• Re: Salt Will Kill You

    From Ralph Mowery@21:1/5 to All on Sat Feb 5 16:13:40 2022
    In article <XnsAE35A3B8B2E0Didtokenpost@144.76.35.252>, spamme@not.com
    says...

    Stop Eating Salt.

    The reason I avoid sodium is because I recently had seven strokes.

    These cost me the vision in my left eye, made my right hand so numb I could not pick up a spoon to eat my food, and cost me the use of my legs. I
    cannot walk.

    All this is because ordinary sodium causes water retention and high blood pressure which leads to strokes. I did not know this at the time, and only found out long afterwards.

    Switch To Potassium

    Potassium chloride doesn't cause the high blood pressure and bloat from
    water retention of sodium.

    If I had known about potassium chloride, I would have avoided these
    problems.



    A certain amount of sodium is needed. Not having enough salt in the
    food put my wife in the hospital for several days. She was acting real
    funny like a drunk and does not drink. Now she takes a salt pill every
    day to keep the sodium level up and blood tests show the sodium level
    slightly on the low side of normal but still in the normal range.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Mike Monett@21:1/5 to All on Sat Feb 5 21:05:39 2022
    Stop Eating Salt.

    The reason I avoid sodium is because I recently had seven strokes.

    These cost me the vision in my left eye, made my right hand so numb I could
    not pick up a spoon to eat my food, and cost me the use of my legs. I
    cannot walk.

    All this is because ordinary sodium causes water retention and high blood pressure which leads to strokes. I did not know this at the time, and only found out long afterwards.

    Switch To Potassium

    Potassium chloride doesn't cause the high blood pressure and bloat from
    water retention of sodium.

    If I had known about potassium chloride, I would have avoided these
    problems.

    Potassium has the same taste as sodium, but it is much stronger so you
    won't use as much. The body has a narrower tolerance for potassium, but
    since you won't use as much you will always stay below the Recommended
    Daily Allowance.

    Windsor Salt Free is Potassium Chloride

    You can get Windsor Salt Free in many grocery stores and on Amazon, but try
    to avoid Amazon since they charge double. I pay CAD$7.45 here in Midland, Ontario. Here is a picture from Windsor Salt:

    https://tinyurl.com/2p8md52c

    Yes, it is more expensive than regular salt, but it lasts a long time since
    you won't use as much. I average about 1 gram per day, so a 311 gram
    container will last me almost a year. You might use a bit more, but you can probably afford it.

    Get a Blood Pressure Monitor

    You can get an inexpensive blood pressure monitor at most health stores and Amazon. Get the type that straps on your upper arm instead of around your wrist. They all work the same way by listening for the ultrasonic whistle
    as your blood vessel is squeezed shut. There is always some variability in
    the readings, and between different models. Get one that is durable and
    easy to use, and watch for the trends as you change your diet and exercise habits.

    Check With Your Doctor

    Check with your doctor about switching to potassium, but be skeptical if he recommends you stay on sodium or wants you to take different pills. Get a second opinion, especially if he has not been monitoring your blood
    pressure. Make up your own mind.

    Exercise

    It is easy to get caught up in a demanding LTspice simulation or a tricky
    piece of code. But it is also killing you. Your body needs exercise. Get a plain kitchen timer, and go for a walk every hour or so. Without Fail. It
    is so easy to put off. Don't do that. A brief walk will often leave room
    for an idea that my unlock the puzzle.

    Live Longer and Happier

    These small changes will help you be more productive and live longer. You
    will be grateful you made them as you grow older and watch your friends die from heart attacks.

    I have just passed my 80th birthday. I have had strokes, but I survived.
    There is no need for you to repeat my mistakes.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Lasse Langwadt Christensen@21:1/5 to All on Sat Feb 5 13:25:02 2022
    lørdag den 5. februar 2022 kl. 22.05.49 UTC+1 skrev Mike Monett:
    Stop Eating Salt.

    The reason I avoid sodium is because I recently had seven strokes.

    These cost me the vision in my left eye, made my right hand so numb I could not pick up a spoon to eat my food, and cost me the use of my legs. I
    cannot walk.

    All this is because ordinary sodium causes water retention and high blood pressure which leads to strokes. I did not know this at the time, and only found out long afterwards.


    only if you get large amounts or have other health issues.
    The body needs sodium for function

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Larkin@21:1/5 to langwadt@fonz.dk on Sat Feb 5 15:23:27 2022
    On Sat, 5 Feb 2022 13:25:02 -0800 (PST), Lasse Langwadt Christensen <langwadt@fonz.dk> wrote:

    lrdag den 5. februar 2022 kl. 22.05.49 UTC+1 skrev Mike Monett:
    Stop Eating Salt.

    The reason I avoid sodium is because I recently had seven strokes.

    These cost me the vision in my left eye, made my right hand so numb I could >> not pick up a spoon to eat my food, and cost me the use of my legs. I
    cannot walk.

    All this is because ordinary sodium causes water retention and high blood
    pressure which leads to strokes. I did not know this at the time, and only >> found out long afterwards.


    only if you get large amounts or have other health issues.
    The body needs sodium for function

    https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/310447#Risks-of-high-salt-intake-only-found-in-people-with-hypertension

    "Published in The Lancet, the study found that low salt, or sodium,
    intake may raise the risk of heart attack, stroke, and death, compared
    with an average salt intake."

    But there are multiple conflicting studies.

    A banana a day is good for potassium, and reduces cramps.

    --

    John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc trk

    The cork popped merrily, and Lord Peter rose to his feet.
    "Bunter", he said, "I give you a toast. The triumph of Instinct over Reason"

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Don Y@21:1/5 to Mike Monett on Sat Feb 5 16:40:41 2022
    On 2/5/2022 2:05 PM, Mike Monett wrote:
    Switch To Potassium

    Potassium chloride doesn't cause the high blood pressure and bloat from
    water retention of sodium.

    Potassium isn't a panacea. It can interfere with the normal function
    of your heart. It's also contraindicated for folks with kidney
    problems. E.g., replacing a sodium-based water softener with
    one driven by potassium just changes the source of the problem.

    Sodium is a problem because so many processed foods *add* sodium
    to your diet. A slice of white bread may contain 150mg of sodium.
    So, 300mg for a sandwich. Not counting any sodium in the condiments
    applied or the contents of the sandwich. The RDA for sodium is
    ~2300mg -- about a teaspoon! FOR THE WHOLE DAY!

    Salted popcorn? Ha! Add salt to ANY of your foods? Tsk tsk...

    Here (hard water), the sodium from the water softener is equivalent
    to ~100 mg of sodium PER QUART of water consumed. Given the amount
    of water you are expected to consume in a day (~16C), that's 400mg
    before you EAT anything.

    If you're not carefully reading labels, you're likely getting too
    much (of whatever).

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Rick C@21:1/5 to Ralph Mowery on Sat Feb 5 17:13:35 2022
    On Saturday, February 5, 2022 at 4:13:52 PM UTC-5, Ralph Mowery wrote:
    In article <XnsAE35A3B8B2...@144.76.35.252>, spa...@not.com
    says...

    Stop Eating Salt.

    The reason I avoid sodium is because I recently had seven strokes.

    These cost me the vision in my left eye, made my right hand so numb I could
    not pick up a spoon to eat my food, and cost me the use of my legs. I cannot walk.

    All this is because ordinary sodium causes water retention and high blood pressure which leads to strokes. I did not know this at the time, and only found out long afterwards.

    Switch To Potassium

    Potassium chloride doesn't cause the high blood pressure and bloat from water retention of sodium.

    If I had known about potassium chloride, I would have avoided these problems.


    A certain amount of sodium is needed. Not having enough salt in the
    food put my wife in the hospital for several days. She was acting real
    funny like a drunk and does not drink. Now she takes a salt pill every
    day to keep the sodium level up and blood tests show the sodium level slightly on the low side of normal but still in the normal range.

    Your wife has a disease that probably causes her to excrete sodium too quickly rather than retain some of it. My aunt had that and instead of giving her sodium, they restricted her fluids. She was basically hooked on cokes, so probably her anguish was
    as much about wanting the caffeine as much as anything. Hyponatremia is the name for the condition and it has many causes.

    Hypernatremia is too much sodium in the blood. It is typically caused by eating too much salt or not drinking enough water. I'm sure once you've had a stroke, you don't want to mess around with your blood pressure, but mostly this can be managed by
    diet control. In addition to drinking fluids, eating food high in potassium helps to eliminate sodium from the body, greens, greens, beans, nuts, dairy foods. Pretty much anything that isn't processed is low in sodium. So eat less processed food and
    drink plenty of water... as if we haven't heard that a million times.

    --

    Rick C.

    - Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
    - Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

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  • From Rick C@21:1/5 to lang...@fonz.dk on Sat Feb 5 17:15:15 2022
    On Saturday, February 5, 2022 at 4:25:09 PM UTC-5, lang...@fonz.dk wrote:
    lørdag den 5. februar 2022 kl. 22.05.49 UTC+1 skrev Mike Monett:
    Stop Eating Salt.

    The reason I avoid sodium is because I recently had seven strokes.

    These cost me the vision in my left eye, made my right hand so numb I could
    not pick up a spoon to eat my food, and cost me the use of my legs. I cannot walk.

    All this is because ordinary sodium causes water retention and high blood pressure which leads to strokes. I did not know this at the time, and only found out long afterwards.

    only if you get large amounts or have other health issues.
    The body needs sodium for function

    Yes, but it needs more potassium which many people don't consume enough of. It is very unusual for anyone in modern society to be eating too little sodium.

    --

    Rick C.

    + Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
    + Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Rick C@21:1/5 to John Larkin on Sat Feb 5 17:17:33 2022
    On Saturday, February 5, 2022 at 6:23:41 PM UTC-5, John Larkin wrote:
    On Sat, 5 Feb 2022 13:25:02 -0800 (PST), Lasse Langwadt Christensen <lang...@fonz.dk> wrote:

    lørdag den 5. februar 2022 kl. 22.05.49 UTC+1 skrev Mike Monett:
    Stop Eating Salt.

    The reason I avoid sodium is because I recently had seven strokes.

    These cost me the vision in my left eye, made my right hand so numb I could
    not pick up a spoon to eat my food, and cost me the use of my legs. I
    cannot walk.

    All this is because ordinary sodium causes water retention and high blood >> pressure which leads to strokes. I did not know this at the time, and only
    found out long afterwards.


    only if you get large amounts or have other health issues.
    The body needs sodium for function https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/310447#Risks-of-high-salt-intake-only-found-in-people-with-hypertension

    "Published in The Lancet, the study found that low salt, or sodium,
    intake may raise the risk of heart attack, stroke, and death, compared
    with an average salt intake."

    But there are multiple conflicting studies.

    A banana a day is good for potassium, and reduces cramps.

    Eating bananas is good for potassium, but it will only help with cramps if they are caused by low potassium. There are many bodily imbalances that will cause cramps. One is excessive or unusual exercise.

    --

    Rick C.

    -- Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
    -- Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Ralph Mowery@21:1/5 to All on Sat Feb 5 20:22:11 2022
    In article <49f0a4a3-6167-4398-b8c9-947470165db1n@googlegroups.com>, gnuarm.deletethisbit@gmail.com says...

    Eating bananas is good for potassium, but it will only help with cramps if they are caused by low potassium. There are many bodily imbalances that will cause cramps. One is excessive or unusual exercise.



    My wife had cramps in her feet at night. After taking salt pills they
    quit and her sodium level is normal now.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From bitrex@21:1/5 to Don Y on Sat Feb 5 23:43:56 2022
    On 2/5/22 18:40, Don Y wrote:
    On 2/5/2022 2:05 PM, Mike Monett wrote:
    Switch To Potassium

    Potassium chloride doesn't cause the high blood pressure and bloat from
    water retention of sodium.

    Potassium isn't a panacea.  It can interfere with the normal function
    of your heart.  It's also contraindicated for folks with kidney
    problems.  E.g., replacing a sodium-based water softener with
    one driven by potassium just changes the source of the problem.

    Sodium is a problem because so many processed foods *add* sodium
    to your diet.  A slice of white bread may contain 150mg of sodium.
    So, 300mg for a sandwich.  Not counting any sodium in the condiments
    applied or the contents of the sandwich.  The RDA for sodium is
    ~2300mg -- about a teaspoon!  FOR THE WHOLE DAY!

    Salted popcorn?  Ha!  Add salt to ANY of your foods?   Tsk tsk...

    Here (hard water), the sodium from the water softener is equivalent
    to ~100 mg of sodium PER QUART of water consumed.  Given the amount
    of water you are expected to consume in a day (~16C), that's 400mg
    before you EAT anything.

    If you're not carefully reading labels, you're likely getting too
    much (of whatever).

    It's pretty hard to get too little sodium eating food you don't prepare yourself. Or just eating anything, pretty much...I have high BP that's
    probably in part genetic and I've been eating a low-sodium diet for
    several years now and I'm just early 40s, it does make in-person
    shopping more difficult because most pre-packaged stuff has a stupid
    amount.

    Most of those TV dinners have absurd amounts, I don't always have time
    to prepare every meal but there's only a small number you get get at a
    regular (not e.g. Whole Foods) grocery that have under 600 mg which is
    what I try for when I buy that stuff.

    After a while food that's too high in salt starts to become off-putting,
    I can't eat regular potato chips or fried chicken or fast-food burgers
    much anymore, too much salt! Can't taste anything but salt, ruins the food.

    Shopping online the local chain lets you sort by most nutritional
    categories including sodium when doing a pick-up which is very helpful. Unfortunately they don't let you filter by multiple items like Digi-key
    or Mouser which would be even better...

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Don Y@21:1/5 to bitrex on Sat Feb 5 23:41:08 2022
    On 2/5/2022 9:43 PM, bitrex wrote:
    On 2/5/22 18:40, Don Y wrote:
    On 2/5/2022 2:05 PM, Mike Monett wrote:
    Switch To Potassium

    Potassium chloride doesn't cause the high blood pressure and bloat from
    water retention of sodium.

    Potassium isn't a panacea. It can interfere with the normal function
    of your heart. It's also contraindicated for folks with kidney
    problems. E.g., replacing a sodium-based water softener with
    one driven by potassium just changes the source of the problem.

    Sodium is a problem because so many processed foods *add* sodium
    to your diet. A slice of white bread may contain 150mg of sodium.
    So, 300mg for a sandwich. Not counting any sodium in the condiments
    applied or the contents of the sandwich. The RDA for sodium is
    ~2300mg -- about a teaspoon! FOR THE WHOLE DAY!

    Salted popcorn? Ha! Add salt to ANY of your foods? Tsk tsk...

    Here (hard water), the sodium from the water softener is equivalent
    to ~100 mg of sodium PER QUART of water consumed. Given the amount
    of water you are expected to consume in a day (~16C), that's 400mg
    before you EAT anything.

    If you're not carefully reading labels, you're likely getting too
    much (of whatever).

    It's pretty hard to get too little sodium eating food you don't prepare yourself. Or just eating anything, pretty much...I have high BP that's probably
    in part genetic and I've been eating a low-sodium diet for several years now and I'm just early 40s, it does make in-person shopping more difficult because
    most pre-packaged stuff has a stupid amount.

    It's important to remember that your concern is with *sodium*, not just
    "salt". E.g., baking soda/powder are similar culprits and contribute to
    the total "sodium" in a product (e.g., baked goods).

    Most of those TV dinners have absurd amounts, I don't always have time to prepare every meal but there's only a small number you get get at a regular (not e.g. Whole Foods) grocery that have under 600 mg which is what I try for when I buy that stuff.

    Soups are lousy with salt. Many canned goods! Ditto cheeses.

    Pizza, anyone? :<

    After a while food that's too high in salt starts to become off-putting, I can't eat regular potato chips or fried chicken or fast-food burgers much anymore, too much salt! Can't taste anything but salt, ruins the food.

    Yeah, there was a period when I avoided salt. I happened to drop by
    a burger place for a "quick bite". And, returned the burgers claiming
    they had been prepared improperly (cuz they tasted like SALT burgers).

    It is interesting to see just how much "salt" is present in the foods that
    we regularly eat! (salt == preservative, flavor enhancer)

    You can (re)train your palate to enjoy other "flavorings" instead of
    salt. But, it's not done overnight. (and easy to "relapse"!)

    Shopping online the local chain lets you sort by most nutritional categories including sodium when doing a pick-up which is very helpful. Unfortunately they
    don't let you filter by multiple items like Digi-key or Mouser which would be even better...

    I've found that you just have to learn from experience.

    Added sugar (in varied forms) is also a problem. Especially in "sauces" (flavorings).

    Of course, many of the "alternatives" have their own problems.

    A good guideline is The Cardiologists' Diet: If it tastes good, spit it out!

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Rick C@21:1/5 to Don Y on Sat Feb 5 23:40:25 2022
    On Sunday, February 6, 2022 at 1:41:35 AM UTC-5, Don Y wrote:

    A good guideline is The Cardiologists' Diet: If it tastes good, spit it out!

    I think that is very highly overstated. I often use canned tomatoes in my cooking. Half a can is my typical serving which has about 250 mg of sodium or one eighth of the total daily recommended amount. I often use that in place of tomato sauce on
    pasta or rice.

    It is easy to look at labels. No need to use general rules that may not be very accurate for any given food.

    Then I make up for the low sodium in my meals by eating popcorn with lots of salt.

    --

    Rick C.

    -+ Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
    -+ Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From legg@21:1/5 to All on Sun Feb 6 10:21:07 2022
    On Sat, 5 Feb 2022 21:05:39 -0000 (UTC), Mike Monett <spamme@not.com>
    wrote:

    Stop Eating Salt.

    The reason I avoid sodium is because I recently had seven strokes.

    These cost me the vision in my left eye, made my right hand so numb I could >not pick up a spoon to eat my food, and cost me the use of my legs. I
    cannot walk.

    All this is because ordinary sodium causes water retention and high blood >pressure which leads to strokes. I did not know this at the time, and only >found out long afterwards.

    Switch To Potassium

    Potassium chloride doesn't cause the high blood pressure and bloat from
    water retention of sodium.

    If I had known about potassium chloride, I would have avoided these
    problems.

    Potassium has the same taste as sodium, but it is much stronger so you
    won't use as much. The body has a narrower tolerance for potassium, but
    since you won't use as much you will always stay below the Recommended
    Daily Allowance.

    Windsor Salt Free is Potassium Chloride

    You can get Windsor Salt Free in many grocery stores and on Amazon, but try >to avoid Amazon since they charge double. I pay CAD$7.45 here in Midland, >Ontario. Here is a picture from Windsor Salt:

    https://tinyurl.com/2p8md52c

    Yes, it is more expensive than regular salt, but it lasts a long time since >you won't use as much. I average about 1 gram per day, so a 311 gram >container will last me almost a year. You might use a bit more, but you can >probably afford it.

    Get a Blood Pressure Monitor

    You can get an inexpensive blood pressure monitor at most health stores and >Amazon. Get the type that straps on your upper arm instead of around your >wrist. They all work the same way by listening for the ultrasonic whistle
    as your blood vessel is squeezed shut. There is always some variability in >the readings, and between different models. Get one that is durable and
    easy to use, and watch for the trends as you change your diet and exercise >habits.

    Check With Your Doctor

    Check with your doctor about switching to potassium, but be skeptical if he >recommends you stay on sodium or wants you to take different pills. Get a >second opinion, especially if he has not been monitoring your blood
    pressure. Make up your own mind.

    Exercise

    It is easy to get caught up in a demanding LTspice simulation or a tricky >piece of code. But it is also killing you. Your body needs exercise. Get a >plain kitchen timer, and go for a walk every hour or so. Without Fail. It
    is so easy to put off. Don't do that. A brief walk will often leave room
    for an idea that my unlock the puzzle.

    Live Longer and Happier

    These small changes will help you be more productive and live longer. You >will be grateful you made them as you grow older and watch your friends die >from heart attacks.

    I have just passed my 80th birthday. I have had strokes, but I survived. >There is no need for you to repeat my mistakes.

    Strokes are no joke.

    Sodium chloride hard to avoid. Just don't add more.

    RL

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Don Y@21:1/5 to legg on Sun Feb 6 09:50:11 2022
    On 2/6/2022 8:21 AM, legg wrote:
    I have just passed my 80th birthday. I have had strokes, but I survived.
    There is no need for you to repeat my mistakes.

    Strokes are no joke.

    Sodium chloride hard to avoid. Just don't add more.

    Note that there are other risk factors that affect the likelihood of
    a stroke. And, addressing them has other benefits!

    You really don't "need" to suck on that cancer-stick. (my god,
    I think smokes are $100/carton?? why don't you just take up
    Cocaine, instead!)

    It's not THAT hard to get off your ass and move those muscles.
    (no, you don't need a gym membership or a fancy piece of equipment
    that you'll have to *dust* regularly)

    And I'm sure you can afford to buy smaller clothes (i.e., lose
    weight so you don't need to buy from Omar-the-Tent-Maker).

    And, adjust the *types* of foodstuffs from which you derive
    your *necessary* calories and other substances. (yeah,
    potato chips are tastier than broccoli... but, you can find
    other ways to augment the broccoli so it's tastier still!)

    These are all relatively easy things to do -- just not always
    "fun" or "profitable-in-the-short-term".

    E.g., the idea of exercising just for the sake of exercising
    is anathema to me; there aren't enough hours in the day, as
    it is, for me to do the things that I *want* to do... why "waste"
    one of them?

    OTOH, it is relatively easy for me to rationalize walking the
    2+ miles to the post office instead of *driving*. In that case,
    the 'cost" of the exercise is reduced -- it would take me 10 minutes
    to drive that distance and just about 30 to walk it. So, I
    receive the benefits of 60 minutes of exercise (there and back)
    for an investment of 40 minutes of my time! (and the car sees
    that much less wear-and-tear from those short jaunts).

    Repeat for library, grocery store, FedEX store, etc.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Larkin@21:1/5 to All on Sun Feb 6 09:02:43 2022
    On Sat, 5 Feb 2022 16:40:41 -0700, Don Y <blockedofcourse@foo.invalid>
    wrote:

    On 2/5/2022 2:05 PM, Mike Monett wrote:
    Switch To Potassium

    Potassium chloride doesn't cause the high blood pressure and bloat from
    water retention of sodium.

    Potassium isn't a panacea. It can interfere with the normal function
    of your heart. It's also contraindicated for folks with kidney
    problems. E.g., replacing a sodium-based water softener with
    one driven by potassium just changes the source of the problem.

    Bodies specifically want salt, and probably/mostly self-regulate about
    the amount. But bodies don't seem to specifically have a taste for
    potassium.

    Maybe because sodium salt is generally available, but potassium salts
    aren't. So if we have a specific regulatory mechanism for potassium,
    it would show in in craving for potassium-rich foods.


    Sodium is a problem because so many processed foods *add* sodium
    to your diet.

    Our natural tastes can be fooled by expert chemists who design cheap
    junk food.

    --

    John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc trk

    The cork popped merrily, and Lord Peter rose to his feet.
    "Bunter", he said, "I give you a toast. The triumph of Instinct over Reason"

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Dimiter_Popoff@21:1/5 to Don Y on Sun Feb 6 22:07:35 2022
    On 2/6/2022 18:50, Don Y wrote:
    .....
    E.g., the idea of exercising just for the sake of exercising
    is anathema to me; there aren't enough hours in the day, as
    it is, for me to do the things that I *want* to do... why "waste"
    one of them?

    OTOH, it is relatively easy for me to rationalize walking the
    2+ miles to the post office instead of *driving*.  In that case,
    the 'cost" of the exercise is reduced -- it would take me 10 minutes
    to drive that distance and just about 30 to walk it.  So, I
    receive the benefits of 60 minutes of exercise (there and back)
    for an investment of 40 minutes of my time!  (and the car sees
    that much less wear-and-tear from those short jaunts).

    Repeat for library, grocery store, FedEX store, etc.

    I feel the same about exercise for the sake of exercise, don't
    have the patience.
    I used to make lengthy walks with a camera hunting for wildlife
    (well almost exclusively birds), chasing something makes it OK.
    ( https://www.flickr.com/photos/didi_tgi/albums/72157600228621276 )

    For nearly 4 years now I am cycling instead, used to cycle once or
    twice a week downtown to visit (35-40 km round trip). But I also did
    cycle for the sake of cycling alone a few times. When the weather
    allows it I cycle to shop for food, some 10km round trip.

    Anyway, in this line of thought let me share a discovery I think I made.
    Some 10 years ago I noticed my head worked markedly better if I
    had been rope bouncing for say 20 minutes on the terrace here before
    I started the day. It took me years to notice it was just the rope
    bouncing, no other exercise I did had this effect.
    And quite recently I stumbled across the same effect in the kitchen....
    while making the morning coffee (2 cups espresso). There are two
    pauses of 1-2 minutes each while the water heats up in the maker;
    I was just bouncing because I felt cold (my morning shower has
    been with cold water for 30+ years and the kitchen is cold during
    the winter). And there it was, the effect was there again.
    It looks like it is not about the exercise but about the shakeup
    the head gets.... Some of the bugs inside it must be falling in
    place I suppose :).

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  • From legg@21:1/5 to All on Sun Feb 6 15:28:48 2022
    On Sun, 6 Feb 2022 09:50:11 -0700, Don Y <blockedofcourse@foo.invalid>
    wrote:

    On 2/6/2022 8:21 AM, legg wrote:
    I have just passed my 80th birthday. I have had strokes, but I survived. >>> There is no need for you to repeat my mistakes.

    Strokes are no joke.

    Sodium chloride hard to avoid. Just don't add more.

    Note that there are other risk factors that affect the likelihood of
    a stroke. And, addressing them has other benefits!

    You really don't "need" to suck on that cancer-stick. (my god,
    I think smokes are $100/carton?? why don't you just take up
    Cocaine, instead!)

    It's not THAT hard to get off your ass and move those muscles.
    (no, you don't need a gym membership or a fancy piece of equipment
    that you'll have to *dust* regularly)

    And I'm sure you can afford to buy smaller clothes (i.e., lose
    weight so you don't need to buy from Omar-the-Tent-Maker).

    And, adjust the *types* of foodstuffs from which you derive
    your *necessary* calories and other substances. (yeah,
    potato chips are tastier than broccoli... but, you can find
    other ways to augment the broccoli so it's tastier still!)

    These are all relatively easy things to do -- just not always
    "fun" or "profitable-in-the-short-term".

    E.g., the idea of exercising just for the sake of exercising
    is anathema to me; there aren't enough hours in the day, as
    it is, for me to do the things that I *want* to do... why "waste"
    one of them?

    OTOH, it is relatively easy for me to rationalize walking the
    2+ miles to the post office instead of *driving*. In that case,
    the 'cost" of the exercise is reduced -- it would take me 10 minutes
    to drive that distance and just about 30 to walk it. So, I
    receive the benefits of 60 minutes of exercise (there and back)
    for an investment of 40 minutes of my time! (and the car sees
    that much less wear-and-tear from those short jaunts).

    Repeat for library, grocery store, FedEX store, etc.

    I'm more a 'hope I don't smell too bad before I'm planted',
    kind of guy.

    Given fate's wicked sense of humor, you've got to be very
    careful what you wish for. Sniff . . .sniff. . . .

    RL

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  • From Don Y@21:1/5 to legg on Sun Feb 6 13:48:53 2022
    On 2/6/2022 1:28 PM, legg wrote:
    I'm more a 'hope I don't smell too bad before I'm planted',
    kind of guy.

    I'm concerned about being able to do what I want to do for as
    long as possible. The idea of a physical injury (or debilitating
    condition) depriving me of some ability -- esp if I could have
    avoided it with a bit of effort (no, I'm not going to waste
    days at a gym, etc.) -- would be annoying.

    This, especially as the costs of "neglect" aren't immediately
    obvious -- like putting your hand in a fire might be! (and,
    because the symptoms are likely not dramatic, initially).

    [I've a friend recently Dx'ed with Parkinson's. It's sad
    to see her having to cope with this -- doubly so as it wasn't
    like she had some "early warning" that it was waiting for her.
    Other friends have dealt with ALS -- wickedly cruel!]

    Given fate's wicked sense of humor, you've got to be very
    careful what you wish for. Sniff . . .sniff. . . .

    <grin>

    Focus on the right side of green...

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  • From Don Y@21:1/5 to All on Sun Feb 6 13:42:28 2022
    On 2/6/2022 1:07 PM, Dimiter_Popoff wrote:
    On 2/6/2022 18:50, Don Y wrote:
    .....
    E.g., the idea of exercising just for the sake of exercising
    is anathema to me; there aren't enough hours in the day, as
    it is, for me to do the things that I *want* to do... why "waste"
    one of them?

    OTOH, it is relatively easy for me to rationalize walking the
    2+ miles to the post office instead of *driving*. In that case,
    the 'cost" of the exercise is reduced -- it would take me 10 minutes
    to drive that distance and just about 30 to walk it. So, I
    receive the benefits of 60 minutes of exercise (there and back)
    for an investment of 40 minutes of my time! (and the car sees
    that much less wear-and-tear from those short jaunts).

    Repeat for library, grocery store, FedEX store, etc.

    I feel the same about exercise for the sake of exercise, don't
    have the patience.

    Exactly. It's as if you're constantly thinking "I could be doing
    _____, instead!"

    At least if you're cooking, watching TV, eating, taking a sh*t,
    etc. you can do some other task that more fully uses your mind.
    When walking, I can *think* about things but can't *read*
    anything (the relative motion of my surroundings is distracting)

    I used to make lengthy walks with a camera hunting for wildlife
    (well almost exclusively birds), chasing something makes it OK.
    ( https://www.flickr.com/photos/didi_tgi/albums/72157600228621276 )

    Ah, well... I'd put "bird watching" in a similar category as exercise! :>
    SWMBO enjoys watching the birds in the back yard as they seem to have
    a preference for our yard over most of the neighbors.

    "Come look at this..."

    <shrug>

    For nearly 4 years now I am cycling instead, used to cycle once or
    twice a week downtown to visit (35-40 km round trip). But I also did
    cycle for the sake of cycling alone a few times. When the weather
    allows it I cycle to shop for food, some 10km round trip.

    That's just a tiny bit farther than my walking limit. I find 4-5
    miles to be about right -- 60-75 minutes of exercise per day.

    Anyway, in this line of thought let me share a discovery I think I made.
    Some 10 years ago I noticed my head worked markedly better if I
    had been rope bouncing for say 20 minutes on the terrace here before
    I started the day. It took me years to notice it was just the rope
    bouncing, no other exercise I did had this effect.

    "Rope bouncing"? "Jumping/skipping rope"?

    And quite recently I stumbled across the same effect in the kitchen....
    while making the morning coffee (2 cups espresso). There are two
    pauses of 1-2 minutes each while the water heats up in the maker;
    I was just bouncing because I felt cold (my morning shower has
    been with cold water for 30+ years and the kitchen is cold during
    the winter). And there it was, the effect was there again.
    It looks like it is not about the exercise but about the shakeup
    the head gets.... Some of the bugs inside it must be falling in
    place I suppose :).

    If you shake your head and folks NEAR you say "what's that noise"...

    I prefer closing my eyes so I'm not distracted by other things in
    my visual field (I'm a "visual thinker"; if my eyes are open, I
    won't "see" what's in front of me in deference to the thought process
    that is monopolizing my conscious mind)

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  • From Dimiter_Popoff@21:1/5 to Don Y on Sun Feb 6 23:06:43 2022
    On 2/6/2022 22:42, Don Y wrote:
    On 2/6/2022 1:07 PM, Dimiter_Popoff wrote:
    On 2/6/2022 18:50, Don Y wrote:
    .....
    E.g., the idea of exercising just for the sake of exercising
    is anathema to me; there aren't enough hours in the day, as
    it is, for me to do the things that I *want* to do... why "waste"
    one of them?

    OTOH, it is relatively easy for me to rationalize walking the
    2+ miles to the post office instead of *driving*.  In that case,
    the 'cost" of the exercise is reduced -- it would take me 10 minutes
    to drive that distance and just about 30 to walk it.  So, I
    receive the benefits of 60 minutes of exercise (there and back)
    for an investment of 40 minutes of my time!  (and the car sees
    that much less wear-and-tear from those short jaunts).

    Repeat for library, grocery store, FedEX store, etc.

    I feel the same about exercise for the sake of exercise, don't
    have the patience.

    Exactly.  It's as if you're constantly thinking "I could be doing
    _____, instead!"

    At least if you're cooking, watching TV, eating, taking a sh*t,
    etc. you can do some other task that more fully uses your mind.
    When walking, I can *think* about things but can't *read*
    anything (the relative motion of my surroundings is distracting)

    I used to make lengthy walks with a camera hunting for wildlife
    (well almost exclusively birds), chasing something makes it OK.
    ( https://www.flickr.com/photos/didi_tgi/albums/72157600228621276 )

    Ah, well... I'd put "bird watching" in a similar category as exercise! :> SWMBO enjoys watching the birds in the back yard as they seem to have
    a preference for our yard over most of the neighbors.

    It is the chasing to find some bird and get close enough to take
    a decent photo, not the watching which did it for me.


    "Come look at this..."

    <shrug>

    For nearly 4 years now I am cycling instead, used to cycle once or
    twice a week downtown to visit (35-40 km round trip). But I also did
    cycle for the sake of cycling alone a few times. When the weather
    allows it I cycle to shop for food, some 10km round trip.

    That's just a tiny bit farther than my walking limit.  I find 4-5
    miles to be about right -- 60-75 minutes of exercise per day.

    This is plenty if you do it on a daily basis of course. Or even every
    other day.


    Anyway, in this line of thought let me share a discovery I think I made.
    Some 10 years ago I noticed my head worked markedly better if I
    had been rope bouncing for say 20 minutes on the terrace here before
    I started the day. It took me years to notice it was just the rope
    bouncing, no other exercise I did had this effect.

    "Rope bouncing"?  "Jumping/skipping rope"?

    Yes, I thought I knew the phrase but apparently I have just made it
    up...


    And quite recently I stumbled across the same effect in the kitchen....
    while making the morning coffee (2 cups espresso). There are two
    pauses of 1-2 minutes each while the water heats up in the maker;
    I was just bouncing because I felt cold (my morning shower has
    been with cold water for 30+ years and the kitchen is cold during
    the winter). And there it was, the effect was there again.
    It looks like it is not about the exercise but about the shakeup
    the head gets.... Some of the bugs inside it must be falling in
    place I suppose :).

    If you shake your head and folks NEAR you say "what's that noise"...

    Or may be not so near me, must ask the neighbours...

    But the effect seems real, it is worth a try.


    I prefer closing my eyes so I'm not distracted by other things in
    my visual field (I'm a "visual thinker"; if my eyes are open, I
    won't "see" what's in front of me in deference to the thought process
    that is monopolizing my conscious mind)

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Don Y@21:1/5 to All on Sun Feb 6 21:54:43 2022
    On 2/6/2022 2:06 PM, Dimiter_Popoff wrote:
    On 2/6/2022 22:42, Don Y wrote:

    For nearly 4 years now I am cycling instead, used to cycle once or
    twice a week downtown to visit (35-40 km round trip). But I also did
    cycle for the sake of cycling alone a few times. When the weather
    allows it I cycle to shop for food, some 10km round trip.

    That's just a tiny bit farther than my walking limit. I find 4-5
    miles to be about right -- 60-75 minutes of exercise per day.

    This is plenty if you do it on a daily basis of course. Or even every
    other day.

    I find it easier to do it daily as "skipping a day" too easily
    morphs into "skipping a FEW days", etc.

    But, if I don't need to travel to the post office, grocer, library,
    etc. (i.e., "long jaunts"), I break the activity into smaller chunks
    that I can get past with minimal distraction.

    E.g., after harvesting the lemons, I made a dozen 10 minute trips
    through the neighborhood to deliver the fruit -- one bag at a time.

    You can, also, deliberately increase the amount of walking that you
    need to do to complete a task. E.g., parking far from the entrance
    of a store so you have to walk farther to get to it. Or, walking
    up the stairs instead of taking the elevator (though I find I am
    winded after five flights if wearing a mask -- it just doesn't let
    enough air in to keep up with my climb rate)

    And quite recently I stumbled across the same effect in the kitchen....
    while making the morning coffee (2 cups espresso). There are two
    pauses of 1-2 minutes each while the water heats up in the maker;
    I was just bouncing because I felt cold (my morning shower has
    been with cold water for 30+ years and the kitchen is cold during
    the winter). And there it was, the effect was there again.
    It looks like it is not about the exercise but about the shakeup
    the head gets.... Some of the bugs inside it must be falling in
    place I suppose :).

    If you shake your head and folks NEAR you say "what's that noise"...

    Or may be not so near me, must ask the neighbours...

    But the effect seems real, it is worth a try.

    I rely on the cadence in music instead of anything "loose" inside!
    I've noticed a very definite difference between the types of music
    I listen to when coming up with a solution vs. the music when I
    am *implementing* a solution. And, different preferences for
    *how* that is consumed -- headphones vs. open-air (the latter being
    a problem after SWMBO has retired for the evening!)

    I prefer closing my eyes so I'm not distracted by other things in
    my visual field (I'm a "visual thinker"; if my eyes are open, I
    won't "see" what's in front of me in deference to the thought process
    that is monopolizing my conscious mind)

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  • From amdx@21:1/5 to Mike Monett on Mon Feb 7 08:48:47 2022
    On 2/5/2022 3:05 PM, Mike Monett wrote:
    Stop Eating Salt.

    The reason I avoid sodium is because I recently had seven strokes.

    These cost me the vision in my left eye, made my right hand so numb I could not pick up a spoon to eat my food, and cost me the use of my legs. I
    cannot walk.

    All this is because ordinary sodium causes water retention and high blood pressure which leads to strokes. I did not know this at the time, and only found out long afterwards.
    stakes.

     More to the point, you should monitor your blood pressure.

    Some folks are more sensitive to salt intake.

    I didn't read that you said, you had high blood pressure, did you?

    If you did, it should have been treated.

    So, now that we all have our BP in check, it's the high fructose that is causing

    much of society health problems.

    https://peterattiamd.com/rickjohnson2/?utm_source=podcast-email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=220207-pod-rickjohnson&utm_content=220207-pod-rickjohnson-email-subs

    https://peterattiamd.com/rickjohnson2/

                                             Mikek



    --
    This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software. https://www.avast.com/antivirus

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  • From Don Y@21:1/5 to amdx on Mon Feb 7 10:06:31 2022
    On 2/7/2022 7:48 AM, amdx wrote:
    On 2/5/2022 3:05 PM, Mike Monett wrote:
    Stop Eating Salt.

    The reason I avoid sodium is because I recently had seven strokes.

    These cost me the vision in my left eye, made my right hand so numb I could >> not pick up a spoon to eat my food, and cost me the use of my legs. I
    cannot walk.

    All this is because ordinary sodium causes water retention and high blood
    pressure which leads to strokes. I did not know this at the time, and only >> found out long afterwards.
    stakes.

    More to the point, you should monitor your blood pressure.

    Some folks are more sensitive to salt intake.

    I didn't read that you said, you had high blood pressure, did you?
    If you did, it should have been treated.

    So, now that we all have our BP in check, it's the high fructose that is causing
    much of society health problems.

    I'd probably rank lack of physical activity as the bigger problem.

    I've been alarmed to see many "old folks" who consider lifting *one*
    pound weights to be "exercise"! If *that* is taxing, then "12 oz curls"
    are out of the question!! :<

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  • From Tom Gardner@21:1/5 to Don Y on Mon Feb 7 17:15:07 2022
    On 07/02/22 17:06, Don Y wrote:
    I've been alarmed to see many "old folks" who consider lifting *one*
    pound weights to be "exercise"!  If *that* is taxing, then "12 oz curls"
    are out of the question!!  :<

    For too many, lifting themselves is taxing.

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  • From Fred Bloggs@21:1/5 to Mike Monett on Mon Feb 7 10:05:43 2022
    On Saturday, February 5, 2022 at 4:05:49 PM UTC-5, Mike Monett wrote:
    Stop Eating Salt.

    The reason I avoid sodium is because I recently had seven strokes.

    These cost me the vision in my left eye, made my right hand so numb I could not pick up a spoon to eat my food, and cost me the use of my legs. I
    cannot walk.

    All this is because ordinary sodium causes water retention and high blood pressure which leads to strokes. I did not know this at the time, and only found out long afterwards.

    Switch To Potassium

    Potassium chloride doesn't cause the high blood pressure and bloat from
    water retention of sodium.

    If I had known about potassium chloride, I would have avoided these
    problems.

    Potassium has the same taste as sodium, but it is much stronger so you
    won't use as much. The body has a narrower tolerance for potassium, but
    since you won't use as much you will always stay below the Recommended
    Daily Allowance.

    Windsor Salt Free is Potassium Chloride

    You can get Windsor Salt Free in many grocery stores and on Amazon, but try to avoid Amazon since they charge double. I pay CAD$7.45 here in Midland, Ontario. Here is a picture from Windsor Salt:

    https://tinyurl.com/2p8md52c

    Yes, it is more expensive than regular salt, but it lasts a long time since you won't use as much. I average about 1 gram per day, so a 311 gram container will last me almost a year. You might use a bit more, but you can probably afford it.

    Get a Blood Pressure Monitor

    You can get an inexpensive blood pressure monitor at most health stores and Amazon. Get the type that straps on your upper arm instead of around your wrist. They all work the same way by listening for the ultrasonic whistle
    as your blood vessel is squeezed shut. There is always some variability in the readings, and between different models. Get one that is durable and
    easy to use, and watch for the trends as you change your diet and exercise habits.

    Check With Your Doctor

    Check with your doctor about switching to potassium, but be skeptical if he recommends you stay on sodium or wants you to take different pills. Get a second opinion, especially if he has not been monitoring your blood
    pressure. Make up your own mind.

    Exercise

    It is easy to get caught up in a demanding LTspice simulation or a tricky piece of code. But it is also killing you. Your body needs exercise. Get a plain kitchen timer, and go for a walk every hour or so. Without Fail. It
    is so easy to put off. Don't do that. A brief walk will often leave room
    for an idea that my unlock the puzzle.

    Live Longer and Happier

    These small changes will help you be more productive and live longer. You will be grateful you made them as you grow older and watch your friends die from heart attacks.

    I have just passed my 80th birthday. I have had strokes, but I survived. There is no need for you to repeat my mistakes.

    Chronic stress will do it too. Were you high strung?

    https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/understanding-the-stress-response

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  • From Don Y@21:1/5 to Tom Gardner on Mon Feb 7 13:13:59 2022
    On 2/7/2022 10:15 AM, Tom Gardner wrote:
    On 07/02/22 17:06, Don Y wrote:
    I've been alarmed to see many "old folks" who consider lifting *one*
    pound weights to be "exercise"! If *that* is taxing, then "12 oz curls"
    are out of the question!! :<

    For too many, lifting themselves is taxing.

    Sadly, yes. I wonder how those folks don't "notice" the
    (developing) problem? It's not like you need any sort
    of expensive lab tests to diagnose (beyond a bathroom scale!)

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  • From John Larkin@21:1/5 to All on Mon Feb 7 12:24:22 2022
    On Mon, 7 Feb 2022 13:13:59 -0700, Don Y <blockedofcourse@foo.invalid>
    wrote:

    On 2/7/2022 10:15 AM, Tom Gardner wrote:
    On 07/02/22 17:06, Don Y wrote:
    I've been alarmed to see many "old folks" who consider lifting *one*
    pound weights to be "exercise"! If *that* is taxing, then "12 oz curls" >>> are out of the question!! :<

    For too many, lifting themselves is taxing.

    Sadly, yes. I wonder how those folks don't "notice" the
    (developing) problem? It's not like you need any sort
    of expensive lab tests to diagnose (beyond a bathroom scale!)

    Clicking a mouse all day is hardly aerobic.

    I at least get up and draw or solder once in a while, but we need real
    exercize to keep our bodies and brains working.

    I worry about kids who sit in front of screens (loaded with violence)
    all day. Really, games and movies are mostly guns and sadism and
    blood.

    I wonder if that Baldwin idiot will keep shooting guns in movies. I
    think he was asked and didn't reply.







    --

    If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end with doubts,
    but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties. Francis Bacon

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  • From Mike Monett@21:1/5 to Mike Monett on Tue Feb 8 19:20:43 2022
    Mike Monett <spamme@not.com> wrote:

    Stop Eating Salt.

    Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics - At-a-Glance
    (some sections omitted)

    Here are a few key statistics about heart disease, stroke, other
    cardiovascular diseases and their risk factors.

    The source for the health statistics is the association's 2015 Heart
    Disease and Stroke Statistics Update, which is compiled annually by
    the American Heart Association, the Centers for Disease Control and
    Prevention, the National Institutes of Health and other government
    sources.

    Heart Disease, Stroke and other Cardiovascular Diseases

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading global cause of death,
    accounting for 17.3 million deaths per year, a number that is
    expected to grow to more than 23.6 million by 2030.

    In 2008, cardiovascular deaths represented 30 percent of all
    global deaths, with 80 percent of those deaths taking place in low-
    and middle-income countries.

    Nearly 787,000 people in the US died from heart disease, stroke
    and other cardiovascular diseases in 2011. That's about one of every
    three deaths in America.

    About 2,150 Americans die each day from these diseases, one every
    40 seconds.

    Cardiovascular diseases claim more lives than all forms of cancer
    combined.

    About 85.6 million Americans are living with some form of
    cardiovascular disease or the after-effects of stroke.

    Direct and indirect costs of cardiovascular diseases and stroke
    total more than $320.1 billion. That includes health expenditures
    and lost productivity.

    Nearly half of all African-American adults have some form of
    cardiovascular disease, 48 percent of women and 46 percent of men.

    Heart disease is the No. 1 cause of death in the world and the
    leading cause of death in the United States, killing over 375,000
    Americans a year.

    Heart disease accounts for 1 in 7 deaths in the US

    Someone in the US dies from heart disease about once every 90
    seconds.

    Heart Disease

    From 2001 to 2011, the death rate from heart disease has fallen
    about 39 percent - but the burden and risk factors remain alarmingly
    high.

    Heart disease strikes someone in the US about once every 43
    seconds.

    Heart disease is the No. 1 cause of death in the United States,
    killing over 375,000 people a year.

    Heart disease is the No. 1 killer of women, taking more lives than
    all forms of cancer combined.

    Over 39,000 African-Americans died from heart disease in 2011.

    Cardiovascular operations and procedures increased about 28
    percent from 2000 to 2010, according to federal data, totaling about
    7.6 million in 2010.

    About 735,000 people in the US have heart attacks each year. Of
    those, about 120,000 die.

    About 635,000 people in the US have a first-time heart attack each
    year, and about 300,000 have recurrent heart attacks.

    Stroke

    In 2010, worldwide prevalence of stroke was 33 million, with 16.9
    million people having a first stroke. Stroke was the second-leading
    global cause of death behind heart disease, accounting for 11.13% of
    total deaths worldwide.

    Stroke is the No. 5 cause of death in the United States, killing
    nearly 129,000 people a year.

    Stroke kills someone in the US about once every four minutes.

    African-Americans have nearly twice the risk for a first-ever
    stroke than white people, and a much higher death rate from stroke.

    Over the past 10 years, the death rate from stroke has fallen
    about 35 percent and the number of stroke deaths has dropped about
    21 percent.

    About 795,000 people have a stroke every year.

    Someone in the US has a stroke about once every 40 seconds.

    Stroke causes 1 of every 20 deaths in the US

    Stroke is a leading cause of disability.

    Stroke is the leading preventable cause of disability.

    Healthy Diet

    Less than 1 percent of US adults meet the American Heart
    Association's definition for "Ideal Healthy Diet." Essentially no
    children meet the definition.

    OF THE 5 COMPONENTS OF A HEALTHY DIET, REDUCING SODIUM AND
    INCREASING WHOLE GRAINS ARE THE BIGGEST CHALLENGES.

    High Blood Pressure

    About 80 million US adults have high blood pressure. That's about
    33 percent. About 77 percent of those are using antihypertensive
    medication, but only 54 of those have their condition controlled.

    About 69 percent of people who have a first heart attack, 77
    percent of people who have a first stroke and 74 percent who have
    congestive heart failure have blood pressure higher than 140/90 mm
    Hg.

    Nearly half of people with high blood pressure (46 percent) do not
    have it under control.

    https://www.heart.org/idc/groups/ahamah-public/@wcm/@sop/ @smd/documents/downloadable/ucm_470704.pdf

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  • From Don Y@21:1/5 to Mike Monett on Tue Feb 8 12:36:56 2022
    On 2/8/2022 12:20 PM, Mike Monett wrote:
    Mike Monett <spamme@not.com> wrote:

    Stop Eating Salt.

    Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics - At-a-Glance
    (some sections omitted)

    Here are a few key statistics about heart disease, stroke, other cardiovascular diseases and their risk factors.

    And you know the interesting thing about these sorts of things?
    "Solve" <leading-cause-of-death> and some other <cause> pops
    up to take its place!

    My MD has a delightful chart in his office that shows the top
    ~10 causes of death in the US. It's arranged in a cute little
    graphic spiral (to make it more engaging than a simple table
    would be -- presentation is important!).

    Starting at the tail of the spiral, you read each greater source of
    death as you spiral in towards the center.

    Where it says: "100%"

    I.e., you can jockey for position (e.g., covid wasn't on the list
    3 years ago) but the final outcome is unchanged.

    <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jim_Fixx>

    There are no guarantees (ask Jim!). You have to balance "responsible
    behavior" with just how much you want that behavior to intrude on your lifestyle.

    [I took my afternoon walk, yesterday, in a very cool, windy out-of-doors.
    My allergies were upset by this as well as my overall comfort level.
    How much did that bit of exercise "help" me?]

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Rick C@21:1/5 to Don Y on Tue Feb 8 13:09:04 2022
    On Tuesday, February 8, 2022 at 2:37:15 PM UTC-5, Don Y wrote:

    And you know the interesting thing about these sorts of things?
    "Solve" <leading-cause-of-death> and some other <cause> pops
    up to take its place!

    LOL! That is one of the most ignorant things I've seen anyone post here, and that includes everything from Larkin (although there may be some Larkin lulus that I didn't read)!

    By the very definition of "leading cause of death" if you cure it whatever was the number two cause of death becomes the leading cause.

    I suppose this is the same sort of thinking that says we don't need to worry about Covid because most of the people who die from it were going to die anyway... yeah, 100% of them.

    WTF???

    --

    Rick C.

    +- Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
    +- Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno@decadenc@21:1/5 to Rick C on Tue Feb 8 22:02:07 2022
    Rick C <gnuarm.deletethisbit@gmail.com> wrote in news:2cea9e5d-b08e-48f5-9adf-6ae6a6940cfbn@googlegroups.com:

    On Tuesday, February 8, 2022 at 2:37:15 PM UTC-5, Don Y wrote:

    And you know the interesting thing about these sorts of things?
    "Solve" <leading-cause-of-death> and some other <cause> pops
    up to take its place!

    LOL! That is one of the most ignorant things I've seen anyone
    post here, and that includes everything from Larkin (although
    there may be some Larkin lulus that I didn't read)!

    By the very definition of "leading cause of death" if you cure it
    whatever was the number two cause of death becomes the leading
    cause.

    I suppose this is the same sort of thinking that says we don't
    need to worry about Covid because most of the people who die from
    it were going to die anyway... yeah, 100% of them.

    WTF???


    "The leading cause of death in women is heart disease."

    They base those declarations on statistical fact. Not manipulated
    stats... REAL STATS.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Mike Monett@21:1/5 to Mike Monett on Tue Feb 8 23:00:43 2022
    Mike Monett <spamme@not.com> wrote:

    Mike Monett <spamme@not.com> wrote:

    Stop Eating Salt.

    [...]

    https://www.heart.org/idc/groups/ahamah-public/@wcm/@sop/ @smd/documents/downloadable/ucm_470704.pdf

    The link doesn't wrap well. Here is the TinyURL:
    https://tinyurl.com/2p8885kj

    I want to show the incredible effect that sodium has on the body.

    Before I switched to Windsor Salt Free, my feet were so swollen I could
    hardly put my shoes on. They wouldn't fit. They were too small, even though they were the largest I could find.

    After switching to Salt Free, see the difference:

    https://tinyurl.com/2es68jeu

    Imagine what salt was doing inside the body.

    Salt will kill you.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Rick C@21:1/5 to Mike Monett on Tue Feb 8 15:23:18 2022
    On Tuesday, February 8, 2022 at 6:00:54 PM UTC-5, Mike Monett wrote:
    Mike Monett <spa...@not.com> wrote:

    Mike Monett <spa...@not.com> wrote:

    Stop Eating Salt.

    [...]

    https://www.heart.org/idc/groups/ahamah-public/@wcm/@sop/ @smd/documents/downloadable/ucm_470704.pdf

    The link doesn't wrap well. Here is the TinyURL: https://tinyurl.com/2p8885kj

    I want to show the incredible effect that sodium has on the body.

    Before I switched to Windsor Salt Free, my feet were so swollen I could hardly put my shoes on. They wouldn't fit. They were too small, even though they were the largest I could find.

    After switching to Salt Free, see the difference:

    https://tinyurl.com/2es68jeu

    Imagine what salt was doing inside the body.

    Salt will kill you.

    It may well kill you. You clearly have some condition that prevents your body from excreting sodium, very likely something with your kidneys. That is what is going to kill you, not the sodium. Has your doctor checked your kidney function? There are
    other issues that may cause similar problems. I'm surprised your investigation into your issues and salt did not turn up any of this. No?

    --

    Rick C.

    ++ Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
    ++ Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Anthony William Sloman@21:1/5 to Mike Monett on Tue Feb 8 16:12:19 2022
    On Wednesday, February 9, 2022 at 10:00:54 AM UTC+11, Mike Monett wrote:
    Mike Monett <spa...@not.com> wrote:

    Mike Monett <spa...@not.com> wrote:

    Stop Eating Salt.

    [...]

    https://www.heart.org/idc/groups/ahamah-public/@wcm/@sop/ @smd/documents/downloadable/ucm_470704.pdf

    The link doesn't wrap well. Here is the TinyURL: https://tinyurl.com/2p8885kj

    I want to show the incredible effect that sodium has on the body.

    Before I switched to Windsor Salt Free, my feet were so swollen I could hardly put my shoes on. They wouldn't fit. They were too small, even though they were the largest I could find.

    After switching to Salt Free, see the difference:

    https://tinyurl.com/2es68jeu

    Imagine what salt was doing inside the body.

    Salt will kill you.

    Salt can kill you, like any number of other things taken to excess.

    What nearly killed you was high blood pressure, which should have been treated a lot earlier than yours was. Eating too much salt can contribute, but so can a careless choice of ancestors.

    Your doctor has a lot drugs that can be used to reduce high blood pressure - I now take three different ones, a beta blocker. an ACE inhibitor and a Calcium blocker - and the combination does the trick. If my genome were different, the treatments
    would need to match that.

    --
    Bill Sloman, Sydney

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  • From Tom Gardner@21:1/5 to Mike Monett on Tue Feb 8 23:36:47 2022
    On 08/02/22 23:00, Mike Monett wrote:
    Imagine what salt was doing inside the body.

    Salt will kill you.

    Don't "imagine". Understand.

    Lack of salt will kill you too.

    Not everybody has the same metabolism not diet. Global
    statements are untrustworthy.

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  • From Don Y@21:1/5 to Tom Gardner on Tue Feb 8 17:19:02 2022
    On 2/8/2022 4:36 PM, Tom Gardner wrote:
    On 08/02/22 23:00, Mike Monett wrote:
    Imagine what salt was doing inside the body.

    Salt will kill you.

    Don't "imagine". Understand.

    Lack of salt will kill you too.

    Not everybody has the same metabolism not diet. Global
    statements are untrustworthy.

    The OP hasn't told us what other factors may have contributed
    to his problems. Hard to imagine his only "failing" was
    a certain preference for salt on (in!) his foods!

    Has he ever smoked or lived/worked in an environment where
    smoking was common?

    Did he eat a "healthy diet" (excepting the sodium intake)?
    Avoid fats? Red meats? Avoid processed foods?

    Get plenty of exercise? (while wearing sun protection?)

    Avoid all nasty industrial chemicals or toxins?

    If you look at the issues that have contributed to longer
    lifespan (at the level of a society), "reducing sodium"
    isn't even on the charts! Better sanitation, controls
    on food quality, infectious diseases, vaccinations,
    medications, clean water, air quality, workplace
    factors, etc.

    [My other half's mom had dangerously high blood pressure
    for most of her life (160+ mm/Hg). Despite medication
    to "control" it. She eventually died of kidney disease.
    At 95.]

    Cut out the salt (even potassium chloride as it is harmful
    to kidneys and heart), avoid the fats, get plenty of exercise,
    etc. -- and you're still not going to do much to increase the
    lifespan of a society. You'll just change the relative weights
    of the issues that eventually take those lives.

    [Make sure we ban guns, cars, anti-vaxers, meat products,
    any medication that can have "harmful side effects", medical
    errors, smoking, all activities that can lead to injury, ...]

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