• [Leps-l] "Male Sex Scales of Moths" - by Richard Brown for ABF, Monday

    From Mike Quinn@21:1/5 to All on Sat Jul 24 12:59:06 2021
    --00000000000044f6d005c7e3f3e6
    Content-Type: text/plain; charset="UTF-8"
    Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

    Greetings,

    Richard Brown has graciously agreed to give the following zoom presentation (open to all) to the Austin Butterfly Form early next week.

    "Male Sex Scales of Moths -- Natural Wicks for Scent Dispersal - Monday,
    July 26th at 7 pm Central Time
    Presented by Richard l. Brown, the W.L. Giles Distinguished Professor
    Emeritus as well as Director Emeritus, Mississippi Entomological Museum at Mississippi State University.

    Male Sex Scales of Moths – Natural Wicks for Scent Dispersal Butterflies
    and moths have attracted much attention because of their colorful wing
    patterns derived from pigments inside their scales. Males of many
    Lepidoptera have scales that lack pigments, but rather are used for
    producing and disseminating pheromones that are essential for mating
    success. This presentation is based on examinations of the male scent
    scales of tortricid and gelechiid moths with a scanning electron
    microscope. The images of magnified scales have revealed another kind of
    beauty with the structural innovations that increase surface area to
    improve dissemination as well as different ways of protecting the scent
    scales when not in courtship.

    Richard L. Brown Bio:
    I began collecting and studying microlepidoptera in Arkansas during the 1960’s and obtained my M.S. degree in Entomology at the University of Arkansas. After serving as a medical entomologist in the U.S. Army at Ft.
    Sam Houston, I obtained a Ph.D. at Cornell University in 1980. I was then employed as Director of the Mississippi Entomological Museum at Mississippi State University where I also taught courses in Insect Taxonomy, Aquatic Insects, and Immature Insects. My research has concentrated on morphology
    and systematics of tortricid and gelechiid moths and has involved fieldwork throughout the U.S. and in Chile, Venezuela, New Caledonia, Fiji Islands,
    and Thailand. Since my retirement in 2020, I have greatly enjoyed working
    full time on moths and manuscripts.

    _______________________________

    Join Zoom Meeting Here:
    https://us02web.zoom.us/j/86426006695

    (Meeting ID: 864 2600 6695)
    _______________________________

    Hope you can join us!

    Mike Quinn, ABF vp, programs
    entomike@gmail.com
    512-577-0250 - call or text
    Please contact me if you have difficulties connecting

    http://austinbutterflies.org/

    --00000000000044f6d005c7e3f3e6
    Content-Type: text/html; charset="UTF-8"
    Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

    <div dir="ltr"><div>Greetings,</div><div><br></div><div>Richard Brown has graciously agreed to give the following zoom presentation (open to all) to the Austin Butterfly Form early next week.</div><div><br></div>&quot;Male Sex Scales of Moths -- Natural
    Wicks for Scent Dispersal - 

    Monday, July 26th at 7 pm Central Time<br><div>Presented by Richard l. Brown, the W.L. Giles Distinguished Professor Emeritus as well as Director Emeritus, Mississippi Entomological Museum at Mississippi State University.<br><br>Male Sex Scales of Moths
    Natural Wicks for Scent Dispersal Butterflies and moths have attracted much attention because of their colorful wing patterns derived from pigments inside their scales. Males of many Lepidoptera have scales that lack pigments, but rather are used for
    producing and disseminating pheromones that are essential for mating success. This presentation is based on examinations of the male scent scales of tortricid and gelechiid moths with a scanning electron microscope. The images of magnified scales have
    revealed another kind of beauty with the structural innovations that increase surface area to improve dissemination as well as different ways of protecting the scent scales when not in courtship.<br><br>Richard L. Brown Bio:</div><div>I began collecting
    and studying microlepidoptera in Arkansas during the 1960’s and obtained my M.S. degree in Entomology at the University of Arkansas. After serving as a medical entomologist in the U.S. Army at Ft. Sam Houston, I obtained a Ph.D. at Cornell University
    in 1980. I was then employed as Director of the Mississippi Entomological Museum at Mississippi State University where I also taught courses in Insect Taxonomy, Aquatic Insects, and Immature Insects. My research has concentrated on morphology and
    systematics of tortricid and gelechiid moths and has involved fieldwork throughout the U.S. and in Chile, Venezuela, New Caledonia, Fiji Islands, and Thailand. Since my retirement in 2020, I have greatly enjoyed working full time on moths and manuscripts.
    </div><div><br>_______________________________<br><br>Join Zoom Meeting Here:<br><a href="https://us02web.zoom.us/j/86426006695">https://us02web.zoom.us/j/86426006695</a><br><br>(Meeting ID: 864 2600 6695)<br>_______________________________<br><br>Hope
    you can join us!<br><br>Mike Quinn, ABF vp, programs</div><div><a href="mailto:entomike@gmail.com">entomike@gmail.com</a></div><div>512-577-0250 - call or text</div><div>Please contact me if you have difficulties connecting</div><div><br></div><div><a
    href="http://austinbutterflies.org/">http://austinbutterflies.org/</a><br></div></div>

    --00000000000044f6d005c7e3f3e6--

    --==============q35389145197940524=Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii" MIME-Version: 1.0
    Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
    Content-Disposition: inline

    _______________________________________________
    Leps-l mailing list
    Leps-l@mailman.yale.edu
    https://mailman.yale.edu/mailman/listinfo/leps-l

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)