• OT: Protein folding

    From Anthony William Sloman@21:1/5 to All on Tue Mar 8 19:58:02 2022
    Today's Proceedings of the (US) National Academy of Sciences starts with an interesting and accessible article on the recent successes in the use of artificial intelligence to predict protein structure from just their amino acid sequence. This has been
    mentioned here before but this is probably as good a review as you can get.

    https://www.pnas.org/doi/pdf/10.1073/pnas.2202107119

    It might even be on-topic. Nerves use electronic signalling, so we may start doing molecular electronics.

    --
    Bill Sloman, Sydney

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  • From Skittles@21:1/5 to bill.sloman@ieee.org on Tue Mar 8 21:15:57 2022
    On Tue, 8 Mar 2022 19:58:02 -0800 (PST), Anthony William Sloman <bill.sloman@ieee.org> wrote:

    Today's Proceedings of the (US) National Academy of Sciences starts with an interesting and accessible article on the recent successes in the use of artificial intelligence to predict protein structure from just their amino acid sequence. This has been
    mentioned here before but this is probably as good a review as you can get.

    https://www.pnas.org/doi/pdf/10.1073/pnas.2202107119

    It might even be on-topic. Nerves use electronic signalling, so we may start doing molecular electronics.


    Interesting! Thanks!

    On a similar note:

    https://news.mit.edu/2022/physicists-steer-chemical-reactions-magnetic-fields-quantum-interference-0308


    I wonder if it is the Magnetic Vector Potential doing the work of
    shifting the phase:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aharonov%E2%80%93Bohm_effect

    The Aharonov–Bohm effect, sometimes called the
    Ehrenberg–Siday–Aharonov–Bohm effect, is a quantum mechanical
    phenomenon in which an electrically charged particle is affected by an electromagnetic potential (f, A), despite being confined to a region
    in which both the magnetic field B and electric field E are zero.[1]
    The underlying mechanism is the coupling of the electromagnetic
    potential with the complex phase of a charged particle's wave
    function, and the Aharonov–Bohm effect is accordingly illustrated by interference experiments.

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  • From Anthony William Sloman@21:1/5 to Skittles on Tue Mar 8 22:46:21 2022
    On Wednesday, March 9, 2022 at 3:16:10 PM UTC+11, Skittles wrote:
    On Tue, 8 Mar 2022 19:58:02 -0800 (PST), Anthony William Sloman <bill....@ieee.org> wrote:

    Today's Proceedings of the (US) National Academy of Sciences starts with an interesting and accessible article on the recent successes in the use of artificial intelligence to predict protein structure from just their amino acid sequence. This has
    been mentioned here before but this is probably as good a review as you can get.

    https://www.pnas.org/doi/pdf/10.1073/pnas.2202107119

    It might even be on-topic. Nerves use electronic signalling, so we may start doing molecular electronics.
    Interesting! Thanks!

    On a similar note:

    https://news.mit.edu/2022/physicists-steer-chemical-reactions-magnetic-fields-quantum-interference-0308


    I wonder if it is the Magnetic Vector Potential doing the work of
    shifting the phase:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aharonov%E2%80%93Bohm_effect

    The Aharonov烹ohm effect, sometimes called the Ehrenberg亡iday泡haronov烹ohm effect, is a quantum mechanical
    phenomenon in which an electrically charged particle is affected by an electromagnetic potential (f, A), despite being confined to a region
    in which both the magnetic field B and electric field E are zero.[1]
    The underlying mechanism is the coupling of the electromagnetic
    potential with the complex phase of a charged particle's wave
    function, and the Aharonov烹ohm effect is accordingly illustrated by interference experiments.

    It's certainly interesting, but less likely to be of any commercial importance - at least for quite a while.

    --
    Bill Sloman, Sydney

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  • From DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno@decadenc@21:1/5 to Skittles on Wed Mar 9 10:05:36 2022
    Skittles<Skittles@nowhere8.org> wrote in news:f8ag2hdjro7o33t1oh3plhg7sm94mcdle9@4ax.com:

    On Tue, 8 Mar 2022 19:58:02 -0800 (PST), Anthony William Sloman <bill.sloman@ieee.org> wrote:

    Today's Proceedings of the (US) National Academy of Sciences
    starts with an interesting and accessible article on the recent
    successes in the use of artificial intelligence to predict protein >>structure from just their amino acid sequence. This has been
    mentioned here before but this is probably as good a review as you
    can get.

    https://www.pnas.org/doi/pdf/10.1073/pnas.2202107119

    It might even be on-topic. Nerves use electronic signalling, so we
    may start doing molecular electronics.


    Interesting! Thanks!

    On a similar note:

    https://news.mit.edu/2022/physicists-steer-chemical-reactions-magne tic-fields-quantum-interference-0308


    I wonder if it is the Magnetic Vector Potential doing the work of
    shifting the phase:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aharonov%E2%80%93Bohm_effect

    The Aharonov–Bohm effect, sometimes called the
    Ehrenberg–Siday–Aharonov–Bohm effect, is a quantum mechanical
    phenomenon in which an electrically charged particle is affected
    by an electromagnetic potential (f, A), despite being confined to
    a region in which both the magnetic field B and electric field E
    are zero.[1] The underlying mechanism is the coupling of the
    electromagnetic potential with the complex phase of a charged
    particle's wave function, and the Aharonov–Bohm effect is
    accordingly illustrated by interference experiments.


    Another find of interest...
    <https://youtu.be/FsTbMfQP7b0>

    Try to always put your posted links inside these guys: <>

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