• Re: Troll-feeding Senile ASSHOLE Alert!

    From Peeler@21:1/5 to All on Wed Apr 6 10:13:23 2022
    XPost: alt.usage.english

    On Tue, 05 Apr 2022 17:02:36 -0700, John Larkin, yet another mentally
    deficient troll-feeding senile idiot, babbled:


    If you bought my wife I'd try to take her back. What's your point again?

    Would you sell her? How much?

    Yeah, that's the right way: answer a KNOWN clinically insane troll's "questions" and make him come back time and again! <tsk>

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com@21:1/5 to All on Wed Apr 6 07:06:12 2022
    XPost: alt.usage.english

    On Wed, 6 Apr 2022 10:13:23 +0200, Peeler <trolltrap@valid.invalid>
    wrote:

    On Tue, 05 Apr 2022 17:02:36 -0700, John Larkin, yet another mentally >deficient troll-feeding senile idiot, babbled:


    If you bought my wife I'd try to take her back. What's your point again?

    Would you sell her? How much?

    Yeah, that's the right way: answer a KNOWN clinically insane troll's >"questions" and make him come back time and again! <tsk>

    The point is that we bought and paid for Alaska, according to the
    standards of the time. Maybe the russkies think they can seize
    anything they want to, whether the locals approve or not. That's
    actually their history.





    --

    I yam what I yam - Popeye

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Peeler@21:1/5 to All on Mon Apr 11 14:47:47 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On Mon, 11 Apr 2022 07:00:48 -0500, amdx, yet another mentally challenged, troll-feeding senile asshole, blathered:


    †As Tim 'the toolman' Taylor would say, more power!

    As anyone with a brain would say, DON'T FEED THE TROLL, troll-feeding senile twit!

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Phil Hobbs@21:1/5 to Peeler on Mon Apr 11 09:42:48 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    Peeler wrote:
    On Mon, 11 Apr 2022 07:00:48 -0500, amdx, yet another mentally challenged, troll-feeding senile asshole, blathered:


     As Tim 'the toolman' Taylor would say, more power!

    As anyone with a brain would say, DON'T FEED THE TROLL, troll-feeding senile twit!


    As if anybody can tell you lot apart without a program. ;)

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com@21:1/5 to pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical. on Mon Apr 11 07:31:33 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On Mon, 11 Apr 2022 09:42:48 -0400, Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    Peeler wrote:
    On Mon, 11 Apr 2022 07:00:48 -0500, amdx, yet another mentally challenged, >> troll-feeding senile asshole, blathered:


    †As Tim 'the toolman' Taylor would say, more power!

    As anyone with a brain would say, DON'T FEED THE TROLL, troll-feeding senile >> twit!


    As if anybody can tell you lot apart without a program. ;)

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs

    Whenever one asks a technical question, we should encourage that
    behavior.

    Don't ultrasonic humidifiers cause mineral deposition nearby? Maybe
    not if one uses good distilled water.





    --

    I yam what I yam - Popeye

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Arie de Muijnck@21:1/5 to jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com on Mon Apr 11 16:47:19 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On 2022-04-11 16:31, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:

    Don't ultrasonic humidifiers cause mineral deposition nearby? Maybe
    not if one uses good distilled water.

    Yes, they do, extensively.

    I had the environment covered in a fine dust within weeks.

    Even stranger, in the kitchen at the other end of the apartment, gas
    flames became orange/red, see for a test: <https://ademu.home.xs4all.nl/Humidifier/Ultrasonic-humidifier-effect-on-gas-flame.mp4>

    I find distilled water at EUR 0.5 / liter too expensive for using up to
    5 liters per day...

    Arie

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Commander Kinsey@21:1/5 to Arie de Muijnck on Mon Apr 11 15:53:04 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On Mon, 11 Apr 2022 15:47:19 +0100, Arie de Muijnck <eternal.september@ademu.com> wrote:

    On 2022-04-11 16:31, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:

    Don't ultrasonic humidifiers cause mineral deposition nearby? Maybe
    not if one uses good distilled water.

    Yes, they do, extensively.

    I had the environment covered in a fine dust within weeks.

    Even stranger, in the kitchen at the other end of the apartment, gas
    flames became orange/red, see for a test: <https://ademu.home.xs4all.nl/Humidifier/Ultrasonic-humidifier-effect-on-gas-flame.mp4>

    So, after I edited that shit to remove the pointless <>, I find some idiot putting damp air into a gas flame, what was your point?

    I find distilled water at EUR 0.5 / liter too expensive for using up to 5 liters per day...

    I find no such problems. All it does is make the air more humid. Why the fuck would that cause deposits?

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Peeler@21:1/5 to All on Mon Apr 11 17:14:47 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On Mon, 11 Apr 2022 09:41:06 -0400, Phil Hobbs, another mentally challenged, troll-feeding senile ASSHOLE, blathered:


    Are you sure the transducer isn't focused?

    I'm sure that he is about to troll the shit out of your ng and that YOU are
    a typical troll-feeding senile asshole!

    Cheers

    LOL! Like I said: troll-feeding senile asshole!

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com@21:1/5 to CK1@nospam.com on Mon Apr 11 08:17:15 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On Mon, 11 Apr 2022 15:53:04 +0100, "Commander Kinsey"
    <CK1@nospam.com> wrote:

    On Mon, 11 Apr 2022 15:47:19 +0100, Arie de Muijnck <eternal.september@ademu.com> wrote:

    On 2022-04-11 16:31, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:

    Don't ultrasonic humidifiers cause mineral deposition nearby? Maybe
    not if one uses good distilled water.

    Yes, they do, extensively.

    I had the environment covered in a fine dust within weeks.

    Even stranger, in the kitchen at the other end of the apartment, gas
    flames became orange/red, see for a test:
    <https://ademu.home.xs4all.nl/Humidifier/Ultrasonic-humidifier-effect-on-gas-flame.mp4>

    So, after I edited that shit to remove the pointless <>, I find some idiot putting damp air into a gas flame, what was your point?

    My mistake for assuming that you could be nudged into civilized
    behavior.

    There is a pattern here: nasty people are rarely, maybe never, any
    good at electronics.



    --

    I yam what I yam - Popeye

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com@21:1/5 to All on Mon Apr 11 08:40:22 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On Mon, 11 Apr 2022 17:14:47 +0200, Peeler <trolltrap@valid.invalid>
    wrote:

    On Mon, 11 Apr 2022 09:41:06 -0400, Phil Hobbs, another mentally challenged, >troll-feeding senile ASSHOLE, blathered:


    Are you sure the transducer isn't focused?

    I'm sure that he is about to troll the shit out of your ng and that YOU are
    a typical troll-feeding senile asshole!

    Cheers

    LOL! Like I said: troll-feeding senile asshole!


    Design some electronics. Show us.

    Or write a book.



    --

    I yam what I yam - Popeye

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Lasse Langwadt Christensen@21:1/5 to All on Mon Apr 11 08:47:31 2022
    mandag den 11. april 2022 kl. 16.53.13 UTC+2 skrev Commander Kinsey:
    On Mon, 11 Apr 2022 15:47:19 +0100, Arie de Muijnck <eternal....@ademu.com> wrote:

    On 2022-04-11 16:31, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:

    Don't ultrasonic humidifiers cause mineral deposition nearby? Maybe
    not if one uses good distilled water.

    Yes, they do, extensively.

    I had the environment covered in a fine dust within weeks.

    Even stranger, in the kitchen at the other end of the apartment, gas
    flames became orange/red, see for a test: <https://ademu.home.xs4all.nl/Humidifier/Ultrasonic-humidifier-effect-on-gas-flame.mp4>
    So, after I edited that shit to remove the pointless <>, I find some idiot putting damp air into a gas flame, what was your point?
    I find distilled water at EUR 0.5 / liter too expensive for using up to 5 liters per day...
    I find no such problems. All it does is make the air more humid. Why the fuck would that cause deposits?

    because it doesn't turn the water into vapor, it turns the water, and what ever minerals in it, into tiny droplets and spread them in the air

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com@21:1/5 to langwadt@fonz.dk on Mon Apr 11 08:57:09 2022
    On Mon, 11 Apr 2022 08:47:31 -0700 (PDT), Lasse Langwadt Christensen <langwadt@fonz.dk> wrote:

    mandag den 11. april 2022 kl. 16.53.13 UTC+2 skrev Commander Kinsey:
    On Mon, 11 Apr 2022 15:47:19 +0100, Arie de Muijnck <eternal....@ademu.com> wrote:

    On 2022-04-11 16:31, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:

    Don't ultrasonic humidifiers cause mineral deposition nearby? Maybe
    not if one uses good distilled water.

    Yes, they do, extensively.

    I had the environment covered in a fine dust within weeks.

    Even stranger, in the kitchen at the other end of the apartment, gas
    flames became orange/red, see for a test:
    <https://ademu.home.xs4all.nl/Humidifier/Ultrasonic-humidifier-effect-on-gas-flame.mp4>
    So, after I edited that shit to remove the pointless <>, I find some idiot putting damp air into a gas flame, what was your point?
    I find distilled water at EUR 0.5 / liter too expensive for using up to 5 liters per day...
    I find no such problems. All it does is make the air more humid. Why the fuck would that cause deposits?

    because it doesn't turn the water into vapor, it turns the water, and what ever minerals in it, into tiny droplets and spread them in the air

    Right. Evaporation keeps the solids behind. Spraying doesn't.

    Our water is naturally acidic, which would eat pipes, so it's passed
    over limestone chips or something. That coats pipes and protects them.
    It will make the deposits.



    --

    I yam what I yam - Popeye

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com@21:1/5 to All on Mon Apr 11 08:58:04 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On Mon, 11 Apr 2022 17:23:01 +0200, Peeler <trolltrap@valid.invalid>
    wrote:

    On Mon, 11 Apr 2022 07:31:33 -0700, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com
    wrote:


    Whenever one asks a technical question, we should encourage that

    NOT in the case of a well-known, PROVEN clinically insane trolling attention >whore like "PHucker"! <BG> If you need proof, I can post it here. ;-)

    I prefer that you post something intelligent on topic.

    What do you do in real life?



    --

    I yam what I yam - Popeye

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Peeler@21:1/5 to All on Mon Apr 11 17:23:01 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On Mon, 11 Apr 2022 07:31:33 -0700, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com
    wrote:


    Whenever one asks a technical question, we should encourage that

    NOT in the case of a well-known, PROVEN clinically insane trolling attention whore like "PHucker"! <BG> If you need proof, I can post it here. ;-)

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Peeler@21:1/5 to All on Mon Apr 11 19:03:10 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On Mon, 11 Apr 2022 08:40:22 -0700, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com,
    another mentally challenged driveling senile idiot, blathered:


    Design some electronics. Show us.

    Or write a book.

    Why should I design "some electronics"? And if I wrote a book, why would
    I point it out to some senile airheads on Usenet? I'm not even subscribed to
    or interested in your newsgroup, nor in what idiotic topic this thread is about. LOL

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Peeler@21:1/5 to All on Mon Apr 11 19:13:15 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On Mon, 11 Apr 2022 08:58:04 -0700, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com,
    another typical senile airhead, blathered:


    NOT in the case of a well-known, PROVEN clinically insane trolling attention >>whore like "PHucker"! <BG> If you need proof, I can post it here. ;-)

    I prefer that you post something intelligent on topic.

    I prefer that you senile airheads stop feeding that WELL-KNOWN and PROVEN clinically insane trolling attention whore! Capisci?

    What do you do in real life?

    None of yours, senile blabbermouth! You may ask your senile "friends" on
    Usenet that question. From what I've seen, the senile assholes that took
    over Usenet are just too happy to keep talking about their personal lives
    and outstanding achievements ...and feeding the trolls! <BG>

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Phil Hobbs@21:1/5 to jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com on Mon Apr 11 13:22:25 2022
    jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Mon, 11 Apr 2022 08:47:31 -0700 (PDT), Lasse Langwadt Christensen <langwadt@fonz.dk> wrote:

    mandag den 11. april 2022 kl. 16.53.13 UTC+2 skrev Commander Kinsey:
    On Mon, 11 Apr 2022 15:47:19 +0100, Arie de Muijnck <eternal....@ademu.com> wrote:

    On 2022-04-11 16:31, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:

    Don't ultrasonic humidifiers cause mineral deposition nearby? Maybe
    not if one uses good distilled water.

    Yes, they do, extensively.

    I had the environment covered in a fine dust within weeks.

    Even stranger, in the kitchen at the other end of the apartment, gas
    flames became orange/red, see for a test:
    <https://ademu.home.xs4all.nl/Humidifier/Ultrasonic-humidifier-effect-on-gas-flame.mp4>
    So, after I edited that shit to remove the pointless <>, I find some idiot putting damp air into a gas flame, what was your point?
    I find distilled water at EUR 0.5 / liter too expensive for using up to 5 liters per day...
    I find no such problems. All it does is make the air more humid. Why the fuck would that cause deposits?

    because it doesn't turn the water into vapor, it turns the water, and what ever minerals in it, into tiny droplets and spread them in the air

    Right. Evaporation keeps the solids behind. Spraying doesn't.

    Our water is naturally acidic, which would eat pipes, so it's passed
    over limestone chips or something. That coats pipes and protects them.
    It will make the deposits.



    I have an ancient (1960-vintage) DeVilbiss mains-powered vapourizer that
    we use when somebody has a lower-respiratory bug. It's a glass jar
    holding a gallon or so, and a Bakelite lid containing two plated steel electrodes that get dunked into the water. They're covered by a
    Bakelite cylinder with a hole in the bottom, and the steam from the
    boiling water gets directed out a hole in the top.

    The steam production can be regulated with a little bit of borax in the
    water if needed. (Salt works but eventually eats the electrodes.)

    Simple, works great, no moving parts, no Legionnaire's disease or lime
    dust on the rug. Cheap on eBay. Good Medicine.

    It does heat the room a little bit, but not enough to worry about.

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs

    --
    Dr Philip C D Hobbs
    Principal Consultant
    ElectroOptical Innovations LLC / Hobbs ElectroOptics
    Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics
    Briarcliff Manor NY 10510

    http://electrooptical.net
    http://hobbs-eo.com

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From amdx@21:1/5 to jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com on Mon Apr 11 13:39:10 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On 4/11/2022 9:31 AM, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Mon, 11 Apr 2022 09:42:48 -0400, Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    Peeler wrote:
    On Mon, 11 Apr 2022 07:00:48 -0500, amdx, yet another mentally challenged, >>> troll-feeding senile asshole, blathered:


     As Tim 'the toolman' Taylor would say, more power!
    As anyone with a brain would say, DON'T FEED THE TROLL, troll-feeding senile
    twit!

    As if anybody can tell you lot apart without a program. ;)

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs
    Whenever one asks a technical question, we should encourage that
    behavior.

    Don't ultrasonic humidifiers cause mineral deposition nearby? Maybe
    not if one uses good distilled water.


    Years ago I repaired VCRs for a living. I open one up and some of the
    foils were covered with a white powder.
    It followed these traces perfectly. I followed up with the customer and
    found they had an ultrasonic humidifier.
    Made me question whether they were good for lung health.
                                               Mikek


    --
    This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software. https://www.avast.com/antivirus

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Mike Monett@21:1/5 to jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com on Mon Apr 11 19:57:57 2022
    jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:

    [...]

    because it doesn't turn the water into vapor, it turns the water, and
    what ever minerals in it, into tiny droplets and spread them in the air

    Right. Evaporation keeps the solids behind. Spraying doesn't.

    Evaporation would have a very difficult time increasing the humidiy from 20%
    to 50%. An ultrasonic humidifier has no problem. It forms a fine coating that covers everything, but it is harmless. See my related post for the equations.


    --
    MRM

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Mike Monett@21:1/5 to Lasse Langwadt Christensen on Mon Apr 11 19:53:43 2022
    Lasse Langwadt Christensen <langwadt@fonz.dk> wrote:

    mandag den 11. april 2022 kl. 16.53.13 UTC+2 skrev Commander Kinsey:
    On Mon, 11 Apr 2022 15:47:19 +0100, Arie de Muijnck
    <eternal....@ademu.com> wrote:

    On 2022-04-11 16:31, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:

    Don't ultrasonic humidifiers cause mineral deposition nearby? Maybe
    not if one uses good distilled water.

    Yes, they do, extensively.

    I had the environment covered in a fine dust within weeks.

    Even stranger, in the kitchen at the other end of the apartment, gas
    flames became orange/red, see for a test:
    <https://ademu.home.xs4all.nl/Humidifier/Ultrasonic-humidifier-effect-
    on-gas-flame.mp4> So, after I edited that shit to remove the
    pointless <>, I find some idiot putting damp air into a gas flame,
    what was your point? I find distilled water at EUR 0.5 / liter too
    expensive for using up to 5 liters per day...
    I find no such problems. All it does is make the air more humid. Why
    the fuck would that cause deposits?

    because it doesn't turn the water into vapor, it turns the water, and
    what ever minerals in it, into tiny droplets and spread them in the air

    I am 80 and live in Canada, a cold climate. When the temperature is low, there is very little humidity in the air. This means the relative humidity indoors is very low and gets down to 20% or below.

    Low humidity causes chapped lips, sore sinuses, and greatly increased vulnerability to virus and bacterial infections. 30% to 50% RH solves these problems.

    I bought an Ultrasonic Top Fill Humidifier from Amazon Canada: https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B09KRCS7R7

    This has no problem maintaining the humidity at 40%, but I discovered some issues.

    1. Ordinary tap water contains calcium. This covers everything with a fine dust.
    It looks awful but it is harmless and is easily wiped off. Obviously, you breath
    this in.

    2. A very small amount of vinegar, 10 grams per 4 litres, prevents calcium deposits from building up on the piezo element.

    3. The humidifier eventually stopped working. It turns out that bacteria built up a fine gray slime that covered the water valve that regulated the flow of water into the piezo chamber. This blocked the valve and stopped the flow of water. It was extremely difficult to remove, and I was never able to remove it all. But I got enough out to allow the valve to begin working again. A very small amount of household bleach, about 1 gram in 4 litres, was sufficient to prevent the slime buildup.

    4. The vinegar and bleach form hypochlorous acid, a very powerful antibiotic.

    Sodium hypochlorite (bleacn) : NaOCl
    Vinegar (acetic acid) : CH3COOH
    Sodium acetate : CH3COONa
    Hypochlorous acid : HOCl

    The hypochlorous acid prevents slime buildup on the humidifier valve.
    This uses 1 gm of vinegar, leaving the rest to combine with the calcium.

    NaOCl(aq) + CH3COOH(aq) ==> CH3COONa(aq) + HOCl(aq).

    5. The vinegar combines with the calcium and forms CO2, water, and calcium acetate as follows:

    Calcium carbonate : CaCO3
    Vinegar (acetic acid) : CH3COOH
    Calcium acetate : Ca(CH3COO)2
    Water : H2O
    Carbon Dioxide : CO2

    CaCO3(s) + 2CH3COOH(l) --> Ca(CH3COO)2(s) + H2O(l) + CO2(g)

    The calcium acetate is what coats the surfaces and gets in your lungs. It is highly soluble and dissolves into your blood stream as soon as it enters.

    The recommended dose for calcium is 2500 mg for adults ages 19-50 years and 2000
    mg for adults over 50 years. If you take calcium supplement, the usual dose is 333 mg. So the small amount you inhale is actually healthful.




    --
    MRM

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Mike Monett@21:1/5 to Phil Hobbs on Mon Apr 11 20:06:34 2022
    Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    [...]

    I have an ancient (1960-vintage) DeVilbiss mains-powered vapourizer that
    we use when somebody has a lower-respiratory bug. It's a glass jar
    holding a gallon or so, and a Bakelite lid containing two plated steel electrodes that get dunked into the water. They're covered by a
    Bakelite cylinder with a hole in the bottom, and the steam from the
    boiling water gets directed out a hole in the top.

    The steam production can be regulated with a little bit of borax in the
    water if needed. (Salt works but eventually eats the electrodes.)

    Simple, works great, no moving parts, no Legionnaire's disease or lime
    dust on the rug. Cheap on eBay. Good Medicine.

    It does heat the room a little bit, but not enough to worry about.

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs

    How long does it take to evaporate a gallon?

    My ultrasonic mister takes about 24 hrs to evaporate 4 litres, which is
    1.06 gallons. This raises the humidity from 20% to 40% and stops the
    chapped lips and sore sinuses. The white film that covers everything is harmless and is a small price to pay, but I wonder if a steamer could do as well.



    --
    MRM

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Lasse Langwadt Christensen@21:1/5 to All on Mon Apr 11 13:06:54 2022
    mandag den 11. april 2022 kl. 21.58.04 UTC+2 skrev Mike Monett:
    jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:

    [...]
    because it doesn't turn the water into vapor, it turns the water, and >>what ever minerals in it, into tiny droplets and spread them in the air

    Right. Evaporation keeps the solids behind. Spraying doesn't.
    Evaporation would have a very difficult time increasing the humidiy from 20% to 50%. An ultrasonic humidifier has no problem. It forms a fine coating that covers everything, but it is harmless. See my related post for the equations.

    50% RH @ 20'C is ~8 grams of water per m^3

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Lasse Langwadt Christensen@21:1/5 to All on Mon Apr 11 12:58:36 2022
    mandag den 11. april 2022 kl. 21.53.51 UTC+2 skrev Mike Monett:
    Lasse Langwadt Christensen <lang...@fonz.dk> wrote:
    mandag den 11. april 2022 kl. 16.53.13 UTC+2 skrev Commander Kinsey:
    On Mon, 11 Apr 2022 15:47:19 +0100, Arie de Muijnck
    <eternal....@ademu.com> wrote:

    On 2022-04-11 16:31, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:

    Don't ultrasonic humidifiers cause mineral deposition nearby? Maybe
    not if one uses good distilled water.

    Yes, they do, extensively.

    I had the environment covered in a fine dust within weeks.

    Even stranger, in the kitchen at the other end of the apartment, gas
    flames became orange/red, see for a test:
    <https://ademu.home.xs4all.nl/Humidifier/Ultrasonic-humidifier-effect- >> > on-gas-flame.mp4> So, after I edited that shit to remove the
    pointless <>, I find some idiot putting damp air into a gas flame,
    what was your point? I find distilled water at EUR 0.5 / liter too
    expensive for using up to 5 liters per day...
    I find no such problems. All it does is make the air more humid. Why
    the fuck would that cause deposits?

    because it doesn't turn the water into vapor, it turns the water, and
    what ever minerals in it, into tiny droplets and spread them in the air
    I am 80 and live in Canada, a cold climate. When the temperature is low, there
    is very little humidity in the air. This means the relative humidity indoors is
    very low and gets down to 20% or below.


    if you need both heat and humidity, just boil some water?

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Mike Monett@21:1/5 to Lasse Langwadt Christensen on Mon Apr 11 20:15:03 2022
    Lasse Langwadt Christensen <langwadt@fonz.dk> wrote:

    [...]

    if you need both heat and humidity, just boil some water?

    It takes about 1.5 KW to bring the apartment to a comfortable temperature.
    That would destroy an electrolytic humidifier.

    My ultrasonic humidifier takes very little power, perhaps 10W or so. The tiny switching power supply doesn't even get warm.



    --
    MRM

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Larkin@21:1/5 to pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical. on Mon Apr 11 14:14:06 2022
    On Mon, 11 Apr 2022 13:22:25 -0400, Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Mon, 11 Apr 2022 08:47:31 -0700 (PDT), Lasse Langwadt Christensen
    <langwadt@fonz.dk> wrote:

    mandag den 11. april 2022 kl. 16.53.13 UTC+2 skrev Commander Kinsey:
    On Mon, 11 Apr 2022 15:47:19 +0100, Arie de Muijnck <eternal....@ademu.com> wrote:

    On 2022-04-11 16:31, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:

    Don't ultrasonic humidifiers cause mineral deposition nearby? Maybe >>>>>> not if one uses good distilled water.

    Yes, they do, extensively.

    I had the environment covered in a fine dust within weeks.

    Even stranger, in the kitchen at the other end of the apartment, gas >>>>> flames became orange/red, see for a test:
    <https://ademu.home.xs4all.nl/Humidifier/Ultrasonic-humidifier-effect-on-gas-flame.mp4>
    So, after I edited that shit to remove the pointless <>, I find some idiot putting damp air into a gas flame, what was your point?
    I find distilled water at EUR 0.5 / liter too expensive for using up to 5 liters per day...
    I find no such problems. All it does is make the air more humid. Why the fuck would that cause deposits?

    because it doesn't turn the water into vapor, it turns the water, and what ever minerals in it, into tiny droplets and spread them in the air

    Right. Evaporation keeps the solids behind. Spraying doesn't.

    Our water is naturally acidic, which would eat pipes, so it's passed
    over limestone chips or something. That coats pipes and protects them.
    It will make the deposits.



    I have an ancient (1960-vintage) DeVilbiss mains-powered vapourizer that
    we use when somebody has a lower-respiratory bug. It's a glass jar
    holding a gallon or so, and a Bakelite lid containing two plated steel >electrodes that get dunked into the water. They're covered by a
    Bakelite cylinder with a hole in the bottom, and the steam from the
    boiling water gets directed out a hole in the top.

    The steam production can be regulated with a little bit of borax in the
    water if needed. (Salt works but eventually eats the electrodes.)

    Simple, works great, no moving parts, no Legionnaire's disease or lime
    dust on the rug. Cheap on eBay. Good Medicine.

    It does heat the room a little bit, but not enough to worry about.

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs

    I was having nasty breathing problems up in the mountains, where it's
    very dry; I grew up the the tropics.

    I tried several commercial humidifiers, which didn't work well, and
    you have to go outside eventually anyhow.

    I got a sinus RF cautery session to open things up. 20 minutes changed
    my life.

    --

    If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end with doubts,
    but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties. Francis Bacon

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Lasse Langwadt Christensen@21:1/5 to All on Mon Apr 11 13:19:56 2022
    mandag den 11. april 2022 kl. 22.15.10 UTC+2 skrev Mike Monett:
    Lasse Langwadt Christensen <lang...@fonz.dk> wrote:
    [...]
    if you need both heat and humidity, just boil some water?
    It takes about 1.5 KW to bring the apartment to a comfortable temperature. That would destroy an electrolytic humidifier.

    put a pot of water on the stove...

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Larkin@21:1/5 to All on Mon Apr 11 14:19:38 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On Mon, 11 Apr 2022 19:13:15 +0200, Peeler <trolltrap@valid.invalid>
    wrote:

    On Mon, 11 Apr 2022 08:58:04 -0700, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com, >another typical senile airhead, blathered:


    NOT in the case of a well-known, PROVEN clinically insane trolling attention >>>whore like "PHucker"! <BG> If you need proof, I can post it here. ;-)

    I prefer that you post something intelligent on topic.

    I prefer that you senile airheads stop feeding that WELL-KNOWN and PROVEN >clinically insane trolling attention whore! Capisci?

    What do you do in real life?

    None of yours, senile blabbermouth! You may ask your senile "friends" on >Usenet that question. From what I've seen, the senile assholes that took
    over Usenet are just too happy to keep talking about their personal lives
    and outstanding achievements ...and feeding the trolls! <BG>

    Your life sounds generally depressing.

    Try electronics. It's fun.

    --

    If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end with doubts,
    but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties. Francis Bacon

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Larkin@21:1/5 to langwadt@fonz.dk on Mon Apr 11 14:17:17 2022
    On Mon, 11 Apr 2022 13:19:56 -0700 (PDT), Lasse Langwadt Christensen <langwadt@fonz.dk> wrote:

    mandag den 11. april 2022 kl. 22.15.10 UTC+2 skrev Mike Monett:
    Lasse Langwadt Christensen <lang...@fonz.dk> wrote:
    [...]
    if you need both heat and humidity, just boil some water?
    It takes about 1.5 KW to bring the apartment to a comfortable temperature. >> That would destroy an electrolytic humidifier.

    put a pot of water on the stove...

    The pot will get all cruddy pretty soon.
    --

    If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end with doubts,
    but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties. Francis Bacon

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Phil Hobbs@21:1/5 to Mike Monett on Mon Apr 11 17:26:01 2022
    Mike Monett wrote:
    Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    [...]

    I have an ancient (1960-vintage) DeVilbiss mains-powered vapourizer that
    we use when somebody has a lower-respiratory bug. It's a glass jar
    holding a gallon or so, and a Bakelite lid containing two plated steel
    electrodes that get dunked into the water. They're covered by a
    Bakelite cylinder with a hole in the bottom, and the steam from the
    boiling water gets directed out a hole in the top.

    The steam production can be regulated with a little bit of borax in the
    water if needed. (Salt works but eventually eats the electrodes.)

    Simple, works great, no moving parts, no Legionnaire's disease or lime
    dust on the rug. Cheap on eBay. Good Medicine.

    It does heat the room a little bit, but not enough to worry about.

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs

    How long does it take to evaporate a gallon?

    Depends on the salt content of the water--generally about 12 hours round
    here. A Variac or even a triac dimmer could probably adjust it as desired.


    My ultrasonic mister takes about 24 hrs to evaporate 4 litres, which is
    1.06 gallons. This raises the humidity from 20% to 40% and stops the
    chapped lips and sore sinuses. The white film that covers everything is harmless and is a small price to pay, but I wonder if a steamer could do as well.

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs


    --
    Dr Philip C D Hobbs
    Principal Consultant
    ElectroOptical Innovations LLC / Hobbs ElectroOptics
    Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics
    Briarcliff Manor NY 10510

    http://electrooptical.net
    http://hobbs-eo.com

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Phil Hobbs@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Mon Apr 11 17:49:21 2022
    John Larkin wrote:
    On Mon, 11 Apr 2022 13:19:56 -0700 (PDT), Lasse Langwadt Christensen <langwadt@fonz.dk> wrote:

    mandag den 11. april 2022 kl. 22.15.10 UTC+2 skrev Mike Monett:
    Lasse Langwadt Christensen <lang...@fonz.dk> wrote:
    [...]
    if you need both heat and humidity, just boil some water?
    It takes about 1.5 KW to bring the apartment to a comfortable temperature. >>> That would destroy an electrolytic humidifier.

    put a pot of water on the stove...

    The pot will get all cruddy pretty soon.

    Not too bad if you dump it out before it boils dry. My vapourizer does
    that automatically--the bottoms of the electrodes are an inch or so off
    the bottom of the jar, so it turns off automatically before it dries out.

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs

    --
    Dr Philip C D Hobbs
    Principal Consultant
    ElectroOptical Innovations LLC / Hobbs ElectroOptics
    Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics
    Briarcliff Manor NY 10510

    http://electrooptical.net
    http://hobbs-eo.com

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Randy Patzkowski@21:1/5 to jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com on Mon Apr 11 23:41:37 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On 4/11/2022 10:31:33 AM, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    Don't ultrasonic humidifiers cause mineral deposition nearby? Maybe
    not if one uses good distilled water.

    Last October I installed an Aprilaire 500M whole house humidifier on our furnace and plumbed it in to the reverse osmosis water system.
    Checked the water evaporator panel this spring and it still looked brand new.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Larkin@21:1/5 to All on Mon Apr 11 16:50:37 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On Mon, 11 Apr 22 23:41:37 UTC, Randy Patzkowski <randyp@redacted.org>
    wrote:

    On 4/11/2022 10:31:33 AM, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    Don't ultrasonic humidifiers cause mineral deposition nearby? Maybe
    not if one uses good distilled water.

    Last October I installed an Aprilaire 500M whole house humidifier on our furnace and plumbed it in to the reverse osmosis water system.
    Checked the water evaporator panel this spring and it still looked brand new.

    Does it literally evaporate the water? Is there any unused water
    discharged?

    --

    If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end with doubts,
    but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties. Francis Bacon

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Phil Allison@21:1/5 to jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com on Mon Apr 11 17:12:46 2022
    jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:

    ============================
    Peeler <trol...@valid.invalid>


    LOL! Like I said: troll-feeding senile asshole!

    Design some electronics. Show us.


    ** FFS do NOT do that !!!

    JL is an anti-social, narcissistic asshole who loves pissing on others here.

    There is a strong pattern here, those who fancy themselves being "good at eletronics" are very often thoroughly nasty people.


    ...... Phil

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com@21:1/5 to pallison49@gmail.com on Mon Apr 11 18:11:36 2022
    On Mon, 11 Apr 2022 17:12:46 -0700 (PDT), Phil Allison
    <pallison49@gmail.com> wrote:

    jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:

    ============================
    Peeler <trol...@valid.invalid>


    LOL! Like I said: troll-feeding senile asshole!

    Design some electronics. Show us.


    ** FFS do NOT do that !!!

    JL is an anti-social, narcissistic asshole who loves pissing on others here.

    There is a strong pattern here, those who fancy themselves being "good at eletronics" are very often thoroughly nasty people.


    That makes you a real sweetie.



    --

    I yam what I yam - Popeye

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Anthony William Sloman@21:1/5 to jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com on Mon Apr 11 19:49:09 2022
    On Tuesday, April 12, 2022 at 11:11:48 AM UTC+10, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Mon, 11 Apr 2022 17:12:46 -0700 (PDT), Phil Allison <palli...@gmail.com> wrote:
    jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    Peeler <trol...@valid.invalid>

    LOL! Like I said: troll-feeding senile asshole!

    Design some electronics. Show us.

    ** FFS do NOT do that !!!

    JL is an anti-social, narcissistic asshole who loves pissing on others here.

    There is a strong pattern here, those who fancy themselves being "good at eletronics" are very often thoroughly nasty people.

    That makes you a real sweetie.

    John Larkin does fancy himself as being good at electronics. Phil Allison is actually good at audio electronics.

    My own impression is that competence at electronics doesn't correlate strongly with personality type at all. None of the really good electronics engineers I've known have been nasty people - in fact a few of them have been truly admirable characters -
    and the only common factor was that they all took electronics seriously.

    --
    Bill Sloman, Sydney

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Commander Kinsey@21:1/5 to Mike Monett on Tue Apr 12 05:58:58 2022
    On Mon, 11 Apr 2022 21:06:34 +0100, Mike Monett <spamme@not.com> wrote:

    Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    [...]

    I have an ancient (1960-vintage) DeVilbiss mains-powered vapourizer that
    we use when somebody has a lower-respiratory bug. It's a glass jar
    holding a gallon or so, and a Bakelite lid containing two plated steel
    electrodes that get dunked into the water. They're covered by a
    Bakelite cylinder with a hole in the bottom, and the steam from the
    boiling water gets directed out a hole in the top.

    The steam production can be regulated with a little bit of borax in the
    water if needed. (Salt works but eventually eats the electrodes.)

    Simple, works great, no moving parts, no Legionnaire's disease or lime
    dust on the rug. Cheap on eBay. Good Medicine.

    It does heat the room a little bit, but not enough to worry about.

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs

    How long does it take to evaporate a gallon?

    My ultrasonic mister takes about 24 hrs to evaporate 4 litres, which is
    1.06 gallons. This raises the humidity from 20% to 40% and stops the
    chapped lips and sore sinuses. The white film that covers everything is harmless and is a small price to pay, but I wonder if a steamer could do as well.

    It would increase the temperature, so you'd then need to use AC which would remove the humidity!

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Commander Kinsey@21:1/5 to Mike Monett on Tue Apr 12 06:01:47 2022
    On Mon, 11 Apr 2022 20:53:43 +0100, Mike Monett <spamme@not.com> wrote:

    Lasse Langwadt Christensen <langwadt@fonz.dk> wrote:

    mandag den 11. april 2022 kl. 16.53.13 UTC+2 skrev Commander Kinsey:
    On Mon, 11 Apr 2022 15:47:19 +0100, Arie de Muijnck
    <eternal....@ademu.com> wrote:

    On 2022-04-11 16:31, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:

    Don't ultrasonic humidifiers cause mineral deposition nearby? Maybe
    not if one uses good distilled water.

    Yes, they do, extensively.

    I had the environment covered in a fine dust within weeks.

    Even stranger, in the kitchen at the other end of the apartment, gas
    flames became orange/red, see for a test:
    <https://ademu.home.xs4all.nl/Humidifier/Ultrasonic-humidifier-effect- >>> > on-gas-flame.mp4> So, after I edited that shit to remove the
    pointless <>, I find some idiot putting damp air into a gas flame,
    what was your point? I find distilled water at EUR 0.5 / liter too
    expensive for using up to 5 liters per day...
    I find no such problems. All it does is make the air more humid. Why
    the fuck would that cause deposits?

    because it doesn't turn the water into vapor, it turns the water, and
    what ever minerals in it, into tiny droplets and spread them in the air

    I am 80 and live in Canada, a cold climate. When the temperature is low, there
    is very little humidity in the air. This means the relative humidity indoors is
    very low and gets down to 20% or below.

    Low humidity causes chapped lips, sore sinuses, and greatly increased vulnerability to virus and bacterial infections. 30% to 50% RH solves these problems.

    I got mine for the parrots.

    I bought an Ultrasonic Top Fill Humidifier from Amazon Canada: https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B09KRCS7R7

    This has no problem maintaining the humidity at 40%, but I discovered some issues.

    1. Ordinary tap water contains calcium. This covers everything with a fine dust.
    It looks awful but it is harmless and is easily wiped off. Obviously, you breath
    this in.

    I'm in a soft water area, virtually none of that. I'm surprised water companies aren't required to remove that shit so it doesn't scale up kettles., washing machines etc.

    Whatever deposits on the piezo element, I just wipe off with my finger every time I refill it.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Commander Kinsey@21:1/5 to Randy Patzkowski on Tue Apr 12 06:02:30 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On Tue, 12 Apr 2022 00:41:37 +0100, Randy Patzkowski <randyp@redacted.org> wrote:

    On 4/11/2022 10:31:33 AM, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    Don't ultrasonic humidifiers cause mineral deposition nearby? Maybe
    not if one uses good distilled water.

    Last October I installed an Aprilaire 500M whole house humidifier on our furnace and plumbed it in to the reverse osmosis water system.
    Checked the water evaporator panel this spring and it still looked brand new.

    WTF is a "reverse osmosis water system"? Do you live in a clean room?

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Mike Monett@21:1/5 to Phil Hobbs on Tue Apr 12 06:26:20 2022
    Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    Mike Monett wrote:
    Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    [...]

    I have an ancient (1960-vintage) DeVilbiss mains-powered vapourizer
    that we use when somebody has a lower-respiratory bug. It's a glass
    jar holding a gallon or so, and a Bakelite lid containing two plated
    steel electrodes that get dunked into the water. They're covered by a
    Bakelite cylinder with a hole in the bottom, and the steam from the
    boiling water gets directed out a hole in the top.

    The steam production can be regulated with a little bit of borax in
    the water if needed. (Salt works but eventually eats the electrodes.)

    Simple, works great, no moving parts, no Legionnaire's disease or lime
    dust on the rug. Cheap on eBay. Good Medicine.

    It does heat the room a little bit, but not enough to worry about.

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs

    How long does it take to evaporate a gallon?

    [...]

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs

    I seached EBay and found one that seems to be like it. The shipping from
    the States was $50, which is outrageous and I refuse to pay.

    I found a steamer at Amazon. It has a small chamber with a heating element

    https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B07GQ2CF4T/

    The calcium appears to stay in the water and attaches to the element, just
    like in an electric kettle. Boiling vinegar for a few minutes should clean
    it out. I'll try your trick of turning power off before the chamber is
    empty.

    The problem with this method is trying to control the output. It claims to
    be able to adjust the output to give 24 hrs of run time. This would make it identical to my ultrasonic mister, which keeps the humidity at 40%, which
    is perfect.

    Thanks very much for your post and helpful reply. Hopefully this will get
    rid of the fine coating all over everything.



    --
    MRM

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Mike Monett@21:1/5 to Phil Hobbs on Tue Apr 12 06:53:29 2022
    Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    [...]

    I have an ancient (1960-vintage) DeVilbiss mains-powered vapourizer that
    we use when somebody has a lower-respiratory bug. It's a glass jar
    holding a gallon or so, and a Bakelite lid containing two plated steel electrodes that get dunked into the water. They're covered by a
    Bakelite cylinder with a hole in the bottom, and the steam from the
    boiling water gets directed out a hole in the top.

    The steam production can be regulated with a little bit of borax in the
    water if needed. (Salt works but eventually eats the electrodes.)

    Simple, works great, no moving parts, no Legionnaire's disease or lime
    dust on the rug. Cheap on eBay. Good Medicine.

    It does heat the room a little bit, but not enough to worry about.

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs

    No need to mess with borax. A simple incadescent light dimmer can adjust
    the output to any level desired. This should give better repeatability of
    the steam output and more predictable results.



    --
    MRM

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From The Natural Philosopher@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Tue Apr 12 09:44:31 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On 11/04/2022 22:19, John Larkin wrote:
    On Mon, 11 Apr 2022 19:13:15 +0200, Peeler <trolltrap@valid.invalid>
    wrote:

    On Mon, 11 Apr 2022 08:58:04 -0700, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com,
    another typical senile airhead, blathered:


    NOT in the case of a well-known, PROVEN clinically insane trolling attention
    whore like "PHucker"! <BG> If you need proof, I can post it here. ;-)

    I prefer that you post something intelligent on topic.

    I prefer that you senile airheads stop feeding that WELL-KNOWN and PROVEN
    clinically insane trolling attention whore! Capisci?

    What do you do in real life?

    None of yours, senile blabbermouth! You may ask your senile "friends" on
    Usenet that question. From what I've seen, the senile assholes that took
    over Usenet are just too happy to keep talking about their personal lives
    and outstanding achievements ...and feeding the trolls! <BG>

    Your life sounds generally depressing.

    Try electronics. It's fun.

    Or gardening. You can bullshit all you like to flowers. They are never
    offended and they never answer back. They are grateful for the hot air
    and carbon emissions.


    --
    Truth welcomes investigation because truth knows investigation will lead
    to converts. It is deception that uses all the other techniques.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Peeler@21:1/5 to All on Tue Apr 12 11:34:21 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On Tue, 12 Apr 2022 09:44:31 +0100, The Natural Idiot, another senile blabbermouth, blabbered again:


    Or gardening. You can bullshit all you like to flowers. They are never offended and they never answer back. They are grateful for the hot air
    and carbon emissions.

    It's hilarious how you senile morons on Usenet insist on your "right" to
    keep feeding the dumbest and filthiest trolls around! Goes to show HOW miserable all you endlessly babbling, senile shitheads really are! <BG>

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Randy Patzkowski@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Tue Apr 12 11:12:14 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On 4/11/2022 7:50:37 PM, John Larkin wrote:
    On Mon, 11 Apr 22 23:41:37 UTC, Randy Patzkowski <randyp@redacted.org>
    wrote:

    On 4/11/2022 10:31:33 AM, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    Don't ultrasonic humidifiers cause mineral deposition nearby? Maybe
    not if one uses good distilled water.

    Last October I installed an Aprilaire 500M whole house humidifier on our furnace and plumbed it in to the reverse osmosis water system.
    Checked the water evaporator panel this spring and it still looked brand new.

    Does it literally evaporate the water?

    Yes

    Is there any unused water
    discharged?


    Yes, approximately one drop per second exits the drain tube when the furnace blower is on and the humidistat is calling for more humidity.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Commander Kinsey@21:1/5 to Randy Patzkowski on Tue Apr 12 12:28:52 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On Tue, 12 Apr 2022 12:12:14 +0100, Randy Patzkowski <randyp@redacted.org> wrote:

    On 4/11/2022 7:50:37 PM, John Larkin wrote:
    On Mon, 11 Apr 22 23:41:37 UTC, Randy Patzkowski <randyp@redacted.org>
    wrote:

    On 4/11/2022 10:31:33 AM, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    Don't ultrasonic humidifiers cause mineral deposition nearby? Maybe
    not if one uses good distilled water.

    Last October I installed an Aprilaire 500M whole house humidifier on our furnace and plumbed it in to the reverse osmosis water system.
    Checked the water evaporator panel this spring and it still looked brand new.

    Does it literally evaporate the water?

    Yes

    Is there any unused water
    discharged?


    Yes, approximately one drop per second exits the drain tube when the furnace blower is on and the humidistat is calling for more humidity.

    Calling for? Does it shout across the house?

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From amdx@21:1/5 to Phil Allison on Tue Apr 12 08:34:41 2022
    On 4/11/2022 7:12 PM, Phil Allison wrote:
    jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:

    ============================
    Peeler <trol...@valid.invalid>

    LOL! Like I said: troll-feeding senile asshole!

    Design some electronics. Show us.

    ** FFS do NOT do that !!!

    JL is an anti-social, narcissistic asshole who loves pissing on others here.

    There is a strong pattern here, those who fancy themselves being "good at eletronics" are very often thoroughly nasty people.


    ...... Phil

    Peeler, you are making Phil look more and more like a nice guy!
                             Mikek

    --
    This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software. https://www.avast.com/antivirus

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Phil Hobbs@21:1/5 to Mike Monett on Tue Apr 12 10:14:19 2022
    Mike Monett wrote:
    Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    Mike Monett wrote:
    Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    [...]

    I have an ancient (1960-vintage) DeVilbiss mains-powered vapourizer
    that we use when somebody has a lower-respiratory bug. It's a glass
    jar holding a gallon or so, and a Bakelite lid containing two plated
    steel electrodes that get dunked into the water. They're covered by a >>>> Bakelite cylinder with a hole in the bottom, and the steam from the
    boiling water gets directed out a hole in the top.

    The steam production can be regulated with a little bit of borax in
    the water if needed. (Salt works but eventually eats the electrodes.) >>>>
    Simple, works great, no moving parts, no Legionnaire's disease or lime >>>> dust on the rug. Cheap on eBay. Good Medicine.

    It does heat the room a little bit, but not enough to worry about.

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs

    How long does it take to evaporate a gallon?

    [...]


    I seached EBay and found one that seems to be like it. The shipping from
    the States was $50, which is outrageous and I refuse to pay.

    There are some for cheaper.


    I found a steamer at Amazon. It has a small chamber with a heating element

    https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B07GQ2CF4T/

    The calcium appears to stay in the water and attaches to the element, just like in an electric kettle. Boiling vinegar for a few minutes should clean
    it out. I'll try your trick of turning power off before the chamber is
    empty.

    The nice thing about the DeVilbiss 145 is that the water is heated by
    passing AC through it (the electrodes are directly connected to the
    mains), so that happens automatically.

    I very rarely need to use it for more than a week at a time, so I've
    never had it crud up on me. Dunno what it's like in continual use.

    The problem with this method is trying to control the output. It claims to
    be able to adjust the output to give 24 hrs of run time. This would make it identical to my ultrasonic mister, which keeps the humidity at 40%, which
    is perfect.

    Thanks very much for your post and helpful reply. Hopefully this will get
    rid of the fine coating all over everything.

    Not to mention all the mould spores and Legionella. ;)

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs


    --
    Dr Philip C D Hobbs
    Principal Consultant
    ElectroOptical Innovations LLC / Hobbs ElectroOptics
    Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics
    Briarcliff Manor NY 10510

    http://electrooptical.net
    http://hobbs-eo.com

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Anthony William Sloman@21:1/5 to Commander Kinsey on Tue Apr 12 07:21:51 2022
    On Tuesday, April 12, 2022 at 3:01:55 PM UTC+10, Commander Kinsey wrote:
    On Mon, 11 Apr 2022 20:53:43 +0100, Mike Monett <spa...@not.com> wrote:
    Lasse Langwadt Christensen <lang...@fonz.dk> wrote:
    mandag den 11. april 2022 kl. 16.53.13 UTC+2 skrev Commander Kinsey:
    On Mon, 11 Apr 2022 15:47:19 +0100, Arie de Muijnck <eternal....@ademu.com> wrote:
    On 2022-04-11 16:31, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:

    1. Ordinary tap water contains calcium. This covers everything with a fine dust.

    It's actually calcium and magnesium salts carbonates and sulphates. Calcium and magnesium are both metals.

    It looks awful but it is harmless and is easily wiped off. Obviously, you breath this in.

    I'm in a soft water area, virtually none of that. I'm surprised water companies aren't required to remove that shit so it doesn't scale up kettles., washing machines etc.

    It is easy to do - you get deionised water by running it through an ion exchange column - but doing it on all the water you pipe into a city isn't economically feasible.

    You can put a water-softener on your laundry water inlet, which does it all automatically. We had one when we lived in Cambridge in the UK, and had to put a couple of kilograms of salt every month (which ended up replacing the calcium and magnesium salts
    in the piped in water). You don't drink the softened water, or use it for cooking - the extra salt isn't good for you.

    Even in soft water areas your water does contain some dissolved salts - the difference is that soft water contains less than 60 milligrams per litre of dissolved salts, and hard water can have up to about 200 milligrams per litre

    Whatever deposits on the piezo element, I just wipe off with my finger every time I refill it.

    It won't do the piezo element much harm.

    --
    Bill Sloman, Sydney

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com@21:1/5 to All on Tue Apr 12 07:42:42 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On Tue, 12 Apr 22 11:12:14 UTC, Randy Patzkowski <randyp@redacted.org>
    wrote:

    On 4/11/2022 7:50:37 PM, John Larkin wrote:
    On Mon, 11 Apr 22 23:41:37 UTC, Randy Patzkowski <randyp@redacted.org>
    wrote:

    On 4/11/2022 10:31:33 AM, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    Don't ultrasonic humidifiers cause mineral deposition nearby? Maybe
    not if one uses good distilled water.

    Last October I installed an Aprilaire 500M whole house humidifier on our furnace and plumbed it in to the reverse osmosis water system.
    Checked the water evaporator panel this spring and it still looked brand new.

    Does it literally evaporate the water?

    Yes

    Is there any unused water
    discharged?


    Yes, approximately one drop per second exits the drain tube when the furnace blower is on and the humidistat is calling for more humidity.

    Makes sense; that's where the minerals exit.



    --

    I yam what I yam - Popeye

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Anthony William Sloman@21:1/5 to Commander Kinsey on Tue Apr 12 07:36:05 2022
    On Tuesday, April 12, 2022 at 3:02:37 PM UTC+10, Commander Kinsey wrote:
    On Tue, 12 Apr 2022 00:41:37 +0100, Randy Patzkowski <ran...@redacted.org> wrote:
    On 4/11/2022 10:31:33 AM, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:

    Don't ultrasonic humidifiers cause mineral deposition nearby? Maybe not if one uses good distilled water.

    Ultrasonic humidifiers just disperse water as a fine mist. The "humidification" happens when this mist evaporates

    Last October I installed an Aprilaire 500M whole house humidifier on our furnace and plumbed it in to the reverse osmosis water system.
    Checked the water evaporator panel this spring and it still looked brand new.

    WTF is a "reverse osmosis water system"? Do you live in a clean room?

    It's a cheap way of getting a lower mineral content in your water. Some cities use big reverse osmosis plants to get drinking water from sea water. Sydney has one, but it costs money to run, and only gets turned on during droughts. With sea water, about
    half water going into the plant emerges as drinking water while the other half carries away the brine concentrated out of that water.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reverse_osmosis

    --
    Bill Sloman, Sydney

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com@21:1/5 to tnp@invalid.invalid on Tue Apr 12 07:41:28 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On Tue, 12 Apr 2022 09:44:31 +0100, The Natural Philosopher <tnp@invalid.invalid> wrote:

    On 11/04/2022 22:19, John Larkin wrote:
    On Mon, 11 Apr 2022 19:13:15 +0200, Peeler <trolltrap@valid.invalid>
    wrote:

    On Mon, 11 Apr 2022 08:58:04 -0700, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com,
    another typical senile airhead, blathered:


    NOT in the case of a well-known, PROVEN clinically insane trolling attention
    whore like "PHucker"! <BG> If you need proof, I can post it here. ;-) >>>>
    I prefer that you post something intelligent on topic.

    I prefer that you senile airheads stop feeding that WELL-KNOWN and PROVEN >>> clinically insane trolling attention whore! Capisci?

    What do you do in real life?

    None of yours, senile blabbermouth! You may ask your senile "friends" on >>> Usenet that question. From what I've seen, the senile assholes that took >>> over Usenet are just too happy to keep talking about their personal lives >>> and outstanding achievements ...and feeding the trolls! <BG>

    Your life sounds generally depressing.

    Try electronics. It's fun.

    Or gardening. You can bullshit all you like to flowers. They are never >offended and they never answer back. They are grateful for the hot air
    and carbon emissions.

    My wife is an avid gardener. A member of Filoli and the SF
    Conservatory. She takes me on garden tours where at least people put
    out good wine and snacks. I just swing a pick or connect some
    irrigation solenoids now and then.

    https://www.dropbox.com/s/dc5dn6p0ctz751k/Lemons_Apr_2020.jpg?raw=1

    I have a cousin who is a "closer", who is hired to be in the room when billion-dollar defense contracts are negotiated. He's the most
    aggressive and competitive person I've ever met, and he gardens most
    of the time. Loves roses.

    That's way too slow for me. I need to get results now.

    Gardening is central to my favorite book, Wodehouse's "A Damsel In
    Distress."

    I recent read "Finding The Mother Tree" which is about the fungus
    fiber network that connects tree roots and transfers nutrients and
    water and information. Essentially an underground nervous system. That
    should be better instrumented; probably the biologists are missing
    things.

    Yes, plants love CO2. It's good for the planet and we need more.



    --

    I yam what I yam - Popeye

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Mike Monett@21:1/5 to Phil Hobbs on Tue Apr 12 15:17:28 2022
    Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    Mike Monett wrote:
    Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    Mike Monett wrote:
    Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    [...]

    I have an ancient (1960-vintage) DeVilbiss mains-powered vapourizer
    that we use when somebody has a lower-respiratory bug. It's a glass >>>>> jar holding a gallon or so, and a Bakelite lid containing two plated >>>>> steel electrodes that get dunked into the water. They're covered by >>>>> a Bakelite cylinder with a hole in the bottom, and the steam from
    the boiling water gets directed out a hole in the top.

    The steam production can be regulated with a little bit of borax in
    the water if needed. (Salt works but eventually eats the
    electrodes.)

    Simple, works great, no moving parts, no Legionnaire's disease or
    lime dust on the rug. Cheap on eBay. Good Medicine.

    It does heat the room a little bit, but not enough to worry about.

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs

    How long does it take to evaporate a gallon?

    [...]


    I seached EBay and found one that seems to be like it. The shipping
    from the States was $50, which is outrageous and I refuse to pay.

    There are some for cheaper.


    I found a steamer at Amazon. It has a small chamber with a heating
    element

    https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B07GQ2CF4T/

    The calcium appears to stay in the water and attaches to the element,
    just like in an electric kettle. Boiling vinegar for a few minutes
    should clean it out. I'll try your trick of turning power off before
    the chamber is empty.

    The nice thing about the DeVilbiss 145 is that the water is heated by
    passing AC through it (the electrodes are directly connected to the
    mains), so that happens automatically.

    Yes. That would make it easy to DIY, but impossible to pass UL.

    I very rarely need to use it for more than a week at a time, so I've
    never had it crud up on me. Dunno what it's like in continual use.

    As I think of it now, the output will drop since the current decreases as
    the water level drops. This will make it impossible to maintain a constant humidity level. Do you ever monitor the humidity? Digital hygrometers are
    very cheap on EBay. For example:

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/363794102205

    I have a bunch that I use everywhere, and I have given a bunch away. I even monitor the humidity in the vegetable bin in the fridges. (I have two) You really need these in Canada when the temperature gets down to -30C.

    The problem with this method is trying to control the output. It claims
    to be able to adjust the output to give 24 hrs of run time. This would
    make it identical to my ultrasonic mister, which keeps the humidity at
    40%, which is perfect.

    Thanks very much for your post and helpful reply. Hopefully this will
    get rid of the fine coating all over everything.

    Not to mention all the mould spores and Legionella. ;)

    The dash of bleach used to prevent slime buildup on the regulator valve
    would eliminate any bacteria or viruses. I don't know where any mold spores would come from. We get our water from an acquifer that filters lake water through thousands of feet of silt and sand.

    Incidentally, I caught Legionella on a trip to Singapore. Almost died
    untill the doctor called and asked me to come into his office. Turns out he
    had misread my chest X-ray and decided to check it again. If he had not, I
    was a goner. Actually, it's not a bad way to go. Very peaceful, with
    beautiful music on the way out.

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs





    --
    MRM

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Anthony William Sloman@21:1/5 to jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com on Tue Apr 12 08:34:32 2022
    On Wednesday, April 13, 2022 at 12:41:41 AM UTC+10, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Tue, 12 Apr 2022 09:44:31 +0100, The Natural Philosopher <t...@invalid.invalid> wrote:
    On 11/04/2022 22:19, John Larkin wrote:
    On Mon, 11 Apr 2022 19:13:15 +0200, Peeler <trol...@valid.invalid> wrote:
    On Mon, 11 Apr 2022 08:58:04 -0700, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com,

    <snip>

    Yes, plants love CO2. It's good for the planet and we need more.

    John Larkin has been reading Anthony Watts' climate change denial propaganda.

    Plant's appreciate CO2 but they are much more interested in water. Give them more CO2, and the number of stomata in the leaves go down - they don't need as many of them to let in the CO2 they actually need, and fewer holes for water to diffuse out of
    mean that they can hang onto more water (which is harder to get hold of).

    John Larkin gets told about this from time to time, but he seems to forget it.

    --
    Bill Sloman, Sydney

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Phil Hobbs@21:1/5 to Commander Kinsey on Tue Apr 12 12:55:42 2022
    Commander Kinsey wrote:
    On Mon, 11 Apr 2022 21:06:34 +0100, Mike Monett <spamme@not.com> wrote:

    Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    [...]

    I have an ancient (1960-vintage) DeVilbiss mains-powered vapourizer that >>> we use when somebody has a lower-respiratory bug.† It's a glass jar
    holding a gallon or so, and a Bakelite lid containing two plated steel
    electrodes that get dunked into the water.† They're covered by a
    Bakelite cylinder with a hole in the bottom, and the steam from the
    boiling water gets directed out a hole in the top.

    The steam production can be regulated with a little bit of borax in the
    water if needed.† (Salt works but eventually eats the electrodes.)

    Simple, works great, no moving parts, no Legionnaire's disease or lime
    dust on the rug.† Cheap on eBay.† Good Medicine.

    It does heat the room a little bit, but not enough to worry about.

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs

    How long does it take to evaporate a gallon?

    My ultrasonic mister takes about 24 hrs to evaporate 4 litres, which is
    1.06 gallons. This raises the humidity from 20% to 40% and stops the
    chapped lips and sore sinuses. The white film that covers everything is
    harmless and is a small price to pay, but I wonder if a steamer could
    do as
    well.

    It would increase the temperature, so you'd then need to use AC which
    would remove the humidity!

    Not a big problem in the parts of Canada that are very dry in the winter. ;)

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs

    --
    Dr Philip C D Hobbs
    Principal Consultant
    ElectroOptical Innovations LLC / Hobbs ElectroOptics
    Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics
    Briarcliff Manor NY 10510

    http://electrooptical.net
    http://hobbs-eo.com

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Phil Hobbs@21:1/5 to Mike Monett on Tue Apr 12 12:58:09 2022
    Mike Monett wrote:
    Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    [...]

    I have an ancient (1960-vintage) DeVilbiss mains-powered vapourizer that
    we use when somebody has a lower-respiratory bug. It's a glass jar
    holding a gallon or so, and a Bakelite lid containing two plated steel
    electrodes that get dunked into the water. They're covered by a
    Bakelite cylinder with a hole in the bottom, and the steam from the
    boiling water gets directed out a hole in the top.

    The steam production can be regulated with a little bit of borax in the
    water if needed. (Salt works but eventually eats the electrodes.)

    Simple, works great, no moving parts, no Legionnaire's disease or lime
    dust on the rug. Cheap on eBay. Good Medicine.

    It does heat the room a little bit, but not enough to worry about.


    No need to mess with borax. A simple incadescent light dimmer can adjust
    the output to any level desired. This should give better repeatability of
    the steam output and more predictable results.

    The borax speeds it up, whereas the dimmer can only slow it down. A
    variac could do both. You'd also want to be careful to avoid any
    residual DC from triac asymmetry.

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs

    --
    Dr Philip C D Hobbs
    Principal Consultant
    ElectroOptical Innovations LLC / Hobbs ElectroOptics
    Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics
    Briarcliff Manor NY 10510

    http://electrooptical.net
    http://hobbs-eo.com

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Phil Hobbs@21:1/5 to Mike Monett on Tue Apr 12 13:14:34 2022
    Mike Monett wrote:
    Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    Mike Monett wrote:
    Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    Mike Monett wrote:
    Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    [...]

    I have an ancient (1960-vintage) DeVilbiss mains-powered vapourizer >>>>>> that we use when somebody has a lower-respiratory bug. It's a glass >>>>>> jar holding a gallon or so, and a Bakelite lid containing two plated >>>>>> steel electrodes that get dunked into the water. They're covered by >>>>>> a Bakelite cylinder with a hole in the bottom, and the steam from
    the boiling water gets directed out a hole in the top.

    The steam production can be regulated with a little bit of borax in >>>>>> the water if needed. (Salt works but eventually eats the
    electrodes.)

    Simple, works great, no moving parts, no Legionnaire's disease or
    lime dust on the rug. Cheap on eBay. Good Medicine.

    It does heat the room a little bit, but not enough to worry about. >>>>>>
    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs

    How long does it take to evaporate a gallon?

    [...]


    I seached EBay and found one that seems to be like it. The shipping
    from the States was $50, which is outrageous and I refuse to pay.

    There are some for cheaper.


    I found a steamer at Amazon. It has a small chamber with a heating
    element

    https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B07GQ2CF4T/

    The calcium appears to stay in the water and attaches to the element,
    just like in an electric kettle. Boiling vinegar for a few minutes
    should clean it out. I'll try your trick of turning power off before
    the chamber is empty.

    The nice thing about the DeVilbiss 145 is that the water is heated by
    passing AC through it (the electrodes are directly connected to the
    mains), so that happens automatically.

    Yes. That would make it easy to DIY, but impossible to pass UL.

    I very rarely need to use it for more than a week at a time, so I've
    never had it crud up on me. Dunno what it's like in continual use.

    As I think of it now, the output will drop since the current decreases as
    the water level drops. This will make it impossible to maintain a constant humidity level. Do you ever monitor the humidity? Digital hygrometers are very cheap on EBay. For example:

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/363794102205

    Not usually. The vapourizer output is more nearly constant than you'd
    think, because the concentration of dissolved solids goes up as the
    water level goes down. It does decrease when the electrodes are nearly
    out of the water.

    I have a bunch that I use everywhere, and I have given a bunch away. I even monitor the humidity in the vegetable bin in the fridges. (I have two) You really need these in Canada when the temperature gets down to -30C.

    The problem with this method is trying to control the output. It claims
    to be able to adjust the output to give 24 hrs of run time. This would
    make it identical to my ultrasonic mister, which keeps the humidity at
    40%, which is perfect.

    Thanks very much for your post and helpful reply. Hopefully this will
    get rid of the fine coating all over everything.

    Not to mention all the mould spores and Legionella. ;)

    The dash of bleach used to prevent slime buildup on the regulator valve
    would eliminate any bacteria or viruses. I don't know where any mold spores would come from. We get our water from an acquifer that filters lake water through thousands of feet of silt and sand.

    Incidentally, I caught Legionella on a trip to Singapore. Almost died
    untill the doctor called and asked me to come into his office. Turns out he had misread my chest X-ray and decided to check it again. If he had not, I was a goner. Actually, it's not a bad way to go. Very peaceful, with beautiful music on the way out.

    Sir William Osler famously called pneumonia "the old man's friend."

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs







    --
    Dr Philip C D Hobbs
    Principal Consultant
    ElectroOptical Innovations LLC / Hobbs ElectroOptics
    Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics
    Briarcliff Manor NY 10510

    http://electrooptical.net
    http://hobbs-eo.com

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Larkin@21:1/5 to CK1@nospam.com on Tue Apr 12 10:15:08 2022
    On Tue, 12 Apr 2022 06:01:47 +0100, "Commander Kinsey"
    <CK1@nospam.com> wrote:

    On Mon, 11 Apr 2022 20:53:43 +0100, Mike Monett <spamme@not.com> wrote:

    Lasse Langwadt Christensen <langwadt@fonz.dk> wrote:

    mandag den 11. april 2022 kl. 16.53.13 UTC+2 skrev Commander Kinsey:
    On Mon, 11 Apr 2022 15:47:19 +0100, Arie de Muijnck
    <eternal....@ademu.com> wrote:

    On 2022-04-11 16:31, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:

    Don't ultrasonic humidifiers cause mineral deposition nearby? Maybe >>>> >> not if one uses good distilled water.

    Yes, they do, extensively.

    I had the environment covered in a fine dust within weeks.

    Even stranger, in the kitchen at the other end of the apartment, gas >>>> > flames became orange/red, see for a test:
    <https://ademu.home.xs4all.nl/Humidifier/Ultrasonic-humidifier-effect- >>>> > on-gas-flame.mp4> So, after I edited that shit to remove the
    pointless <>, I find some idiot putting damp air into a gas flame,
    what was your point? I find distilled water at EUR 0.5 / liter too
    expensive for using up to 5 liters per day...
    I find no such problems. All it does is make the air more humid. Why
    the fuck would that cause deposits?

    because it doesn't turn the water into vapor, it turns the water, and
    what ever minerals in it, into tiny droplets and spread them in the air

    I am 80 and live in Canada, a cold climate. When the temperature is low, there
    is very little humidity in the air. This means the relative humidity indoors is
    very low and gets down to 20% or below.

    Low humidity causes chapped lips, sore sinuses, and greatly increased
    vulnerability to virus and bacterial infections. 30% to 50% RH solves these >> problems.

    I got mine for the parrots.

    I bought an Ultrasonic Top Fill Humidifier from Amazon Canada:
    https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B09KRCS7R7

    This has no problem maintaining the humidity at 40%, but I discovered some >> issues.

    1. Ordinary tap water contains calcium. This covers everything with a fine dust.
    It looks awful but it is harmless and is easily wiped off. Obviously, you breath
    this in.

    I'm in a soft water area, virtually none of that. I'm surprised water companies aren't required to remove that shit so it doesn't scale up kettles., washing machines etc.

    Our water company adds limestone or something to protect the pipes.
    The water supply here is naturally a bit acidic.

    --

    If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end with doubts,
    but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties. Francis Bacon

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Larkin@21:1/5 to CK1@nospam.com on Tue Apr 12 10:18:46 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On Tue, 12 Apr 2022 06:02:30 +0100, "Commander Kinsey"
    <CK1@nospam.com> wrote:

    On Tue, 12 Apr 2022 00:41:37 +0100, Randy Patzkowski <randyp@redacted.org> wrote:

    On 4/11/2022 10:31:33 AM, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    Don't ultrasonic humidifiers cause mineral deposition nearby? Maybe
    not if one uses good distilled water.

    Last October I installed an Aprilaire 500M whole house humidifier on our furnace and plumbed it in to the reverse osmosis water system.
    Checked the water evaporator panel this spring and it still looked brand new.

    WTF is a "reverse osmosis water system"?

    Ask Mister Google!

    --

    If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end with doubts,
    but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties. Francis Bacon

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Larkin@21:1/5 to pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical. on Tue Apr 12 12:27:41 2022
    On Tue, 12 Apr 2022 13:14:34 -0400, Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    Mike Monett wrote:
    Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    Mike Monett wrote:
    Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    Mike Monett wrote:
    Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    [...]

    I have an ancient (1960-vintage) DeVilbiss mains-powered vapourizer >>>>>>> that we use when somebody has a lower-respiratory bug. It's a glass >>>>>>> jar holding a gallon or so, and a Bakelite lid containing two plated >>>>>>> steel electrodes that get dunked into the water. They're covered by >>>>>>> a Bakelite cylinder with a hole in the bottom, and the steam from >>>>>>> the boiling water gets directed out a hole in the top.

    The steam production can be regulated with a little bit of borax in >>>>>>> the water if needed. (Salt works but eventually eats the
    electrodes.)

    Simple, works great, no moving parts, no Legionnaire's disease or >>>>>>> lime dust on the rug. Cheap on eBay. Good Medicine.

    It does heat the room a little bit, but not enough to worry about. >>>>>>>
    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs

    How long does it take to evaporate a gallon?

    [...]


    I seached EBay and found one that seems to be like it. The shipping
    from the States was $50, which is outrageous and I refuse to pay.

    There are some for cheaper.


    I found a steamer at Amazon. It has a small chamber with a heating
    element

    https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B07GQ2CF4T/

    The calcium appears to stay in the water and attaches to the element,
    just like in an electric kettle. Boiling vinegar for a few minutes
    should clean it out. I'll try your trick of turning power off before
    the chamber is empty.

    The nice thing about the DeVilbiss 145 is that the water is heated by
    passing AC through it (the electrodes are directly connected to the
    mains), so that happens automatically.

    Yes. That would make it easy to DIY, but impossible to pass UL.

    I very rarely need to use it for more than a week at a time, so I've
    never had it crud up on me. Dunno what it's like in continual use.

    As I think of it now, the output will drop since the current decreases as
    the water level drops. This will make it impossible to maintain a constant >> humidity level. Do you ever monitor the humidity? Digital hygrometers are
    very cheap on EBay. For example:

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/363794102205

    Not usually. The vapourizer output is more nearly constant than you'd
    think, because the concentration of dissolved solids goes up as the
    water level goes down. It does decrease when the electrodes are nearly
    out of the water.

    I have a bunch that I use everywhere, and I have given a bunch away. I even >> monitor the humidity in the vegetable bin in the fridges. (I have two) You >> really need these in Canada when the temperature gets down to -30C.

    The problem with this method is trying to control the output. It claims >>>> to be able to adjust the output to give 24 hrs of run time. This would >>>> make it identical to my ultrasonic mister, which keeps the humidity at >>>> 40%, which is perfect.

    Thanks very much for your post and helpful reply. Hopefully this will
    get rid of the fine coating all over everything.

    Not to mention all the mould spores and Legionella. ;)

    The dash of bleach used to prevent slime buildup on the regulator valve
    would eliminate any bacteria or viruses. I don't know where any mold spores >> would come from. We get our water from an acquifer that filters lake water >> through thousands of feet of silt and sand.

    Incidentally, I caught Legionella on a trip to Singapore. Almost died
    untill the doctor called and asked me to come into his office. Turns out he >> had misread my chest X-ray and decided to check it again. If he had not, I >> was a goner. Actually, it's not a bad way to go. Very peaceful, with
    beautiful music on the way out.

    Sir William Osler famously called pneumonia "the old man's friend."

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs






    From the Game of Thrones:

    What do you say to the god of death?

    Not today.

    --

    If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end with doubts,
    but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties. Francis Bacon

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Mike Monett@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Tue Apr 12 19:21:14 2022
    John Larkin <jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote:

    [...]

    Our water company adds limestone or something to protect the pipes.
    The water supply here is naturally a bit acidic.

    We have copper pipes in the residences, but I don't know if the city supply uses copper, pvc or abs.

    Limestone is Calcium carbonate, CaCO3.

    This leaves a white film all over everything in an ultrasonic humidifier.

    A boiling water steamer leaves the calcium on the heating element.

    https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B07GQ2CF4T/

    The calcium is removed by boiling a small amount of vinegar in the chamber.

    Calcium carbonate : CaCO3
    Vinegar (acetic acid) : CH3COOH
    Calcium acetate : Ca(CH3COO)2
    Water : H2O
    Carbon Dioxide : CO2

    CaCO3(s) + 2CH3COOH(l) --> Ca(CH3COO)2(s) + H2O(l) + CO2(g)



    --
    MRM

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno@decadenc@21:1/5 to Mike Monett on Wed Apr 13 00:15:30 2022
    Mike Monett <spamme@not.com> wrote in news:XnsAE779C309CF91idtokenpost@144.76.35.252:

    John Larkin <jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote:

    [...]

    Our water company adds limestone or something to protect the
    pipes. The water supply here is naturally a bit acidic.

    We have copper pipes in the residences, but I don't know if the
    city supply uses copper, pvc or abs.

    Limestone is Calcium carbonate, CaCO3.

    This leaves a white film all over everything in an ultrasonic
    humidifier.

    A boiling water steamer leaves the calcium on the heating element.

    https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B07GQ2CF4T/

    The calcium is removed by boiling a small amount of vinegar in the
    chamber.

    Calcium carbonate : CaCO3
    Vinegar (acetic acid) : CH3COOH
    Calcium acetate : Ca(CH3COO)2
    Water : H2O
    Carbon Dioxide : CO2

    CaCO3(s) + 2CH3COOH(l) --> Ca(CH3COO)2(s) + H2O(l) + CO2(g)

    And "Zero Water" filter gets it all before you place it into your
    cooking appliances. My water pot gets no calcifications

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Joe Gwinn@21:1/5 to pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical. on Tue Apr 12 20:19:01 2022
    On Tue, 12 Apr 2022 10:14:19 -0400, Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    Mike Monett wrote:
    Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    Mike Monett wrote:
    Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    [...]

    I have an ancient (1960-vintage) DeVilbiss mains-powered vapourizer
    that we use when somebody has a lower-respiratory bug. It's a glass >>>>> jar holding a gallon or so, and a Bakelite lid containing two plated >>>>> steel electrodes that get dunked into the water. They're covered by a >>>>> Bakelite cylinder with a hole in the bottom, and the steam from the
    boiling water gets directed out a hole in the top.

    The steam production can be regulated with a little bit of borax in
    the water if needed. (Salt works but eventually eats the electrodes.) >>>>>
    Simple, works great, no moving parts, no Legionnaire's disease or lime >>>>> dust on the rug. Cheap on eBay. Good Medicine.

    It does heat the room a little bit, but not enough to worry about.

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs

    How long does it take to evaporate a gallon?

    [...]


    I seached EBay and found one that seems to be like it. The shipping from
    the States was $50, which is outrageous and I refuse to pay.

    There are some for cheaper.


    I found a steamer at Amazon. It has a small chamber with a heating element >>
    <https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B07GQ2CF4T/>

    It's US $90 (if the website converts, as many do), shipping included.


    The calcium appears to stay in the water and attaches to the element, just >> like in an electric kettle. Boiling vinegar for a few minutes should clean >> it out. I'll try your trick of turning power off before the chamber is
    empty.

    The nice thing about the DeVilbiss 145 is that the water is heated by
    passing AC through it (the electrodes are directly connected to the
    mains), so that happens automatically.

    I very rarely need to use it for more than a week at a time, so I've
    never had it crud up on me. Dunno what it's like in continual use.

    The problem with this method is trying to control the output. It claims to >> be able to adjust the output to give 24 hrs of run time. This would make it >> identical to my ultrasonic mister, which keeps the humidity at 40%, which
    is perfect.

    Thanks very much for your post and helpful reply. Hopefully this will get
    rid of the fine coating all over everything.

    Not to mention all the mould spores and Legionella. ;)

    Yes. I just ordered an old DeVbliss 145 on ebay for about US $68,
    including shipping. Looks to be in perfect condition.

    Someone listed the relevant patent, US 2,818,486, which is mainly
    about the inventors discovering that nickel-free stainless steel
    lasted basically forever, unlike far more expensive kinds of stainless
    steel.

    The modern alloy equivalent is Type 430, which McMaster sells for
    small dollars. It is soft and easily cut with tinsnips. (Series 200
    and 300 alloys will corrode badly in this application.)

    It would be easy the duplicate the patent using glass-epoxy PWB sheets
    glued together with slow-cure epoxy, like Araldite or Hankel's
    equivalent in the US, Loctite slow cure, enclosed in a polypropylene
    container of some kind.

    Joe Gwinn

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Commander Kinsey@21:1/5 to jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com on Wed Apr 13 05:34:17 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On Tue, 12 Apr 2022 15:42:42 +0100, <jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com> wrote:

    On Tue, 12 Apr 22 11:12:14 UTC, Randy Patzkowski <randyp@redacted.org>
    wrote:

    On 4/11/2022 7:50:37 PM, John Larkin wrote:
    On Mon, 11 Apr 22 23:41:37 UTC, Randy Patzkowski <randyp@redacted.org>
    wrote:

    On 4/11/2022 10:31:33 AM, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    Don't ultrasonic humidifiers cause mineral deposition nearby? Maybe
    not if one uses good distilled water.

    Last October I installed an Aprilaire 500M whole house humidifier on our furnace and plumbed it in to the reverse osmosis water system.
    Checked the water evaporator panel this spring and it still looked brand new.

    Does it literally evaporate the water?

    Yes

    Is there any unused water
    discharged?


    Yes, approximately one drop per second exits the drain tube when the furnace blower is on and the humidistat is calling for more humidity.

    Makes sense; that's where the minerals exit.

    We need minerals.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Anthony William Sloman@21:1/5 to Commander Kinsey on Tue Apr 12 22:17:51 2022
    On Wednesday, April 13, 2022 at 2:34:26 PM UTC+10, Commander Kinsey wrote:
    On Tue, 12 Apr 2022 15:42:42 +0100, <jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com> wrote:
    On Tue, 12 Apr 22 11:12:14 UTC, Randy Patzkowski <ran...@redacted.org> wrote:
    On 4/11/2022 7:50:37 PM, John Larkin wrote:
    On Mon, 11 Apr 22 23:41:37 UTC, Randy Patzkowski <ran...@redacted.org> wrote:
    On 4/11/2022 10:31:33 AM, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:

    Don't ultrasonic humidifiers cause mineral deposition nearby? Maybe not if one uses good distilled water.

    Ultra sonic humidifiers are badly named. They are mist generators, and the humidification comes after the mist evaporates, leaving any minerals in the water that formed the mist hanging in the air as fine dust.

    Last October I installed an Aprilaire 500M whole house humidifier on our furnace and plumbed it in to the reverse osmosis water system.
    Checked the water evaporator panel this spring and it still looked brand new.

    Does it literally evaporate the water?

    Yes

    Is there any unused water discharged?

    Yes, approximately one drop per second exits the drain tube when the furnace blower is on and the humidistat is calling for more humidity.

    Makes sense; that's where the minerals exit.

    We need minerals.

    And we'd be delighted if somebody delivered a life-time supply to you, all at once, from a great height. Enough to ensure that you weren't ever going to need any more, and would never feel the need to post about it again.

    --
    Bill Sloman, Sydney

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Commander Kinsey@21:1/5 to Phil Hobbs on Wed Apr 13 08:04:12 2022
    On Tue, 12 Apr 2022 17:55:42 +0100, Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    Commander Kinsey wrote:
    On Mon, 11 Apr 2022 21:06:34 +0100, Mike Monett <spamme@not.com> wrote:

    Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    [...]

    I have an ancient (1960-vintage) DeVilbiss mains-powered vapourizer that >>>> we use when somebody has a lower-respiratory bug. It's a glass jar
    holding a gallon or so, and a Bakelite lid containing two plated steel >>>> electrodes that get dunked into the water. They're covered by a
    Bakelite cylinder with a hole in the bottom, and the steam from the
    boiling water gets directed out a hole in the top.

    The steam production can be regulated with a little bit of borax in the >>>> water if needed. (Salt works but eventually eats the electrodes.)

    Simple, works great, no moving parts, no Legionnaire's disease or lime >>>> dust on the rug. Cheap on eBay. Good Medicine.

    It does heat the room a little bit, but not enough to worry about.

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs

    How long does it take to evaporate a gallon?

    My ultrasonic mister takes about 24 hrs to evaporate 4 litres, which is
    1.06 gallons. This raises the humidity from 20% to 40% and stops the
    chapped lips and sore sinuses. The white film that covers everything is
    harmless and is a small price to pay, but I wonder if a steamer could
    do as
    well.

    It would increase the temperature, so you'd then need to use AC which
    would remove the humidity!

    Not a big problem in the parts of Canada that are very dry in the winter. ;)

    Dry and cold don't go together well. Cold always means 100% RH.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Jasen Betts@21:1/5 to Mike Monett on Wed Apr 13 06:16:06 2022
    On 2022-04-12, Mike Monett <spamme@not.com> wrote:
    John Larkin <jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote:

    [...]

    Our water company adds limestone or something to protect the pipes.
    The water supply here is naturally a bit acidic.

    We have copper pipes in the residences, but I don't know if the city supply uses copper, pvc or abs.

    More likely polyethylene, iron, lead, asbestos, or even wood.

    --
    Jasen.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Commander Kinsey@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Wed Apr 13 08:05:18 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On Tue, 12 Apr 2022 18:18:46 +0100, John Larkin <jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote:

    On Tue, 12 Apr 2022 06:02:30 +0100, "Commander Kinsey"
    <CK1@nospam.com> wrote:

    On Tue, 12 Apr 2022 00:41:37 +0100, Randy Patzkowski <randyp@redacted.org> wrote:

    On 4/11/2022 10:31:33 AM, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    Don't ultrasonic humidifiers cause mineral deposition nearby? Maybe
    not if one uses good distilled water.

    Last October I installed an Aprilaire 500M whole house humidifier on our furnace and plumbed it in to the reverse osmosis water system.
    Checked the water evaporator panel this spring and it still looked brand new.

    WTF is a "reverse osmosis water system"?

    Ask Mister Google!

    Not interested, just wondering why anyone needs anything so complicated.

    And I use Duckduckgo so I don't get traced.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Commander Kinsey@21:1/5 to Jasen Betts on Wed Apr 13 09:05:27 2022
    On Wed, 13 Apr 2022 07:16:06 +0100, Jasen Betts <usenet@revmaps.no-ip.org> wrote:

    On 2022-04-12, Mike Monett <spamme@not.com> wrote:
    John Larkin <jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote:

    [...]

    Our water company adds limestone or something to protect the pipes.
    The water supply here is naturally a bit acidic.

    We have copper pipes in the residences, but I don't know if the city supply >> uses copper, pvc or abs.

    More likely polyethylene, iron, lead, asbestos, or even wood.

    Wooden pipes WTF?

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Commander Kinsey@21:1/5 to Mike Monett on Wed Apr 13 09:05:52 2022
    On Tue, 12 Apr 2022 20:21:14 +0100, Mike Monett <spamme@not.com> wrote:

    John Larkin <jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote:

    [...]

    Our water company adds limestone or something to protect the pipes.
    The water supply here is naturally a bit acidic.

    We have copper pipes in the residences, but I don't know if the city supply uses copper, pvc or abs.

    ABS can be plastic, anti lock brakes, or a sexy stomach.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Anthony William Sloman@21:1/5 to Commander Kinsey on Wed Apr 13 00:58:39 2022
    On Wednesday, April 13, 2022 at 5:04:20 PM UTC+10, Commander Kinsey wrote:
    On Tue, 12 Apr 2022 17:55:42 +0100, Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamM...@electrooptical.net> wrote:
    Commander Kinsey wrote:
    On Mon, 11 Apr 2022 21:06:34 +0100, Mike Monett <spa...@not.com> wrote: >>> Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamM...@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    It would increase the temperature, so you'd then need to use AC which
    would remove the humidity!

    Not a big problem in the parts of Canada that are very dry in the winter. ;)

    Dry and cold don't go together well. Cold always means 100% RH.

    It doesn't. Humidity is always about the water content of the air. At low temperatures the vapour pressure of water over ice can be remarkably low, and most of the water vapour that gets blown in from warmer places get condensed out. Air that has
    evaporated off liquid air is always very dry - 0% relative humidity.

    Canada doesn't get that cold, but vapour pressure of water over ice is 4.58 torr at zero Celcius, while the air in your lungs is has got a about 50 torr of water vapour. At -20 Celcius the vapour pressure is down to about 1 torr.

    It's going to feel dry to you, if you are warn enough to feel anything.

    --
    Bill Sloman, Sydney

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Commander Kinsey@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Wed Apr 13 09:06:14 2022
    On Tue, 12 Apr 2022 18:15:08 +0100, John Larkin <jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote:

    On Tue, 12 Apr 2022 06:01:47 +0100, "Commander Kinsey"
    <CK1@nospam.com> wrote:

    On Mon, 11 Apr 2022 20:53:43 +0100, Mike Monett <spamme@not.com> wrote:

    Lasse Langwadt Christensen <langwadt@fonz.dk> wrote:

    mandag den 11. april 2022 kl. 16.53.13 UTC+2 skrev Commander Kinsey:
    On Mon, 11 Apr 2022 15:47:19 +0100, Arie de Muijnck
    <eternal....@ademu.com> wrote:

    On 2022-04-11 16:31, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:

    Don't ultrasonic humidifiers cause mineral deposition nearby? Maybe >>>>> >> not if one uses good distilled water.

    Yes, they do, extensively.

    I had the environment covered in a fine dust within weeks.

    Even stranger, in the kitchen at the other end of the apartment, gas >>>>> > flames became orange/red, see for a test:
    <https://ademu.home.xs4all.nl/Humidifier/Ultrasonic-humidifier-effect- >>>>> > on-gas-flame.mp4> So, after I edited that shit to remove the
    pointless <>, I find some idiot putting damp air into a gas flame, >>>>> > what was your point? I find distilled water at EUR 0.5 / liter too >>>>> > expensive for using up to 5 liters per day...
    I find no such problems. All it does is make the air more humid. Why >>>>> the fuck would that cause deposits?

    because it doesn't turn the water into vapor, it turns the water, and
    what ever minerals in it, into tiny droplets and spread them in the air >>>
    I am 80 and live in Canada, a cold climate. When the temperature is low, there
    is very little humidity in the air. This means the relative humidity indoors is
    very low and gets down to 20% or below.

    Low humidity causes chapped lips, sore sinuses, and greatly increased
    vulnerability to virus and bacterial infections. 30% to 50% RH solves these >>> problems.

    I got mine for the parrots.

    I bought an Ultrasonic Top Fill Humidifier from Amazon Canada:
    https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B09KRCS7R7

    This has no problem maintaining the humidity at 40%, but I discovered some >>> issues.

    1. Ordinary tap water contains calcium. This covers everything with a fine dust.
    It looks awful but it is harmless and is easily wiped off. Obviously, you breath
    this in.

    I'm in a soft water area, virtually none of that. I'm surprised water companies aren't required to remove that shit so it doesn't scale up kettles., washing machines etc.

    Our water company adds limestone or something to protect the pipes.
    The water supply here is naturally a bit acidic.

    Amazing they can't just make it pure. This is the 21st century right?

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Jasen Betts@21:1/5 to Commander Kinsey on Wed Apr 13 09:48:44 2022
    On 2022-04-13, Commander Kinsey <CK1@nospam.com> wrote:
    On Wed, 13 Apr 2022 07:16:06 +0100, Jasen Betts <usenet@revmaps.no-ip.org> wrote:

    On 2022-04-12, Mike Monett <spamme@not.com> wrote:
    John Larkin <jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote:

    [...]

    Our water company adds limestone or something to protect the pipes.
    The water supply here is naturally a bit acidic.

    We have copper pipes in the residences, but I don't know if the city supply >>> uses copper, pvc or abs.

    More likely polyethylene, iron, lead, asbestos, or even wood.

    Wooden pipes WTF?

    Remarkably (you did), although over a century old, there are still
    wooden pipes in service in some places; either stave pipes (constructed
    like long barrels), or single-piece pipes, ( a log bored lengthwise).
    If you do a search, for "wooden water pipes" you will find plenty of information.


    @Peeler GFY.

    --
    Jasen.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com@21:1/5 to All on Wed Apr 13 07:38:23 2022
    On Tue, 12 Apr 2022 19:21:14 -0000 (UTC), Mike Monett <spamme@not.com>
    wrote:

    John Larkin <jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote:

    [...]

    Our water company adds limestone or something to protect the pipes.
    The water supply here is naturally a bit acidic.

    We have copper pipes in the residences, but I don't know if the city supply >uses copper, pvc or abs.

    Older houses here usually had threaded iron pipes. The limestone
    coated them to protect them from rust, but in ca 100 years built up
    enough to restrict flow. That could be snaked out. I did that in our
    old (1892) house.



    --

    I yam what I yam - Popeye

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com@21:1/5 to usenet@revmaps.no-ip.org on Wed Apr 13 07:43:59 2022
    On Wed, 13 Apr 2022 06:16:06 -0000 (UTC), Jasen Betts <usenet@revmaps.no-ip.org> wrote:

    On 2022-04-12, Mike Monett <spamme@not.com> wrote:
    John Larkin <jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote:

    [...]

    Our water company adds limestone or something to protect the pipes.
    The water supply here is naturally a bit acidic.

    We have copper pipes in the residences, but I don't know if the city supply >> uses copper, pvc or abs.

    More likely polyethylene, iron, lead, asbestos, or even wood.

    Or sometimes vitrified clay here, flower pot material. Very fragile.

    Wood pipes in Dutch Flat, CA:

    https://www.dropbox.com/sh/ezi7utkoldlbofv/AADyOUIheVZMS0P3J_vFEjpfa?dl=0



    --

    I yam what I yam - Popeye

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com@21:1/5 to CK1@nospam.com on Wed Apr 13 07:52:23 2022
    On Wed, 13 Apr 2022 09:06:14 +0100, "Commander Kinsey"
    <CK1@nospam.com> wrote:

    On Tue, 12 Apr 2022 18:15:08 +0100, John Larkin <jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote:

    On Tue, 12 Apr 2022 06:01:47 +0100, "Commander Kinsey"
    <CK1@nospam.com> wrote:

    On Mon, 11 Apr 2022 20:53:43 +0100, Mike Monett <spamme@not.com> wrote:

    Lasse Langwadt Christensen <langwadt@fonz.dk> wrote:

    mandag den 11. april 2022 kl. 16.53.13 UTC+2 skrev Commander Kinsey: >>>>>> On Mon, 11 Apr 2022 15:47:19 +0100, Arie de Muijnck
    <eternal....@ademu.com> wrote:

    On 2022-04-11 16:31, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:

    Don't ultrasonic humidifiers cause mineral deposition nearby? Maybe >>>>>> >> not if one uses good distilled water.

    Yes, they do, extensively.

    I had the environment covered in a fine dust within weeks.

    Even stranger, in the kitchen at the other end of the apartment, gas >>>>>> > flames became orange/red, see for a test:
    <https://ademu.home.xs4all.nl/Humidifier/Ultrasonic-humidifier-effect- >>>>>> > on-gas-flame.mp4> So, after I edited that shit to remove the
    pointless <>, I find some idiot putting damp air into a gas flame, >>>>>> > what was your point? I find distilled water at EUR 0.5 / liter too >>>>>> > expensive for using up to 5 liters per day...
    I find no such problems. All it does is make the air more humid. Why >>>>>> the fuck would that cause deposits?

    because it doesn't turn the water into vapor, it turns the water, and >>>>> what ever minerals in it, into tiny droplets and spread them in the air >>>>
    I am 80 and live in Canada, a cold climate. When the temperature is low, there
    is very little humidity in the air. This means the relative humidity indoors is
    very low and gets down to 20% or below.

    Low humidity causes chapped lips, sore sinuses, and greatly increased
    vulnerability to virus and bacterial infections. 30% to 50% RH solves these
    problems.

    I got mine for the parrots.

    I bought an Ultrasonic Top Fill Humidifier from Amazon Canada:
    https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B09KRCS7R7

    This has no problem maintaining the humidity at 40%, but I discovered some >>>> issues.

    1. Ordinary tap water contains calcium. This covers everything with a fine dust.
    It looks awful but it is harmless and is easily wiped off. Obviously, you breath
    this in.

    I'm in a soft water area, virtually none of that. I'm surprised water companies aren't required to remove that shit so it doesn't scale up kettles., washing machines etc.

    Our water company adds limestone or something to protect the pipes.
    The water supply here is naturally a bit acidic.

    Amazing they can't just make it pure. This is the 21st century right?

    We drink melted snow from the Hetch Hechy reservoir in the Sierras. It
    is very pure and very tasty, but has a bit of natural CO2 that can
    attack older iron pipes. The added carbonate protects the pipes.

    Most places have water with enough dissolved minerals (and sewage and
    chemicals from places upstream) to be alkaline, and taste terrible.
    Lots of places, people don't drink the tap water.


    --

    I yam what I yam - Popeye

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com@21:1/5 to CK1@nospam.com on Wed Apr 13 07:54:32 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On Wed, 13 Apr 2022 08:05:18 +0100, "Commander Kinsey"
    <CK1@nospam.com> wrote:

    On Tue, 12 Apr 2022 18:18:46 +0100, John Larkin <jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote:

    On Tue, 12 Apr 2022 06:02:30 +0100, "Commander Kinsey"
    <CK1@nospam.com> wrote:

    On Tue, 12 Apr 2022 00:41:37 +0100, Randy Patzkowski <randyp@redacted.org> wrote:

    On 4/11/2022 10:31:33 AM, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    Don't ultrasonic humidifiers cause mineral deposition nearby? Maybe
    not if one uses good distilled water.

    Last October I installed an Aprilaire 500M whole house humidifier on our furnace and plumbed it in to the reverse osmosis water system.
    Checked the water evaporator panel this spring and it still looked brand new.

    WTF is a "reverse osmosis water system"?

    Ask Mister Google!

    Not interested, just wondering why anyone needs anything so complicated.

    You define yourself by the things that you are not interested in.



    --

    I yam what I yam - Popeye

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Anthony William Sloman@21:1/5 to Commander Kinsey on Wed Apr 13 08:01:03 2022
    On Wednesday, April 13, 2022 at 6:06:23 PM UTC+10, Commander Kinsey wrote:
    On Tue, 12 Apr 2022 18:15:08 +0100, John Larkin <jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote:
    On Tue, 12 Apr 2022 06:01:47 +0100, "Commander Kinsey" <C...@nospam.com> wrote:
    On Mon, 11 Apr 2022 20:53:43 +0100, Mike Monett <spa...@not.com> wrote: >>> Lasse Langwadt Christensen <lang...@fonz.dk> wrote:
    mandag den 11. april 2022 kl. 16.53.13 UTC+2 skrev Commander Kinsey: >>>>> On Mon, 11 Apr 2022 15:47:19 +0100, Arie de Muijnck <eternal....@ademu.com> wrote:
    On 2022-04-11 16:31, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:

    <snip>

    Our water company adds limestone or something to protect the pipes.
    The water supply here is naturally a bit acidic.

    Amazing they can't just make it pure. This is the 21st century right?

    Of course they could make it pure. Distillation has been around for very long time. It isn't cheap, and while there are now plenty of cheaper methods making water softer. or cleaner or whatever, why bother when what comes down a river or out of well is
    clean enough?

    Humans evolved to cope with drinking surface fresh water, and municipal governments are discouraged from spending more than they have to on keeping the tap water more or less drinkable. Sometimes they don't spend quite enough.

    https://www.nrdc.org/stories/flint-water-crisis-everything-you-need-know

    America is a great source of horrible examples. In the UK somebody would have slapped a D-notice on the problem, and there wouldn't be anything to post a link to.

    --
    Bill Sloman, Sydney

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Commander Kinsey@21:1/5 to jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com on Wed Apr 13 16:04:32 2022
    On Wed, 13 Apr 2022 15:43:59 +0100, <jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com> wrote:

    On Wed, 13 Apr 2022 06:16:06 -0000 (UTC), Jasen Betts <usenet@revmaps.no-ip.org> wrote:

    On 2022-04-12, Mike Monett <spamme@not.com> wrote:
    John Larkin <jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote:

    [...]

    Our water company adds limestone or something to protect the pipes.
    The water supply here is naturally a bit acidic.

    We have copper pipes in the residences, but I don't know if the city supply >>> uses copper, pvc or abs.

    More likely polyethylene, iron, lead, asbestos, or even wood.

    Or sometimes vitrified clay here, flower pot material. Very fragile.

    Wood pipes in Dutch Flat, CA:

    https://www.dropbox.com/sh/ezi7utkoldlbofv/AADyOUIheVZMS0P3J_vFEjpfa?dl=0

    Which one of those 15 files should I look at? This one looks metal: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/ezi7utkoldlbofv/AADyOUIheVZMS0P3J_vFEjpfa?dl=0&preview=Big_Mon.JPG

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Commander Kinsey@21:1/5 to jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com on Wed Apr 13 16:07:18 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On Wed, 13 Apr 2022 15:54:32 +0100, <jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com> wrote:

    On Wed, 13 Apr 2022 08:05:18 +0100, "Commander Kinsey"
    <CK1@nospam.com> wrote:

    On Tue, 12 Apr 2022 18:18:46 +0100, John Larkin <jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote:

    On Tue, 12 Apr 2022 06:02:30 +0100, "Commander Kinsey"
    <CK1@nospam.com> wrote:

    On Tue, 12 Apr 2022 00:41:37 +0100, Randy Patzkowski <randyp@redacted.org> wrote:

    On 4/11/2022 10:31:33 AM, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote: >>>>>> Don't ultrasonic humidifiers cause mineral deposition nearby? Maybe >>>>>> not if one uses good distilled water.

    Last October I installed an Aprilaire 500M whole house humidifier on our furnace and plumbed it in to the reverse osmosis water system.
    Checked the water evaporator panel this spring and it still looked brand new.

    WTF is a "reverse osmosis water system"?

    Ask Mister Google!

    Not interested, just wondering why anyone needs anything so complicated.

    You define yourself by the things that you are not interested in.

    Most people are not interested in 99% of stuff. There's too many things to take an interest in a large amount of them.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Phil Hobbs@21:1/5 to Commander Kinsey on Wed Apr 13 11:41:08 2022
    Commander Kinsey wrote:
    On Tue, 12 Apr 2022 17:55:42 +0100, Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    Commander Kinsey wrote:
    On Mon, 11 Apr 2022 21:06:34 +0100, Mike Monett <spamme@not.com> wrote:

    Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    [...]

    I have an ancient (1960-vintage) DeVilbiss mains-powered vapourizer
    that
    we use when somebody has a lower-respiratory bug.† It's a glass jar
    holding a gallon or so, and a Bakelite lid containing two plated steel >>>>> electrodes that get dunked into the water.† They're covered by a
    Bakelite cylinder with a hole in the bottom, and the steam from the
    boiling water gets directed out a hole in the top.

    The steam production can be regulated with a little bit of borax in
    the
    water if needed.† (Salt works but eventually eats the electrodes.)

    Simple, works great, no moving parts, no Legionnaire's disease or lime >>>>> dust on the rug.† Cheap on eBay.† Good Medicine.

    It does heat the room a little bit, but not enough to worry about.

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs

    How long does it take to evaporate a gallon?

    My ultrasonic mister takes about 24 hrs to evaporate 4 litres, which is >>>> 1.06 gallons. This raises the humidity from 20% to 40% and stops the
    chapped lips and sore sinuses. The white film that covers everything is >>>> harmless and is a small price to pay, but I wonder if a steamer could
    do as
    well.

    It would increase the temperature, so you'd then need to use AC which
    would remove the humidity!

    Not a big problem in the parts of Canada that are very dry in the
    winter. ;)

    Dry and cold don't go together well.† Cold always means 100% RH.

    Not indoors. And that's far from always true even outdoors--not
    everywhere does cold mud as well as you Brits, after all. ;) (The Dutch
    have you beat there, but not by much.)

    In places like New Mexico, it's far from unusual to have sub-freezing temperatures with single-digit RH. It's dangerous to leave your bedroom
    window open even a crack in those conditions, as I found out one time
    about a decade ago.

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Commander Kinsey@21:1/5 to Phil Hobbs on Wed Apr 13 16:45:24 2022
    On Wed, 13 Apr 2022 16:41:08 +0100, Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    Commander Kinsey wrote:
    On Tue, 12 Apr 2022 17:55:42 +0100, Phil Hobbs
    <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    Commander Kinsey wrote:
    On Mon, 11 Apr 2022 21:06:34 +0100, Mike Monett <spamme@not.com> wrote: >>>>
    Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    [...]

    I have an ancient (1960-vintage) DeVilbiss mains-powered vapourizer >>>>>> that
    we use when somebody has a lower-respiratory bug. It's a glass jar >>>>>> holding a gallon or so, and a Bakelite lid containing two plated steel >>>>>> electrodes that get dunked into the water. They're covered by a
    Bakelite cylinder with a hole in the bottom, and the steam from the >>>>>> boiling water gets directed out a hole in the top.

    The steam production can be regulated with a little bit of borax in >>>>>> the
    water if needed. (Salt works but eventually eats the electrodes.) >>>>>>
    Simple, works great, no moving parts, no Legionnaire's disease or lime >>>>>> dust on the rug. Cheap on eBay. Good Medicine.

    It does heat the room a little bit, but not enough to worry about. >>>>>>
    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs

    How long does it take to evaporate a gallon?

    My ultrasonic mister takes about 24 hrs to evaporate 4 litres, which is >>>>> 1.06 gallons. This raises the humidity from 20% to 40% and stops the >>>>> chapped lips and sore sinuses. The white film that covers everything is >>>>> harmless and is a small price to pay, but I wonder if a steamer could >>>>> do as
    well.

    It would increase the temperature, so you'd then need to use AC which
    would remove the humidity!

    Not a big problem in the parts of Canada that are very dry in the
    winter. ;)

    Dry and cold don't go together well. Cold always means 100% RH.

    Not indoors.

    If you're indoors you can't blame the outdoors.

    And that's far from always true even outdoors--not
    everywhere does cold mud as well as you Brits, after all. ;) (The Dutch
    have you beat there, but not by much.)

    I find heat is caused by sunny weather, which is dryer.

    In places like New Mexico, it's far from unusual to have sub-freezing temperatures with single-digit RH. It's dangerous to leave your bedroom window open even a crack in those conditions, as I found out one time
    about a decade ago.

    Why would that be dangerous?

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Phil Hobbs@21:1/5 to Commander Kinsey on Wed Apr 13 11:43:10 2022
    Commander Kinsey wrote:
    On Wed, 13 Apr 2022 07:16:06 +0100, Jasen Betts
    <usenet@revmaps.no-ip.org> wrote:

    On 2022-04-12, Mike Monett <spamme@not.com> wrote:
    John Larkin <jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote:

    [...]

    Our water company adds limestone or something to protect the pipes.
    The water supply here is naturally a bit acidic.

    We have copper pipes in the residences, but I don't know if the city
    supply
    uses copper, pvc or abs.

    More likely polyethylene, iron, lead, asbestos, or even wood.

    Wooden pipes WTF?

    A wooden water main in lower Manhattan burst a few years ago--it had
    been made by boring a hole along the length of a huge log. Lasted over
    250 years IIRC.

    Inner cities that haven't been devastated by war recently can have some
    pretty old infrastructure.

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs

    --
    Dr Philip C D Hobbs
    Principal Consultant
    ElectroOptical Innovations LLC / Hobbs ElectroOptics
    Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics
    Briarcliff Manor NY 10510

    http://electrooptical.net
    http://hobbs-eo.com

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com@21:1/5 to CK1@nospam.com on Wed Apr 13 08:54:45 2022
    On Wed, 13 Apr 2022 16:04:32 +0100, "Commander Kinsey"
    <CK1@nospam.com> wrote:

    On Wed, 13 Apr 2022 15:43:59 +0100, <jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com> wrote:

    On Wed, 13 Apr 2022 06:16:06 -0000 (UTC), Jasen Betts
    <usenet@revmaps.no-ip.org> wrote:

    On 2022-04-12, Mike Monett <spamme@not.com> wrote:
    John Larkin <jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote:

    [...]

    Our water company adds limestone or something to protect the pipes.
    The water supply here is naturally a bit acidic.

    We have copper pipes in the residences, but I don't know if the city supply
    uses copper, pvc or abs.

    More likely polyethylene, iron, lead, asbestos, or even wood.

    Or sometimes vitrified clay here, flower pot material. Very fragile.

    Wood pipes in Dutch Flat, CA:

    https://www.dropbox.com/sh/ezi7utkoldlbofv/AADyOUIheVZMS0P3J_vFEjpfa?dl=0

    Which one of those 15 files should I look at? This one looks metal: >https://www.dropbox.com/sh/ezi7utkoldlbofv/AADyOUIheVZMS0P3J_vFEjpfa?dl=0&preview=Big_Mon.JPG

    Don't look at any of them. They wouldn't interest you anyhow.



    --

    I yam what I yam - Popeye

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Phil Hobbs@21:1/5 to Commander Kinsey on Wed Apr 13 12:02:41 2022
    Commander Kinsey wrote:


    In places like New Mexico, it's far from unusual to have sub-freezing
    temperatures with single-digit RH.† It's dangerous to leave your bedroom
    window open even a crack in those conditions, as I found out one time
    about a decade ago.

    Why would that be dangerous?

    Glues all the parts of your throat to all the other parts. Unpleasant
    waking up like that.

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Commander Kinsey@21:1/5 to Phil Hobbs on Thu Apr 14 07:35:01 2022
    On Wed, 13 Apr 2022 17:02:41 +0100, Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    Commander Kinsey wrote:


    In places like New Mexico, it's far from unusual to have sub-freezing
    temperatures with single-digit RH. It's dangerous to leave your bedroom >>> window open even a crack in those conditions, as I found out one time
    about a decade ago.

    Why would that be dangerous?

    Glues all the parts of your throat to all the other parts. Unpleasant
    waking up like that.

    I find it best to breathe through your nose in unpleasant air. Yor nose warms and dampens the air ready for the lungs.

    And why did you say dangerous when you meant unpleasant?

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Commander Kinsey@21:1/5 to jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com on Thu Apr 14 07:33:51 2022
    On Wed, 13 Apr 2022 16:54:45 +0100, <jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com> wrote:

    On Wed, 13 Apr 2022 16:04:32 +0100, "Commander Kinsey"
    <CK1@nospam.com> wrote:

    On Wed, 13 Apr 2022 15:43:59 +0100, <jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com> wrote:

    On Wed, 13 Apr 2022 06:16:06 -0000 (UTC), Jasen Betts
    <usenet@revmaps.no-ip.org> wrote:

    On 2022-04-12, Mike Monett <spamme@not.com> wrote:
    John Larkin <jlarkin@highland_atwork_technology.com> wrote:

    [...]

    Our water company adds limestone or something to protect the pipes. >>>>>> The water supply here is naturally a bit acidic.

    We have copper pipes in the residences, but I don't know if the city supply
    uses copper, pvc or abs.

    More likely polyethylene, iron, lead, asbestos, or even wood.

    Or sometimes vitrified clay here, flower pot material. Very fragile.

    Wood pipes in Dutch Flat, CA:

    https://www.dropbox.com/sh/ezi7utkoldlbofv/AADyOUIheVZMS0P3J_vFEjpfa?dl=0 >>
    Which one of those 15 files should I look at? This one looks metal:
    https://www.dropbox.com/sh/ezi7utkoldlbofv/AADyOUIheVZMS0P3J_vFEjpfa?dl=0&preview=Big_Mon.JPG
    Don't look at any of them. They wouldn't interest you anyhow.

    Anyway, please learn basic English.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Peeler@21:1/5 to All on Thu Apr 14 16:47:03 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On Thu, 14 Apr 2022 12:01:48 +0100, Martin Brown, yet another mentally deficient, troll-feeding senile asshole, blathered:


    A small one and a smartphone/tablet video fed to a decent sized screen.

    You wouldn't be able to afford an analogue meter that large.
    Though you could build one from scratch in the true DIY fashion.

    Model 8 Avo is about as big as they ever realistically get now.

    ISTR Gallencamp (sp?) did larger ones for school labs back in the 70's.
    There is a Unilab 8" one +/- 50 uA on eBay right now.

    https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/115332876615

    Another brain dead senile moron who doesn't get what's going on in this "thread"! LMAO

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Peeler@21:1/5 to All on Thu Apr 14 16:42:18 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On Thu, 14 Apr 2022 10:52:32 GMT, Jan Panteltje, another mentally
    challenged, troll-feeding, senile ASSHOLE, blathered:


    Use a small one, camera and monitor?
    Or just draw it digitally on a monitor?

    Use your brain and don't feed the troll, troll-feeding senile asshole? <BG>

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Peeler@21:1/5 to All on Thu Apr 14 16:44:29 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On Thu, 14 Apr 2022 22:45:24 +1000, Sylvia Else, yet another mentally
    deficient troll-feeding senile asshole, blathered:


    They may well have existed then, but given the modern alternatives
    suggested by Jan that exist, I doubt there's a market for large meters now.

    Sylvia.

    He needs it for nothing but his well-known idiotic TROLLING here, you troll-feeding senile idiot! <tsk>

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Peeler@21:1/5 to All on Thu Apr 14 16:49:08 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On Thu, 14 Apr 2022 12:59:48 +0100, Martin Brown, yet another mentally deficient, troll-feeding senile asshole, blathered:


    Make one yourself then. This is uk.d-i-y the clue is in the name!

    LOL!!! The clue for you is that he's a filthy trolling wanker who will jerk
    off to another successful "thread" of his!

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Peeler@21:1/5 to All on Thu Apr 14 16:45:39 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On Thu, 14 Apr 2022 11:53:20 +0100, Jon, another brain dead, troll-feeding senile ASSHOLE driveled:

    I am sure there was one used in a willy wonka film.

    I'm sure he's leading all your idiotic troll-feeding senile asshole around
    by your stupid senile noses, yet again! LOL

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Peeler@21:1/5 to All on Thu Apr 14 16:59:28 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On Thu, 14 Apr 2022 12:22:41 +0100, charles, another mentally
    deficient, troll-feeding, senile asshole, blathered:


    get a smaller one and a video camera.

    He doesn't need one, senile idiot! He ONLY needs all you senile assholes to keep taking every single idiotic bait of his! <BG>

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Peeler@21:1/5 to All on Thu Apr 14 17:01:04 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On Thu, 14 Apr 2022 12:24:10 +0100, anal_m, the notorious troll-feeding
    senile retard, blathered again:


    Big screen TV with an analogue representation of a digital reading
    performed in software.

    Where have you been so long, anal_m? You, the clinically insane Scottish wanker's most "loyal" troll-feeding senile idiot? <BG>

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Peeler@21:1/5 to All on Thu Apr 14 17:21:18 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On Thu, 14 Apr 2022 15:08:05 -0000 (UTC), Bertrand Sindri, yet another brain dead, troll-feeding, senile idiot, blathered:


    When the world went to meters with number readouts (digital meters)
    "they" saw their demand for analog needle movements crater. Over time
    "they" quit making analog needle movements all together.

    With the exception of a few niche markets (i.e., Simpson 260) you
    simply are *not* going to find a manufacturer making new product that
    meets your desires.

    Your choices are going to be: make it yourself or buy an antique (if
    you can find one, and if you are willing to pay what the current owner demands to part with the antique).

    Another senile idiot who doesn't get (or refuses to get) what's going on
    here! LOL

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Peeler@21:1/5 to All on Thu Apr 14 17:19:12 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On Thu, 14 Apr 2022 15:34:36 +0100, David, another mentally challenged, troll-feeding, senile asshole, blathered:


    www.ebay.co.uk/itm/175237367160?hash=item28ccf60578

    You senile morons just don't get what that clinically insane troll and attention whore is doing with all of you! <BG>

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Phil Hobbs@21:1/5 to Commander Kinsey on Thu Apr 14 13:01:23 2022
    Commander Kinsey wrote:
    On Wed, 13 Apr 2022 17:02:41 +0100, Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    Commander Kinsey wrote:


    In places like New Mexico, it's far from unusual to have sub-freezing
    temperatures with single-digit RH.† It's dangerous to leave your
    bedroom
    window open even a crack in those conditions, as I found out one time
    about a decade ago.

    Why would that be dangerous?

    Glues all the parts of your throat to all the other parts.† Unpleasant
    waking up like that.

    I find it best to breathe through your nose in unpleasant air.† Yor nose warms and dampens the air ready for the lungs.

    And why did you say dangerous when you meant unpleasant?

    Because I almost choked to death.

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Peeler@21:1/5 to All on Thu Apr 14 19:25:57 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On Thu, 14 Apr 2022 16:55:26 +0100, charles, another mentally
    deficient, troll-feeding, senile asshole, blathered:


    6.2 litres of what?

    Of trollshit, troll-feeding senile asshole! <tsk>

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Peeler@21:1/5 to All on Thu Apr 14 19:27:24 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On Thu, 14 Apr 2022 17:40:11 +0100, newshound, yet another troll-feeding
    senile idiot, blabbered again:


    I can. Why would they?. As Martin says, just keep searching eBay.

    What??? And STOP trolling you senile assholes on these groups? Try again, senile idiot! <tsk>

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno@decadenc@21:1/5 to Peeler on Thu Apr 14 18:43:16 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    Peeler <trolltrap@valid.invalid> wrote in news:TsW5K.1099943$Sxe.605137@usenetxs.com:

    On Thu, 14 Apr 2022 11:53:20 +0100, Jon, another brain dead,
    troll-feeding senile ASSHOLE driveled:

    I am sure there was one used in a willy wonka film.

    I'm sure he's leading all your idiotic troll-feeding senile
    asshole around by your stupid senile noses, yet again! LOL


    Go away, fuckhead. You are worse than any of the trolls.

    As a troll's troll, you ain't all that bright, dumbfuck.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Peeler@21:1/5 to All on Thu Apr 14 20:44:21 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On Thu, 14 Apr 2022 13:59:09 -0400, Wade Garrulous, another mentally handicapped, troll-feeding, senile asshole, blathered:

    Something like this one?

    Or rather something like this:

    \|||/
    (o o)
    ,----ooO--(_)-------.
    | Don't feed the |
    | TROLLS! |
    '--------------Ooo-- '
    |__|__|
    || ||
    ooO Ooo

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Peeler@21:1/5 to All on Thu Apr 14 21:12:37 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On Thu, 14 Apr 2022 19:37:00 +0100, Andy Bennet, yet another mentally
    deficient troll-feeding senile ASSHOLE, bullshitted:


    just buy a cheap servo and put a chuffin great pointer on it!

    Why should he buy ANYTHING when he can have so much fun leading ALL you demented senile assholes around by your senile noses for as long as he wants
    to be fed by you idiots? Eh? WHY? LMAO

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Peeler@21:1/5 to All on Fri Apr 15 00:11:48 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On Thu, 14 Apr 2022 21:57:55 -0000 (UTC), DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno@decadence.org, an ESPECIALLY retarded, troll-feeding, senile ASSHOLE, blathered, yet again:


    You just aren't very bright.

    Oh, the IRONY! Poor troll-feeding senile moron STILL doesn't get it! LOL

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Sylvia Else@21:1/5 to Peeler on Fri Apr 15 16:05:20 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On 15-Apr-22 12:44 am, Peeler wrote:
    On Thu, 14 Apr 2022 22:45:24 +1000, Sylvia Else, yet another mentally deficient troll-feeding senile asshole, blathered:


    They may well have existed then, but given the modern alternatives
    suggested by Jan that exist, I doubt there's a market for large meters now. >>
    Sylvia.

    He needs it for nothing but his well-known idiotic TROLLING here, you troll-feeding senile idiot! <tsk>

    You can kill-file me if you like. I promise I won't mind.

    Sylvia.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Commander Kinsey@21:1/5 to Phil Hobbs on Fri Apr 15 08:59:40 2022
    On Thu, 14 Apr 2022 18:01:23 +0100, Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    Commander Kinsey wrote:
    On Wed, 13 Apr 2022 17:02:41 +0100, Phil Hobbs
    <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    Commander Kinsey wrote:


    In places like New Mexico, it's far from unusual to have sub-freezing >>>>> temperatures with single-digit RH. It's dangerous to leave your
    bedroom
    window open even a crack in those conditions, as I found out one time >>>>> about a decade ago.

    Why would that be dangerous?

    Glues all the parts of your throat to all the other parts. Unpleasant
    waking up like that.

    I find it best to breathe through your nose in unpleasant air. Yor nose
    warms and dampens the air ready for the lungs.

    And why did you say dangerous when you meant unpleasant?

    Because I almost choked to death.

    Nobody's that fragile. Imagine the animals outside....

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Peeler@21:1/5 to All on Fri Apr 15 10:37:15 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On Fri, 15 Apr 2022 10:05:46 +0200, Arie de Muijnck, another mentally challenged, troll-feeding senile asshole, babbled:

    £80 + shipping is certainly too much.

    All have centered needles for a +/- indicating instrument. All scales
    are NOT so.
    The 2nd is a really bad 'restoration' job with a non-fitting scale, not
    even aligned with the rotation center. The 3rd and 4th are also with a
    bad replaced scale, but at least centered.

    I'd say this is only worth $15 + shipping.

    Arie

    I'm looking forward to the moment when you troll-feeding senile assholes
    will be screeching AGAIN, realizing how you've been trolled by that
    clinically insane sociopathic attention whore! Won't be long from now on.
    LOL

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Peeler@21:1/5 to Sylvia Else on Fri Apr 15 10:29:15 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On Fri, 15 Apr 2022 16:05:20 +1000, Sylvia Else wrote:


    He needs it for nothing but his well-known idiotic TROLLING here, you
    troll-feeding senile idiot! <tsk>

    You can kill-file me if you like. I promise I won't mind.

    Sylvia.

    Oh, my! (LMAO)

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Peeler@21:1/5 to All on Fri Apr 15 10:50:00 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On Fri, 15 Apr 2022 14:48:50 +1000, Chris Jones, another brain dead, troll-feeding, senile asshole, blathered:


    I have such a mechanism, except it doesn't have the pointer or scale
    fitted. In fact I have several.

    All you troll-feeding senile idiots need a mechanism that indicates to you
    when you are being trolled! <BG>

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Peeler@21:1/5 to All on Fri Apr 15 11:36:23 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On Fri, 15 Apr 2022 10:05:47 +0100, Andy Bennet, yet another mentally
    deficient troll-feeding senile ASSHOLE, bullshitted:


    Doesn't that mean me designing a PWM controller?

    Use an arduino. Then you can use the arduino a/d convertor inputs as
    well for your measurement! win win!

    Is he "asking questions" again, you dumb senile assholes? LOL And you
    miserable morons all ARE thankful when some trolling psycho seems to be "asking" you something, aren't you? You'll soon learn what his "questioning"
    is all about! LOL

    --
    damduck-egg@yahoo.co.uk about Birdbrain Macaw's (now "Commander Kinsey" LOL) trolling:
    "He is a well known attention seeking troll and every reply you
    make feeds him.
    Starts many threads most of which die quick as on the UK groups anyone
    with sense Kill filed him ages ago which is why he now cross posts to
    the US groups for a new audience.
    This thread was unusual in that it derived and continued without him
    to a large extent and his silly questioning is an attempt to get
    noticed again."
    MID: <be195d5jh0hktj054mvfu7ef9ap854mjdb@4ax.com>

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Peeler@21:1/5 to All on Fri Apr 15 11:45:07 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On Fri, 15 Apr 2022 10:00:46 +0100, charles, another mentally
    deficient, troll-feeding, senile asshole, blathered again:

    you don't have pistons on an electric car.

    But that nutter DOES have psychiatric certificates that tell the authorities that he only can do some government-sponsored jobs! (He suffers, by his own account, among many other things, from extreme "tiredness"! LOL)

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Peeler@21:1/5 to All on Fri Apr 15 16:13:37 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On Fri, 15 Apr 2022 11:28:38 GMT, Jan Panteltje, another troll-feeding,
    senile idiot, driveled:


    Just for the sake of argument,

    Yeah, I think all people who know him have had enough of that in this thread and in all other "threads" started by that clinically insane pathological attention whore and troll! <tsk>

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Peeler@21:1/5 to All on Fri Apr 15 16:20:51 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On Fri, 15 Apr 2022 13:02:54 -0000 (UTC), Jasen Betts, another brain dead, troll-feeding senile asshole, blathered:


    Doesn't that mean me designing a PWM controller?

    To make PWM from DC volts you'll need a ramp generator and a comparator.
    The ramp doen't need ot be perfectly linear, you can adjust the scale markings.

    LOL Is he playing his "ask any, just any dumb questions" game again? ROTFLOL And you idiots are dumb and senile enough, again, not to notice what it is about? Man, Usenet has come to STINK of SENILITY over the years!

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Peeler@21:1/5 to All on Fri Apr 15 16:32:36 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On Fri, 15 Apr 2022 12:43:53 -0000 (UTC), Jasen Betts, another brain dead, troll-feeding senile asshole, blathered:


    use a regular size meter modified to have a glass back with an overhead projector.

    But WHY, you demented senile assholes? That unemployable wanker doesn't need it! He just makes up questions on the go of which he believes they will get
    him the most attention for a while! As always, after a few days, the baited senile assholes start noticing it and the howling and crying starts again... until the next time when he comes back again to those very groups where he
    had been so "successful", and the game starts all over again!

    This all is about a TROLL and about TROLL-FEEDING SENILE ASSHOLES, and about nothing else! LOL

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com@21:1/5 to CK1@nospam.com on Fri Apr 15 07:28:31 2022
    On Fri, 15 Apr 2022 08:59:40 +0100, "Commander Kinsey"
    <CK1@nospam.com> wrote:

    On Thu, 14 Apr 2022 18:01:23 +0100, Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    Commander Kinsey wrote:
    On Wed, 13 Apr 2022 17:02:41 +0100, Phil Hobbs
    <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    Commander Kinsey wrote:


    In places like New Mexico, it's far from unusual to have sub-freezing >>>>>> temperatures with single-digit RH. It's dangerous to leave your
    bedroom
    window open even a crack in those conditions, as I found out one time >>>>>> about a decade ago.

    Why would that be dangerous?

    Glues all the parts of your throat to all the other parts. Unpleasant >>>> waking up like that.

    I find it best to breathe through your nose in unpleasant air. Yor nose >>> warms and dampens the air ready for the lungs.

    And why did you say dangerous when you meant unpleasant?

    Because I almost choked to death.

    Nobody's that fragile. Imagine the animals outside....

    I'm sure glad you don't design electronics.



    --

    I yam what I yam - Popeye

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Commander Kinsey@21:1/5 to jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com on Fri Apr 15 15:49:00 2022
    On Fri, 15 Apr 2022 15:28:31 +0100, <jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com> wrote:

    On Fri, 15 Apr 2022 08:59:40 +0100, "Commander Kinsey"
    <CK1@nospam.com> wrote:

    On Thu, 14 Apr 2022 18:01:23 +0100, Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    Commander Kinsey wrote:
    On Wed, 13 Apr 2022 17:02:41 +0100, Phil Hobbs
    <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    Commander Kinsey wrote:


    In places like New Mexico, it's far from unusual to have sub-freezing >>>>>>> temperatures with single-digit RH. It's dangerous to leave your >>>>>>> bedroom
    window open even a crack in those conditions, as I found out one time >>>>>>> about a decade ago.

    Why would that be dangerous?

    Glues all the parts of your throat to all the other parts. Unpleasant >>>>> waking up like that.

    I find it best to breathe through your nose in unpleasant air. Yor nose >>>> warms and dampens the air ready for the lungs.

    And why did you say dangerous when you meant unpleasant?

    Because I almost choked to death.

    Nobody's that fragile. Imagine the animals outside....

    I'm sure glad you don't design electronics.

    WTF has that do with the breathing of animals?

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Anthony William Sloman@21:1/5 to Commander Kinsey on Fri Apr 15 08:23:04 2022
    On Saturday, April 16, 2022 at 12:49:09 AM UTC+10, Commander Kinsey wrote:
    On Fri, 15 Apr 2022 15:28:31 +0100, <jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com> wrote:

    On Fri, 15 Apr 2022 08:59:40 +0100, "Commander Kinsey"
    <C...@nospam.com> wrote:

    On Thu, 14 Apr 2022 18:01:23 +0100, Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamM...@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    Commander Kinsey wrote:
    On Wed, 13 Apr 2022 17:02:41 +0100, Phil Hobbs
    <pcdhSpamM...@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    Commander Kinsey wrote:


    In places like New Mexico, it's far from unusual to have sub-freezing temperatures with single-digit RH. It's dangerous to leave your bedroom window open even a crack in those conditions, as I found out one time about a decade ago.

    Why would that be dangerous?

    Glues all the parts of your throat to all the other parts. Unpleasant >>>>> waking up like that.

    I find it best to breathe through your nose in unpleasant air. Your nose >>>> warms and dampens the air ready for the lungs.

    And why did you say dangerous when you meant unpleasant?

    Because I almost choked to death.

    Nobody's that fragile. Imagine the animals outside....

    Of course if they were liable to die if the air got very dry, people wouldn't keep them outside. Human beings get to chose their own environments, and even people as smart as Phil Hobbs can make a poor choice from time to time.

    I'm sure glad you don't design electronics.

    WTF has that do with the breathing of animals?

    It's John Larkin's standard insult. He thinks that he designs electronics and other - inferior - people don't. What he posts about his design process here isn't all that impressive, but it seems to work for him, if not quite as well as he seems to think.

    --
    Bill Sloman, Sydney

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com@21:1/5 to CK1@nospam.com on Fri Apr 15 08:28:33 2022
    On Fri, 15 Apr 2022 15:49:00 +0100, "Commander Kinsey"
    <CK1@nospam.com> wrote:

    On Fri, 15 Apr 2022 15:28:31 +0100, <jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com> wrote:

    On Fri, 15 Apr 2022 08:59:40 +0100, "Commander Kinsey"
    <CK1@nospam.com> wrote:

    On Thu, 14 Apr 2022 18:01:23 +0100, Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    Commander Kinsey wrote:
    On Wed, 13 Apr 2022 17:02:41 +0100, Phil Hobbs
    <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    Commander Kinsey wrote:


    In places like New Mexico, it's far from unusual to have sub-freezing >>>>>>>> temperatures with single-digit RH. It's dangerous to leave your >>>>>>>> bedroom
    window open even a crack in those conditions, as I found out one time >>>>>>>> about a decade ago.

    Why would that be dangerous?

    Glues all the parts of your throat to all the other parts. Unpleasant >>>>>> waking up like that.

    I find it best to breathe through your nose in unpleasant air. Yor nose >>>>> warms and dampens the air ready for the lungs.

    And why did you say dangerous when you meant unpleasant?

    Because I almost choked to death.

    Nobody's that fragile. Imagine the animals outside....

    I'm sure glad you don't design electronics.

    WTF has that do with the breathing of animals?

    Your comments show that you are all emotion and no rationality. That's
    the norm in humans, actually.



    --

    I yam what I yam - Popeye

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Commander Kinsey@21:1/5 to jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com on Fri Apr 15 16:41:53 2022
    On Fri, 15 Apr 2022 16:28:33 +0100, <jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com> wrote:

    On Fri, 15 Apr 2022 15:49:00 +0100, "Commander Kinsey"
    <CK1@nospam.com> wrote:

    On Fri, 15 Apr 2022 15:28:31 +0100, <jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com> wrote:

    On Fri, 15 Apr 2022 08:59:40 +0100, "Commander Kinsey"
    <CK1@nospam.com> wrote:

    On Thu, 14 Apr 2022 18:01:23 +0100, Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    Commander Kinsey wrote:
    On Wed, 13 Apr 2022 17:02:41 +0100, Phil Hobbs
    <pcdhSpamMeSenseless@electrooptical.net> wrote:

    Commander Kinsey wrote:


    In places like New Mexico, it's far from unusual to have sub-freezing >>>>>>>>> temperatures with single-digit RH. It's dangerous to leave your >>>>>>>>> bedroom
    window open even a crack in those conditions, as I found out one time >>>>>>>>> about a decade ago.

    Why would that be dangerous?

    Glues all the parts of your throat to all the other parts. Unpleasant >>>>>>> waking up like that.

    I find it best to breathe through your nose in unpleasant air. Yor nose >>>>>> warms and dampens the air ready for the lungs.

    And why did you say dangerous when you meant unpleasant?

    Because I almost choked to death.

    Nobody's that fragile. Imagine the animals outside....

    I'm sure glad you don't design electronics.

    WTF has that do with the breathing of animals?

    Your comments show that you are all emotion and no rationality. That's
    the norm in humans, actually.

    No, I detest emotions, emotions are for girls.

    Again, what electronics are used in an open window, some cold dry air, and an old codger with a tracheal problem?

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Peeler@21:1/5 to All on Fri Apr 15 19:41:47 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On Fri, 15 Apr 2022 17:00:36 +0100, newshound, yet another troll-feeding
    senile idiot, blabbered again:


    As I said, chemical plant still has a use for pressure gauges.

    As I said, the sociopathic Scottish wanker and attention whore still has a
    use for otherwise useless senile assholes like you as long as they keep
    feeding him. <G>

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno@decadenc@21:1/5 to Peeler on Fri Apr 15 21:33:33 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    Peeler <trollretard@valid.invalid> wrote in news:%7i6K.1093036$dS2.335434@usenetxs.com:

    On Fri, 15 Apr 2022 17:00:36 +0100, newshound, yet another
    troll-feeding senile idiot, blabbered again:


    As I said, chemical plant still has a use for pressure gauges.

    As I said, the sociopathic Scottish wanker and attention whore
    still has a use for otherwise useless senile assholes like you as
    long as they keep feeding him. <G>


    SHUT THE FUCK UP, RETARDED TROLL!

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Peeler@21:1/5 to All on Fri Apr 15 23:46:15 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On Fri, 15 Apr 2022 21:33:33 -0000 (UTC), DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno@decadence.org, an ESPECIALLY retarded, troll-feeding, senile ASSHOLE, blathered, yet again:


    As I said, the sociopathic Scottish wanker and attention whore
    still has a use for otherwise useless senile assholes like you as
    long as they keep feeding him. <G>


    SHUT THE FUCK UP, RETARDED TROLL!

    HAHAHAHAHAHAAA!!! Senile idiot just can't hear the truth! Another typical senile thing! LOL

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Peeler@21:1/5 to All on Fri Apr 15 23:44:31 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On Fri, 15 Apr 2022 22:27:33 +0200, Carlos E.R., another brain dead, troll-feeding senile asshole, bullshitted:


    It may be stuff specific for schools, not really for labs or industry.

    It's mainly stuff for trolling in these groups, senile shithead! Get a clue, finally! <tsk>

    Cheers! <BG>

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From T@21:1/5 to DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno@decadenc on Fri Apr 15 16:27:45 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On 4/15/22 14:33, DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno@decadence.org wrote:

    SHUT THE FUCK UP, RETARDED TROLL!

    Do you know how to do a kill file?

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From T@21:1/5 to DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno@decadenc on Fri Apr 15 19:45:01 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On 4/15/22 19:35, DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno@decadence.org wrote:
    T <T@invalid.invalid> wrote in news:t3cv1h$28h$2@dont-email.me:

    On 4/15/22 14:33, DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno@decadence.org wrote:

    SHUT THE FUCK UP, RETARDED TROLL!

    Do you know how to do a kill file?



    Do you know how to ALSO STAY THE FUCK OUT OF IT.

    Use your own kill file, know nothing putz.

    If you used Thunderbird, I was actually going to help
    you with it, as I am familiar with it. But not so
    much after your last response.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno@decadenc@21:1/5 to T@invalid.invalid on Sat Apr 16 02:35:00 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    T <T@invalid.invalid> wrote in news:t3cv1h$28h$2@dont-email.me:

    On 4/15/22 14:33, DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno@decadence.org wrote:

    SHUT THE FUCK UP, RETARDED TROLL!

    Do you know how to do a kill file?



    Do you know how to ALSO STAY THE FUCK OUT OF IT.

    Use your own kill file, know nothing putz.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Anthony William Sloman@21:1/5 to Commander Kinsey on Fri Apr 15 20:28:49 2022
    On Saturday, April 16, 2022 at 1:42:03 AM UTC+10, Commander Kinsey wrote:
    On Fri, 15 Apr 2022 16:28:33 +0100, <jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com> wrote:
    On Fri, 15 Apr 2022 15:49:00 +0100, "Commander Kinsey" <C...@nospam.com> wrote:
    On Fri, 15 Apr 2022 15:28:31 +0100, <jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com> wrote:
    On Fri, 15 Apr 2022 08:59:40 +0100, "Commander Kinsey" <C...@nospam.com> wrote:
    On Thu, 14 Apr 2022 18:01:23 +0100, Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamM...@electrooptical.net> wrote:
    Commander Kinsey wrote:
    On Wed, 13 Apr 2022 17:02:41 +0100, Phil Hobbs <pcdhSpamM...@electrooptical.net> wrote:
    Commander Kinsey wrote:

    <snip>

    Nobody's that fragile. Imagine the animals outside....

    I'm sure glad you don't design electronics.

    WTF has that do with the breathing of animals?

    Your comments show that you are all emotion and no rationality. That's the norm in humans, actually.

    No, I detest emotions, emotions are for girls.

    That's an emotional reaction.

    Again, what electronics are used in an open window, some cold dry air, and an old codger with a tracheal problem?

    The assertion that you don't design electronics - which is clearly true - was intended as an insult. It didn't have any more content than that.

    --
    Bill Sloman, Sydney

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno@decadenc@21:1/5 to T@invalid.invalid on Sat Apr 16 05:13:23 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    T <T@invalid.invalid> wrote in news:t3dajd$2m1$1@dont-email.me:

    On 4/15/22 19:35, DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno@decadence.org wrote:
    T <T@invalid.invalid> wrote in news:t3cv1h$28h$2@dont-email.me:

    On 4/15/22 14:33, DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno@decadence.org wrote:

    SHUT THE FUCK UP, RETARDED TROLL!

    Do you know how to do a kill file?



    Do you know how to ALSO STAY THE FUCK OUT OF IT.

    Use your own kill file, know nothing putz.

    If you used Thunderbird, I was actually going to help
    you with it, as I am familiar with it. But not so
    much after your last response.

    I do not do Usenet via a web browser.

    I do not filter my feed and do not need a primer nor a suggestion
    to do so.

    And I get snappy when told to filter someone. I would rather call
    him the asswipe he is than filter him. But thanks anyway.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From whit3rd@21:1/5 to jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com on Sat Apr 16 00:33:54 2022
    On Tuesday, April 12, 2022 at 7:41:41 AM UTC-7, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:

    Yes, plants love CO2. It's good for the planet and we need more.

    Planets aren't plants. Neither are 'we'. And, plants don't express love.
    CO2 and sunlight and rain, plants make into... carbohydrates. That's the 'empty calories'
    subset of agriculture, for instance, and not unequivocally good.

    What can you say approvingly about microplastics in your food?
    They're less toxic than pepper, I hear.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Commander Kinsey@21:1/5 to whit3rd@gmail.com on Sat Apr 16 12:12:08 2022
    On Sat, 16 Apr 2022 08:33:54 +0100, whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Tuesday, April 12, 2022 at 7:41:41 AM UTC-7, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:

    Yes, plants love CO2. It's good for the planet and we need more.

    Planets aren't plants. Neither are 'we'. And, plants don't express love. CO2 and sunlight and rain, plants make into... carbohydrates. That's the 'empty calories'
    subset of agriculture, for instance, and not unequivocally good.

    So you're a meat eating moron? What do you think those animals eat?

    What can you say approvingly about microplastics in your food?
    They're less toxic than pepper, I hear.

    Go vote for the green party and fuck off out of my sight.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Peeler@21:1/5 to All on Sat Apr 16 18:59:26 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On Sat, 16 Apr 2022 17:40:41 +0100, Max Dumb, the REAL dumb, notorious, troll-feeding senile idiot, blathered again:


    So not a slide rule. Either or both of you are in the company of Sam
    Cooke: #"Don't know what a slide rule is for."#

    HE's regularly in the company of the men in the white coats, you
    troll-feeding senile ASSHOLE!

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno@decadenc@21:1/5 to Peeler on Sun Apr 17 15:27:50 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    Peeler <trolltrap@valid.invalid> wrote in news:jCC6K.1645035$8b1.785549@usenetxs.com:

    On Sat, 16 Apr 2022 17:40:41 +0100, Max Dumb, the REAL dumb,
    notorious, troll-feeding senile idiot, blathered again:


    So not a slide rule. Either or both of you are in the company of
    Sam Cooke: #"Don't know what a slide rule is for."#

    HE's regularly in the company of the men in the white coats, you troll-feeding senile ASSHOLE!

    Goddamn! Shut the fuck up, CHILD!!! YOU BLOODY FUCKING RETARD!

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Peeler@21:1/5 to All on Tue Apr 19 10:20:43 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On Tue, 19 Apr 2022 06:27:39 GMT, Jan Panteltje, another absolutely brain
    dead, troll-feeding senile ASSHOLE blathered again:


    I have 9 virtual desktops,

    Alas, but no brain, you degenerate troll-feeding senile asshole! BTW, how
    about trying to remove your senile head from the troll's arse? Or is it
    grown in already, senile shithead?

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Peeler@21:1/5 to All on Tue Apr 19 10:18:32 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On Sun, 17 Apr 2022 15:27:50 -0000 (UTC), DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno@decadence.org, an ESPECIALLY retarded, troll-feeding, senile ASSHOLE, blathered, yet again:

    HE's regularly in the company of the men in the white coats, you
    troll-feeding senile ASSHOLE!

    Goddamn! Shut the fuck up, CHILD!!! YOU BLOODY FUCKING RETARD!

    Good grief, you idiotic senile shithead! About time you removed your thick senile head from your senile arse! Or is it already grown in? <BG>

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Peeler@21:1/5 to All on Tue Apr 19 16:21:18 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On Tue, 19 Apr 2022 12:16:12 +0100, Max Dumb, the REAL dumb, notorious, troll-feeding senile idiot, blathered again:


    Perhaps you are short sighted and took your glasses off.

    Perhaps he's just, as everyone keeps saying, a sick wanker, troll and
    attention whore, and you are, as I keep saying, a troll-feeding senile
    asshole, troll-feeding senile asshole?

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Peeler@21:1/5 to All on Tue Apr 19 20:25:09 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On Tue, 19 Apr 2022 17:12:13 GMT, Jan Panteltje, another absolutely brain
    dead, troll-feeding senile ASSHOLE blathered again:


    Bye

    ??? You mean you are going to pull your thick head out of the unwashed
    Scottish wanker's arse? I'm sure he'll soon return and try his luck with you again! <BG>

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From whit3rd@21:1/5 to Commander Kinsey on Tue Apr 19 23:29:36 2022
    On Saturday, April 16, 2022 at 4:12:18 AM UTC-7, Commander Kinsey wrote:
    On Sat, 16 Apr 2022 08:33:54 +0100, whit3rd <whi...@gmail.com> wrote:

    CO2 and sunlight and rain, plants make into... carbohydrates. That's the 'empty calories'
    subset of agriculture, for instance, and not unequivocally good.
    So you're a meat eating moron? What do you think those animals eat?

    Whole plant tissues, with proteins, trace minerals, etc. Not just the sugar-and-starch components. More CO2 makes for more carbohydrates, but doesn't increase uptake of nitrogen, potassium, and other necessary chemical components of a foodstuff. CHO isn't enough, CHON, or CHONP, are food requirements.

    What can you say approvingly about microplastics in your food?
    They're less toxic than pepper, I hear.

    Go vote for the green party and fuck off out of my sight.

    Do you want an F on the assignment, or are you going for an incomplete? That doesn't address microplastics in any coherent way.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com@21:1/5 to All on Wed Apr 20 07:17:20 2022
    On Sat, 16 Apr 2022 00:33:54 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Tuesday, April 12, 2022 at 7:41:41 AM UTC-7, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:

    Yes, plants love CO2. It's good for the planet and we need more.

    Planets aren't plants. Neither are 'we'. And, plants don't express love. >CO2 and sunlight and rain, plants make into... carbohydrates. That's the 'empty calories'
    subset of agriculture, for instance, and not unequivocally good.

    It would be interesting to assign a single, literal meaning to every
    word in the English language and try to live with that.



    --

    I yam what I yam - Popeye

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Arie de Muijnck@21:1/5 to jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com on Wed Apr 20 17:55:08 2022
    On 2022-04-20 16:17, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Sat, 16 Apr 2022 00:33:54 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Tuesday, April 12, 2022 at 7:41:41 AM UTC-7, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:

    Yes, plants love CO2. It's good for the planet and we need more.

    Planets aren't plants. Neither are 'we'. And, plants don't express love. >> CO2 and sunlight and rain, plants make into... carbohydrates. That's the 'empty calories'
    subset of agriculture, for instance, and not unequivocally good.

    It would be interesting to assign a single, literal meaning to every
    word in the English language and try to live with that.


    Not for everyday use and each word, but there has been attempts and even standards to do so for technical manuals:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simplified_Technical_English

    Arie

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Peeler@21:1/5 to All on Sat Apr 23 11:48:01 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On Sat, 23 Apr 2022 09:57:51 +0200, none, another mentally deficient, troll-feeding senile asshole, blathered:

    As long as you have memorized those hieroglyphs.

    As long as you haven't yet learned not to feed the troll, you'd better stay
    out of Usenet, troll-feeding senile ASSHOLE! Capisci, senile twit?

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Commander Kinsey@21:1/5 to whit3rd@gmail.com on Mon Apr 25 01:05:32 2022
    On Wed, 20 Apr 2022 07:29:36 +0100, whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Saturday, April 16, 2022 at 4:12:18 AM UTC-7, Commander Kinsey wrote:
    On Sat, 16 Apr 2022 08:33:54 +0100, whit3rd <whi...@gmail.com> wrote:

    CO2 and sunlight and rain, plants make into... carbohydrates. That's the 'empty calories'
    subset of agriculture, for instance, and not unequivocally good.
    So you're a meat eating moron? What do you think those animals eat?

    Whole plant tissues, with proteins, trace minerals, etc. Not just the sugar-and-starch components.

    We eat the tasty bits because we have brains.

    More CO2 makes for more carbohydrates, but
    doesn't increase uptake of nitrogen, potassium, and other necessary chemical components of a foodstuff. CHO isn't enough, CHON, or CHONP, are food requirements.

    Fusspot.

    What can you say approvingly about microplastics in your food?
    They're less toxic than pepper, I hear.

    Go vote for the green party and fuck off out of my sight.

    Do you want an F on the assignment, or are you going for an incomplete? That
    doesn't address microplastics in any coherent way.

    The green party hate them for some reason, I don't care.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Commander Kinsey@21:1/5 to Arie de Muijnck on Thu Apr 28 06:13:49 2022
    XPost: alt.usage.english

    On Wed, 20 Apr 2022 16:55:08 +0100, Arie de Muijnck <eternal.september@ademu.com> wrote:

    On 2022-04-20 16:17, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Sat, 16 Apr 2022 00:33:54 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Tuesday, April 12, 2022 at 7:41:41 AM UTC-7, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:

    Yes, plants love CO2. It's good for the planet and we need more.

    Planets aren't plants. Neither are 'we'. And, plants don't express love. >>> CO2 and sunlight and rain, plants make into... carbohydrates. That's the 'empty calories'
    subset of agriculture, for instance, and not unequivocally good.

    It would be interesting to assign a single, literal meaning to every
    word in the English language and try to live with that.


    Not for everyday use and each word, but there has been attempts and even standards to do so for technical manuals:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simplified_Technical_English

    I'm guessing yanks couldn't handle this.

    Instead of
    "GET ACCESS TO THE ACCUMULATOR FOR THE NO. 1 HYDRAULIC SYSTEM"
    they would write
    "Now what you're gonna wanna go and do next is be getting the access to the accumulator so you can then go and use the first one of those hydraulic doohickeys."

    Oh how far the world could have come without Merkins.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From rbowman@21:1/5 to Commander Kinsey on Thu Apr 28 07:31:47 2022
    XPost: alt.usage.english

    On 04/27/2022 11:13 PM, Commander Kinsey wrote:
    On Wed, 20 Apr 2022 16:55:08 +0100, Arie de Muijnck <eternal.september@ademu.com> wrote:

    On 2022-04-20 16:17, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Sat, 16 Apr 2022 00:33:54 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Tuesday, April 12, 2022 at 7:41:41 AM UTC-7,
    jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:

    Yes, plants love CO2. It's good for the planet and we need more.

    Planets aren't plants. Neither are 'we'. And, plants don't
    express love.
    CO2 and sunlight and rain, plants make into... carbohydrates.
    That's the 'empty calories'
    subset of agriculture, for instance, and not unequivocally good.

    It would be interesting to assign a single, literal meaning to every
    word in the English language and try to live with that.


    Not for everyday use and each word, but there has been attempts and
    even standards to do so for technical manuals:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simplified_Technical_English

    I'm guessing yanks couldn't handle this.

    Instead of
    "GET ACCESS TO THE ACCUMULATOR FOR THE NO. 1 HYDRAULIC SYSTEM"
    they would write
    "Now what you're gonna wanna go and do next is be getting the access to
    the accumulator so you can then go and use the first one of those
    hydraulic doohickeys."

    Oh how far the world could have come without Merkins.

    you would be speaking German without Merkins. Not that that would be a
    bad thing...

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Anthony William Sloman@21:1/5 to Commander Kinsey on Thu Apr 28 08:10:56 2022
    On Monday, April 25, 2022 at 10:05:40 AM UTC+10, Commander Kinsey wrote:
    On Wed, 20 Apr 2022 07:29:36 +0100, whit3rd <whi...@gmail.com> wrote:
    On Saturday, April 16, 2022 at 4:12:18 AM UTC-7, Commander Kinsey wrote:
    On Sat, 16 Apr 2022 08:33:54 +0100, whit3rd <whi...@gmail.com> wrote:

    CO2 and sunlight and rain, plants make into... carbohydrates. That's the 'empty calories'
    subset of agriculture, for instance, and not unequivocally good.

    So you're a meat eating moron? What do you think those animals eat?

    Whole plant tissues, with proteins, trace minerals, etc. Not just the sugar-and-starch components.

    We eat the tasty bits because we have brains.

    You haven't, so how do you manage it? In reality, the sort of mechanisms that let grazing animals pick the salt lick that contains the cobalt or whatever element they need doesn't seem to have much to do with brains, or not at least the intellectual
    bits that clowns like you think you can boast about.

    More CO2 makes for more carbohydrates, but doesn't increase uptake of nitrogen, potassium, and other necessary chemical
    components of a foodstuff. CHO isn't enough, CHON, or CHONP, are food requirements.

    Fusspot.

    It's worth fussing about. If you don't get your proteins (nitrogen) and phosphates you will starve quite quickly.

    What can you say approvingly about microplastics in your food?
    They're less toxic than pepper, I hear.

    Go vote for the green party and fuck off out of my sight.

    It hasn't got much to do with green party, but Commander Kinsey never misses a chance to tell people to fuck off. They'd be wise to take his advice.
    He sounds like a total disaster area,

    Do you want an F on the assignment, or are you going for an incomplete? That doesn't address microplastics in any coherent way.

    Commander Kinsey makes a virtue of his ignorance. It doesn't make him any less ignorant.

    The green party hate them for some reason, I don't care.

    Of course you don't. You'd have to learn stuff before you could work out why, and that's not in your skill set.

    --
    Bill Sloman, Sydney

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com@21:1/5 to All on Thu Apr 28 08:34:11 2022
    On Tue, 19 Apr 2022 23:29:36 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Saturday, April 16, 2022 at 4:12:18 AM UTC-7, Commander Kinsey wrote:
    On Sat, 16 Apr 2022 08:33:54 +0100, whit3rd <whi...@gmail.com> wrote:

    CO2 and sunlight and rain, plants make into... carbohydrates. That's the 'empty calories'
    subset of agriculture, for instance, and not unequivocally good.
    So you're a meat eating moron? What do you think those animals eat?

    Whole plant tissues, with proteins, trace minerals, etc. Not just the >sugar-and-starch components. More CO2 makes for more carbohydrates, but >doesn't increase uptake of nitrogen, potassium, and other necessary chemical >components of a foodstuff. CHO isn't enough, CHON, or CHONP, are food requirements.


    We make nitrogen fertilizers from air and oil/gas. We mine and
    transport other plant nutrients using oil and gas. Cows and chickens
    convert carbs to proteins. Per-capita ag production is way, way up
    from the past and still increasing. Added CO2 certainly helps. Google
    nasa greening

    Things keep getting better. That seems to annoy people who desperately
    want things to get worse.


    What can you say approvingly about microplastics in your food?

    No problem. We have sand and indigestable fiber and all sorts of
    things just passing through. Micrograms of plastic are down in the
    noise.



    --

    Anybody can count to one.

    - Robert Widlar

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com@21:1/5 to CK1@nospam.com on Thu Apr 28 08:36:32 2022
    XPost: alt.usage.english

    On Thu, 28 Apr 2022 06:13:49 +0100, "Commander Kinsey"
    <CK1@nospam.com> wrote:

    On Wed, 20 Apr 2022 16:55:08 +0100, Arie de Muijnck <eternal.september@ademu.com> wrote:

    On 2022-04-20 16:17, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Sat, 16 Apr 2022 00:33:54 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Tuesday, April 12, 2022 at 7:41:41 AM UTC-7, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:

    Yes, plants love CO2. It's good for the planet and we need more.

    Planets aren't plants. Neither are 'we'. And, plants don't express love.
    CO2 and sunlight and rain, plants make into... carbohydrates. That's the 'empty calories'
    subset of agriculture, for instance, and not unequivocally good.

    It would be interesting to assign a single, literal meaning to every
    word in the English language and try to live with that.


    Not for everyday use and each word, but there has been attempts and even standards to do so for technical manuals:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simplified_Technical_English

    I'm guessing yanks couldn't handle this.

    Instead of
    "GET ACCESS TO THE ACCUMULATOR FOR THE NO. 1 HYDRAULIC SYSTEM"
    they would write
    "Now what you're gonna wanna go and do next is be getting the access to the accumulator so you can then go and use the first one of those hydraulic doohickeys."


    Life would be simpler with everyone speaking either Japanese or
    German.



    --

    Anybody can count to one.

    - Robert Widlar

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From rbowman@21:1/5 to jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com on Thu Apr 28 19:26:31 2022
    XPost: alt.usage.english

    On 04/28/2022 09:36 AM, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Thu, 28 Apr 2022 06:13:49 +0100, "Commander Kinsey"
    <CK1@nospam.com> wrote:

    On Wed, 20 Apr 2022 16:55:08 +0100, Arie de Muijnck <eternal.september@ademu.com> wrote:

    On 2022-04-20 16:17, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Sat, 16 Apr 2022 00:33:54 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Tuesday, April 12, 2022 at 7:41:41 AM UTC-7, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:

    Yes, plants love CO2. It's good for the planet and we need more.

    Planets aren't plants. Neither are 'we'. And, plants don't express love.
    CO2 and sunlight and rain, plants make into... carbohydrates. That's the 'empty calories'
    subset of agriculture, for instance, and not unequivocally good.

    It would be interesting to assign a single, literal meaning to every
    word in the English language and try to live with that.


    Not for everyday use and each word, but there has been attempts and even standards to do so for technical manuals:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simplified_Technical_English

    I'm guessing yanks couldn't handle this.

    Instead of
    "GET ACCESS TO THE ACCUMULATOR FOR THE NO. 1 HYDRAULIC SYSTEM"
    they would write
    "Now what you're gonna wanna go and do next is be getting the access to the accumulator so you can then go and use the first one of those hydraulic doohickeys."


    Life would be simpler with everyone speaking either Japanese or
    German.




    Sie haben vollkommen recht.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Commander Kinsey@21:1/5 to rbowman on Fri Apr 29 04:33:07 2022
    XPost: alt.usage.english

    On Thu, 28 Apr 2022 14:31:47 +0100, rbowman <bowman@montana.com> wrote:

    On 04/27/2022 11:13 PM, Commander Kinsey wrote:
    On Wed, 20 Apr 2022 16:55:08 +0100, Arie de Muijnck
    <eternal.september@ademu.com> wrote:

    On 2022-04-20 16:17, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Sat, 16 Apr 2022 00:33:54 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Tuesday, April 12, 2022 at 7:41:41 AM UTC-7,
    jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:

    Yes, plants love CO2. It's good for the planet and we need more.

    Planets aren't plants. Neither are 'we'. And, plants don't
    express love.
    CO2 and sunlight and rain, plants make into... carbohydrates.
    That's the 'empty calories'
    subset of agriculture, for instance, and not unequivocally good.

    It would be interesting to assign a single, literal meaning to every
    word in the English language and try to live with that.


    Not for everyday use and each word, but there has been attempts and
    even standards to do so for technical manuals:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simplified_Technical_English

    I'm guessing yanks couldn't handle this.

    Instead of
    "GET ACCESS TO THE ACCUMULATOR FOR THE NO. 1 HYDRAULIC SYSTEM"
    they would write
    "Now what you're gonna wanna go and do next is be getting the access to
    the accumulator so you can then go and use the first one of those
    hydraulic doohickeys."

    Oh how far the world could have come without Merkins.

    you would be speaking German without Merkins. Not that that would be a
    bad thing...

    I don't like masculine feminine neuter in their language, but other than that they're a very sensible people.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Anthony William Sloman@21:1/5 to jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com on Thu Apr 28 20:49:24 2022
    On Friday, April 29, 2022 at 1:34:22 AM UTC+10, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Tue, 19 Apr 2022 23:29:36 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whi...@gmail.com>
    wrote:
    On Saturday, April 16, 2022 at 4:12:18 AM UTC-7, Commander Kinsey wrote:
    On Sat, 16 Apr 2022 08:33:54 +0100, whit3rd <whi...@gmail.com> wrote:

    CO2 and sunlight and rain, plants make into... carbohydrates. That's the 'empty calories'
    subset of agriculture, for instance, and not unequivocally good.
    So you're a meat eating moron? What do you think those animals eat?

    Whole plant tissues, with proteins, trace minerals, etc. Not just the >sugar-and-starch components. More CO2 makes for more carbohydrates, but >doesn't increase uptake of nitrogen, potassium, and other necessary chemical
    components of a foodstuff. CHO isn't enough, CHON, or CHONP, are food requirements.

    We make nitrogen fertilizers from air and oil/gas. We mine and
    transport other plant nutrients using oil and gas. Cows and chickens
    convert carbs to proteins.

    Cows and chickens can't transmute carbon, oxygen or hydogen into the nitrogen you need to make proteins. John Larkin seems to have skipped the relevant chemistry lecture.

    Per-capita agricultural production is way, way up from the past and still increasing. Added CO2 certainly helps. Google nasa greening .

    Additional CO2 in the atmosphere can help plant growth in some situations. Anthony Watts' climate change denial propaganda does ignore the ways in which it is less helpful

    Things keep getting better. That seems to annoy people who desperately want things to get worse.

    Things have gotten better so far. This doesn't constitute any guarantee that they will keep on getting better, and there's a lot of evidence that makes it clear that they won't.
    John Larkin probably couldn't understand any of it, even if he could be bothered to try.

    What can you say approvingly about microplastics in your food?

    No problem. We have sand and indigestible fiber and all sorts of things just passing through. Micrograms of plastic are down in the noise.

    That's John Larkin's theory and he's happy to test it on his own gut every day. The trouble with that kind of experiment is that it pretty much has to start killing people before anybody notices the unfortunate side effects when they do show up. More
    sensible people - the kind who can design stuff before they put it together to see if it works - tend to be a bit more careful.

    --
    Bill Sloman, Sydney

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Commander Kinsey@21:1/5 to rbowman on Fri Apr 29 05:25:49 2022
    XPost: alt.usage.english

    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 02:26:31 +0100, rbowman <bowman@montana.com> wrote:

    On 04/28/2022 09:36 AM, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Thu, 28 Apr 2022 06:13:49 +0100, "Commander Kinsey"
    <CK1@nospam.com> wrote:

    On Wed, 20 Apr 2022 16:55:08 +0100, Arie de Muijnck <eternal.september@ademu.com> wrote:

    On 2022-04-20 16:17, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Sat, 16 Apr 2022 00:33:54 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com> >>>>> wrote:

    On Tuesday, April 12, 2022 at 7:41:41 AM UTC-7, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:

    Yes, plants love CO2. It's good for the planet and we need more.

    Planets aren't plants. Neither are 'we'. And, plants don't express love.
    CO2 and sunlight and rain, plants make into... carbohydrates. That's the 'empty calories'
    subset of agriculture, for instance, and not unequivocally good.

    It would be interesting to assign a single, literal meaning to every >>>>> word in the English language and try to live with that.


    Not for everyday use and each word, but there has been attempts and even standards to do so for technical manuals:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simplified_Technical_English

    I'm guessing yanks couldn't handle this.

    Instead of
    "GET ACCESS TO THE ACCUMULATOR FOR THE NO. 1 HYDRAULIC SYSTEM"
    they would write
    "Now what you're gonna wanna go and do next is be getting the access to the accumulator so you can then go and use the first one of those hydraulic doohickeys."

    Life would be simpler with everyone speaking either Japanese or
    German.

    Sie haben vollkommen recht.

    Japanisch habe ich noch nie probiert. Was macht es so gut?

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From whit3rd@21:1/5 to jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com on Thu Apr 28 21:31:54 2022
    On Thursday, April 28, 2022 at 8:34:22 AM UTC-7, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Tue, 19 Apr 2022 23:29:36 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whi...@gmail.com>
    wrote:

    What can you say approvingly about microplastics in your food?

    No problem. We have sand and indigestable fiber and all sorts of
    things just passing through. Micrograms of plastic are down in the
    noise.

    Not approving, really, just a claim of ignorance. Ignorance isn't always fatal. Small particles (like heavy metal ions) are sometimes
    effective poisons, and even microgram doses are a lot, if the material accumulates.

    Did you hear about the sewer cleaning in New Orleans, that discovered tons of plastic? <https://www.huffpost.com/entry/new-orleans-beads-storm-drains_n_5a6bb80be4b0ddb658c693bb>

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From rbowman@21:1/5 to Commander Kinsey on Fri Apr 29 00:08:00 2022
    XPost: alt.usage.english

    On 04/28/2022 09:33 PM, Commander Kinsey wrote:
    On Thu, 28 Apr 2022 14:31:47 +0100, rbowman <bowman@montana.com> wrote:

    On 04/27/2022 11:13 PM, Commander Kinsey wrote:
    On Wed, 20 Apr 2022 16:55:08 +0100, Arie de Muijnck
    <eternal.september@ademu.com> wrote:

    On 2022-04-20 16:17, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Sat, 16 Apr 2022 00:33:54 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com> >>>>> wrote:

    On Tuesday, April 12, 2022 at 7:41:41 AM UTC-7,
    jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:

    Yes, plants love CO2. It's good for the planet and we need more.

    Planets aren't plants. Neither are 'we'. And, plants don't
    express love.
    CO2 and sunlight and rain, plants make into... carbohydrates.
    That's the 'empty calories'
    subset of agriculture, for instance, and not unequivocally good.

    It would be interesting to assign a single, literal meaning to every >>>>> word in the English language and try to live with that.


    Not for everyday use and each word, but there has been attempts and
    even standards to do so for technical manuals:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simplified_Technical_English

    I'm guessing yanks couldn't handle this.

    Instead of
    "GET ACCESS TO THE ACCUMULATOR FOR THE NO. 1 HYDRAULIC SYSTEM"
    they would write
    "Now what you're gonna wanna go and do next is be getting the access to
    the accumulator so you can then go and use the first one of those
    hydraulic doohickeys."

    Oh how far the world could have come without Merkins.

    you would be speaking German without Merkins. Not that that would be a
    bad thing...

    I don't like masculine feminine neuter in their language, but other than
    that they're a very sensible people.

    You prefer gender fluidity? I will admit I've been curious how things
    like der Wein und das Bier came about.


    An otherwise highly respected translator of Old Norse material took a
    lot of flack when he switched the pronouns for the sun and the moon to
    conform to the English sense. English may not have genders anymore but
    to most people a feminine sun and masculine moon just seems wrong.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From rbowman@21:1/5 to Commander Kinsey on Fri Apr 29 00:15:39 2022
    XPost: alt.usage.english

    On 04/28/2022 10:25 PM, Commander Kinsey wrote:
    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 02:26:31 +0100, rbowman <bowman@montana.com> wrote:

    On 04/28/2022 09:36 AM, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Thu, 28 Apr 2022 06:13:49 +0100, "Commander Kinsey"
    <CK1@nospam.com> wrote:

    On Wed, 20 Apr 2022 16:55:08 +0100, Arie de Muijnck
    <eternal.september@ademu.com> wrote:

    On 2022-04-20 16:17, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Sat, 16 Apr 2022 00:33:54 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com> >>>>>> wrote:

    On Tuesday, April 12, 2022 at 7:41:41 AM UTC-7,
    jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:

    Yes, plants love CO2. It's good for the planet and we need more. >>>>>>>
    Planets aren't plants. Neither are 'we'. And, plants don't
    express love.
    CO2 and sunlight and rain, plants make into... carbohydrates.
    That's the 'empty calories'
    subset of agriculture, for instance, and not unequivocally good.

    It would be interesting to assign a single, literal meaning to every >>>>>> word in the English language and try to live with that.


    Not for everyday use and each word, but there has been attempts and
    even standards to do so for technical manuals:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simplified_Technical_English

    I'm guessing yanks couldn't handle this.

    Instead of
    "GET ACCESS TO THE ACCUMULATOR FOR THE NO. 1 HYDRAULIC SYSTEM"
    they would write
    "Now what you're gonna wanna go and do next is be getting the access
    to the accumulator so you can then go and use the first one of those
    hydraulic doohickeys."

    Life would be simpler with everyone speaking either Japanese or
    German.

    Sie haben vollkommen recht.

    Japanisch habe ich noch nie probiert. Was macht es so gut?


    Chiaki Kuriyama.

    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/12/77/b2/1277b218a620a9c4ee16a678a5f6fd91.jpg

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Commander Kinsey@21:1/5 to rbowman on Fri Apr 29 07:30:36 2022
    XPost: alt.usage.english

    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 07:15:39 +0100, rbowman <bowman@montana.com> wrote:

    On 04/28/2022 10:25 PM, Commander Kinsey wrote:
    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 02:26:31 +0100, rbowman <bowman@montana.com> wrote:

    On 04/28/2022 09:36 AM, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Thu, 28 Apr 2022 06:13:49 +0100, "Commander Kinsey"
    <CK1@nospam.com> wrote:

    On Wed, 20 Apr 2022 16:55:08 +0100, Arie de Muijnck
    <eternal.september@ademu.com> wrote:

    On 2022-04-20 16:17, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Sat, 16 Apr 2022 00:33:54 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com> >>>>>>> wrote:

    On Tuesday, April 12, 2022 at 7:41:41 AM UTC-7,
    jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:

    Yes, plants love CO2. It's good for the planet and we need more. >>>>>>>>
    Planets aren't plants. Neither are 'we'. And, plants don't
    express love.
    CO2 and sunlight and rain, plants make into... carbohydrates.
    That's the 'empty calories'
    subset of agriculture, for instance, and not unequivocally good. >>>>>>>
    It would be interesting to assign a single, literal meaning to every >>>>>>> word in the English language and try to live with that.


    Not for everyday use and each word, but there has been attempts and >>>>>> even standards to do so for technical manuals:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simplified_Technical_English

    I'm guessing yanks couldn't handle this.

    Instead of
    "GET ACCESS TO THE ACCUMULATOR FOR THE NO. 1 HYDRAULIC SYSTEM"
    they would write
    "Now what you're gonna wanna go and do next is be getting the access >>>>> to the accumulator so you can then go and use the first one of those >>>>> hydraulic doohickeys."

    Life would be simpler with everyone speaking either Japanese or
    German.

    Sie haben vollkommen recht.

    Japanisch habe ich noch nie probiert. Was macht es so gut?


    Chiaki Kuriyama.

    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/12/77/b2/1277b218a620a9c4ee16a678a5f6fd91.jpg

    Oooh she looks fun, but in this image her face is all lopsided:

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/af/26th_Tokyo_International_Film_Festival_Kuriyama_Chiaki.jpg

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Commander Kinsey@21:1/5 to rbowman on Fri Apr 29 07:28:03 2022
    XPost: alt.usage.english

    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 07:08:00 +0100, rbowman <bowman@montana.com> wrote:

    On 04/28/2022 09:33 PM, Commander Kinsey wrote:
    On Thu, 28 Apr 2022 14:31:47 +0100, rbowman <bowman@montana.com> wrote:

    On 04/27/2022 11:13 PM, Commander Kinsey wrote:
    On Wed, 20 Apr 2022 16:55:08 +0100, Arie de Muijnck
    <eternal.september@ademu.com> wrote:

    On 2022-04-20 16:17, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Sat, 16 Apr 2022 00:33:54 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com> >>>>>> wrote:

    On Tuesday, April 12, 2022 at 7:41:41 AM UTC-7,
    jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:

    Yes, plants love CO2. It's good for the planet and we need more. >>>>>>>
    Planets aren't plants. Neither are 'we'. And, plants don't
    express love.
    CO2 and sunlight and rain, plants make into... carbohydrates.
    That's the 'empty calories'
    subset of agriculture, for instance, and not unequivocally good.

    It would be interesting to assign a single, literal meaning to every >>>>>> word in the English language and try to live with that.


    Not for everyday use and each word, but there has been attempts and
    even standards to do so for technical manuals:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simplified_Technical_English

    I'm guessing yanks couldn't handle this.

    Instead of
    "GET ACCESS TO THE ACCUMULATOR FOR THE NO. 1 HYDRAULIC SYSTEM"
    they would write
    "Now what you're gonna wanna go and do next is be getting the access to >>>> the accumulator so you can then go and use the first one of those
    hydraulic doohickeys."

    Oh how far the world could have come without Merkins.

    you would be speaking German without Merkins. Not that that would be a
    bad thing...

    I don't like masculine feminine neuter in their language, but other than
    that they're a very sensible people.

    You prefer gender fluidity?

    I prefer a noun like "table" not to have a gender. Gender is only for living things.

    I will admit I've been curious how things
    like der Wein und das Bier came about.

    In French you can change the gender of a word and change it's meaning. For example foret can be a forest or a sword.

    An otherwise highly respected translator of Old Norse material took a
    lot of flack when he switched the pronouns for the sun and the moon to conform to the English sense. English may not have genders anymore but
    to most people a feminine sun and masculine moon just seems wrong.

    Giving either of them a gender is wrong. Since they don't procreate sexually, they have no gender.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From rbowman@21:1/5 to Commander Kinsey on Fri Apr 29 07:52:24 2022
    XPost: alt.usage.english

    On 04/29/2022 12:28 AM, Commander Kinsey wrote:

    An otherwise highly respected translator of Old Norse material took a
    lot of flack when he switched the pronouns for the sun and the moon to
    conform to the English sense. English may not have genders anymore but
    to most people a feminine sun and masculine moon just seems wrong.

    Giving either of them a gender is wrong. Since they don't procreate sexually, they have no gender.

    https://www.worldhistory.org/article/1911/the-sun--the-moon-in-norse-myth/

    One hopes the sun and moon don't since they're siblings.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com@21:1/5 to All on Fri Apr 29 07:13:02 2022
    On Thu, 28 Apr 2022 21:31:54 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Thursday, April 28, 2022 at 8:34:22 AM UTC-7, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Tue, 19 Apr 2022 23:29:36 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whi...@gmail.com>
    wrote:

    What can you say approvingly about microplastics in your food?

    No problem. We have sand and indigestable fiber and all sorts of
    things just passing through. Micrograms of plastic are down in the
    noise.

    Not approving, really, just a claim of ignorance. Ignorance isn't always >fatal. Small particles (like heavy metal ions) are sometimes
    effective poisons, and even microgram doses are a lot, if the material accumulates.

    Well, be afraid as much as you like.

    In some people, fear has an AGC effect. Given any large or tiny
    hazards, they will amp up their fear gain until they are terrified.

    Don't brush your teeth. Tiny plastic particles will erode off the
    tootbrush bristles and kill you. Heck, particles in the toothpaste
    will poison you first.

    Never use plastic spoons or sporks either.



    --

    Anybody can count to one.

    - Robert Widlar

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Commander Kinsey@21:1/5 to rbowman on Sat Apr 30 00:27:15 2022
    XPost: alt.usage.english

    On Fri, 29 Apr 2022 14:52:24 +0100, rbowman <bowman@montana.com> wrote:

    On 04/29/2022 12:28 AM, Commander Kinsey wrote:

    An otherwise highly respected translator of Old Norse material took a
    lot of flack when he switched the pronouns for the sun and the moon to
    conform to the English sense. English may not have genders anymore but
    to most people a feminine sun and masculine moon just seems wrong.

    Giving either of them a gender is wrong. Since they don't procreate
    sexually, they have no gender.

    https://www.worldhistory.org/article/1911/the-sun--the-moon-in-norse-myth/

    Oh dear....

    One hopes the sun and moon don't since they're siblings.

    Contrary to popular belief that only doubles the chances of problems.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From rbowman@21:1/5 to jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com on Fri Apr 29 19:58:06 2022
    On 04/29/2022 08:13 AM, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    Don't brush your teeth. Tiny plastic particles will erode off the
    tootbrush bristles and kill you. Heck, particles in the toothpaste
    will poison you first.

    It's the fluoride that will get you... Only use baking soda.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Anthony William Sloman@21:1/5 to jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com on Sat Apr 30 07:28:36 2022
    On Saturday, April 30, 2022 at 12:13:22 AM UTC+10, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Thu, 28 Apr 2022 21:31:54 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whi...@gmail.com> wrote: >On Thursday, April 28, 2022 at 8:34:22 AM UTC-7, jla...@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    On Tue, 19 Apr 2022 23:29:36 -0700 (PDT), whit3rd <whi...@gmail.com> wrote:

    What can you say approvingly about microplastics in your food?

    No problem. We have sand and indigestable fiber and all sorts of things just passing through. Micrograms of plastic are down in the noise.

    The phtalate plasicisers added to make some plastics flexible rather than brittle can be endocrine mimics

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5615111/

    Not approving, really, just a claim of ignorance. Ignorance isn't always fatal. Small particles (like heavy metal ions) are sometimes.effective poisons, and even microgram doses are a lot, if the material accumulates.

    Well, be afraid as much as you like.

    In some people, fear has an AGC effect. Given any large or tiny hazards, they will amp up their fear gain until they are terrified.

    John Larkin doesn't know much, and resents any attempt to educate him. He wants to think that people who know more than him, and take rational precautions, are actually being pathologically nervous. It's pathetic.

    Don't brush your teeth. Tiny plastic particles will erode off the toothbrush bristles and kill you. Heck, particles in the toothpaste will poison you first.

    Seems unlikely.

    Never use plastic spoons or sporks either.

    He seems to think that they shed microplastic particles. One has to wonder why.

    --
    Bill Sloman, Sydney

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Peeler@21:1/5 to All on Sat Apr 30 16:55:13 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On Sat, 30 Apr 2022 12:08:42 +0100, Max Dumb, the REAL dumb, notorious, troll-feeding senile idiot, blathered again:


    The offspring of a donkey and a horse is infertile. That's why they are regarded as different species.

    The human races can all interbreed freely, which is why they are the
    same species.

    The Scottish wanker CAN'T interbreed freely, Max Dumb! That's why he comes
    here to get sucked off by troll-feeding senile assholes like you, whenever
    he feels the need to get sucked off by a toothless senile cocksucker!

    --
    Max Dumb having another senile moment:
    "It's the consistency of the shit that counts. Sometimes I don't need to
    wipe, but I have to do so to tell. Also humans have buttocks to get
    smeared due to our bipedalism."
    Message-ID: <6vydnWiYDoV1VUrDnZ2dnUU78QednZ2d@brightview.co.uk>

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Peeler@21:1/5 to All on Wed May 4 11:32:18 2022
    XPost: alt.home.repair, uk.d-i-y

    On Wed, 4 May 2022 04:48:01 -0400, Paul, another mentally deficient, troll-feeding, senile asshole, blathered:

    If you want to make your own

    He ONLY wants to be fed by you senile assholes in these groups who keep
    doing him the favour, time and again! The mentally ill wanker will jerk off
    to every idiotic reply he gets from you for his idiotic baits! Luckily, for him, Usenet nowadays is infested with miserable troll-feeding senile
    assholes who are (because of their senility) too happy and willing to keep playing his game, even after they learned what the proven clinically insane sociopath is all about. <BG>

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Commander Kinsey@21:1/5 to rbowman on Thu May 5 11:19:58 2022
    On Sat, 30 Apr 2022 02:58:06 +0100, rbowman <bowman@montana.com> wrote:

    On 04/29/2022 08:13 AM, jlarkin@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
    Don't brush your teeth. Tiny plastic particles will erode off the
    tootbrush bristles and kill you. Heck, particles in the toothpaste
    will poison you first.

    It's the fluoride that will get you... Only use baking soda.

    If you don't use fluoride, your teeth will rot. But I do avoid sodium laurel sulphate, as it exacerbates my mouth ulcers and I have a nasty habit of biting my cheek and tongue. I use Aloe Dent, all their range is sodium laurel sulphate free. I pick
    the one with fluoride and whitening. £3 a tube instead of £1 a tube but it's not like I replace it that often. I also clean my teeth twice every morning and twice every evening.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno@decadenc@21:1/5 to Commander Kinsey on Thu May 5 20:07:58 2022
    "Commander Kinsey" <CK1@nospam.com> wrote in
    news:op.1loxnkrlmvhs6z@ryzen.lan:

    as it exacerbates my mouth ulcers

    I am so happy that a punk fuck troll like you is afflicted.
    You shouldn't have rimmed out all those assholes.

    The inside of your mouth is like the portrait of Dorian Gray.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)