• Ultrasonic Humidifiers Will Kill Your Computer

    From Mike Monett@21:1/5 to All on Mon Apr 18 02:46:19 2022
    If you live in a cold climate, you may run into problems with low humidity
    in the winter. This causes sore throats and colds and flu.

    If you look on Amazon, the only humidifiers available are ultrasonic.

    These have a serious problem. They emit a great deal of calcium dust. This covers everything. If you turn the lights out and shine a LED flashlight straight up, you can see the dust in the air. It goes everywhere.

    OK, you think to yourself, it's unsightly, but it's better than the sore throats and flu from low humidity.

    Unfortunately, there is another problem. Unknown to you, the dust is
    collecting in the fins of the aluminum heat sink that is cooling your cpu.

    Pretty soon, it will overheat and shut off. What do you do without a
    computer? Not much.

    The solution is a warm mist humidifier. The has a small chamber that heats water to the boiling point, just like a kettle. The steam contains no
    calcium. This collects on the heating element, which you have to remove periodically with vinegar.

    These humnidifiers are hard to find. I bought one on Amazon. The link is

    https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B089WKB1S2

    So far, I am very pleased with the performance. Turning the lights out and shining the LED flashlight in the air shows absolutely no dust floating
    around. My eyeglasses are not covered with a white film every time I sleep. Highly recommended.

    Very important: Top fill warm mist humidifiers are extremely rare. Watch
    out for bottom fill units, like the Vicks

    https://www.amazon.ca/Vicks-Humidifier-Shut-Off-Gallon-V745A/dp/B001FWXKTA/

    Bottom fill units are extremely difficult to deal with. You have to take
    the chamber to the sink, wrestle with the unlock cap, fill the unit with
    water, screw the cap back on, take the unit back to the humidifier, and try
    to get it back on the humidifier. I tried to do this with the Honeywell HWM845BC humidifier:

    https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B07GQ2CF4T/

    and gave up. I donated it to the trash bin. Top fill only.

    Best regards,

    Mike

    --
    MRM

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  • From Joe Gwinn@21:1/5 to All on Mon Apr 18 11:12:34 2022
    On Mon, 18 Apr 2022 02:46:19 -0000 (UTC), Mike Monett <spamme@not.com>
    wrote:

    If you live in a cold climate, you may run into problems with low humidity
    in the winter. This causes sore throats and colds and flu.

    If you look on Amazon, the only humidifiers available are ultrasonic.

    Not true. My wife has one. Search for "evaporative humidifier". This
    uses a wick and fan, but does not heat the water.

    The water tank is removable, and can be filled in the kitchen sink.
    One does have to take the bottom of the unit to the sink and wash it
    out maybe once a month.

    Joe Gwinn

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  • From Jeff Liebermann@21:1/5 to All on Mon Apr 18 15:32:20 2022
    On Mon, 18 Apr 2022 02:46:19 -0000 (UTC), Mike Monett <spamme@not.com>
    wrote:

    If you live in a cold climate, you may run into problems with low humidity
    in the winter. This causes sore throats and colds and flu.

    If you look on Amazon, the only humidifiers available are ultrasonic.

    These have a serious problem. They emit a great deal of calcium dust. This >covers everything. If you turn the lights out and shine a LED flashlight >straight up, you can see the dust in the air. It goes everywhere.

    OK, you think to yourself, it's unsightly, but it's better than the sore >throats and flu from low humidity.

    Are you using a humidifier for medical purposes? If so, it's commonly
    called a nebulizer:
    <https://www.webmd.com/asthma/guide/home-nebulizer-therapy>
    There are a variety of technologies available (jet, mesh, ultrasonic,
    boiling water, etc). Anything that will produce an aerosol. Lots of
    uses ranging from medicine delivery to compensating for the drying
    effects of oxygen bottles and concentrators. For recreational use, I
    built one long ago while in college that would volatilize alcoholic
    beverages. The basic principle is that the water aerosol also carries
    the drugs and sometimes whatever is in the humidifier/nebulizer water
    tank.

    Unfortunately, there is another problem. Unknown to you, the dust is >collecting in the fins of the aluminum heat sink that is cooling your cpu.

    Up until about a year ago, I was in the computah repair business. I've
    seen incredibly filthy computers, including many with power supply and
    CPU heat sinks clogged with all manner of airborne crud that did an
    excellent job of ruining air flow. Computah manufacturers have known
    about this problem for at least 25 years and have protected their
    devices with thermal throttling algorithms. OS vendors have done
    their part with APM (advanced power management). Slow down the CPU or
    video card clock rate and the CPU will not overheat. Google search
    and YouTube should produce a variety of CPU/GPU cooling contraptions
    ranging from refrigeration to a gasoline driven water pump. Linus
    Tech Tips is full of them:
    <https://www.youtube.com/c/LinusTechTips/videos>
    Here's the gasoline engine powered water cooling system: <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m7Pn7_a37W8> (12:43)
    With the exception of older AMD CPU's[1], *all* of this century's
    CPU's and GPU's do thermal throttling. If you unplug the fan(s), the
    clock will slow down as the CPU or GPU gets hot and eventually settles
    at around 75C to 85C maximum. If for some reason the temperature goes
    above the limit, the computer and power supply will shut down and turn
    off. For what it's worth, I haven't seen a dead CPU in the last 20
    years (except for early AMD CPU's). I have seen some dead GPU's, but
    those were caused by creative overclocking, not overheating.

    Pretty soon, it will overheat and shut off. What do you do without a >computer? Not much.

    I tried avoiding my computer(s) for a few days to see if it was
    possible. I lasted about 2 days and gave up. Computers are
    addictive.

    The solution is a warm mist humidifier. The has a small chamber that heats >water to the boiling point, just like a kettle. The steam contains no >calcium. This collects on the heating element, which you have to remove >periodically with vinegar.

    I have a more tradition version of such a device. During winter, I
    heat my house with a wood burning stove: <http://www.learnbydestroying.com/jeffl/pics/home/#img=wood-burner.jpg>
    One of the side effects of burning firewood for heat is that it really
    dries out the air. So, I leave a tea pot full of tap water to boil. I
    can easily evaporate a gallon of water in 12 hrs.

    However, there's a nasty side effect to boiling tap water. Some of
    the lime (calcium oxide) in the water hitches a ride on the water
    aerosol. Only a small percentage of the lime would go airborne, but
    it was enough to cover the house with white dust after a few winters
    of boiling tap water on the wood burner. The result was a runny noise
    that lasted all winter. I switched to boiling de-ionized water (steam
    iron water), which solved the problem.

    Incidentally, I also use vinegar to remove the lime scale from the tea
    pot. However, in 2020, I had to use HCl (hydrochloric acid) to remove
    the lime scale. Vinegar and CLR were too weak. What changes was that
    we had a rather large brush fire that melted many of the plastic water
    tanks and pipes in the area. So, the water district switched from
    surface water sources (rivers and streams) to underground sources
    (wells), which have much more dissolved lime. If the amount of lime
    in the water is an issue, there are "water hardness test kits": <https://inspectapedia.com/plumbing/Hard_Water_Measurement.php>.

    These humnidifiers are hard to find. I bought one on Amazon. The link is

    https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B089WKB1S2

    So far, I am very pleased with the performance. Turning the lights out and >shining the LED flashlight in the air shows absolutely no dust floating >around. My eyeglasses are not covered with a white film every time I sleep. >Highly recommended.

    Ummm... That's fairly extreme. I suggest you have your water tested. Meanwhile, switch to de-ionized or distilled water for the humidifier/nebulizer/evaporator.


    [1] Old AMD CPU's relied on a thermistor temp sensor on the
    motherboard to measure and control the temperature. If the thermistor
    was dislodged or the CPU was mounted badly, the CPU would overheat and
    die a horrible, but quick, death.
    <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BSGcnRanYMM> (2:17)


    --
    Jeff Liebermann jeffl@cruzio.com
    PO Box 272 http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
    Ben Lomond CA 95005-0272
    Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558

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  • From Clifford Heath@21:1/5 to Mike Monett on Tue Apr 19 10:27:33 2022
    On 18/4/22 12:46 pm, Mike Monett wrote:
    The solution is a warm mist humidifier. The has a small chamber that heats water to the boiling point, just like a kettle. The steam contains no calcium. This collects on the heating element, which you have to remove periodically with vinegar.

    These humnidifiers are hard to find. I bought one on Amazon. The link is

    https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B089WKB1S2

    So far, I am very pleased with the performance.
    I guess that's a big problem with espresso machine steam-makers too?

    Not a big problem here, we have bugger-all calcium in our water supply.
    The current analysis says 48 - 69 (mgCaCO3/L).

    <https://www.sydneywater.com.au/water-the-environment/how-we-manage-sydneys-water/safe-drinking-water/water-analysis.html>

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Mike Monett@21:1/5 to Jeff Liebermann on Tue Apr 19 04:55:39 2022
    Jeff Liebermann <jeffl@cruzio.com> wrote:

    On Mon, 18 Apr 2022 02:46:19 -0000 (UTC), Mike Monett <spamme@not.com>
    wrote:

    [...]

    Incidentally, I also use vinegar to remove the lime scale from the tea
    pot. However, in 2020, I had to use HCl (hydrochloric acid) to remove
    the lime scale. Vinegar and CLR were too weak. What changes was that
    we had a rather large brush fire that melted many of the plastic water
    tanks and pipes in the area. So, the water district switched from
    surface water sources (rivers and streams) to underground sources
    (wells), which have much more dissolved lime. If the amount of lime
    in the water is an issue, there are "water hardness test kits": <https://inspectapedia.com/plumbing/Hard_Water_Measurement.php>.

    These humnidifiers are hard to find. I bought one on Amazon. The link is

    https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B089WKB1S2

    So far, I am very pleased with the performance. Turning the lights out
    and shining the LED flashlight in the air shows absolutely no dust
    floating around. My eyeglasses are not covered with a white film every
    time I sleep. Highly recommended.

    Ummm... That's fairly extreme. I suggest you have your water tested. Meanwhile, switch to de-ionized or distilled water for the humidifier/nebulizer/evaporator.

    The water is from an acquifier. It is moderate hardness, not as bad as some other towns.

    Distilled or deionized water is out of the question. Too expensive, and as
    I have had a number of strokes, I have lost my legs. I cannot walk, and
    have no way of obtaining the water. The warm mist humidifier is working
    very well and has solved the problem.



    --
    MRM

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  • From Cydrome Leader@21:1/5 to Mike Monett on Tue Apr 19 19:47:00 2022
    Mike Monett <spamme@not.com> wrote:
    If you live in a cold climate, you may run into problems with low humidity
    in the winter. This causes sore throats and colds and flu.

    If you look on Amazon, the only humidifiers available are ultrasonic.

    These have a serious problem. They emit a great deal of calcium dust. This covers everything. If you turn the lights out and shine a LED flashlight straight up, you can see the dust in the air. It goes everywhere.

    OK, you think to yourself, it's unsightly, but it's better than the sore throats and flu from low humidity.

    Unfortunately, there is another problem. Unknown to you, the dust is collecting in the fins of the aluminum heat sink that is cooling your cpu.

    Pretty soon, it will overheat and shut off. What do you do without a computer? Not much.

    The solution is a warm mist humidifier. The has a small chamber that heats water to the boiling point, just like a kettle. The steam contains no calcium. This collects on the heating element, which you have to remove periodically with vinegar.

    semi-related. I finally pulled the trigger on a boiling water humidifier
    from aprilair. It was moderately complex to install, requiring a dedicated
    240v circuit and wiring to an external thermometer (which I never
    finished, running it in "dumb" mode now). There are no filters or media to
    get moldy. It basically sanitizes itself with boiling water. The only consumable is the canister, it's alleged they last a year.

    If any midwest folks need reliable humidity without mold and minerals, but
    have cheap electricity this is the way to go.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Carlos E.R.@21:1/5 to Mike Monett on Tue Apr 19 21:50:42 2022
    On 2022-04-18 04:46, Mike Monett wrote:
    If you live in a cold climate, you may run into problems with low humidity
    in the winter. This causes sore throats and colds and flu.

    If you look on Amazon, the only humidifiers available are ultrasonic.

    These have a serious problem. They emit a great deal of calcium dust. This covers everything. If you turn the lights out and shine a LED flashlight straight up, you can see the dust in the air. It goes everywhere.

    OK, you think to yourself, it's unsightly, but it's better than the sore throats and flu from low humidity.

    Unfortunately, there is another problem. Unknown to you, the dust is collecting in the fins of the aluminum heat sink that is cooling your cpu.

    Pretty soon, it will overheat and shut off. What do you do without a computer? Not much.

    The solution is a warm mist humidifier. The has a small chamber that heats water to the boiling point, just like a kettle. The steam contains no calcium. This collects on the heating element, which you have to remove periodically with vinegar.

    IMHO it is a bit ridiculous using an ultrasonic humidifier on a cold
    climate (they cool the room).


    These humnidifiers are hard to find. I bought one on Amazon. The link is

    https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B089WKB1S2

    In the 90's I saw in Canada humidifier that apparently used electrolysis
    of the water with AC. They just put two electrodes into the water, the
    gases recombined instantly into warm steam. They were top fill, and they
    would stop with no water without needing any sensor. The water tank was big.

    The only problem I noticed is that the two electrodes corroded (iron, apparently) and thus the unit died.

    I don't know if this is possible to do with 230 AC mains. Here (Spain) I
    have not seen them.

    --
    Cheers, Carlos.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Lasse Langwadt Christensen@21:1/5 to All on Tue Apr 19 13:02:22 2022
    tirsdag den 19. april 2022 kl. 21.52.12 UTC+2 skrev Carlos E.R.:
    On 2022-04-18 04:46, Mike Monett wrote:
    If you live in a cold climate, you may run into problems with low humidity in the winter. This causes sore throats and colds and flu.

    If you look on Amazon, the only humidifiers available are ultrasonic.

    These have a serious problem. They emit a great deal of calcium dust. This covers everything. If you turn the lights out and shine a LED flashlight straight up, you can see the dust in the air. It goes everywhere.

    OK, you think to yourself, it's unsightly, but it's better than the sore throats and flu from low humidity.

    Unfortunately, there is another problem. Unknown to you, the dust is collecting in the fins of the aluminum heat sink that is cooling your cpu.

    Pretty soon, it will overheat and shut off. What do you do without a computer? Not much.

    The solution is a warm mist humidifier. The has a small chamber that heats water to the boiling point, just like a kettle. The steam contains no calcium. This collects on the heating element, which you have to remove periodically with vinegar.
    IMHO it is a bit ridiculous using an ultrasonic humidifier on a cold
    climate (they cool the room).
    These humnidifiers are hard to find. I bought one on Amazon. The link is

    https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B089WKB1S2
    In the 90's I saw in Canada humidifier that apparently used electrolysis
    of the water with AC. They just put two electrodes into the water, the
    gases recombined instantly into warm steam. They were top fill, and they would stop with no water without needing any sensor. The water tank was big.

    The only problem I noticed is that the two electrodes corroded (iron, apparently) and thus the unit died.

    I don't know if this is possible to do with 230 AC mains. Here (Spain) I
    have not seen them.

    https://youtu.be/EViyccc2t9w

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Carlos E.R.@21:1/5 to Lasse Langwadt Christensen on Tue Apr 19 23:28:50 2022
    On 2022-04-19 22:02, Lasse Langwadt Christensen wrote:
    tirsdag den 19. april 2022 kl. 21.52.12 UTC+2 skrev Carlos E.R.:
    On 2022-04-18 04:46, Mike Monett wrote:

    ...

    In the 90's I saw in Canada humidifier that apparently used electrolysis
    of the water with AC. They just put two electrodes into the water, the
    gases recombined instantly into warm steam. They were top fill, and they
    would stop with no water without needing any sensor. The water tank was big. >>
    The only problem I noticed is that the two electrodes corroded (iron,
    apparently) and thus the unit died.

    I don't know if this is possible to do with 230 AC mains. Here (Spain) I
    have not seen them.

    https://youtu.be/EViyccc2t9w

    Wow, thanks.

    I would not drink those beverages. My chemistry knowledge is not good,
    but I seem to remember that the electrolysis of salty water generated
    chloride as one of the gases. Who knows what you get with tea, sugar,
    milk... I'm certainly not going to try.

    However, those humidifiers I saw did not generate that much heat, the
    water did not boil (maybe part of it?). Warm, yes, certainly. And there
    was no manner to touch the water or the electrodes.

    --
    Cheers, Carlos.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Cydrome Leader@21:1/5 to Carlos E.R. on Wed Apr 20 07:50:26 2022
    Carlos E.R. <robin_listas@es.invalid> wrote:
    On 2022-04-18 04:46, Mike Monett wrote:
    If you live in a cold climate, you may run into problems with low humidity >> in the winter. This causes sore throats and colds and flu.

    If you look on Amazon, the only humidifiers available are ultrasonic.

    These have a serious problem. They emit a great deal of calcium dust. This >> covers everything. If you turn the lights out and shine a LED flashlight
    straight up, you can see the dust in the air. It goes everywhere.

    OK, you think to yourself, it's unsightly, but it's better than the sore
    throats and flu from low humidity.

    Unfortunately, there is another problem. Unknown to you, the dust is
    collecting in the fins of the aluminum heat sink that is cooling your cpu. >>
    Pretty soon, it will overheat and shut off. What do you do without a
    computer? Not much.

    The solution is a warm mist humidifier. The has a small chamber that heats >> water to the boiling point, just like a kettle. The steam contains no
    calcium. This collects on the heating element, which you have to remove
    periodically with vinegar.

    IMHO it is a bit ridiculous using an ultrasonic humidifier on a cold
    climate (they cool the room).


    These humnidifiers are hard to find. I bought one on Amazon. The link is

    https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B089WKB1S2

    In the 90's I saw in Canada humidifier that apparently used electrolysis
    of the water with AC. They just put two electrodes into the water, the
    gases recombined instantly into warm steam. They were top fill, and they would stop with no water without needing any sensor. The water tank was big.

    The only problem I noticed is that the two electrodes corroded (iron, apparently) and thus the unit died.

    I don't know if this is possible to do with 230 AC mains. Here (Spain) I
    have not seen them.

    That's a boiling water system. It's not electrolysis at work, but
    resistive heating of water that causes it to actually boil. Yes, there's probably some hydrogen and oxygen give off, but it's minor. Those systems
    use canisters with sealed in expanded metal electrodes. They eventually
    corrode and fail. That's supposed to happen when there's finally too
    many minerals built up anyways. They utilize "rinse" cycles to try to
    clear themselves out as well, so it's not a consumables scam, like with
    printer cartridges.

    Condair (formerly Nortec) makes the big ones which are popular for use in datacenters. There's the nonstop battle of airconditioning that never
    shuts off and the need for humidity. Dry air doesn't conduct heat as well
    and can cause static electricity problems.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Phil Hobbs@21:1/5 to Carlos E.R. on Wed Apr 20 07:44:14 2022
    Carlos E.R. wrote:
    On 2022-04-18 04:46, Mike Monett wrote:
    If you live in a cold climate, you may run into problems with low
    humidity
    in the winter. This causes sore throats and colds and flu.

    If you look on Amazon, the only humidifiers available are ultrasonic.

    These have a serious problem. They emit a great deal of calcium dust.
    This
    covers everything. If you turn the lights out  and shine a LED flashlight >> straight up, you can see the dust in the air. It goes everywhere.

    OK, you think to yourself, it's unsightly, but it's better than the sore
    throats and flu from low humidity.

    Unfortunately, there is another problem. Unknown to you, the dust is
    collecting in the fins of the aluminum heat sink that is cooling your
    cpu.

    Pretty soon, it will overheat and shut off. What do you do without a
    computer? Not much.

    The solution is a warm mist humidifier. The has a small chamber that
    heats
    water to the boiling point, just like a kettle. The steam contains no
    calcium. This collects on the heating element, which you have to remove
    periodically with vinegar.

    IMHO it is a bit ridiculous using an ultrasonic humidifier on a cold
    climate (they cool the room).


    These humnidifiers are hard to find. I bought one on Amazon. The link is

    https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B089WKB1S2

    In the 90's I saw in Canada humidifier that apparently used electrolysis
    of the water with AC. They just put two electrodes into the water, the
    gases recombined instantly into warm steam. They were top fill, and they would stop with no water without needing any sensor. The water tank was
    big.
    The only problem I noticed is that the two electrodes corroded (iron, apparently) and thus the unit died.


    That's like the DeVilbiss 145 I mentioned upthread. Works like the
    bomb. Somebody mentioned that the electrodes are nickel-free stainless,
    so not a huge deal to replace if you keep the surface area constant.
    They used to sell replacements, but good luck finding them in 2022.

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno@decadenc@21:1/5 to Joe Gwinn on Wed Apr 20 22:04:45 2022
    Joe Gwinn <joegwinn@comcast.net> wrote in news:vjvq5h5fk7d7c8u3bpt8a4ui53t01ak9ps@4ax.com:

    On Mon, 18 Apr 2022 02:46:19 -0000 (UTC), Mike Monett
    <spamme@not.com> wrote:

    If you live in a cold climate, you may run into problems with low
    humidity in the winter. This causes sore throats and colds and
    flu.

    If you look on Amazon, the only humidifiers available are
    ultrasonic.

    Not true. My wife has one. Search for "evaporative humidifier".
    This uses a wick and fan, but does not heat the water.

    The water tank is removable, and can be filled in the kitchen
    sink. One does have to take the bottom of the unit to the sink and
    wash it out maybe once a month.

    Joe Gwinn


    They will definitely 'kill' your 3D printer filaments if you do not
    keep them in a dry box between uses.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno@decadenc@21:1/5 to Jeff Liebermann on Wed Apr 20 23:13:33 2022
    Jeff Liebermann <jeffl@cruzio.com> wrote in news:oblr5hhs7cf9cf9asimr7pngni4t15bfio@4ax.com:

    Up until about a year ago, I was in the computah repair business.

    Tere's that goddamned "lamah" word again, which completely destroys
    any crdibility you ever had. Simply by embracing and never abandoning
    such a stupid term.

    And the really sad part is that I KNOW you have more character than
    that stupid shit term you refuse to give up even after decades of
    looking stupid for using it. Such a lamah.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Jeff Liebermann@21:1/5 to DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno@decadenc on Wed Apr 20 18:34:34 2022
    On Wed, 20 Apr 2022 23:13:33 -0000 (UTC), DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno@decadence.org wrote:

    Jeff Liebermann <jeffl@cruzio.com> wrote in >news:oblr5hhs7cf9cf9asimr7pngni4t15bfio@4ax.com:

    Up until about a year ago, I was in the computah repair business.

    Tere's that goddamned "lamah" word again, which completely destroys
    any crdibility you ever had. Simply by embracing and never abandoning
    such a stupid term.

    What's a credibility? If that was accidental, please repair the "e"
    key on your keyboard.

    And the really sad part is that I KNOW you have more character than
    that stupid shit term you refuse to give up even after decades of
    looking stupid for using it. Such a lamah.

    Thanks. Hopefully, nobody in S.E.D. relies solely on the proper use
    of the English language as a credibility indicator. I certainly
    don't.

    Bad news. The abusers of the term are slowly gaining traction. We
    now have an official song:
    "Lealani & SnakeFoot - Kid Computah (Official Video Clip)" <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lefN5Q-OsAU>
    There's also a singer who has adopted the name: <https://soundcloud.com/computah>
    We are winning.

    56,900 Google search hits and climbing. Soon everyone will be using
    the word:
    <https://www.google.com/search?q=%22computah%22>

    It hasn't made much of an impact on the world word usage hit list
    quite yet. Maybe in a few years: <https://trends.google.com/trends/explore?q=computah>

    I don't recall exactly when I first started using the word, but my
    guess(tm) is around 1990. I was not the originator of this
    intentional mis-spelling, but was probably one of the early promoters.
    "Anyone who can only think of one way to spell a word obviously lacks imagination."
    - Mark Twain

    "The success of any technology is largely determined by how
    effectively it can be abused and misused."
    - Me


    --
    Jeff Liebermann jeffl@cruzio.com
    PO Box 272 http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
    Ben Lomond CA 95005-0272
    Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno@decadenc@21:1/5 to Jeff Liebermann on Thu Apr 21 17:06:57 2022
    Jeff Liebermann <jeffl@cruzio.com> wrote in news:scb16htbk5bo4uhvndbm8pv812q1mms9n5@4ax.com:

    It hasn't made much of an impact on the world word usage hit list
    quite yet. Maybe in a few years:

    Like the canuks and "eh"?

    Stupidah argumentah dumbshitah, googletardah. Eh?

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  • From Jeff Liebermann@21:1/5 to DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno@decadenc on Thu Apr 21 10:42:15 2022
    On Thu, 21 Apr 2022 17:06:57 -0000 (UTC), DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno@decadence.org wrote:

    Jeff Liebermann <jeffl@cruzio.com> wrote in >news:scb16htbk5bo4uhvndbm8pv812q1mms9n5@4ax.com:

    It hasn't made much of an impact on the world word usage hit list
    quite yet. Maybe in a few years:

    Like the canuks and "eh"?

    <https://trends.google.com/trends/explore?q=canuck> <https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/canuck>

    Stupidah argumentah dumbshitah, googletardah. Eh?

    If you intend to demonstrate your linguistic abilities and immortalize
    your terminology, it might be helpful if you would contrive terms that
    are more memorable and clever. Your habit of attaching "tard" as a
    suffix to everything you fail to appreciate is not particularly clever
    or imaginative. Keep trying, or simply borrow some of the terms that pre-teenagers are prone to invent. English is a dynamic and ever
    changing language. Adapt to the changes or resign yourself to joining
    the fate of static or dead languages: <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Extinct_language> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_languages_by_time_of_extinction>


    --
    Jeff Liebermann jeffl@cruzio.com
    PO Box 272 http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
    Ben Lomond CA 95005-0272
    Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558

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  • From Don Y@21:1/5 to Jeff Liebermann on Thu Apr 21 13:12:30 2022
    On 4/18/2022 3:32 PM, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
    Unfortunately, there is another problem. Unknown to you, the dust is
    collecting in the fins of the aluminum heat sink that is cooling your cpu.

    Up until about a year ago, I was in the computah repair business. I've
    seen incredibly filthy computers, including many with power supply and
    CPU heat sinks clogged with all manner of airborne crud that did an
    excellent job of ruining air flow.

    +42

    I see about ~2000 (used) computers each year. I've yet to find one that
    didn't have a heatsink coated (or filled!) with dust-bunnies, etc.
    Laptops are the worst!

    I can understand folks being lazy and not wanting to open/disassemble
    a machine for better access to the heatsink(s). But, you can remove *some*
    of it just by forcefully pulling air through the heatsink from outside
    the machine (not true of bigger machines with "active" heatsinks).

    OTOH, aside from laptops, most (quantities deployed) modern machines open without resorting to tools. So, it's not a HUGE burden to undertake
    that bit of PM.

    Computah manufacturers have known
    about this problem for at least 25 years and have protected their
    devices with thermal throttling algorithms. OS vendors have done
    their part with APM (advanced power management). Slow down the CPU or
    video card clock rate and the CPU will not overheat.

    You also have to look at memory temperatures.

    Most users don't know what to expect from their machines, in terms of performance. So, won't notice if it is operating at full speed or not.

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  • From David Lesher@21:1/5 to Cydrome Leader on Thu Jun 16 12:02:41 2022
    Cydrome Leader <presence@MUNGEpanix.com> writes:

    Unfortunately, there is another problem. Unknown to you, the
    dust is collecting in the fins of the aluminum heat sink
    that is cooling your cpu.

    And that dust includes the trace asbestos often found in
    drinking water.

    The solution is a warm mist humidifier. The has a small
    chamber that heats water to the boiling point, just like a
    kettle. The steam contains no calcium. This collects on the
    heating element, which you have to remove periodically with
    vinegar.

    There is another choice. An evaporative unit; such as a "water
    wheel" with a fan, where all the solids are left on the foam or
    fiber belt/pad. Lasko, alas, discontinued the one they made.


    --
    A host is a host from coast to coast...............wb8foz@panix.com
    & no one will talk to a host that's close..........................
    Unless the host (that isn't close).........................pob 1433
    is busy, hung or dead....................................20915-1433

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  • From a a@21:1/5 to David Lesher on Thu Jun 16 05:23:22 2022
    On Thursday, 16 June 2022 at 14:02:48 UTC+2, David Lesher wrote:
    Cydrome Leader <pres...@MUNGEpanix.com> writes:

    Unfortunately, there is another problem. Unknown to you, the
    dust is collecting in the fins of the aluminum heat sink
    that is cooling your cpu.
    And that dust includes the trace asbestos often found in
    drinking water.
    The solution is a warm mist humidifier. The has a small
    chamber that heats water to the boiling point, just like a
    kettle. The steam contains no calcium. This collects on the
    heating element, which you have to remove periodically with
    vinegar.
    There is another choice. An evaporative unit; such as a "water
    wheel" with a fan, where all the solids are left on the foam or
    fiber belt/pad. Lasko, alas, discontinued the one they made.


    --
    A host is a host from coast to coast...............wb8foz@panix.com
    & no one will talk to a host that's close..........................
    Unless the host (that isn't close).........................pob 1433
    is busy, hung or dead....................................20915-1433
    fake

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