public transport emphasizes giant vehicles, like 20-car BART
    trains with a few hard-to-access stations. Public transport tends to
    emphasize bigness, to trade latency for speed.

    I can drive to work in 12 minutes or spend an hour or more on public
    transit. Just waiting for a giant BART train on the platform kills
    about 12 minutes.

    San Francisco used to have hundreds of private jitneys that would pick
    people up and drop them off everywhere. The city outlawed them to
    force people onto gigabuck public transport full of union labor.


    --

    If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end with doubts,
    but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties. Francis Bacon

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Tabby@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Wed May 11 15:21:27 2022
    On Tuesday, 10 May 2022 at 17:49:57 UTC+1, John Larkin wrote:
    On Mon, 9 May 2022 23:11:17 -0600, rbowman <bow...@montana.com> wrote:

    On 05/09/2022 10:44 PM, Ricky wrote:
    On Monday, May 9, 2022 at 11:43:36 AM UTC-4, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Mon, 9 May 2022 11:10:25 -0400, Phil Hobbs
    <pcdhSpamM...@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    whit3rd wrote:
    rOn Sunday, May 8, 2022 at 7:26:44 PM UTC-7, Phil Hobbs wrote:
    whit3rd wrote:
    On Thursday, May 5, 2022 at 11:17:45 AM UTC-7, Phil Hobbs wrote: >>>>>>>
    I have no idea why anybody would use a monorail for anything >>>>>>>> real.

    Why? Because the ones you've seen are small? Hero's steam turbine >>>>>>> was small, too.

    No, because in order to get static stability your one track has to >>>>>> be huge and therefore expensive.

    Following that reasoning, we'd expect funiculars for intraurban
    transit.

    Do tell. Cable suspension and all those towers are cheaper than train >>>> tracks? And funiculars are as fast as trains?

    The rigid elevated systems use less airspace than a guyed tower
    (there's HUGE lateral cable-tension loads in a funicular). A
    dovetail monorail is practical and less derail-able than standard
    twin-track.

    Most derailments are caused by maintenance failures, IIRC. With the
    same standard of maintenance, your dovetail gizmos are less likely to >>>> fail, and/or easier to repair?

    Don't think so.

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs
    I think our underground systems, MUNI and BART, should tear up their
    tracks and pave the tubes and run electric busses in them.

    Isn't that Elon Musk's idea? The Boring Company.


    Teslas in Tunnels.
    Boring emphasizes speed but needs gigabuck tunnels to get that speed.
    It probably won't happen.

    Most public transport emphasizes giant vehicles, like 20-car BART
    trains with a few hard-to-access stations. Public transport tends to emphasize bigness, to trade latency for speed.

    I can drive to work in 12 minutes or spend an hour or more on public
    transit. Just waiting for a giant BART train on the platform kills
    about 12 minutes.

    San Francisco used to have hundreds of private jitneys that would pick
    people up and drop them off everywhere. The city outlawed them to
    force people onto gigabuck public transport full of union labor.

    Bring back the electrobats!

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