• Re: Is honey the solution?

    From Ricky@21:1/5 to Jan Panteltje on Tue Apr 5 21:41:02 2022
    On Wednesday, April 6, 2022 at 12:20:15 AM UTC-4, Jan Panteltje wrote:
    Is honey the solution? https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2022/04/220405084610.htm

    "They created the memristors by processing honey into a solid form and sandwiching it between two metal electrodes, making a structure similar to a human synapse."

    This was written by a "writer" rather than a researcher. The idea that anything with electrodes is "similar to a human synapse" is a bit of a stretch. Synapses don't even have electrodes. They have a synaptic gap which is just a space which
    neurotransmitters diffuse across.

    It's also interesting they make a big deal about using honey as the memristor active material, when it is almost certainly the sugar in honey that results in the desired operation. They did not indicate any particular property or component of honey that
    makes it better than just sugar.

    --

    Rick C.

    - Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
    - Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Jan Panteltje@21:1/5 to All on Wed Apr 6 04:19:25 2022
    Is honey the solution?
    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2022/04/220405084610.htm

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Sjouke Burry@21:1/5 to Ricky on Wed Apr 6 07:18:41 2022
    On 06.04.22 6:41, Ricky wrote:
    On Wednesday, April 6, 2022 at 12:20:15 AM UTC-4, Jan Panteltje wrote:
    Is honey the solution?
    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2022/04/220405084610.htm

    "They created the memristors by processing honey into a solid form and sandwiching it between two metal electrodes, making a structure similar to a human synapse."

    This was written by a "writer" rather than a researcher. The idea that anything with electrodes is "similar to a human synapse" is a bit of a stretch. Synapses don't even have electrodes. They have a synaptic gap which is just a space which
    neurotransmitters diffuse across.

    It's also interesting they make a big deal about using honey as the memristor active material, when it is almost certainly the sugar in honey that results in the desired operation. They did not indicate any particular property or component of honey
    that makes it better than just sugar.

    I like Sc.dayly, but the number of brilliant inventions/day

    makes me suspicious about quite a few of them.

    But I keep reading those articles (RSS feed) every day.

    And enjoy them.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Martin Brown@21:1/5 to Jan Panteltje on Wed Apr 6 09:54:11 2022
    On 06/04/2022 05:19, Jan Panteltje wrote:
    Is honey the solution?
    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2022/04/220405084610.htm

    They seem about 4 days late with their April fools joke!
    OTOH Google searches suggest they might be serious.

    Polariton based QM memristors are one of the front runners for a viable memristor.

    https://journals.aps.org/prapplied/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevApplied.17.024056

    And a lot of false dawns too eg. :

    https://aip.scitation.org/doi/abs/10.1063/1.5042281

    Reminds me of a book that a friend won in a raffle entitled:
    "The Magic of Honey" by Barbara Cartland

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Magic-Honey-Barbara-Cartland/dp/0552103365

    Every bit as bad as her trashy novels.

    --
    Regards,
    Martin Brown

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com@21:1/5 to pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com on Wed Apr 6 07:35:02 2022
    On Wed, 06 Apr 2022 04:19:25 GMT, Jan Panteltje
    <pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote:

    Is honey the solution?
    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2022/04/220405084610.htm

    Memristors were the memory of the future... many times. I think HP
    announced a soon-to-be-shipped product once.

    The Ovonics thing came and went for decades.

    Memristors started as an intellectual conceit

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Memristor

    But maybe moving stuff is not a good way to make RAM. Who was making
    that fuzzy nanotube ram?

    HP also developed "modulation domain" instruments, a similar sort of abstraction to memristors.

    We actually do something like mod domain analysis now and then, to
    track down sources of jitter. Plot time vs time, and the FFT of that.


    --

    I yam what I yam - Popeye

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com@21:1/5 to '''newspam'''@nonad.co.uk on Wed Apr 6 07:39:05 2022
    On Wed, 6 Apr 2022 09:54:11 +0100, Martin Brown
    <'''newspam'''@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

    On 06/04/2022 05:19, Jan Panteltje wrote:
    Is honey the solution?
    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2022/04/220405084610.htm

    They seem about 4 days late with their April fools joke!
    OTOH Google searches suggest they might be serious.

    Polariton based QM memristors are one of the front runners for a viable >memristor.

    https://journals.aps.org/prapplied/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevApplied.17.024056

    And a lot of false dawns too eg. :

    https://aip.scitation.org/doi/abs/10.1063/1.5042281

    Reminds me of a book that a friend won in a raffle entitled:
    "The Magic of Honey" by Barbara Cartland

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Magic-Honey-Barbara-Cartland/dp/0552103365

    Every bit as bad as her trashy novels.

    It's good in tea, and apparently a decent treatment for burns and bed
    sores. Good on English muffins.

    Do they have English Muffins in England? Sort of like Canadian Bacon
    in Canada. And French Fries.







    --

    I yam what I yam - Popeye

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ricky@21:1/5 to jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com on Wed Apr 6 09:26:31 2022
    On Wednesday, April 6, 2022 at 10:39:16 AM UTC-4, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Wed, 6 Apr 2022 09:54:11 +0100, Martin Brown
    <'''newspam'''@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

    On 06/04/2022 05:19, Jan Panteltje wrote:
    Is honey the solution?
    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2022/04/220405084610.htm

    They seem about 4 days late with their April fools joke!
    OTOH Google searches suggest they might be serious.

    Polariton based QM memristors are one of the front runners for a viable >memristor.

    https://journals.aps.org/prapplied/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevApplied.17.024056

    And a lot of false dawns too eg. :

    https://aip.scitation.org/doi/abs/10.1063/1.5042281

    Reminds me of a book that a friend won in a raffle entitled:
    "The Magic of Honey" by Barbara Cartland

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Magic-Honey-Barbara-Cartland/dp/0552103365

    Every bit as bad as her trashy novels.
    It's good in tea, and apparently a decent treatment for burns and bed
    sores. Good on English muffins.

    Do they have English Muffins in England? Sort of like Canadian Bacon
    in Canada. And French Fries.

    Half of Larkin's posts sound like they were written by the village idiot. Discussing Honey used in memristors and this guy starts talking about English Muffins. BTW, that term has a very different meaning in England.

    --

    Rick C.

    + Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
    + Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Martin Brown@21:1/5 to Ricky on Wed Apr 6 17:48:53 2022
    On 06/04/2022 17:26, Ricky wrote:
    On Wednesday, April 6, 2022 at 10:39:16 AM UTC-4, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Wed, 6 Apr 2022 09:54:11 +0100, Martin Brown
    <'''newspam'''@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

    On 06/04/2022 05:19, Jan Panteltje wrote:
    Is honey the solution?
    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2022/04/220405084610.htm

    They seem about 4 days late with their April fools joke! OTOH
    Google searches suggest they might be serious.

    Polariton based QM memristors are one of the front runners for a
    viable memristor.

    https://journals.aps.org/prapplied/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevApplied.17.024056



    And a lot of false dawns too eg. :

    https://aip.scitation.org/doi/abs/10.1063/1.5042281

    Reminds me of a book that a friend won in a raffle entitled: "The
    Magic of Honey" by Barbara Cartland

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Magic-Honey-Barbara-Cartland/dp/0552103365



    Every bit as bad as her trashy novels.
    It's good in tea, and apparently a decent treatment for burns and
    bed sores. Good on English muffins.

    Surprisingly it is extremely good for certain skin damage as the very
    high sugar content osmatic pressure acts as a non-specific sterilising
    agent against some otherwise almost intractable wound infections.

    ISTR they concentrate and purify it for this particular use. There are
    traces of natural bee related antifungals and antibiotics in it too.

    Do they have English Muffins in England? Sort of like Canadian
    Bacon in Canada. And French Fries.

    "French" fries came from a Francophone region of *Belgium*.

    Half of Larkin's posts sound like they were written by the village
    idiot. Discussing Honey used in memristors and this guy starts
    talking about English Muffins. BTW, that term has a very different
    meaning in England.

    We don't call them "English" muffins but they are a breakfast staple. particulalry in the colder months.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/english_muffins_56640

    As are the much more suggestive sounding "crumpets" which are a not
    dissimilar recipe but only cooked on one side and rather holey.

    https://www.daringgourmet.com/traditional-english-crumpets/

    --
    Regards,
    Martin Brown

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Larkin@21:1/5 to '''newspam'''@nonad.co.uk on Wed Apr 6 10:41:25 2022
    On Wed, 6 Apr 2022 17:48:53 +0100, Martin Brown
    <'''newspam'''@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

    On 06/04/2022 17:26, Ricky wrote:
    On Wednesday, April 6, 2022 at 10:39:16 AM UTC-4,
    jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Wed, 6 Apr 2022 09:54:11 +0100, Martin Brown
    <'''newspam'''@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

    On 06/04/2022 05:19, Jan Panteltje wrote:
    Is honey the solution?
    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2022/04/220405084610.htm

    They seem about 4 days late with their April fools joke! OTOH
    Google searches suggest they might be serious.

    Polariton based QM memristors are one of the front runners for a
    viable memristor.

    https://journals.aps.org/prapplied/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevApplied.17.024056



    And a lot of false dawns too eg. :

    https://aip.scitation.org/doi/abs/10.1063/1.5042281

    Reminds me of a book that a friend won in a raffle entitled: "The
    Magic of Honey" by Barbara Cartland

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Magic-Honey-Barbara-Cartland/dp/0552103365



    Every bit as bad as her trashy novels.
    It's good in tea, and apparently a decent treatment for burns and
    bed sores. Good on English muffins.

    Surprisingly it is extremely good for certain skin damage as the very
    high sugar content osmatic pressure acts as a non-specific sterilising
    agent against some otherwise almost intractable wound infections.

    ISTR they concentrate and purify it for this particular use. There are
    traces of natural bee related antifungals and antibiotics in it too.

    Do they have English Muffins in England? Sort of like Canadian
    Bacon in Canada. And French Fries.

    "French" fries came from a Francophone region of *Belgium*.

    Half of Larkin's posts sound like they were written by the village
    idiot. Discussing Honey used in memristors and this guy starts
    talking about English Muffins. BTW, that term has a very different
    meaning in England.

    We don't call them "English" muffins but they are a breakfast staple. >particulalry in the colder months.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/english_muffins_56640

    Thomas' is the iconic brand here, widely available. "Fork split."

    One of our favorites is fried shrimp on a English muffin. With kettle
    chips or tater tots.


    As are the much more suggestive sounding "crumpets" which are a not >dissimilar recipe but only cooked on one side and rather holey.

    https://www.daringgourmet.com/traditional-english-crumpets/

    We love crumpets but they are hard to find here. Ikedas in Auburn has
    them so we stock up when we pass through there.

    --

    If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end with doubts,
    but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties. Francis Bacon

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Tom Gardner@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Wed Apr 6 19:24:20 2022
    On 06/04/22 18:41, John Larkin wrote:
    On Wed, 6 Apr 2022 17:48:53 +0100, Martin Brown
    <'''newspam'''@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

    On 06/04/2022 17:26, Ricky wrote:
    On Wednesday, April 6, 2022 at 10:39:16 AM UTC-4,
    jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Wed, 6 Apr 2022 09:54:11 +0100, Martin Brown
    <'''newspam'''@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

    On 06/04/2022 05:19, Jan Panteltje wrote:
    Is honey the solution?
    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2022/04/220405084610.htm

    They seem about 4 days late with their April fools joke! OTOH
    Google searches suggest they might be serious.

    Polariton based QM memristors are one of the front runners for a
    viable memristor.

    https://journals.aps.org/prapplied/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevApplied.17.024056



    And a lot of false dawns too eg. :

    https://aip.scitation.org/doi/abs/10.1063/1.5042281

    Reminds me of a book that a friend won in a raffle entitled: "The
    Magic of Honey" by Barbara Cartland

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Magic-Honey-Barbara-Cartland/dp/0552103365



    Every bit as bad as her trashy novels.
    It's good in tea, and apparently a decent treatment for burns and
    bed sores. Good on English muffins.

    Surprisingly it is extremely good for certain skin damage as the very
    high sugar content osmatic pressure acts as a non-specific sterilising
    agent against some otherwise almost intractable wound infections.

    ISTR they concentrate and purify it for this particular use. There are
    traces of natural bee related antifungals and antibiotics in it too.

    Do they have English Muffins in England? Sort of like Canadian
    Bacon in Canada. And French Fries.

    "French" fries came from a Francophone region of *Belgium*.

    Half of Larkin's posts sound like they were written by the village
    idiot. Discussing Honey used in memristors and this guy starts
    talking about English Muffins. BTW, that term has a very different
    meaning in England.

    We don't call them "English" muffins but they are a breakfast staple.
    particulalry in the colder months.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/english_muffins_56640

    Thomas' is the iconic brand here, widely available. "Fork split."

    One of our favorites is fried shrimp on a English muffin. With kettle
    chips or tater tots.

    In the UK, shrimps are ~6cm long, and the edible bit fits on the last joint of your thumb. Prawns are ~9cm. Both are delicious https://britishseafishing.co.uk/brown-shrimp/ https://britishseafishing.co.uk/prawn-and-shrimp-species/

    Larger still are Dublin bay prawns (scampi, langoustine).

    The enormous tropical prawns aren't worth eating, IMHO.


    As are the much more suggestive sounding "crumpets" which are a not
    dissimilar recipe but only cooked on one side and rather holey.

    https://www.daringgourmet.com/traditional-english-crumpets/

    We love crumpets but they are hard to find here. Ikedas in Auburn has
    them so we stock up when we pass through there.

    Potted Morecombe bay shrimps on crumpets. Delicious, but expensive.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Larkin@21:1/5 to spamjunk@blueyonder.co.uk on Wed Apr 6 11:40:18 2022
    On Wed, 6 Apr 2022 19:24:20 +0100, Tom Gardner
    <spamjunk@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote:

    On 06/04/22 18:41, John Larkin wrote:
    On Wed, 6 Apr 2022 17:48:53 +0100, Martin Brown
    <'''newspam'''@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

    On 06/04/2022 17:26, Ricky wrote:
    On Wednesday, April 6, 2022 at 10:39:16 AM UTC-4,
    jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Wed, 6 Apr 2022 09:54:11 +0100, Martin Brown
    <'''newspam'''@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

    On 06/04/2022 05:19, Jan Panteltje wrote:
    Is honey the solution?
    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2022/04/220405084610.htm

    They seem about 4 days late with their April fools joke! OTOH
    Google searches suggest they might be serious.

    Polariton based QM memristors are one of the front runners for a
    viable memristor.

    https://journals.aps.org/prapplied/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevApplied.17.024056



    And a lot of false dawns too eg. :

    https://aip.scitation.org/doi/abs/10.1063/1.5042281

    Reminds me of a book that a friend won in a raffle entitled: "The
    Magic of Honey" by Barbara Cartland

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Magic-Honey-Barbara-Cartland/dp/0552103365 >>>>>>


    Every bit as bad as her trashy novels.
    It's good in tea, and apparently a decent treatment for burns and
    bed sores. Good on English muffins.

    Surprisingly it is extremely good for certain skin damage as the very
    high sugar content osmatic pressure acts as a non-specific sterilising
    agent against some otherwise almost intractable wound infections.

    ISTR they concentrate and purify it for this particular use. There are
    traces of natural bee related antifungals and antibiotics in it too.

    Do they have English Muffins in England? Sort of like Canadian
    Bacon in Canada. And French Fries.

    "French" fries came from a Francophone region of *Belgium*.

    Half of Larkin's posts sound like they were written by the village
    idiot. Discussing Honey used in memristors and this guy starts
    talking about English Muffins. BTW, that term has a very different
    meaning in England.

    We don't call them "English" muffins but they are a breakfast staple.
    particulalry in the colder months.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/english_muffins_56640

    Thomas' is the iconic brand here, widely available. "Fork split."

    One of our favorites is fried shrimp on a English muffin. With kettle
    chips or tater tots.

    In the UK, shrimps are ~6cm long, and the edible bit fits on the last joint of >your thumb. Prawns are ~9cm. Both are delicious >https://britishseafishing.co.uk/brown-shrimp/ >https://britishseafishing.co.uk/prawn-and-shrimp-species/

    The only difference between shrimps and prawns is the 1:3 price ratio.

    The $7 a pound shrimps at Safeway are actually pretty good. Probably
    from Viet Nam or something.


    Larger still are Dublin bay prawns (scampi, langoustine).

    The enormous tropical prawns aren't worth eating, IMHO.

    The bigger they are, the easier to peel and the less flavor.

    The ones from the Gulf of Mexico are best. They snack on oil spills
    and Mississippi river silt.

    The key to boiled shrimps is Zatarains.

    https://www.amazon.com/ZATARAINS-Shrimp-Liquid-Concentrated-8-Ounce/dp/B088F1XSNX/ref=sr_1_5?crid=3BBG4026BBKKT&keywords=zatarains+crab+boil&qid=1649270102&sprefix=zata%2Caps%2C264&sr=8-5

    I actually knew old man Zatarain when I was a kid. Crazy old coot by
    then.



    As are the much more suggestive sounding "crumpets" which are a not
    dissimilar recipe but only cooked on one side and rather holey.

    https://www.daringgourmet.com/traditional-english-crumpets/

    We love crumpets but they are hard to find here. Ikedas in Auburn has
    them so we stock up when we pass through there.

    Potted Morecombe bay shrimps on crumpets. Delicious, but expensive.

    Shrimp Remoulade is good too. Boiled shrimp and sauce wrapped in a
    lettuce leaf.

    --

    If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end with doubts,
    but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties. Francis Bacon

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Clifford Heath@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Thu Apr 7 08:30:02 2022
    On 7/4/22 3:41 am, John Larkin wrote:
    We love crumpets but they are hard to find here. Ikedas in Auburn has
    them so we stock up when we pass through there.

    They're quite easy to make. I made some that filled a 20cm frypan. They
    don't go in the toaster but under the griller, but there's breakfast in
    a single crumpet.


    CH

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Tom Gardner@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Wed Apr 6 23:44:18 2022
    On 06/04/22 19:40, John Larkin wrote:
    On Wed, 6 Apr 2022 19:24:20 +0100, Tom Gardner
    <spamjunk@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote:

    On 06/04/22 18:41, John Larkin wrote:
    On Wed, 6 Apr 2022 17:48:53 +0100, Martin Brown
    <'''newspam'''@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

    On 06/04/2022 17:26, Ricky wrote:
    On Wednesday, April 6, 2022 at 10:39:16 AM UTC-4,
    jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Wed, 6 Apr 2022 09:54:11 +0100, Martin Brown
    <'''newspam'''@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

    On 06/04/2022 05:19, Jan Panteltje wrote:
    Is honey the solution?
    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2022/04/220405084610.htm

    They seem about 4 days late with their April fools joke! OTOH
    Google searches suggest they might be serious.

    Polariton based QM memristors are one of the front runners for a >>>>>>> viable memristor.

    https://journals.aps.org/prapplied/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevApplied.17.024056



    And a lot of false dawns too eg. :

    https://aip.scitation.org/doi/abs/10.1063/1.5042281

    Reminds me of a book that a friend won in a raffle entitled: "The >>>>>>> Magic of Honey" by Barbara Cartland

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Magic-Honey-Barbara-Cartland/dp/0552103365 >>>>>>>


    Every bit as bad as her trashy novels.
    It's good in tea, and apparently a decent treatment for burns and
    bed sores. Good on English muffins.

    Surprisingly it is extremely good for certain skin damage as the very
    high sugar content osmatic pressure acts as a non-specific sterilising >>>> agent against some otherwise almost intractable wound infections.

    ISTR they concentrate and purify it for this particular use. There are >>>> traces of natural bee related antifungals and antibiotics in it too.

    Do they have English Muffins in England? Sort of like Canadian
    Bacon in Canada. And French Fries.

    "French" fries came from a Francophone region of *Belgium*.

    Half of Larkin's posts sound like they were written by the village
    idiot. Discussing Honey used in memristors and this guy starts
    talking about English Muffins. BTW, that term has a very different
    meaning in England.

    We don't call them "English" muffins but they are a breakfast staple.
    particulalry in the colder months.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/english_muffins_56640

    Thomas' is the iconic brand here, widely available. "Fork split."

    One of our favorites is fried shrimp on a English muffin. With kettle
    chips or tater tots.

    In the UK, shrimps are ~6cm long, and the edible bit fits on the last joint of
    your thumb. Prawns are ~9cm. Both are delicious
    https://britishseafishing.co.uk/brown-shrimp/
    https://britishseafishing.co.uk/prawn-and-shrimp-species/

    The only difference between shrimps and prawns is the 1:3 price ratio.

    The $7 a pound shrimps at Safeway are actually pretty good. Probably
    from Viet Nam or something.


    Larger still are Dublin bay prawns (scampi, langoustine).

    The enormous tropical prawns aren't worth eating, IMHO.

    The bigger they are, the easier to peel and the less flavor.

    That /is/ a pain, but is an advantage if you are on a diet.

    Bigger -> less flavour seems to be valid for many things,
    e.g. strawberries. It is almost as if there are the same
    number of flavour molecules, just more or less diluted.



    The ones from the Gulf of Mexico are best. They snack on oil spills
    and Mississippi river silt.

    The key to boiled shrimps is Zatarains.

    https://www.amazon.com/ZATARAINS-Shrimp-Liquid-Concentrated-8-Ounce/dp/B088F1XSNX/ref=sr_1_5?crid=3BBG4026BBKKT&keywords=zatarains+crab+boil&qid=1649270102&sprefix=zata%2Caps%2C264&sr=8-5

    I actually knew old man Zatarain when I was a kid. Crazy old coot by
    then.

    Shudder!

    Even frozen, the cold water prawns are deliciously sweet,
    much like fresh lobster and fresh squid from the English
    channel.

    /Nothing/ should be added to those :)

    Ditto live spoots, which are also sweet.

    Spoots and squid should be sauted for a 60-90s, not
    longer - unless you like eating rubber.



    As are the much more suggestive sounding "crumpets" which are a not
    dissimilar recipe but only cooked on one side and rather holey.

    https://www.daringgourmet.com/traditional-english-crumpets/

    We love crumpets but they are hard to find here. Ikedas in Auburn has
    them so we stock up when we pass through there.

    Potted Morecombe bay shrimps on crumpets. Delicious, but expensive.

    Shrimp Remoulade is good too. Boiled shrimp and sauce wrapped in a
    lettuce leaf.

    I like celeriac remoulade, but the sauce would overpower a
    good shrimp or prawn (but be necessary for tropical tiger
    prawns).

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Larkin@21:1/5 to spamjunk@blueyonder.co.uk on Wed Apr 6 16:08:40 2022
    On Wed, 6 Apr 2022 23:44:18 +0100, Tom Gardner
    <spamjunk@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote:

    On 06/04/22 19:40, John Larkin wrote:
    On Wed, 6 Apr 2022 19:24:20 +0100, Tom Gardner
    <spamjunk@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote:

    On 06/04/22 18:41, John Larkin wrote:
    On Wed, 6 Apr 2022 17:48:53 +0100, Martin Brown
    <'''newspam'''@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

    On 06/04/2022 17:26, Ricky wrote:
    On Wednesday, April 6, 2022 at 10:39:16 AM UTC-4,
    jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Wed, 6 Apr 2022 09:54:11 +0100, Martin Brown
    <'''newspam'''@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

    On 06/04/2022 05:19, Jan Panteltje wrote:
    Is honey the solution?
    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2022/04/220405084610.htm >>>>>>>>
    They seem about 4 days late with their April fools joke! OTOH
    Google searches suggest they might be serious.

    Polariton based QM memristors are one of the front runners for a >>>>>>>> viable memristor.

    https://journals.aps.org/prapplied/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevApplied.17.024056



    And a lot of false dawns too eg. :

    https://aip.scitation.org/doi/abs/10.1063/1.5042281

    Reminds me of a book that a friend won in a raffle entitled: "The >>>>>>>> Magic of Honey" by Barbara Cartland

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Magic-Honey-Barbara-Cartland/dp/0552103365 >>>>>>>>


    Every bit as bad as her trashy novels.
    It's good in tea, and apparently a decent treatment for burns and >>>>>>> bed sores. Good on English muffins.

    Surprisingly it is extremely good for certain skin damage as the very >>>>> high sugar content osmatic pressure acts as a non-specific sterilising >>>>> agent against some otherwise almost intractable wound infections.

    ISTR they concentrate and purify it for this particular use. There are >>>>> traces of natural bee related antifungals and antibiotics in it too. >>>>>
    Do they have English Muffins in England? Sort of like Canadian
    Bacon in Canada. And French Fries.

    "French" fries came from a Francophone region of *Belgium*.

    Half of Larkin's posts sound like they were written by the village >>>>>> idiot. Discussing Honey used in memristors and this guy starts
    talking about English Muffins. BTW, that term has a very different >>>>>> meaning in England.

    We don't call them "English" muffins but they are a breakfast staple. >>>>> particulalry in the colder months.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/english_muffins_56640

    Thomas' is the iconic brand here, widely available. "Fork split."

    One of our favorites is fried shrimp on a English muffin. With kettle
    chips or tater tots.

    In the UK, shrimps are ~6cm long, and the edible bit fits on the last joint of
    your thumb. Prawns are ~9cm. Both are delicious
    https://britishseafishing.co.uk/brown-shrimp/
    https://britishseafishing.co.uk/prawn-and-shrimp-species/

    The only difference between shrimps and prawns is the 1:3 price ratio.

    The $7 a pound shrimps at Safeway are actually pretty good. Probably
    from Viet Nam or something.


    Larger still are Dublin bay prawns (scampi, langoustine).

    The enormous tropical prawns aren't worth eating, IMHO.

    The bigger they are, the easier to peel and the less flavor.

    That /is/ a pain, but is an advantage if you are on a diet.

    Bigger -> less flavour seems to be valid for many things,
    e.g. strawberries. It is almost as if there are the same
    number of flavour molecules, just more or less diluted.



    The ones from the Gulf of Mexico are best. They snack on oil spills
    and Mississippi river silt.

    The key to boiled shrimps is Zatarains.

    https://www.amazon.com/ZATARAINS-Shrimp-Liquid-Concentrated-8-Ounce/dp/B088F1XSNX/ref=sr_1_5?crid=3BBG4026BBKKT&keywords=zatarains+crab+boil&qid=1649270102&sprefix=zata%2Caps%2C264&sr=8-5

    I actually knew old man Zatarain when I was a kid. Crazy old coot by
    then.

    Shudder!

    Even frozen, the cold water prawns are deliciously sweet,
    much like fresh lobster and fresh squid from the English
    channel.

    /Nothing/ should be added to those :)

    Cajun/creole food: Nothing succeeds like excess.

    --

    If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end with doubts,
    but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties. Francis Bacon

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ricky@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Wed Apr 6 16:20:22 2022
    On Wednesday, April 6, 2022 at 2:40:29 PM UTC-4, John Larkin wrote:
    On Wed, 6 Apr 2022 19:24:20 +0100, Tom Gardner
    <spam...@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote:

    On 06/04/22 18:41, John Larkin wrote:
    On Wed, 6 Apr 2022 17:48:53 +0100, Martin Brown
    <'''newspam'''@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

    On 06/04/2022 17:26, Ricky wrote:
    On Wednesday, April 6, 2022 at 10:39:16 AM UTC-4,
    jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Wed, 6 Apr 2022 09:54:11 +0100, Martin Brown
    <'''newspam'''@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

    On 06/04/2022 05:19, Jan Panteltje wrote:
    Is honey the solution?
    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2022/04/220405084610.htm >>>>>>
    They seem about 4 days late with their April fools joke! OTOH
    Google searches suggest they might be serious.

    Polariton based QM memristors are one of the front runners for a >>>>>> viable memristor.

    https://journals.aps.org/prapplied/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevApplied.17.024056



    And a lot of false dawns too eg. :

    https://aip.scitation.org/doi/abs/10.1063/1.5042281

    Reminds me of a book that a friend won in a raffle entitled: "The >>>>>> Magic of Honey" by Barbara Cartland

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Magic-Honey-Barbara-Cartland/dp/0552103365 >>>>>>


    Every bit as bad as her trashy novels.
    It's good in tea, and apparently a decent treatment for burns and >>>>> bed sores. Good on English muffins.

    Surprisingly it is extremely good for certain skin damage as the very >>> high sugar content osmatic pressure acts as a non-specific sterilising >>> agent against some otherwise almost intractable wound infections.

    ISTR they concentrate and purify it for this particular use. There are >>> traces of natural bee related antifungals and antibiotics in it too.

    Do they have English Muffins in England? Sort of like Canadian
    Bacon in Canada. And French Fries.

    "French" fries came from a Francophone region of *Belgium*.

    Half of Larkin's posts sound like they were written by the village
    idiot. Discussing Honey used in memristors and this guy starts
    talking about English Muffins. BTW, that term has a very different
    meaning in England.

    We don't call them "English" muffins but they are a breakfast staple. >>> particulalry in the colder months.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/english_muffins_56640

    Thomas' is the iconic brand here, widely available. "Fork split."

    One of our favorites is fried shrimp on a English muffin. With kettle
    chips or tater tots.

    In the UK, shrimps are ~6cm long, and the edible bit fits on the last joint of
    your thumb. Prawns are ~9cm. Both are delicious >https://britishseafishing.co.uk/brown-shrimp/ >https://britishseafishing.co.uk/prawn-and-shrimp-species/
    The only difference between shrimps and prawns is the 1:3 price ratio.

    The $7 a pound shrimps at Safeway are actually pretty good. Probably
    from Viet Nam or something.

    Larger still are Dublin bay prawns (scampi, langoustine).

    The enormous tropical prawns aren't worth eating, IMHO.
    The bigger they are, the easier to peel and the less flavor.

    That is simply BS. I cook shrimp all the time and the best shrimp are not frozen, which here typically means gulf shrimp. I've had frozen gulf shrimp and they are not as good. I have never seen any correlation of size to taste. But then I don't buy
    the super colossal shrimp. I usually throw in the towel at colossal or my favorite is extra jumbo (16/20 cnt).


    The ones from the Gulf of Mexico are best. They snack on oil spills
    and Mississippi river silt.

    The key to boiled shrimps is Zatarains.

    https://www.amazon.com/ZATARAINS-Shrimp-Liquid-Concentrated-8-Ounce/dp/B088F1XSNX/ref=sr_1_5?crid=3BBG4026BBKKT&keywords=zatarains+crab+boil&qid=1649270102&sprefix=zata%2Caps%2C264&sr=8-5

    I actually knew old man Zatarain when I was a kid. Crazy old coot by
    then.

    Boiling shrimp is ok, but grilled with a special seasoning blend is much better. I recently had offers of sex for my shrimp. lol

    It's kind of funny that Puerto Rico doesn't have much in the way of spicy food. It's actually pretty bland. Lost of plantains.

    --

    Rick C.

    -- Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
    -- Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ricky@21:1/5 to Tom Gardner on Wed Apr 6 16:23:49 2022
    On Wednesday, April 6, 2022 at 6:44:24 PM UTC-4, Tom Gardner wrote:
    On 06/04/22 19:40, John Larkin wrote:
    On Wed, 6 Apr 2022 19:24:20 +0100, Tom Gardner
    <spam...@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote:

    On 06/04/22 18:41, John Larkin wrote:
    On Wed, 6 Apr 2022 17:48:53 +0100, Martin Brown
    <'''newspam'''@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

    On 06/04/2022 17:26, Ricky wrote:
    On Wednesday, April 6, 2022 at 10:39:16 AM UTC-4,
    jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Wed, 6 Apr 2022 09:54:11 +0100, Martin Brown
    <'''newspam'''@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

    On 06/04/2022 05:19, Jan Panteltje wrote:
    Is honey the solution?
    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2022/04/220405084610.htm >>>>>>>
    They seem about 4 days late with their April fools joke! OTOH
    Google searches suggest they might be serious.

    Polariton based QM memristors are one of the front runners for a >>>>>>> viable memristor.

    https://journals.aps.org/prapplied/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevApplied.17.024056



    And a lot of false dawns too eg. :

    https://aip.scitation.org/doi/abs/10.1063/1.5042281

    Reminds me of a book that a friend won in a raffle entitled: "The >>>>>>> Magic of Honey" by Barbara Cartland

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Magic-Honey-Barbara-Cartland/dp/0552103365 >>>>>>>


    Every bit as bad as her trashy novels.
    It's good in tea, and apparently a decent treatment for burns and >>>>>> bed sores. Good on English muffins.

    Surprisingly it is extremely good for certain skin damage as the very >>>> high sugar content osmatic pressure acts as a non-specific sterilising >>>> agent against some otherwise almost intractable wound infections.

    ISTR they concentrate and purify it for this particular use. There are >>>> traces of natural bee related antifungals and antibiotics in it too. >>>>
    Do they have English Muffins in England? Sort of like Canadian
    Bacon in Canada. And French Fries.

    "French" fries came from a Francophone region of *Belgium*.

    Half of Larkin's posts sound like they were written by the village >>>>> idiot. Discussing Honey used in memristors and this guy starts
    talking about English Muffins. BTW, that term has a very different >>>>> meaning in England.

    We don't call them "English" muffins but they are a breakfast staple. >>>> particulalry in the colder months.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/english_muffins_56640

    Thomas' is the iconic brand here, widely available. "Fork split."

    One of our favorites is fried shrimp on a English muffin. With kettle
    chips or tater tots.

    In the UK, shrimps are ~6cm long, and the edible bit fits on the last joint of
    your thumb. Prawns are ~9cm. Both are delicious
    https://britishseafishing.co.uk/brown-shrimp/
    https://britishseafishing.co.uk/prawn-and-shrimp-species/

    The only difference between shrimps and prawns is the 1:3 price ratio.

    The $7 a pound shrimps at Safeway are actually pretty good. Probably
    from Viet Nam or something.


    Larger still are Dublin bay prawns (scampi, langoustine).

    The enormous tropical prawns aren't worth eating, IMHO.

    The bigger they are, the easier to peel and the less flavor.
    That /is/ a pain, but is an advantage if you are on a diet.

    Bigger -> less flavour seems to be valid for many things,
    e.g. strawberries. It is almost as if there are the same
    number of flavour molecules, just more or less diluted.

    It's simply not true for shrimp. Large strawberries have been bred for size in addition to surviving traveling. That is where the flavor goes, the connective tissue rather than the sweet, sugary flesh that makes the berry worth eating.

    --

    Rick C.

    -+ Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
    -+ Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Tom Gardner@21:1/5 to Ricky on Thu Apr 7 08:26:18 2022
    On 07/04/22 00:20, Ricky wrote:
    On Wednesday, April 6, 2022 at 2:40:29 PM UTC-4, John Larkin wrote:
    On Wed, 6 Apr 2022 19:24:20 +0100, Tom Gardner <spam...@blueyonder.co.uk>
    wrote:

    On 06/04/22 18:41, John Larkin wrote:
    On Wed, 6 Apr 2022 17:48:53 +0100, Martin Brown
    <'''newspam'''@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

    On 06/04/2022 17:26, Ricky wrote:
    On Wednesday, April 6, 2022 at 10:39:16 AM UTC-4,
    jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Wed, 6 Apr 2022 09:54:11 +0100, Martin Brown
    <'''newspam'''@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

    On 06/04/2022 05:19, Jan Panteltje wrote:
    Is honey the solution?
    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2022/04/220405084610.htm >>>>>>>>


    They seem about 4 days late with their April fools joke! OTOH
    Google searches suggest they might be serious.

    Polariton based QM memristors are one of the front runners for >>>>>>>> a viable memristor.

    https://journals.aps.org/prapplied/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevApplied.17.024056





    And a lot of false dawns too eg. :

    https://aip.scitation.org/doi/abs/10.1063/1.5042281

    Reminds me of a book that a friend won in a raffle entitled:
    "The Magic of Honey" by Barbara Cartland

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Magic-Honey-Barbara-Cartland/dp/0552103365 >>>>>>>>




    Every bit as bad as her trashy novels.
    It's good in tea, and apparently a decent treatment for burns
    and bed sores. Good on English muffins.

    Surprisingly it is extremely good for certain skin damage as the
    very high sugar content osmatic pressure acts as a non-specific
    sterilising agent against some otherwise almost intractable wound
    infections.

    ISTR they concentrate and purify it for this particular use. There
    are traces of natural bee related antifungals and antibiotics in it
    too.

    Do they have English Muffins in England? Sort of like Canadian
    Bacon in Canada. And French Fries.

    "French" fries came from a Francophone region of *Belgium*.

    Half of Larkin's posts sound like they were written by the village >>>>>> idiot. Discussing Honey used in memristors and this guy starts
    talking about English Muffins. BTW, that term has a very different >>>>>> meaning in England.

    We don't call them "English" muffins but they are a breakfast
    staple. particulalry in the colder months.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/english_muffins_56640

    Thomas' is the iconic brand here, widely available. "Fork split."

    One of our favorites is fried shrimp on a English muffin. With kettle
    chips or tater tots.

    In the UK, shrimps are ~6cm long, and the edible bit fits on the last
    joint of your thumb. Prawns are ~9cm. Both are delicious
    https://britishseafishing.co.uk/brown-shrimp/
    https://britishseafishing.co.uk/prawn-and-shrimp-species/
    The only difference between shrimps and prawns is the 1:3 price ratio.

    The $7 a pound shrimps at Safeway are actually pretty good. Probably from
    Viet Nam or something.

    Larger still are Dublin bay prawns (scampi, langoustine).

    The enormous tropical prawns aren't worth eating, IMHO.
    The bigger they are, the easier to peel and the less flavor.

    That is simply BS. I cook shrimp all the time and the best shrimp are not frozen, which here typically means gulf shrimp. I've had frozen gulf shrimp and they are not as good. I have never seen any correlation of size to taste. But then I don't buy the super colossal shrimp. I usually throw in the towel at colossal or my favorite is extra jumbo (16/20 cnt).


    The ones from the Gulf of Mexico are best. They snack on oil spills and
    Mississippi river silt.

    The key to boiled shrimps is Zatarains.

    https://www.amazon.com/ZATARAINS-Shrimp-Liquid-Concentrated-8-Ounce/dp/B088F1XSNX/ref=sr_1_5?crid=3BBG4026BBKKT&keywords=zatarains+crab+boil&qid=1649270102&sprefix=zata%2Caps%2C264&sr=8-5



    I actually knew old man Zatarain when I was a kid. Crazy old coot by
    then.

    Boiling shrimp is ok, but grilled with a special seasoning blend is much better. I recently had offers of sex for my shrimp. lol

    It's kind of funny that Puerto Rico doesn't have much in the way of spicy food. It's actually pretty bland. Lost of plantains.



    Did you bother to read my post?

    How big are /your/ shrimp?

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Martin Brown@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Thu Apr 7 09:30:53 2022
    On 06/04/2022 18:41, John Larkin wrote:
    On Wed, 6 Apr 2022 17:48:53 +0100, Martin Brown
    <'''newspam'''@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

    On 06/04/2022 17:26, Ricky wrote:
    On Wednesday, April 6, 2022 at 10:39:16 AM UTC-4,

    As are the much more suggestive sounding "crumpets" which are a not
    dissimilar recipe but only cooked on one side and rather holey.

    https://www.daringgourmet.com/traditional-english-crumpets/

    We love crumpets but they are hard to find here. Ikedas in Auburn has
    them so we stock up when we pass through there.

    There must surely be a British shop in somewhere the size of San
    Francisco. I recall there were a few "British" and "Irish" pubs.

    Recipe isn't that difficult if you are inclined to DIY.

    --
    Regards,
    Martin Brown

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com@21:1/5 to '''newspam'''@nonad.co.uk on Thu Apr 7 03:58:06 2022
    On Thu, 7 Apr 2022 09:30:53 +0100, Martin Brown
    <'''newspam'''@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

    On 06/04/2022 18:41, John Larkin wrote:
    On Wed, 6 Apr 2022 17:48:53 +0100, Martin Brown
    <'''newspam'''@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

    On 06/04/2022 17:26, Ricky wrote:
    On Wednesday, April 6, 2022 at 10:39:16 AM UTC-4,

    As are the much more suggestive sounding "crumpets" which are a not
    dissimilar recipe but only cooked on one side and rather holey.

    https://www.daringgourmet.com/traditional-english-crumpets/

    We love crumpets but they are hard to find here. Ikedas in Auburn has
    them so we stock up when we pass through there.

    There must surely be a British shop in somewhere the size of San
    Francisco. I recall there were a few "British" and "Irish" pubs.

    Recipe isn't that difficult if you are inclined to DIY.

    Camelot, on the crumbling cliffs of Pacifica (look for drone vids of
    Pacifica on Youtube) is a proper fake British bar. The fish and chips
    are optionally oysters and chips.

    There are far more Irish pubs than brit.


    --

    I yam what I yam - Popeye

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Martin Brown@21:1/5 to jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com on Thu Apr 7 13:24:59 2022
    On 07/04/2022 11:58, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Thu, 7 Apr 2022 09:30:53 +0100, Martin Brown
    <'''newspam'''@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

    On 06/04/2022 18:41, John Larkin wrote:
    On Wed, 6 Apr 2022 17:48:53 +0100, Martin Brown
    <'''newspam'''@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

    On 06/04/2022 17:26, Ricky wrote:
    On Wednesday, April 6, 2022 at 10:39:16 AM UTC-4,

    As are the much more suggestive sounding "crumpets" which are a not
    dissimilar recipe but only cooked on one side and rather holey.

    https://www.daringgourmet.com/traditional-english-crumpets/

    We love crumpets but they are hard to find here. Ikedas in Auburn has
    them so we stock up when we pass through there.

    There must surely be a British shop in somewhere the size of San
    Francisco. I recall there were a few "British" and "Irish" pubs.

    Recipe isn't that difficult if you are inclined to DIY.

    Camelot, on the crumbling cliffs of Pacifica (look for drone vids of
    Pacifica on Youtube) is a proper fake British bar. The fish and chips
    are optionally oysters and chips.

    My British friends who are now US expats invariably demand to go to the
    chippy when they visit the UK - something they can't easily get at home.
    Not seen any of them since lockdown started.

    UK isn't a good place to visit right now. Transport is in complete chaos
    as Covid infections run rife and there is a new Omicron XE variant a recombination of BA.1 & BA.2 that is reckoned 10% more infectious than
    either now beginning to take hold. 1 in 12 had active Covid last week!

    I'm going back a long while so I expect it isn't there now but I recall
    being taken to a "British" pub not too far from Redwood. Apart from
    serving freezing cold British beer it was notable for a big Union flag
    over the front door and a tree growing through the bar area up through
    the roof. It looked vaguely tropical shack for a "British" pub.

    There are far more Irish pubs than brit.

    Indeed.

    --
    Regards,
    Martin Brown

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com@21:1/5 to '''newspam'''@nonad.co.uk on Thu Apr 7 07:37:01 2022
    On Thu, 7 Apr 2022 13:24:59 +0100, Martin Brown
    <'''newspam'''@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

    On 07/04/2022 11:58, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Thu, 7 Apr 2022 09:30:53 +0100, Martin Brown
    <'''newspam'''@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

    On 06/04/2022 18:41, John Larkin wrote:
    On Wed, 6 Apr 2022 17:48:53 +0100, Martin Brown
    <'''newspam'''@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

    On 06/04/2022 17:26, Ricky wrote:
    On Wednesday, April 6, 2022 at 10:39:16 AM UTC-4,

    As are the much more suggestive sounding "crumpets" which are a not
    dissimilar recipe but only cooked on one side and rather holey.

    https://www.daringgourmet.com/traditional-english-crumpets/

    We love crumpets but they are hard to find here. Ikedas in Auburn has
    them so we stock up when we pass through there.

    There must surely be a British shop in somewhere the size of San
    Francisco. I recall there were a few "British" and "Irish" pubs.

    Recipe isn't that difficult if you are inclined to DIY.

    Camelot, on the crumbling cliffs of Pacifica (look for drone vids of
    Pacifica on Youtube) is a proper fake British bar. The fish and chips
    are optionally oysters and chips.

    My British friends who are now US expats invariably demand to go to the >chippy when they visit the UK - something they can't easily get at home.
    Not seen any of them since lockdown started.

    Do you have curly fries in Olde England? Civilization is greatly
    diminished without curly fries.



    --

    I yam what I yam - Popeye

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Martin Brown@21:1/5 to jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com on Thu Apr 7 15:42:13 2022
    On 07/04/2022 15:37, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Thu, 7 Apr 2022 13:24:59 +0100, Martin Brown
    <'''newspam'''@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

    On 07/04/2022 11:58, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:

    Camelot, on the crumbling cliffs of Pacifica (look for drone vids of
    Pacifica on Youtube) is a proper fake British bar. The fish and chips
    are optionally oysters and chips.

    My British friends who are now US expats invariably demand to go to the
    chippy when they visit the UK - something they can't easily get at home.
    Not seen any of them since lockdown started.

    Do you have curly fries in Olde England? Civilization is greatly
    diminished without curly fries.

    We have something called curly fries. Are they what you mean?

    https://www.tesco.com/groceries/en-GB/products/282059879

    They look like and about as appealing as worms to me!

    Or do you mean what we would call crinkle cut chips (which were all the
    rage in the 1970's here as I recall). Chunky ones and thin cut ones are
    more common now. I can't recall when I last saw them crinkle cut.

    --
    Regards,
    Martin Brown

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com@21:1/5 to '''newspam'''@nonad.co.uk on Thu Apr 7 08:04:17 2022
    On Thu, 7 Apr 2022 15:42:13 +0100, Martin Brown
    <'''newspam'''@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

    On 07/04/2022 15:37, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Thu, 7 Apr 2022 13:24:59 +0100, Martin Brown
    <'''newspam'''@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

    On 07/04/2022 11:58, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:

    Camelot, on the crumbling cliffs of Pacifica (look for drone vids of
    Pacifica on Youtube) is a proper fake British bar. The fish and chips
    are optionally oysters and chips.

    My British friends who are now US expats invariably demand to go to the
    chippy when they visit the UK - something they can't easily get at home. >>> Not seen any of them since lockdown started.

    Do you have curly fries in Olde England? Civilization is greatly
    diminished without curly fries.

    We have something called curly fries. Are they what you mean?

    https://www.tesco.com/groceries/en-GB/products/282059879

    They look like and about as appealing as worms to me!

    Real (not frozen supermarket) curlies can be wonderful.

    https://tinyurl.com/5ecafra9

    Ikeda's tri-tip sandwich with curly fries is worth the 130-mile drive.


    Or do you mean what we would call crinkle cut chips (which were all the
    rage in the 1970's here as I recall). Chunky ones and thin cut ones are
    more common now. I can't recall when I last saw them crinkle cut.

    A few places here do proper french fries, skinny and crispy and served
    in a fancy metal cone thing lined with newspaper.



    --

    I yam what I yam - Popeye

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Phil Hobbs@21:1/5 to Martin Brown on Thu Apr 7 17:04:55 2022
    Martin Brown wrote:
    On 06/04/2022 18:41, John Larkin wrote:
    On Wed, 6 Apr 2022 17:48:53 +0100, Martin Brown
    <'''newspam'''@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

    On 06/04/2022 17:26, Ricky wrote:
    On Wednesday, April 6, 2022 at 10:39:16 AM UTC-4,

    As are the much more suggestive sounding "crumpets" which are a not
    dissimilar recipe but only cooked on one side and rather holey.

    https://www.daringgourmet.com/traditional-english-crumpets/

    We love crumpets but they are hard to find here. Ikedas in Auburn has
    them so we stock up when we pass through there.

    There must surely be a British shop in somewhere the size of San
    Francisco. I recall there were a few "British" and "Irish" pubs.

    Recipe isn't that difficult if you are inclined to DIY.


    BTW, Martin,

    Do you have a copy of your PHYS362 notes page handy? It's nowhere to be
    found on the web, even on archive.org. I'm going through old sci.optics
    posts for the new book, and IIRC you said it had everything about all
    kinds of dispersive spectrometers.

    Thanks

    Phil Hobbs
    (the above email address works)

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Clifford Heath@21:1/5 to jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com on Fri Apr 8 09:33:34 2022
    On 8/4/22 1:04 am, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Thu, 7 Apr 2022 15:42:13 +0100, Martin Brown
    <'''newspam'''@nonad.co.uk> wrote:
    Or do you mean what we would call crinkle cut chips (which were all the
    rage in the 1970's here as I recall). Chunky ones and thin cut ones are
    more common now. I can't recall when I last saw them crinkle cut.

    A few places here do proper french fries, skinny and crispy and served
    in a fancy metal cone thing lined with newspaper.

    The French call those Belgian fries.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ricky@21:1/5 to Tom Gardner on Thu Apr 7 19:38:21 2022
    On Thursday, April 7, 2022 at 3:26:25 AM UTC-4, Tom Gardner wrote:
    On 07/04/22 00:20, Ricky wrote:
    On Wednesday, April 6, 2022 at 2:40:29 PM UTC-4, John Larkin wrote:
    On Wed, 6 Apr 2022 19:24:20 +0100, Tom Gardner <spam...@blueyonder.co.uk> >> wrote:

    On 06/04/22 18:41, John Larkin wrote:
    On Wed, 6 Apr 2022 17:48:53 +0100, Martin Brown
    <'''newspam'''@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

    On 06/04/2022 17:26, Ricky wrote:
    On Wednesday, April 6, 2022 at 10:39:16 AM UTC-4,
    jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Wed, 6 Apr 2022 09:54:11 +0100, Martin Brown
    <'''newspam'''@nonad.co.uk> wrote:

    On 06/04/2022 05:19, Jan Panteltje wrote:
    Is honey the solution?
    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2022/04/220405084610.htm >>>>>>>>


    They seem about 4 days late with their April fools joke! OTOH
    Google searches suggest they might be serious.

    Polariton based QM memristors are one of the front runners for >>>>>>>> a viable memristor.

    https://journals.aps.org/prapplied/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevApplied.17.024056





    And a lot of false dawns too eg. :

    https://aip.scitation.org/doi/abs/10.1063/1.5042281

    Reminds me of a book that a friend won in a raffle entitled: >>>>>>>> "The Magic of Honey" by Barbara Cartland

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Magic-Honey-Barbara-Cartland/dp/0552103365 >>>>>>>>




    Every bit as bad as her trashy novels.
    It's good in tea, and apparently a decent treatment for burns >>>>>>> and bed sores. Good on English muffins.

    Surprisingly it is extremely good for certain skin damage as the
    very high sugar content osmatic pressure acts as a non-specific
    sterilising agent against some otherwise almost intractable wound >>>>> infections.

    ISTR they concentrate and purify it for this particular use. There >>>>> are traces of natural bee related antifungals and antibiotics in it >>>>> too.

    Do they have English Muffins in England? Sort of like Canadian >>>>>>> Bacon in Canada. And French Fries.

    "French" fries came from a Francophone region of *Belgium*.

    Half of Larkin's posts sound like they were written by the village >>>>>> idiot. Discussing Honey used in memristors and this guy starts
    talking about English Muffins. BTW, that term has a very different >>>>>> meaning in England.

    We don't call them "English" muffins but they are a breakfast
    staple. particulalry in the colder months.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/english_muffins_56640

    Thomas' is the iconic brand here, widely available. "Fork split."

    One of our favorites is fried shrimp on a English muffin. With kettle >>>> chips or tater tots.

    In the UK, shrimps are ~6cm long, and the edible bit fits on the last >>> joint of your thumb. Prawns are ~9cm. Both are delicious
    https://britishseafishing.co.uk/brown-shrimp/
    https://britishseafishing.co.uk/prawn-and-shrimp-species/
    The only difference between shrimps and prawns is the 1:3 price ratio.

    The $7 a pound shrimps at Safeway are actually pretty good. Probably from >> Viet Nam or something.

    Larger still are Dublin bay prawns (scampi, langoustine).

    The enormous tropical prawns aren't worth eating, IMHO.
    The bigger they are, the easier to peel and the less flavor.

    That is simply BS. I cook shrimp all the time and the best shrimp are not frozen, which here typically means gulf shrimp. I've had frozen gulf shrimp
    and they are not as good. I have never seen any correlation of size to taste. But then I don't buy the super colossal shrimp. I usually throw in the towel at colossal or my favorite is extra jumbo (16/20 cnt).


    The ones from the Gulf of Mexico are best. They snack on oil spills and >> Mississippi river silt.

    The key to boiled shrimps is Zatarains.

    https://www.amazon.com/ZATARAINS-Shrimp-Liquid-Concentrated-8-Ounce/dp/B088F1XSNX/ref=sr_1_5?crid=3BBG4026BBKKT&keywords=zatarains+crab+boil&qid=1649270102&sprefix=zata%2Caps%2C264&sr=8-5



    I actually knew old man Zatarain when I was a kid. Crazy old coot by
    then.

    Boiling shrimp is ok, but grilled with a special seasoning blend is much better. I recently had offers of sex for my shrimp. lol

    It's kind of funny that Puerto Rico doesn't have much in the way of spicy food. It's actually pretty bland. Lost of plantains.

    Did you bother to read my post?

    Weird question to ask. I didn't reply to your post. Was there something in your post that is pertinent to what I wrote?


    How big are /your/ shrimp?

    They're not actually "my" shrimp. I just buy them. It's the seasoning mixture that's "mine". I use anything from 30-40 (when sautéing) count to 16-20 count (on the grill) and have tried larger. I find the larger ones taste just fine. The only issue
    is it's a bit harder to get enough seasoning on them given the large volume vs. surface, and of course, the higher price not to mention it's hard to find shrimp larger than 16 count.

    One thing odd about shrimp in Puerto Rico is they are mostly sold in stores in 12 oz bags rather than 1 lb like in the mainland. The exception is in the Walmart owned Amigo supermarkets. Seems they are a mainland "intrusion" into the PR space and sell
    what they sell elsewhere. It's the only store where I can find my brand of peanut butter and a couple of other things.

    --

    Rick C.

    +- Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
    +- Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Martin Brown@21:1/5 to Phil Hobbs on Fri Apr 8 10:24:57 2022
    On 07/04/2022 22:04, Phil Hobbs wrote:

    BTW, Martin,

    Do you have a copy of your PHYS362 notes page handy?  It's nowhere to be found on the web, even on archive.org.  I'm going through old sci.optics posts for the new book, and IIRC you said it had everything about all
    kinds of dispersive spectrometers.

    I can't find my own old post about this but I suspect you mean the JMU astronomy instrumentation course PHYS362. This one?

    https://www.astro.ljmu.ac.uk/~dfb/teaching.html#past_years

    It must be a decade or so since I wrote about that. If you need it
    quickly you are best off asking the lecturer who wrote it. Link above.

    If you can point me at my own Usenet post it will give me an idea of the
    date range to look and more importantly the filename!

    I might have a copy squirrelled away on my (N-3)rd desktop but at the
    moment it is doing a good impression of a Norwegian blue parrot.

    To be fair there are no warning beeps on boot but it outputs no video
    signal at all and refuses to connect to the network. However, my recent
    move to FTTP and new router on a different subnet may explain that.

    Firewall running on the old XP machine is very aggressive and paranoid.
    It hasn't been switched on for a couple of years now...

    --
    Regards,
    Martin Brown

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Phil Hobbs@21:1/5 to Martin Brown on Fri Apr 8 10:00:45 2022
    Martin Brown wrote:
    On 07/04/2022 22:04, Phil Hobbs wrote:

    BTW, Martin,

    Do you have a copy of your PHYS362 notes page handy?  It's nowhere to
    be found on the web, even on archive.org.  I'm going through old
    sci.optics posts for the new book, and IIRC you said it had everything
    about all kinds of dispersive spectrometers.

    I can't find my own old post about this but I suspect you mean the JMU astronomy instrumentation course PHYS362. This one?

    https://www.astro.ljmu.ac.uk/~dfb/teaching.html#past_years

    It must be a decade or so since I wrote about that. If you need it
    quickly you are best off asking the lecturer who wrote it. Link above.

    If you can point me at my own Usenet post it will give me an idea of the
    date range to look and more importantly the filename!

    I might have a copy squirrelled away on my (N-3)rd desktop but at the
    moment it is doing a good impression of a Norwegian blue parrot.

    To be fair there are no warning beeps on boot but it outputs no video
    signal at all and refuses to connect to the network. However, my recent
    move to FTTP and new router on a different subnet may explain that.

    Firewall running on the old XP machine is very aggressive and paranoid.
    It hasn't been switched on for a couple of years now...


    I looked on ljmu.ac.uk, but there wasn't anything resembling the
    description.

    The original sci.optics post is below.

    Thanks

    Phil





    -------- Forwarded Message --------
    Subject: Re: Working Principles of an Echelle Monochromator
    Date: Mon, 30 Jul 2007 01:00:01 -0700
    From: Martin Brown <|||newspam|||@nezumi.demon.co.uk>
    Organization: http://groups.google.com
    Newsgroups: sci.techniques.spectroscopy,sci.optics,sci.chem
    References: <1185734989.602361.251930@w3g2000hsg.googlegroups.com>

    On Jul 29, 7:49 pm, Farooq W <faroo...@gmail.com> wrote:
    Does anyone know of an very elementary discussion and working
    principles of echelle monochromator as a review article/ website as
    how the order sorter works and how the spectrum is obtained in a two dimensional way. I have a chemistry background, most websites are
    either too technical company advertisments. Google images for a simple diagram of an echelle monochromator, leads to mostly astronomy
    webpages. I am interested in its applications in atomic spectroscopic analysis.

    The working principles are the same. And astronomers are in effect
    using it to study amonst other things chemistry in molecular clouds by spectroscopy. You have a bit more signal and don't have to hang the
    thing on a telescope.

    A bit scrappy in style but a webpage covering almost all the ways of
    splitting and resolving wavelengths is below. Echelle monochromators
    and Fabry-Perot interferometers are well down the page.

    http://www.astro.livjm.ac.uk/courses/phys362/notes/index.html

    BTW Did you really mean "too technical company advertisments" isn't
    there an "or" to go in there somewhere?
    Most company advertisments make grandiose claims for their magical kit
    and gloss over all the detail.

    Regards,
    Martin Brown



    --
    Dr Philip C D Hobbs
    Principal Consultant
    ElectroOptical Innovations LLC / Hobbs ElectroOptics
    Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics
    Briarcliff Manor NY 10510

    http://electrooptical.net
    http://hobbs-eo.com

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Martin Brown@21:1/5 to Phil Hobbs on Fri Apr 8 16:28:17 2022
    On 08/04/2022 15:00, Phil Hobbs wrote:
    Martin Brown wrote:
    On 07/04/2022 22:04, Phil Hobbs wrote:

    BTW, Martin,

    Do you have a copy of your PHYS362 notes page handy?  It's nowhere to
    be found on the web, even on archive.org.  I'm going through old
    sci.optics posts for the new book, and IIRC you said it had
    everything about all kinds of dispersive spectrometers.

    I can't find my own old post about this but I suspect you mean the JMU
    astronomy instrumentation course PHYS362. This one?

    https://www.astro.ljmu.ac.uk/~dfb/teaching.html#past_years

    It must be a decade or so since I wrote about that. If you need it
    quickly you are best off asking the lecturer who wrote it. Link above.

    If you can point me at my own Usenet post it will give me an idea of
    the date range to look and more importantly the filename!

    I might have a copy squirrelled away on my (N-3)rd desktop but at the
    moment it is doing a good impression of a Norwegian blue parrot.

    To be fair there are no warning beeps on boot but it outputs no video
    signal at all and refuses to connect to the network. However, my
    recent move to FTTP and new router on a different subnet may explain
    that.

    Firewall running on the old XP machine is very aggressive and
    paranoid. It hasn't been switched on for a couple of years now...


    I looked on ljmu.ac.uk, but there wasn't anything resembling the
    description.

    The original sci.optics post is below.

    I'm not sure now but I think the guy who put that page together may have
    been David Bersier at Liverpool JMU. Contact details below.

    https://www.ljmu.ac.uk/about-us/staff-profiles/faculty-of-engineering-and-technology/astrophysics-research-institute/david-bersier

    If you drop him a line he might be able to help you or point you at
    whoever did create that old web page on the various spectroscopy
    techniques. His webpage says he taught PHYS362 so there is a chance.

    If I do find my copy I'll drop you a line privately, but I'm afraid the
    odds are stacked against it if it was a web URL. PDFs I usually download
    and keep but I only scrape webpages if I expect to need it again.

    --
    Regards,
    Martin Brown

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Phil Hobbs@21:1/5 to Martin Brown on Fri Apr 8 12:43:24 2022
    Martin Brown wrote:
    On 07/04/2022 22:04, Phil Hobbs wrote:

    BTW, Martin,

    Do you have a copy of your PHYS362 notes page handy?  It's nowhere to
    be found on the web, even on archive.org.  I'm going through old
    sci.optics posts for the new book, and IIRC you said it had everything
    about all kinds of dispersive spectrometers.

    I can't find my own old post about this but I suspect you mean the JMU astronomy instrumentation course PHYS362. This one?

    https://www.astro.ljmu.ac.uk/~dfb/teaching.html#past_years

    It must be a decade or so since I wrote about that. If you need it
    quickly you are best off asking the lecturer who wrote it. Link above.

    If you can point me at my own Usenet post it will give me an idea of the
    date range to look and more importantly the filename!

    I might have a copy squirrelled away on my (N-3)rd desktop but at the
    moment it is doing a good impression of a Norwegian blue parrot.

    To be fair there are no warning beeps on boot but it outputs no video
    signal at all and refuses to connect to the network. However, my recent
    move to FTTP and new router on a different subnet may explain that.

    Firewall running on the old XP machine is very aggressive and paranoid.
    It hasn't been switched on for a couple of years now...


    (Reposted because the first one hasn't shown up)

    I looked on ljmu.ac.uk, but there wasn't anything resembling the
    description.

    The original sci.optics post is below.

    Thanks

    Phil





    -------- Forwarded Message --------
    Subject: Re: Working Principles of an Echelle Monochromator
    Date: Mon, 30 Jul 2007 01:00:01 -0700
    From: Martin Brown <|||newspam|||@nezumi.demon.co.uk>
    Organization: http://groups.google.com
    Newsgroups: sci.techniques.spectroscopy,sci.optics,sci.chem
    References: <1185734989.602361.251930@w3g2000hsg.googlegroups.com>

    On Jul 29, 7:49 pm, Farooq W <faroo...@gmail.com> wrote:
    Does anyone know of an very elementary discussion and working
    principles of echelle monochromator as a review article/ website as
    how the order sorter works and how the spectrum is obtained in a two dimensional way. I have a chemistry background, most websites are
    either too technical company advertisments. Google images for a simple diagram of an echelle monochromator, leads to mostly astronomy
    webpages. I am interested in its applications in atomic spectroscopic analysis.

    The working principles are the same. And astronomers are in effect
    using it to study amonst other things chemistry in molecular clouds by spectroscopy. You have a bit more signal and don't have to hang the
    thing on a telescope.

    A bit scrappy in style but a webpage covering almost all the ways of
    splitting and resolving wavelengths is below. Echelle monochromators
    and Fabry-Perot interferometers are well down the page.

    http://www.astro.livjm.ac.uk/courses/phys362/notes/index.html

    BTW Did you really mean "too technical company advertisments" isn't
    there an "or" to go in there somewhere?
    Most company advertisments make grandiose claims for their magical kit
    and gloss over all the detail.

    Regards,
    Martin Brown



    --
    Dr Philip C D Hobbs
    Principal Consultant
    ElectroOptical Innovations LLC / Hobbs ElectroOptics
    Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics
    Briarcliff Manor NY 10510

    http://electrooptical.net
    http://hobbs-eo.com

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Phil Hobbs@21:1/5 to Martin Brown on Fri Apr 8 15:16:53 2022
    Martin Brown wrote:
    On 08/04/2022 15:00, Phil Hobbs wrote:
    Martin Brown wrote:
    On 07/04/2022 22:04, Phil Hobbs wrote:

    BTW, Martin,

    Do you have a copy of your PHYS362 notes page handy?  It's nowhere
    to be found on the web, even on archive.org.  I'm going through old
    sci.optics posts for the new book, and IIRC you said it had
    everything about all kinds of dispersive spectrometers.

    I can't find my own old post about this but I suspect you mean the
    JMU astronomy instrumentation course PHYS362. This one?

    https://www.astro.ljmu.ac.uk/~dfb/teaching.html#past_years

    It must be a decade or so since I wrote about that. If you need it
    quickly you are best off asking the lecturer who wrote it. Link above.

    If you can point me at my own Usenet post it will give me an idea of
    the date range to look and more importantly the filename!

    I might have a copy squirrelled away on my (N-3)rd desktop but at the
    moment it is doing a good impression of a Norwegian blue parrot.

    To be fair there are no warning beeps on boot but it outputs no video
    signal at all and refuses to connect to the network. However, my
    recent move to FTTP and new router on a different subnet may explain
    that.

    Firewall running on the old XP machine is very aggressive and
    paranoid. It hasn't been switched on for a couple of years now...


    I looked on ljmu.ac.uk, but there wasn't anything resembling the
    description.

    The original sci.optics post is below.

    I'm not sure now but I think the guy who put that page together may have
    been David Bersier at Liverpool JMU. Contact details below.

    https://www.ljmu.ac.uk/about-us/staff-profiles/faculty-of-engineering-and-technology/astrophysics-research-institute/david-bersier


    If you drop him a line he might be able to help you or point you at
    whoever did create that old web page on the various spectroscopy
    techniques. His webpage says he taught PHYS362 so there is a chance.

    If I do find my copy I'll drop you a line privately, but I'm afraid the
    odds are stacked against it if it was a web URL. PDFs I usually download
    and keep but I only scrape webpages if I expect to need it again.


    Shall do, thanks.

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs

    --
    Dr Philip C D Hobbs
    Principal Consultant
    ElectroOptical Innovations LLC / Hobbs ElectroOptics
    Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics
    Briarcliff Manor NY 10510

    http://electrooptical.net
    http://hobbs-eo.com

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)