• Annual Spring Cautionary Post

    From Peter W.@21:1/5 to All on Tue Mar 22 05:46:42 2022
    Although not many here are scroungers or scavengers, perhaps there are enough to merit this post. I have pulled any number of gems out of dumpsters, barn sales and yard sales, in any case. This applies mostly to the continental United States, but I am
    sure similar perils lurk everywhere. Further to this, I am told (by an Australian) that pretty much every person, plant or animal in Australia is trying to kill you. So:

    http://www.nwf.org/~/media/PDFs/Global-Warming/Reports/They-Came-From-Climate-Change-WEB.ashx

    https://entomology.ca.uky.edu/ef631

    https://www.cdc.gov/hantavirus/surveillance/

    http://bugguide.net/node/view/475348

    https://www.cdc.gov/rodents/diseases/direct.html

    https://www.cdc.gov/ncezid/dvbd/

    https://ee_ce_img.s3.amazonaws.com/cache/ce_img/media/remote/ce_img/https_ee_channel_images.s3.amazonaws.com/article-figures/12582/article-g02_400_301.jpg

    http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/61646.php images.radiopaedia.org/images/1827647/6b765cac7f64a5107b54df2e031e12.jpg

    It is time for the annual post on stalking the wild radio, audio component (or other collectible) - and what accidental passengers that may come along with it:

    1. Insects and other arthropods:

    Anything from spiders to wasps to fleas and more. Any radio that has spent substantial time in a barn, basement, shed, garage or any other damp or exposed area may well be inhabited by or infested with various small and potentially painful critters.
    Especially those found in the southern states, home to the Brown Recluse and Black Widow spiders. Wasps, centipedes (quite
    poisonous as it happens) and other vermin are no fun as well. And, if you do find some critter of this nature, KILL IT. Being soft-hearted and releasing it into _your_ environment may make you feel all warm
    and fuzzy, but that creature may then cause considerable harm being somewhere it does not belong and where it perhaps has no natural predators. EDIT: Global Warming (whether you believe in it or not) has pushed the Recluse range into southern Maryland –
    mostly by human transport and not as successful breeding colonies but more and more common, with some few transported by human agency as far as Michigan and Pennsylvania. This is one NASTY spider with a very nasty bite.

    2. Evidence of Rodent Inhabitation: Handle with GREAT care.

    Hanta-Virus (a relative of Ebola) is endemic throughout the entire United States, Mexico and parts of Canada. It is a disease without effective treatment and an over 50% mortality rate worldwide (36% in the US). It is carried in the feces and fresh urine
    of many rodents...and there is limited recent evidence that reconstituted waste (dried but inhaled) will also spread the disease especially if inhaled, a possibility not accepted in the recent past.

    Lyme Disease: Carried by deer ticks that winter over in the white-footed deer mouse (an omnivore, BTW) that will winter over anywhere it can find shelter. The ticks that mice carry will leave the mouse to lay eggs... perhaps in that radio that served as
    their temporary winter dorm and latrine. Various other tick-borne diseases include Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, and a whole bunch more *very* nasty diseases not worth risking, are all endemic in the US.

    Note that per the CDC, there are now four types of ticks carrying multiple diseases dangerous to humans and pets. All this flying back and forth with pet animals has made the problem massively worse.

    3. Bird Dung & Old Nests: Per a recent paper, there have been over sixty (60) diseases that may be carried in wild bird poop including Avian Flu, Fowl Typhoid, Infectious Coryza, Paratyphoid, Salmonellosis, Schistosomiasis, strep and on-and-on. ((Those
    of you servicing your Bluebird and other bird houses about now need also keep this in mind.)) Most wild birds are carriers of these diseases and show no visible symptoms. We bleach our birdhouses - THEN we clean them out. Amazing the number of dead
    insects and other vermin we get out of them every spring.

    Asbestos: Dangerous only when friable - small particles able to become airborne easily. If you are a smoker, even more dangerous. It is possible for a single (one (1)) fiber to cause a fatal reaction over time – although that actuality is extremely
    rare and will (usually) take many years. For all that, it is fairly easily made safe with a little bit of care and caution. But even if you do not believe it is dangerous, you do not have the right to expose others, or transport it in conveyances where
    residual material may come in contact with others - that is, do not transport it openly in the family minivan.

    Bottom line: A proverbial ounce of caution beats the hell out of a pound of care. Common sense, rubber gloves, a breathing mask, Lysol, Bleach, Moth-balls, Insecticides (which often do not work on Spiders or Ticks, so read the label), and other
    elementary precautions conscientiously and carefully applied will "safen" even the nastiest of wild radios.



    Peter Wieck
    Melrose Park, PA

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Trevor Wilson@21:1/5 to Peter W. on Wed Mar 23 07:05:00 2022
    On 22/03/2022 11:46 pm, Peter W. wrote:
    Although not many here are scroungers or scavengers, perhaps there are enough to merit this post. I have pulled any number of gems out of dumpsters, barn sales and yard sales, in any case. This applies mostly to the continental United States, but I am
    sure similar perils lurk everywhere. Further to this, I am told (by an Australian) that pretty much every person, plant or animal in Australia is trying to kill you.

    **Time for a reality check about Aussie critters. The most dangerous,
    deadly critter in Australia is the horse.

    Yep, that's correct. Horses kill more humans than any other critter
    (including the much maligned great white shark). And by a very
    considerable margin. I am of the opinion that we should leave all the
    sharks, snakes, spiders and other critters be and kill all the horses.
    It will save many lives.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From ohger1s@gmail.com@21:1/5 to Trevor Wilson on Tue Mar 22 13:25:02 2022
    On Tuesday, March 22, 2022 at 4:05:09 PM UTC-4, Trevor Wilson wrote:
    On 22/03/2022 11:46 pm, Peter W. wrote:
    Although not many here are scroungers or scavengers, perhaps there are enough to merit this post. I have pulled any number of gems out of dumpsters, barn sales and yard sales, in any case. This applies mostly to the continental United States, but I
    am sure similar perils lurk everywhere. Further to this, I am told (by an Australian) that pretty much every person, plant or animal in Australia is trying to kill you.
    **Time for a reality check about Aussie critters. The most dangerous,
    deadly critter in Australia is the horse.

    Yep, that's correct. Horses kill more humans than any other critter (including the much maligned great white shark). And by a very
    considerable margin. I am of the opinion that we should leave all the sharks, snakes, spiders and other critters be and kill all the horses.
    It will save many lives.

    That can't be true.. Crocodile Dundee would have told us that. "...the funnelweb spider can kill a man in eight seconds, just by lookin' at him." ~ Mick Dundee

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Trevor Wilson@21:1/5 to ohg...@gmail.com on Wed Mar 23 07:40:04 2022
    On 23/03/2022 7:25 am, ohg...@gmail.com wrote:
    On Tuesday, March 22, 2022 at 4:05:09 PM UTC-4, Trevor Wilson wrote:
    On 22/03/2022 11:46 pm, Peter W. wrote:
    Although not many here are scroungers or scavengers, perhaps there are enough to merit this post. I have pulled any number of gems out of dumpsters, barn sales and yard sales, in any case. This applies mostly to the continental United States, but I
    am sure similar perils lurk everywhere. Further to this, I am told (by an Australian) that pretty much every person, plant or animal in Australia is trying to kill you.
    **Time for a reality check about Aussie critters. The most dangerous,
    deadly critter in Australia is the horse.

    Yep, that's correct. Horses kill more humans than any other critter
    (including the much maligned great white shark). And by a very
    considerable margin. I am of the opinion that we should leave all the
    sharks, snakes, spiders and other critters be and kill all the horses.
    It will save many lives.

    That can't be true.. Crocodile Dundee would have told us that. "...the funnelweb spider can kill a man in eight seconds, just by lookin' at him." ~ Mick Dundee



    **LOL! Whilst the Sydney Funnel Web Spider is an exceptionally deadly
    critter, 8 seconds is very much an over-statement. We're told about 30
    minutes for the toxin to take hold is about right. Once bitten, the
    patient should sit quietly and wait for treatment. A pressure bandage
    may assist in reducing the impact of the toxin. Without treatment, death
    is likely. Deaths from funnel web spider bites are rare today, thanks to
    the availability of anti-venom. FWIW: Even the toughest gardening gloves
    are no match for the fangs of the funnel web spider. I don't do
    gardening. My partner broke her leg whilst gardening. Very dangerous
    activity. I'm much safer holed up in my workshop.

    Horses are still way more deadly.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Phil Allison@21:1/5 to John Robertson on Tue Mar 22 14:50:58 2022
    John Robertson wrote:

    ===================

    Horses are still way more deadly.
    https://www.theland.com.au/story/4022997/what-is-australias-deadliest-animal/


    ** That article is mostly nonsense, just some journo doing "tongue in cheek" data fudging.

    Horses (including ponies and donkeys) were the most ‘deadly’ animal in Australia, causing 77 deaths in 10 years, mostly related to falls.

    ** Climbing onto a horse's back and making it jump over stuff is the rider's mad idea, not the poor horse.
    Do you blame motor bikes for all the injuries and deaths they cause ?
    Maybe you are that stupid.

    By far the most dangerous animal on earth is the * human* animal.



    ...... Phil


    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Robertson@21:1/5 to All on Tue Mar 22 14:25:57 2022
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    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Robertson@21:1/5 to Phil Allison on Tue Mar 22 16:15:19 2022
    On 2022/03/22 2:50 p.m., Phil Allison wrote:
    John Robertson wrote:

    ===================

    Horses are still way more deadly.
    https://www.theland.com.au/story/4022997/what-is-australias-deadliest-animal/
    ...

    By far the most dangerous animal on earth is the * human* animal.

    ...... Phil


    We did kind of get way off topic. Let's not bring in the clowns!

    Thanks Peter for your annual reminder - I use it to remind my staff of potential dangers in dealing with equipment that hasn't been kept spotless.

    John :-#)#
    --
    (Please post followups or tech inquiries to the USENET newsgroup)
    John's Jukes Ltd.
    MOVED to #7 - 3979 Marine Way, Burnaby, BC, Canada V5J 5E3
    (604)872-5757 (Pinballs, Jukes, Video Games)
    www.flippers.com
    "Old pinballers never die, they just flip out."

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Charlie+@21:1/5 to peterwieck33@gmail.com on Wed Mar 23 07:31:40 2022
    On Tue, 22 Mar 2022 05:46:42 -0700 (PDT), "Peter W."
    <peterwieck33@gmail.com> wrote as underneath :

    Although not many here are scroungers or scavengers, perhaps there are enough to merit this post. I have pulled any number of gems out of dumpsters, barn sales and yard sales, in any case. This applies mostly to the continental United States, but I am
    sure similar perils lurk everywhere. Further to this, I am told (by an Australian) that pretty much every person, plant or animal in Australia is trying to kill you. So:

    http://www.nwf.org/~/media/PDFs/Global-Warming/Reports/They-Came-From-Climate-Change-WEB.ashx

    https://entomology.ca.uky.edu/ef631

    https://www.cdc.gov/hantavirus/surveillance/

    http://bugguide.net/node/view/475348

    https://www.cdc.gov/rodents/diseases/direct.html

    https://www.cdc.gov/ncezid/dvbd/

    https://ee_ce_img.s3.amazonaws.com/cache/ce_img/media/remote/ce_img/https_ee_channel_images.s3.amazonaws.com/article-figures/12582/article-g02_400_301.jpg

    http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/61646.php >images.radiopaedia.org/images/1827647/6b765cac7f64a5107b54df2e031e12.jpg

    It is time for the annual post on stalking the wild radio, audio component (or other collectible) - and what accidental passengers that may come along with it:

    1. Insects and other arthropods:

    Anything from spiders to wasps to fleas and more. Any radio that has spent substantial time in a barn, basement, shed, garage or any other damp or exposed area may well be inhabited by or infested with various small and potentially painful critters.
    Especially those found in the southern states, home to the Brown Recluse and Black Widow spiders. Wasps, centipedes (quite
    poisonous as it happens) and other vermin are no fun as well. And, if you do find some critter of this nature, KILL IT. Being soft-hearted and releasing it into _your_ environment may make you feel all warm
    and fuzzy, but that creature may then cause considerable harm being somewhere it does not belong and where it perhaps has no natural predators. EDIT: Global Warming (whether you believe in it or not) has pushed the Recluse range into southern Maryland
    mostly by human transport and not as successful breeding colonies but more and more common, with some few transported by human agency as far as Michigan and Pennsylvania. This is one NASTY spider with a very nasty bite.

    2. Evidence of Rodent Inhabitation: Handle with GREAT care.

    Hanta-Virus (a relative of Ebola) is endemic throughout the entire United States, Mexico and parts of Canada. It is a disease without effective treatment and an over 50% mortality rate worldwide (36% in the US). It is carried in the feces and fresh
    urine of many rodents...and there is limited recent evidence that reconstituted waste (dried but inhaled) will also spread the disease especially if inhaled, a possibility not accepted in the recent past.

    Lyme Disease: Carried by deer ticks that winter over in the white-footed deer mouse (an omnivore, BTW) that will winter over anywhere it can find shelter. The ticks that mice carry will leave the mouse to lay eggs... perhaps in that radio that served as
    their temporary winter dorm and latrine. Various other tick-borne diseases include Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, and a whole bunch more *very* nasty diseases not worth risking, are all endemic in the US.

    Note that per the CDC, there are now four types of ticks carrying multiple diseases dangerous to humans and pets. All this flying back and forth with pet animals has made the problem massively worse.

    3. Bird Dung & Old Nests: Per a recent paper, there have been over sixty (60) diseases that may be carried in wild bird poop including Avian Flu, Fowl Typhoid, Infectious Coryza, Paratyphoid, Salmonellosis, Schistosomiasis, strep and on-and-on. ((Those
    of you servicing your Bluebird and other bird houses about now need also keep this in mind.)) Most wild birds are carriers of these diseases and show no visible symptoms. We bleach our birdhouses - THEN we clean them out. Amazing the number of dead
    insects and other vermin we get out of them every spring.

    Asbestos: Dangerous only when friable - small particles able to become airborne easily. If you are a smoker, even more dangerous. It is possible for a single (one (1)) fiber to cause a fatal reaction over time although that actuality is extremely rare
    and will (usually) take many years. For all that, it is fairly easily made safe with a little bit of care and caution. But even if you do not believe it is dangerous, you do not have the right to expose others, or transport it in conveyances where
    residual material may come in contact with others - that is, do not transport it openly in the family minivan.

    Bottom line: A proverbial ounce of caution beats the hell out of a pound of care. Common sense, rubber gloves, a breathing mask, Lysol, Bleach, Moth-balls, Insecticides (which often do not work on Spiders or Ticks, so read the label), and other
    elementary precautions conscientiously and carefully applied will "safen" even the nastiest of wild radios.


    Another nice one one is Toxoplasmosis carried in cat poo, not a killer
    but affects human eyesight and brain with no cure.

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  • From Tim R@21:1/5 to All on Fri Mar 25 07:13:44 2022
    I left my small benchtop bandsaw in the shed over the winter.

    The mice packed the inside solid with nests made from chewed up paper towels (which I also left out there) and I guess peed all over the insides, like mice do. Foul creatures.

    I cleaned it very carefully but it won't run anymore. I haven't got around to figuring out what's wrong, but it's another case of rodents harming the equipment and potentially us if we're not careful.

    These are deer mice, by the way, distinct from house mice which are all gray. I didn't know this before, but found out that Lyme disease comes from ticks biting deer mice, not biting deer. Deer don't carry Lyme disease themselves, but they have enough
    blood to support about a million ticks. Fortunately they don't fit in a bandsaw.

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