• BOF (bit of physics):: An achromatic X-ray lens

    From Jan Panteltje@21:1/5 to All on Tue Mar 15 05:38:14 2022
    An achromatic X-ray lens:
    https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-022-28902-8

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  • From Rich S@21:1/5 to Jan Panteltje on Wed Mar 16 07:37:52 2022
    On Tuesday, March 15, 2022 at 5:39:26 AM UTC, Jan Panteltje wrote:
    An achromatic X-ray lens:
    https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-022-28902-8

    Very interesting , Jan, Thanks!

    So slick that at these wavelengths, you can make
    refractive optics out of... plastic. (acrylic?).
    Must be much cheaper than those at the "other end",
    IR. (diamond-like carbon coated Germanium).
    cheers, RS

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  • From Rich S@21:1/5 to Jan Panteltje on Wed Mar 16 07:35:44 2022
    On Tuesday, March 15, 2022 at 5:39:26 AM UTC, Jan Panteltje wrote:
    An achromatic X-ray lens:
    https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-022-28902-8

    Very interesting, thanks Joerg.

    So slick that at these wavelengths, you
    can make refractive optics out of....
    plastic. (acrylic?). What a deal.
    Must be cheaper than those at the "other
    end ", IR...
    (diamond-like carbon coated germanium).
    cheers, RS

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  • From whit3rd@21:1/5 to Rich S on Wed Mar 16 16:50:06 2022
    On Wednesday, March 16, 2022 at 7:37:57 AM UTC-7, Rich S wrote:
    On Tuesday, March 15, 2022 at 5:39:26 AM UTC, Jan Panteltje wrote:
    An achromatic X-ray lens: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-022-28902-8
    Very interesting , Jan, Thanks!

    So slick that at these wavelengths, you can make
    refractive optics out of... plastic. (acrylic?).

    This is a niche application, however; it presumes a beam of broad-spectrum X-rays, of sufficient intensity to be useful at imaging.

    So, there's a relativistic synchro-cyclotron taking up an acre next to the tiny little
    lens. Also, it isn't the X-ray laser that's being used for illumination, because
    that's presumably not polychromatic enough to matter, but a plain old
    wiggler. The resolution claimed is about on par with visible-light microscopes.

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  • From Jeroen Belleman@21:1/5 to All on Thu Mar 17 20:43:20 2022
    On 2022-03-17 00:50, whit3rd wrote:
    On Wednesday, March 16, 2022 at 7:37:57 AM UTC-7, Rich S wrote:
    On Tuesday, March 15, 2022 at 5:39:26 AM UTC, Jan Panteltje wrote:
    An achromatic X-ray lens:
    https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-022-28902-8
    Very interesting , Jan, Thanks!

    So slick that at these wavelengths, you can make
    refractive optics out of... plastic. (acrylic?).

    This is a niche application, however; it presumes a beam of broad-spectrum X-rays, of sufficient intensity to be useful at imaging.

    So, there's a relativistic synchro-cyclotron taking up an acre next to the tiny little
    lens. Also, it isn't the X-ray laser that's being used for illumination, because
    that's presumably not polychromatic enough to matter, but a plain old wiggler. The resolution claimed is about on par with visible-light microscopes.


    The PSI synchrotron light source has experiments installed in multiple
    stations all around it. This was just one of them. Synchrotron light
    is useful for lots of things in material science, biology, chemistry,
    pure physics, et j'en passe.

    Lots of countries want their own. I remember there was some competition
    on the European level whether to finance either the British Diamond light source, or the French Soleil. In the end, both got built. And France has another near Grenoble. They must be good for something...

    Jeroen Belleman

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