• Re: Truck with a 5.5 box

    From Scott Lurndal@21:1/5 to Michael on Wed Jan 11 16:14:45 2023
    Michael <michaeldwilson2@gmail.com> writes:
    I'm getting a good deal on an F150, but a 5.5 box seems really small to be hauling plywood sheets and construction lumber. Anyone have experience with this? Thanks.

    Get a bedliner with the supports molded in the side for
    a couple of 2x4s at the same level as the top of the
    wheel well. Those will hold sheets flat, with some
    overhang at the back. Works fine.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Michael@21:1/5 to All on Wed Jan 11 07:50:35 2023
    I'm getting a good deal on an F150, but a 5.5 box seems really small to be hauling plywood sheets and construction lumber. Anyone have experience with this? Thanks.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Michael@21:1/5 to Scott Lurndal on Wed Jan 11 10:44:15 2023
    On Wednesday, January 11, 2023 at 10:14:50 AM UTC-6, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    Michael <michael...@gmail.com> writes:
    I'm getting a good deal on an F150, but a 5.5 box seems really small to be hauling plywood sheets and construction lumber. Anyone have experience with this? Thanks.
    Get a bedliner with the supports molded in the side for
    a couple of 2x4s at the same level as the top of the
    wheel well. Those will hold sheets flat, with some
    overhang at the back. Works fine.

    Sounds great. Much appreciated!

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Grossbohlin@21:1/5 to Michael on Wed Jan 11 17:12:27 2023
    On Wednesday, January 11, 2023 at 1:44:18 PM UTC-5, Michael wrote:
    On Wednesday, January 11, 2023 at 10:14:50 AM UTC-6, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    Michael <michael...@gmail.com> writes:
    I'm getting a good deal on an F150, but a 5.5 box seems really small to be hauling plywood sheets and construction lumber. Anyone have experience with this? Thanks.
    Get a bedliner with the supports molded in the side for
    a couple of 2x4s at the same level as the top of the
    wheel well. Those will hold sheets flat, with some
    overhang at the back. Works fine.
    Sounds great. Much appreciated!

    The F150 should have a bit over 4 feet between the wheel wells so you don't need to raise the sheets to that level to have enough width. Opening the tail gate so it lays flat, and ratchet strapping the sheets to keep them in the bed, and you should be
    good to go. The smaller trucks, like the old Rangers, actually had steps stamped into the inner walls of the bed where you could put 2x4s to support the sheets above the wheel wells.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to grossboj@gmail.com on Wed Jan 11 20:52:29 2023
    On Wed, 11 Jan 2023 17:12:27 -0800 (PST), John Grossbohlin
    <grossboj@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Wednesday, January 11, 2023 at 1:44:18 PM UTC-5, Michael wrote:
    On Wednesday, January 11, 2023 at 10:14:50 AM UTC-6, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    Michael <michael...@gmail.com> writes:
    I'm getting a good deal on an F150, but a 5.5 box seems really small to be hauling plywood sheets and construction lumber. Anyone have experience with this? Thanks.
    Get a bedliner with the supports molded in the side for
    a couple of 2x4s at the same level as the top of the
    wheel well. Those will hold sheets flat, with some
    overhang at the back. Works fine.
    Sounds great. Much appreciated!

    The F150 should have a bit over 4 feet between the wheel wells so you don't need to raise the sheets to that level to have enough width. Opening the tail gate so it lays flat, and ratchet strapping the sheets to keep them in the bed, and you should be
    good to go. The smaller trucks, like the old Rangers, actually had steps stamped into the inner walls of the bed where you could put 2x4s to support the sheets above the wheel wells.

    With a standard box, a sheet will extend to about the middle of the
    tailgate. I agree that another foot isn't a killer, until you get to
    longer stuff. A single, or a couple, of 2Xs will fit entirely in the
    bed, too. I've carried 8' metal angle and it was nice fitting it
    inside the bed.

    My '01 ranger did not have the steps in the fender wells for the
    supports. They certainly would have been nice. I had to put the
    sheets at an angle. I had 2x4s cut to support the sheets.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to michaeldwilson2@gmail.com on Wed Jan 11 20:44:22 2023
    On Wed, 11 Jan 2023 07:50:35 -0800 (PST), Michael
    <michaeldwilson2@gmail.com> wrote:

    I'm getting a good deal on an F150, but a 5.5 box seems really small to be hauling plywood sheets and construction lumber. Anyone have experience with this? Thanks.

    I bought an extended cab instead of a crew cab for exactly this
    reason. I wanted a full-size bed.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Michael@21:1/5 to Michael on Wed Jan 11 19:58:57 2023
    On Wednesday, January 11, 2023 at 9:50:39 AM UTC-6, Michael wrote:
    I'm getting a good deal on an F150, but a 5.5 box seems really small to be hauling plywood sheets and construction lumber. Anyone have experience with this? Thanks.

    Thanks for the help! I feel better about the purchase.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Clare Snyder@21:1/5 to All on Wed Jan 11 23:07:01 2023
    On Wed, 11 Jan 2023 16:14:45 GMT, scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal)
    wrote:

    Michael <michaeldwilson2@gmail.com> writes:
    I'm getting a good deal on an F150, but a 5.5 box seems really small to be hauling plywood sheets and construction lumber. Anyone have experience with this? Thanks.

    Get a bedliner with the supports molded in the side for
    a couple of 2x4s at the same level as the top of the
    wheel well. Those will hold sheets flat, with some
    overhang at the back. Works fine.
    Put a rack on it and you can haul 16 foot lumber.
    A 5.5 foot box without a rack is about as usefull as the trunk on a 72
    impala.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Clare Snyder@21:1/5 to grossboj@gmail.com on Wed Jan 11 23:07:57 2023
    On Wed, 11 Jan 2023 17:12:27 -0800 (PST), John Grossbohlin
    <grossboj@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Wednesday, January 11, 2023 at 1:44:18 PM UTC-5, Michael wrote:
    On Wednesday, January 11, 2023 at 10:14:50 AM UTC-6, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    Michael <michael...@gmail.com> writes:
    I'm getting a good deal on an F150, but a 5.5 box seems really small to be hauling plywood sheets and construction lumber. Anyone have experience with this? Thanks.
    Get a bedliner with the supports molded in the side for
    a couple of 2x4s at the same level as the top of the
    wheel well. Those will hold sheets flat, with some
    overhang at the back. Works fine.
    Sounds great. Much appreciated!

    The F150 should have a bit over 4 feet between the wheel wells so you don't need to raise the sheets to that level to have enough width. Opening the tail gate so it lays flat, and ratchet strapping the sheets to keep them in the bed, and you should be
    good to go. The smaller trucks, like the old Rangers, actually had steps stamped into the inner walls of the bed where you could put 2x4s to support the sheets above the wheel wells.
    And my Ranger has a 7 foot box - - -

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Grossbohlin@21:1/5 to k...@notreal.com on Wed Jan 11 20:08:21 2023
    On Wednesday, January 11, 2023 at 8:52:34 PM UTC-5, k...@notreal.com wrote:

    My '01 ranger did not have the steps in the fender wells for the
    supports. They certainly would have been nice. I had to put the
    sheets at an angle. I had 2x4s cut to support the sheets.

    They had changed the trucks by then... Go back to the '80s! ūüėČ

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Mr. E@21:1/5 to Michael on Thu Jan 12 06:53:13 2023
    On 1/11/23 10:50, Michael wrote:
    I'm getting a good deal on an F150, but a 5.5 box seems really small to be hauling plywood sheets and construction lumber. Anyone have experience with this? Thanks.
    A kayak/boat carrier extends the load carrying length without a roof
    height carrier rack.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Scott Lurndal@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Thu Jan 12 17:59:25 2023
    krw@notreal.com writes:
    On Wed, 11 Jan 2023 17:12:27 -0800 (PST), John Grossbohlin ><grossboj@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Wednesday, January 11, 2023 at 1:44:18 PM UTC-5, Michael wrote:
    On Wednesday, January 11, 2023 at 10:14:50 AM UTC-6, Scott Lurndal wrote: >>> > Michael <michael...@gmail.com> writes:
    I'm getting a good deal on an F150, but a 5.5 box seems really small to be hauling plywood sheets and construction lumber. Anyone have experience with this? Thanks.
    Get a bedliner with the supports molded in the side for
    a couple of 2x4s at the same level as the top of the
    wheel well. Those will hold sheets flat, with some
    overhang at the back. Works fine.
    Sounds great. Much appreciated!

    The F150 should have a bit over 4 feet between the wheel wells so you don't need to raise the sheets to that level to have enough width. Opening the tail gate so it lays flat, and ratchet strapping the sheets to keep them in the bed, and you should be
    good to go. The smaller trucks, like the old Rangers, actually had steps stamped into the inner walls of the bed where you could put 2x4s to support the sheets above the wheel wells.

    With a standard box, a sheet will extend to about the middle of the
    tailgate. I agree that another foot isn't a killer, until you get to
    longer stuff. A single, or a couple, of 2Xs will fit entirely in the
    bed, too. I've carried 8' metal angle and it was nice fitting it
    inside the bed.

    My '01 ranger did not have the steps in the fender wells for the
    supports. They certainly would have been nice. I had to put the
    sheets at an angle. I had 2x4s cut to support the sheets.

    The bed liner for my old '00 ranger had the steps. As does my '16 colorado.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to All on Thu Jan 12 13:18:29 2023
    On Wed, 11 Jan 2023 23:07:57 -0500, Clare Snyder <clare@snyder.on.ca>
    wrote:

    On Wed, 11 Jan 2023 17:12:27 -0800 (PST), John Grossbohlin ><grossboj@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Wednesday, January 11, 2023 at 1:44:18 PM UTC-5, Michael wrote:
    On Wednesday, January 11, 2023 at 10:14:50 AM UTC-6, Scott Lurndal wrote: >>> > Michael <michael...@gmail.com> writes:
    I'm getting a good deal on an F150, but a 5.5 box seems really small to be hauling plywood sheets and construction lumber. Anyone have experience with this? Thanks.
    Get a bedliner with the supports molded in the side for
    a couple of 2x4s at the same level as the top of the
    wheel well. Those will hold sheets flat, with some
    overhang at the back. Works fine.
    Sounds great. Much appreciated!

    The F150 should have a bit over 4 feet between the wheel wells so you don't need to raise the sheets to that level to have enough width. Opening the tail gate so it lays flat, and ratchet strapping the sheets to keep them in the bed, and you should be
    good to go. The smaller trucks, like the old Rangers, actually had steps stamped into the inner walls of the bed where you could put 2x4s to support the sheets above the wheel wells.
    And my Ranger has a 7 foot box - - -

    Standard cab? I wanted the extended cab so I could put some
    "valuables" inside, particularly when we traveled.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to All on Thu Jan 12 13:27:11 2023
    On Wed, 11 Jan 2023 23:07:01 -0500, Clare Snyder <clare@snyder.on.ca>
    wrote:

    On Wed, 11 Jan 2023 16:14:45 GMT, scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal)
    wrote:

    Michael <michaeldwilson2@gmail.com> writes:
    I'm getting a good deal on an F150, but a 5.5 box seems really small to be hauling plywood sheets and construction lumber. Anyone have experience with this? Thanks.

    Get a bedliner with the supports molded in the side for
    a couple of 2x4s at the same level as the top of the
    wheel well. Those will hold sheets flat, with some
    overhang at the back. Works fine.
    Put a rack on it and you can haul 16 foot lumber.
    A 5.5 foot box without a rack is about as usefull as the trunk on a 72 >impala.

    I have a hitch extender so I can carry 12' lumber easily and 16'
    carefully.

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01I1AQRM0/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to All on Thu Jan 12 13:16:58 2023
    On Thu, 12 Jan 2023 17:59:25 GMT, scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal)
    wrote:

    krw@notreal.com writes:
    On Wed, 11 Jan 2023 17:12:27 -0800 (PST), John Grossbohlin >><grossboj@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Wednesday, January 11, 2023 at 1:44:18 PM UTC-5, Michael wrote:
    On Wednesday, January 11, 2023 at 10:14:50 AM UTC-6, Scott Lurndal wrote: >>>> > Michael <michael...@gmail.com> writes:
    I'm getting a good deal on an F150, but a 5.5 box seems really small to be hauling plywood sheets and construction lumber. Anyone have experience with this? Thanks.
    Get a bedliner with the supports molded in the side for
    a couple of 2x4s at the same level as the top of the
    wheel well. Those will hold sheets flat, with some
    overhang at the back. Works fine.
    Sounds great. Much appreciated!

    The F150 should have a bit over 4 feet between the wheel wells so you don't need to raise the sheets to that level to have enough width. Opening the tail gate so it lays flat, and ratchet strapping the sheets to keep them in the bed, and you should
    be good to go. The smaller trucks, like the old Rangers, actually had steps stamped into the inner walls of the bed where you could put 2x4s to support the sheets above the wheel wells.

    With a standard box, a sheet will extend to about the middle of the >>tailgate. I agree that another foot isn't a killer, until you get to >>longer stuff. A single, or a couple, of 2Xs will fit entirely in the
    bed, too. I've carried 8' metal angle and it was nice fitting it
    inside the bed.

    My '01 ranger did not have the steps in the fender wells for the
    supports. They certainly would have been nice. I had to put the
    sheets at an angle. I had 2x4s cut to support the sheets.

    The bed liner for my old '00 ranger had the steps. As does my '16 colorado.

    I wonder if it was because mine was a flare-side. In '13 the Ranger
    had rotted out so badly (springs riding on the frame) that I replaced
    it with the '13 F150. It probably would have been my last truck.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Bill@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Thu Jan 12 13:39:18 2023
    On 1/12/2023 1:18 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Wed, 11 Jan 2023 23:07:57 -0500, Clare Snyder <clare@snyder.on.ca>
    wrote:

    On Wed, 11 Jan 2023 17:12:27 -0800 (PST), John Grossbohlin
    <grossboj@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Wednesday, January 11, 2023 at 1:44:18 PM UTC-5, Michael wrote:
    On Wednesday, January 11, 2023 at 10:14:50 AM UTC-6, Scott Lurndal wrote: >>>>> Michael <michael...@gmail.com> writes:
    I'm getting a good deal on an F150, but a 5.5 box seems really small to be hauling plywood sheets and construction lumber. Anyone have experience with this? Thanks.
    Get a bedliner with the supports molded in the side for
    a couple of 2x4s at the same level as the top of the
    wheel well. Those will hold sheets flat, with some
    overhang at the back. Works fine.
    Sounds great. Much appreciated!

    The F150 should have a bit over 4 feet between the wheel wells so you don't need to raise the sheets to that level to have enough width. Opening the tail gate so it lays flat, and ratchet strapping the sheets to keep them in the bed, and you should
    be good to go. The smaller trucks, like the old Rangers, actually had steps stamped into the inner walls of the bed where you could put 2x4s to support the sheets above the wheel wells.
    And my Ranger has a 7 foot box - - -

    Standard cab? I wanted the extended cab so I could put some
    "valuables" inside, particularly when we traveled.


    This thread got me thinking/learning more about trucks and bed-liners,
    ways to carry sheet goods, and things like that. I even browsed a few car-selling web sites. While I was watching a YouTube video related to car-buying yesterday, my wife asks me out of the blue, so *WHO* is
    getting a new vehicle??? I answered that it was going "to be a
    surprise"! If I mount a base for "bird spotting scope" in the truck
    bed, she just might fall for it--I mean go for it! ; )

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to Bill on Thu Jan 12 14:40:23 2023
    On Thu, 12 Jan 2023 13:39:18 -0500, Bill <nonegiven@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/12/2023 1:18 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Wed, 11 Jan 2023 23:07:57 -0500, Clare Snyder <clare@snyder.on.ca>
    wrote:

    On Wed, 11 Jan 2023 17:12:27 -0800 (PST), John Grossbohlin
    <grossboj@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Wednesday, January 11, 2023 at 1:44:18 PM UTC-5, Michael wrote:
    On Wednesday, January 11, 2023 at 10:14:50 AM UTC-6, Scott Lurndal wrote: >>>>>> Michael <michael...@gmail.com> writes:
    I'm getting a good deal on an F150, but a 5.5 box seems really small to be hauling plywood sheets and construction lumber. Anyone have experience with this? Thanks.
    Get a bedliner with the supports molded in the side for
    a couple of 2x4s at the same level as the top of the
    wheel well. Those will hold sheets flat, with some
    overhang at the back. Works fine.
    Sounds great. Much appreciated!

    The F150 should have a bit over 4 feet between the wheel wells so you don't need to raise the sheets to that level to have enough width. Opening the tail gate so it lays flat, and ratchet strapping the sheets to keep them in the bed, and you should
    be good to go. The smaller trucks, like the old Rangers, actually had steps stamped into the inner walls of the bed where you could put 2x4s to support the sheets above the wheel wells.
    And my Ranger has a 7 foot box - - -

    Standard cab? I wanted the extended cab so I could put some
    "valuables" inside, particularly when we traveled.


    This thread got me thinking/learning more about trucks and bed-liners,
    ways to carry sheet goods, and things like that. I even browsed a few >car-selling web sites. While I was watching a YouTube video related to >car-buying yesterday, my wife asks me out of the blue, so *WHO* is
    getting a new vehicle??? I answered that it was going "to be a
    surprise"! If I mount a base for "bird spotting scope" in the truck
    bed, she just might fall for it--I mean go for it! ; )

    I bought a new one last November ('21). Someone ran a stop sign at
    full speed and totaled my '13. A new one, even fairly well loaded,
    was the same price as a used one at the time. Used vehicles were nuts,
    which helped me out with the insurance claim too. ;-)

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Scott Lurndal@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Thu Jan 12 19:32:11 2023
    krw@notreal.com writes:
    On Thu, 12 Jan 2023 17:59:25 GMT, scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal)
    wrote:

    krw@notreal.com writes:
    On Wed, 11 Jan 2023 17:12:27 -0800 (PST), John Grossbohlin >>><grossboj@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Wednesday, January 11, 2023 at 1:44:18 PM UTC-5, Michael wrote:
    On Wednesday, January 11, 2023 at 10:14:50 AM UTC-6, Scott Lurndal wrote: >>>>> > Michael <michael...@gmail.com> writes:
    I'm getting a good deal on an F150, but a 5.5 box seems really small to be hauling plywood sheets and construction lumber. Anyone have experience with this? Thanks.
    Get a bedliner with the supports molded in the side for
    a couple of 2x4s at the same level as the top of the
    wheel well. Those will hold sheets flat, with some
    overhang at the back. Works fine.
    Sounds great. Much appreciated!

    The F150 should have a bit over 4 feet between the wheel wells so you don't need to raise the sheets to that level to have enough width. Opening the tail gate so it lays flat, and ratchet strapping the sheets to keep them in the bed, and you should
    be good to go. The smaller trucks, like the old Rangers, actually had steps stamped into the inner walls of the bed where you could put 2x4s to support the sheets above the wheel wells.

    With a standard box, a sheet will extend to about the middle of the >>>tailgate. I agree that another foot isn't a killer, until you get to >>>longer stuff. A single, or a couple, of 2Xs will fit entirely in the >>>bed, too. I've carried 8' metal angle and it was nice fitting it
    inside the bed.

    My '01 ranger did not have the steps in the fender wells for the >>>supports. They certainly would have been nice. I had to put the
    sheets at an angle. I had 2x4s cut to support the sheets.

    The bed liner for my old '00 ranger had the steps. As does my '16 colorado.

    I wonder if it was because mine was a flare-side. In '13 the Ranger
    had rotted out so badly (springs riding on the frame) that I replaced
    it with the '13 F150. It probably would have been my last truck.

    Dunno. My '00 ranger was stock base model (manual everything), the kind
    that used to dominate fleet sales to the trades. It would still be
    running if a tree hadn't fallen on it a couple years ago in a derecho.
    Never had a problem with it over the first 120k miles (other than replacing
    the alternator once). Body in great condition (california weather dontchanknow).

    Loved that Ranger, I'd even custom turned the shifter lever knob from
    some local Almond. The replacement colorado was the only manual light truck for sale at the time (2016).

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DerbyDad03@21:1/5 to Scott Lurndal on Thu Jan 12 18:27:27 2023
    On Thursday, January 12, 2023 at 2:32:16 PM UTC-5, Scott Lurndal wrote:

    Dunno. My '00 ranger was stock base model (manual everything), the kind
    that used to dominate fleet sales to the trades. It would still be
    running if a tree hadn't fallen on it a couple years ago in a derecho.

    I know all about trees and well maintained vehicles.

    My super clean 2006 Honda Odyssey in 2014:

    https://i.imgur.com/MTBfotQ.jpg

    SWMBO's super clean 2011 Honda CR-V in 2022:

    https://i.imgur.com/pKO2q4z.jpg

    Fun fact: 99% of the time the 2017 Ody you see next to the CR-V is
    parked where the CR-V was parked that day. That limb came down
    on one of the rare days that we swapped spots.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From ritzannaseaton@gmail.com@21:1/5 to k...@notreal.com on Thu Jan 12 18:20:51 2023
    On Wednesday, January 11, 2023 at 7:52:34 PM UTC-6, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Wed, 11 Jan 2023 17:12:27 -0800 (PST), John Grossbohlin <gros...@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Wednesday, January 11, 2023 at 1:44:18 PM UTC-5, Michael wrote:
    On Wednesday, January 11, 2023 at 10:14:50 AM UTC-6, Scott Lurndal wrote: >> > Michael <michael...@gmail.com> writes:
    I'm getting a good deal on an F150, but a 5.5 box seems really small to be hauling plywood sheets and construction lumber. Anyone have experience with this? Thanks.
    Get a bedliner with the supports molded in the side for
    a couple of 2x4s at the same level as the top of the
    wheel well. Those will hold sheets flat, with some
    overhang at the back. Works fine.
    Sounds great. Much appreciated!

    The F150 should have a bit over 4 feet between the wheel wells so you don't need to raise the sheets to that level to have enough width. Opening the tail gate so it lays flat, and ratchet strapping the sheets to keep them in the bed, and you should be
    good to go. The smaller trucks, like the old Rangers, actually had steps stamped into the inner walls of the bed where you could put 2x4s to support the sheets above the wheel wells.
    With a standard box, a sheet will extend to about the middle of the tailgate.

    How times have changed. Long, long ago. Back when the dinosaurs roamed the shopping malls with 25 cent video arcades and Radio Shacks and Sears stores and break dancing was all the rage. A standard box was considered 8 feet. The short box was 6.5
    feet. And the super short box of 5.5 feet had not even been invented yet. Back then I remember the only crew cab four door pickup truck I ever saw was one owned by the railroad. It had an 8 foot bed too. Single rear wheels so they could mount the
    railroad wheels underneath it.



    I agree that another foot isn't a killer, until you get to
    longer stuff. A single, or a couple, of 2Xs will fit entirely in the
    bed, too. I've carried 8' metal angle and it was nice fitting it
    inside the bed.

    My '01 ranger did not have the steps in the fender wells for the
    supports. They certainly would have been nice. I had to put the
    sheets at an angle. I had 2x4s cut to support the sheets.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DerbyDad03@21:1/5 to k...@notreal.com on Thu Jan 12 18:31:43 2023
    On Thursday, January 12, 2023 at 2:40:28 PM UTC-5, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Thu, 12 Jan 2023 13:39:18 -0500, Bill <none...@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/12/2023 1:18 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Wed, 11 Jan 2023 23:07:57 -0500, Clare Snyder <cl...@snyder.on.ca>
    wrote:

    On Wed, 11 Jan 2023 17:12:27 -0800 (PST), John Grossbohlin
    <gros...@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Wednesday, January 11, 2023 at 1:44:18 PM UTC-5, Michael wrote: >>>>> On Wednesday, January 11, 2023 at 10:14:50 AM UTC-6, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    Michael <michael...@gmail.com> writes:
    I'm getting a good deal on an F150, but a 5.5 box seems really small to be hauling plywood sheets and construction lumber. Anyone have experience with this? Thanks.
    Get a bedliner with the supports molded in the side for
    a couple of 2x4s at the same level as the top of the
    wheel well. Those will hold sheets flat, with some
    overhang at the back. Works fine.
    Sounds great. Much appreciated!

    The F150 should have a bit over 4 feet between the wheel wells so you don't need to raise the sheets to that level to have enough width. Opening the tail gate so it lays flat, and ratchet strapping the sheets to keep them in the bed, and you
    should be good to go. The smaller trucks, like the old Rangers, actually had steps stamped into the inner walls of the bed where you could put 2x4s to support the sheets above the wheel wells.
    And my Ranger has a 7 foot box - - -

    Standard cab? I wanted the extended cab so I could put some
    "valuables" inside, particularly when we traveled.


    This thread got me thinking/learning more about trucks and bed-liners, >ways to carry sheet goods, and things like that. I even browsed a few >car-selling web sites. While I was watching a YouTube video related to >car-buying yesterday, my wife asks me out of the blue, so *WHO* is
    getting a new vehicle??? I answered that it was going "to be a
    surprise"! If I mount a base for "bird spotting scope" in the truck
    bed, she just might fall for it--I mean go for it! ; )
    I bought a new one last November ('21). Someone ran a stop sign at
    full speed and totaled my '13. A new one, even fairly well loaded,
    was the same price as a used one at the time. Used vehicles were nuts,
    which helped me out with the insurance claim too. ;-)

    The only reason that the 2011 CR-V that I mentioned in my other post
    was repaired after the large tree limb crushed it was because of the
    insane used car prices in 2022.

    5 years and 50K miles after she bought it, they valued it at $100 less
    than she bought it for.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to ritzannaseaton@gmail.com on Thu Jan 12 21:40:19 2023
    On Thu, 12 Jan 2023 18:20:51 -0800 (PST), "russellseaton1@yahoo.com" <ritzannaseaton@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Wednesday, January 11, 2023 at 7:52:34 PM UTC-6, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Wed, 11 Jan 2023 17:12:27 -0800 (PST), John Grossbohlin
    <gros...@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Wednesday, January 11, 2023 at 1:44:18 PM UTC-5, Michael wrote:
    On Wednesday, January 11, 2023 at 10:14:50 AM UTC-6, Scott Lurndal wrote: >> >> > Michael <michael...@gmail.com> writes:
    I'm getting a good deal on an F150, but a 5.5 box seems really small to be hauling plywood sheets and construction lumber. Anyone have experience with this? Thanks.
    Get a bedliner with the supports molded in the side for
    a couple of 2x4s at the same level as the top of the
    wheel well. Those will hold sheets flat, with some
    overhang at the back. Works fine.
    Sounds great. Much appreciated!

    The F150 should have a bit over 4 feet between the wheel wells so you don't need to raise the sheets to that level to have enough width. Opening the tail gate so it lays flat, and ratchet strapping the sheets to keep them in the bed, and you should
    be good to go. The smaller trucks, like the old Rangers, actually had steps stamped into the inner walls of the bed where you could put 2x4s to support the sheets above the wheel wells.
    With a standard box, a sheet will extend to about the middle of the
    tailgate.

    How times have changed. Long, long ago. Back when the dinosaurs roamed the shopping malls with 25 cent video arcades and Radio Shacks and Sears stores and break dancing was all the rage. A standard box was considered 8 feet. The short box was 6.5
    feet. And the super short box of 5.5 feet had not even been invented yet. Back then I remember the only crew cab four door pickup truck I ever saw was one owned by the railroad. It had an 8 foot bed too. Single rear wheels so they could mount the
    railroad wheels underneath it.

    I wouldn't want to park that beast!

    8' beds are still available but are a PITA to park.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Markem618@21:1/5 to ritzannaseaton@gmail.com on Thu Jan 12 20:56:24 2023
    On Thu, 12 Jan 2023 18:20:51 -0800 (PST), "russellseaton1@yahoo.com" <ritzannaseaton@gmail.com> wrote:

    How times have changed. Long, long ago. Back when the dinosaurs roamed the shopping malls with 25 cent video arcades and Radio Shacks and Sears stores and break dancing was all the rage. A standard box was considered 8 feet. The short box was 6.5
    feet. And the super short box of 5.5 feet had not even been invented yet. Back then I remember the only crew cab four door pickup truck I ever saw was one owned by the railroad. It had an 8 foot bed too. Single rear wheels so they could mount the
    railroad wheels underneath it.

    Back in those day my parents had Ford F250 six pack, the camper fitted
    on the back for camping. I remember we drove from Lake Charles to
    Galveston, my sister and I were in the camper looking out the front
    window. We first saw the lights of Galveston, thought we will be there
    soon. Our estimate proved incorrect that is one flat stretch of road.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Scott Lurndal@21:1/5 to teamarrows@eznet.net on Fri Jan 13 15:13:41 2023
    DerbyDad03 <teamarrows@eznet.net> writes:
    On Thursday, January 12, 2023 at 2:32:16 PM UTC-5, Scott Lurndal wrote:

    Dunno. My '00 ranger was stock base model (manual everything), the kind
    that used to dominate fleet sales to the trades. It would still be
    running if a tree hadn't fallen on it a couple years ago in a derecho.

    I know all about trees and well maintained vehicles.

    My super clean 2006 Honda Odyssey in 2014:

    https://i.imgur.com/MTBfotQ.jpg

    SWMBO's super clean 2011 Honda CR-V in 2022:

    https://i.imgur.com/pKO2q4z.jpg

    For the ranger, the tree flattened the cab. My B-I-L sold it
    to a salvage guy who figured he could fix it somehow. Haven't
    heard anything further on it.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Leon@21:1/5 to Michael on Fri Jan 13 10:41:38 2023
    On 1/11/2023 9:50 AM, Michael wrote:
    I'm getting a good deal on an F150, but a 5.5 box seems really small to be hauling plywood sheets and construction lumber. Anyone have experience with this? Thanks.


    Mine is the Crew Cab with the 5.5 box. No problem with plywood with
    the tail gate down.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DerbyDad03@21:1/5 to Scott Lurndal on Fri Jan 13 11:03:41 2023
    On Friday, January 13, 2023 at 10:13:46 AM UTC-5, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    DerbyDad03 <teama...@eznet.net> writes:
    On Thursday, January 12, 2023 at 2:32:16 PM UTC-5, Scott Lurndal wrote:

    Dunno. My '00 ranger was stock base model (manual everything), the kind
    that used to dominate fleet sales to the trades. It would still be
    running if a tree hadn't fallen on it a couple years ago in a derecho.

    I know all about trees and well maintained vehicles.

    My super clean 2006 Honda Odyssey in 2014:

    https://i.imgur.com/MTBfotQ.jpg

    SWMBO's super clean 2011 Honda CR-V in 2022:

    https://i.imgur.com/pKO2q4z.jpg
    For the ranger, the tree flattened the cab. My B-I-L sold it
    to a salvage guy who figured he could fix it somehow. Haven't
    heard anything further on it.

    If you look carefully at the Ody, right under the side windows, you
    can see that the driver's door doesn't quite line up with the slider.

    The tree hit the top of the A pillar and then slid down to the hood.
    The driver's door was pushed down and back. To get a feel how
    heavy the tree was, check out the front tire. That's not a low profile
    tire, that's just compressed by the weight.

    Every 6 months or so - since 2014 - I get the Takata Air Bag recall
    notice. :-)

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Michael Trew@21:1/5 to Michael on Tue Jan 17 15:34:00 2023
    On 1/11/2023 10:50, Michael wrote:
    I'm getting a good deal on an F150, but a 5.5 box seems really small
    to be hauling plywood sheets and construction lumber. Anyone have
    experience with this? Thanks.

    I've owned multiple compact S10's and Rangers. The 6' box was kind of a
    pain, mainly due to plywood and drywall having to rest on top of the
    wheel wells. If stacked on an angle (of course ratchet strapped down),
    the drywall/plywood would hang at least to the end of the tailgate, down
    flat.

    Me, I buy cheap old trucks, and use them primarily for utility. I,
    personally, would not buy a full-size truck with any shorter than an 8'
    bed, where 4X8' sheets could lay flat between the wheel wells, with the tailgate shut. 5.5' bed seems *way* too small to me; might as well have
    an SUV or van at that point.

    If the truck is your primary vehicle, and you need a back seat (without
    a huge cab), you might feel differently. I'm fine with a single cab 8'
    bed since the truck is a secondary vehicle for me.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to michael.trew@att.net on Wed Jan 18 00:34:46 2023
    On Tue, 17 Jan 2023 15:34:00 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/11/2023 10:50, Michael wrote:
    I'm getting a good deal on an F150, but a 5.5 box seems really small
    to be hauling plywood sheets and construction lumber. Anyone have
    experience with this? Thanks.

    I've owned multiple compact S10's and Rangers. The 6' box was kind of a >pain, mainly due to plywood and drywall having to rest on top of the
    wheel wells. If stacked on an angle (of course ratchet strapped down),
    the drywall/plywood would hang at least to the end of the tailgate, down >flat.

    Me, I buy cheap old trucks, and use them primarily for utility. I, >personally, would not buy a full-size truck with any shorter than an 8'
    bed, where 4X8' sheets could lay flat between the wheel wells, with the >tailgate shut. 5.5' bed seems *way* too small to me; might as well have
    an SUV or van at that point.

    If the truck is your primary vehicle, and you need a back seat (without
    a huge cab), you might feel differently. I'm fine with a single cab 8'
    bed since the truck is a secondary vehicle for me.

    An 8' bed with a standard cab is OK but with an extended cab or crew
    cab, the vehicle is simply too long. It would be impossible to park.
    I wouldn't have a standard cab, so it's a 6-1/2' cab.

    I saw a RR work truck the other day that had a crew cab and 8' bed. It
    looked as long as a bus.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Bill@21:1/5 to Michael on Sun Jan 22 22:53:00 2023
    On 1/22/2023 10:44 PM, Michael wrote:
    On Wednesday, January 11, 2023 at 9:50:39 AM UTC-6, Michael wrote:
    I'm getting a good deal on an F150, but a 5.5 box seems really small to be hauling plywood sheets and construction lumber. Anyone have experience with this? Thanks.

    I bought the truck, a 2022 hybrid F150. One of the things I really like about it is that it has a 7.4 kW generator that powers outlets inside and outside the truck. It has three 120V outlets and a 240V outlet. It draws from the battery and starts up if
    it needs to charge.

    The 5.5 box is pretty short though.

    Just curious, what happens if you turn on the heater (or A/C)?
    I haven't even ridden in an EV yet.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Michael@21:1/5 to Michael on Sun Jan 22 19:44:34 2023
    On Wednesday, January 11, 2023 at 9:50:39 AM UTC-6, Michael wrote:
    I'm getting a good deal on an F150, but a 5.5 box seems really small to be hauling plywood sheets and construction lumber. Anyone have experience with this? Thanks.

    I bought the truck, a 2022 hybrid F150. One of the things I really like about it is that it has a 7.4 kW generator that powers outlets inside and outside the truck. It has three 120V outlets and a 240V outlet. It draws from the battery and starts up if
    it needs to charge.

    The 5.5 box is pretty short though.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Michael@21:1/5 to Bill on Sun Jan 22 21:22:20 2023
    On Sunday, January 22, 2023 at 9:53:06 PM UTC-6, Bill wrote:
    On 1/22/2023 10:44 PM, Michael wrote:
    On Wednesday, January 11, 2023 at 9:50:39 AM UTC-6, Michael wrote:
    I'm getting a good deal on an F150, but a 5.5 box seems really small to be hauling plywood sheets and construction lumber. Anyone have experience with this? Thanks.

    I bought the truck, a 2022 hybrid F150. One of the things I really like about it is that it has a 7.4 kW generator that powers outlets inside and outside the truck. It has three 120V outlets and a 240V outlet. It draws from the battery and starts up
    if it needs to charge.

    The 5.5 box is pretty short though.
    Just curious, what happens if you turn on the heater (or A/C)?
    I haven't even ridden in an EV yet.

    It's not an actual EV. It's a hybrid so runs primarily on gas, but runs on electric when it can. There are two 120V outlets in the cab, so I assume they work then the heater or AC is on. The five outlets in the bed work when the truck is in "generator"
    mode (trucks automatically runs if the battery needs a charge). I don't know if the heater or AC would work in generator mode. It has good power on the road and rides really smoothly and quietly inside. I've never been much of a bells and whistles person
    because I always had the philosophy that that's just one more thing that could break. But everything, even the gas pedal, according the salesman, is electronic. It makes me nervous but we'll just go for now and see what happens.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Bill@21:1/5 to Michael on Mon Jan 23 02:08:43 2023
    On 1/23/2023 12:22 AM, Michael wrote:
    On Sunday, January 22, 2023 at 9:53:06 PM UTC-6, Bill wrote:
    On 1/22/2023 10:44 PM, Michael wrote:
    On Wednesday, January 11, 2023 at 9:50:39 AM UTC-6, Michael wrote:
    I'm getting a good deal on an F150, but a 5.5 box seems really small to be hauling plywood sheets and construction lumber. Anyone have experience with this? Thanks.

    I bought the truck, a 2022 hybrid F150. One of the things I really like about it is that it has a 7.4 kW generator that powers outlets inside and outside the truck. It has three 120V outlets and a 240V outlet. It draws from the battery and starts up
    if it needs to charge.

    The 5.5 box is pretty short though.
    Just curious, what happens if you turn on the heater (or A/C)?
    I haven't even ridden in an EV yet.

    It's not an actual EV. It's a hybrid so runs primarily on gas, but runs on electric when it can. There are two 120V outlets in the cab, so I assume they work then the heater or AC is on. The five outlets in the bed work when the truck is in "generator"
    mode (trucks automatically runs if the battery needs a charge). I don't know if the heater or AC would work in generator mode. It has good power on the road and rides really smoothly and quietly inside. I've never been much of a bells and whistles
    person because I always had the philosophy that that's just one more thing that could break. But everything, even the gas pedal, according the salesman, is electronic. It makes me nervous but we'll just go for now and see what happens.

    Thank you for your explanation. It is insightful. I'm like you, I'm a
    little nervous of the technology, but I'll be watching to see what
    happens. I'm "afraid" of "expensive batteries" and things like that.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Michael Trew@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Mon Jan 23 23:06:25 2023
    On 1/18/2023 0:34, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Tue, 17 Jan 2023 15:34:00 -0500, Michael Trew wrote:

    Me, I buy cheap old trucks, and use them primarily for utility. I,
    personally, would not buy a full-size truck with any shorter than an 8'
    bed, where 4X8' sheets could lay flat between the wheel wells, with the
    tailgate shut. 5.5' bed seems *way* too small to me; might as well have
    an SUV or van at that point.

    If the truck is your primary vehicle, and you need a back seat (without
    a huge cab), you might feel differently. I'm fine with a single cab 8'
    bed since the truck is a secondary vehicle for me.

    An 8' bed with a standard cab is OK but with an extended cab or crew
    cab, the vehicle is simply too long. It would be impossible to park.
    I wouldn't have a standard cab, so it's a 6-1/2' cab.

    I saw a RR work truck the other day that had a crew cab and 8' bed. It
    looked as long as a bus.

    I've driven one of those crew cab w/ 8' bed trucks before; an early 80's
    F-250. That was a lot of truck, but it wasn't terrible to drive. I'm
    fairly used to switching vehicles. I got the hang of parallel parking
    my '64 Olds 88 (boat-size) pretty quickly.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Leon@21:1/5 to Michael Trew on Tue Jan 24 08:35:19 2023
    On 1/23/2023 10:06 PM, Michael Trew wrote:
    On 1/18/2023 0:34, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Tue, 17 Jan 2023 15:34:00 -0500, Michael Trew  wrote:

    Me, I buy cheap old trucks, and use them primarily for utility.  I,
    personally, would not buy a full-size truck with any shorter than an 8'
    bed, where 4X8' sheets could lay flat between the wheel wells, with the
    tailgate shut.  5.5' bed seems *way* too small to me; might as well have >>> an SUV or van at that point.

    If the truck is your primary vehicle, and you need a back seat (without
    a huge cab), you might feel differently.  I'm fine with a single cab 8' >>> bed since the truck is a secondary vehicle for me.

    An 8' bed with a standard cab is OK but with an extended cab or crew
    cab, the vehicle is simply too long.  It would be impossible to park.
    I wouldn't have a standard cab, so it's a 6-1/2' cab.

    I saw a RR work truck the other day that had a crew cab and 8' bed. It
    looked as long as a bus.

    I've driven one of those crew cab w/ 8' bed trucks before; an early 80's F-250.  That was a lot of truck, but it wasn't terrible to drive.  I'm fairly used to switching vehicles.  I got the hang of parallel parking
    my '64 Olds 88 (boat-size) pretty quickly.


    Driving one of those crew cab long beds is not the issue. It's parking
    one in a parking lot and especially with straight in parking.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From hubops@ccanoemail.com@21:1/5 to All on Tue Jan 24 11:05:51 2023
    On Tue, 24 Jan 2023 08:35:19 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/23/2023 10:06 PM, Michael Trew wrote:
    On 1/18/2023 0:34, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Tue, 17 Jan 2023 15:34:00 -0500, Michael Trew† wrote:

    Me, I buy cheap old trucks, and use them primarily for utility.† I,
    personally, would not buy a full-size truck with any shorter than an 8' >>>> bed, where 4X8' sheets could lay flat between the wheel wells, with the >>>> tailgate shut.† 5.5' bed seems *way* too small to me; might as well have >>>> an SUV or van at that point.

    If the truck is your primary vehicle, and you need a back seat (without >>>> a huge cab), you might feel differently.† I'm fine with a single cab 8' >>>> bed since the truck is a secondary vehicle for me.

    An 8' bed with a standard cab is OK but with an extended cab or crew
    cab, the vehicle is simply too long.† It would be impossible to park.
    I wouldn't have a standard cab, so it's a 6-1/2' cab.

    I saw a RR work truck the other day that had a crew cab and 8' bed. It
    looked as long as a bus.

    I've driven one of those crew cab w/ 8' bed trucks before; an early 80's
    F-250.† That was a lot of truck, but it wasn't terrible to drive.† I'm
    fairly used to switching vehicles.† I got the hang of parallel parking
    my '64 Olds 88 (boat-size) pretty quickly.


    Driving one of those crew cab long beds is not the issue. It's parking
    one in a parking lot and especially with straight in parking.


    .. don't forget the pintle hitch sticking out at the back ! :-)
    When my son was working-through-college doing landscape
    construction - he had more-than-one driver drive into his hitch
    at red lights ... then try to blame him for it sticking out ..
    This was a small dump truck rather than a pick-up.
    John T.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Leon@21:1/5 to hubops@ccanoemail.com on Tue Jan 24 12:06:58 2023
    On 1/24/2023 10:05 AM, hubops@ccanoemail.com wrote:
    On Tue, 24 Jan 2023 08:35:19 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/23/2023 10:06 PM, Michael Trew wrote:
    On 1/18/2023 0:34, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Tue, 17 Jan 2023 15:34:00 -0500, Michael Trew  wrote:

    Me, I buy cheap old trucks, and use them primarily for utility.  I, >>>>> personally, would not buy a full-size truck with any shorter than an 8' >>>>> bed, where 4X8' sheets could lay flat between the wheel wells, with the >>>>> tailgate shut.  5.5' bed seems *way* too small to me; might as well have >>>>> an SUV or van at that point.

    If the truck is your primary vehicle, and you need a back seat (without >>>>> a huge cab), you might feel differently.  I'm fine with a single cab 8' >>>>> bed since the truck is a secondary vehicle for me.

    An 8' bed with a standard cab is OK but with an extended cab or crew
    cab, the vehicle is simply too long.  It would be impossible to park. >>>> I wouldn't have a standard cab, so it's a 6-1/2' cab.

    I saw a RR work truck the other day that had a crew cab and 8' bed. It >>>> looked as long as a bus.

    I've driven one of those crew cab w/ 8' bed trucks before; an early 80's >>> F-250.  That was a lot of truck, but it wasn't terrible to drive.  I'm >>> fairly used to switching vehicles.  I got the hang of parallel parking
    my '64 Olds 88 (boat-size) pretty quickly.


    Driving one of those crew cab long beds is not the issue. It's parking
    one in a parking lot and especially with straight in parking.


    .. don't forget the pintle hitch sticking out at the back ! :-)
    When my son was working-through-college doing landscape
    construction - he had more-than-one driver drive into his hitch
    at red lights ... then try to blame him for it sticking out ..
    This was a small dump truck rather than a pick-up.
    John T.


    The person at fault always tries to blame some one other than
    themselves. Seriously, if you hit a hitch you are at fault for not
    controlling your vehicle. My truck has one, its my bumper guard.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Scott Lurndal@21:1/5 to Leon on Tue Jan 24 18:53:16 2023
    Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> writes:
    On 1/24/2023 10:05 AM, hubops@ccanoemail.com wrote:
    On Tue, 24 Jan 2023 08:35:19 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/23/2023 10:06 PM, Michael Trew wrote:
    On 1/18/2023 0:34, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Tue, 17 Jan 2023 15:34:00 -0500, Michael Trew  wrote:

    Me, I buy cheap old trucks, and use them primarily for utility.  I, >>>>>> personally, would not buy a full-size truck with any shorter than an 8' >>>>>> bed, where 4X8' sheets could lay flat between the wheel wells, with the >>>>>> tailgate shut.  5.5' bed seems *way* too small to me; might as well have
    an SUV or van at that point.

    If the truck is your primary vehicle, and you need a back seat (without >>>>>> a huge cab), you might feel differently.  I'm fine with a single cab 8' >>>>>> bed since the truck is a secondary vehicle for me.

    An 8' bed with a standard cab is OK but with an extended cab or crew >>>>> cab, the vehicle is simply too long.  It would be impossible to park. >>>>> I wouldn't have a standard cab, so it's a 6-1/2' cab.

    I saw a RR work truck the other day that had a crew cab and 8' bed. It >>>>> looked as long as a bus.

    I've driven one of those crew cab w/ 8' bed trucks before; an early 80's >>>> F-250.  That was a lot of truck, but it wasn't terrible to drive.  I'm >>>> fairly used to switching vehicles.  I got the hang of parallel parking >>>> my '64 Olds 88 (boat-size) pretty quickly.


    Driving one of those crew cab long beds is not the issue. It's parking >>> one in a parking lot and especially with straight in parking.


    .. don't forget the pintle hitch sticking out at the back ! :-)
    When my son was working-through-college doing landscape
    construction - he had more-than-one driver drive into his hitch
    at red lights ... then try to blame him for it sticking out ..
    This was a small dump truck rather than a pick-up.
    John T.


    The person at fault always tries to blame some one other than
    themselves. Seriously, if you hit a hitch you are at fault for not >controlling your vehicle. My truck has one, its my bumper guard.

    It is pretty much universal that in a rear-end collision, the
    fault is with vehicle following too
    closely, not driving attentively, (or forgetting to engage autopilot :-).

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From hubops@ccanoemail.com@21:1/5 to All on Tue Jan 24 14:18:54 2023
    On Tue, 24 Jan 2023 18:53:16 GMT, scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal)
    wrote:

    Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> writes:
    On 1/24/2023 10:05 AM, hubops@ccanoemail.com wrote:
    On Tue, 24 Jan 2023 08:35:19 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/23/2023 10:06 PM, Michael Trew wrote:
    On 1/18/2023 0:34, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Tue, 17 Jan 2023 15:34:00 -0500, Michael Trew  wrote:

    Me, I buy cheap old trucks, and use them primarily for utility.  I, >>>>>>> personally, would not buy a full-size truck with any shorter than an 8' >>>>>>> bed, where 4X8' sheets could lay flat between the wheel wells, with the >>>>>>> tailgate shut.  5.5' bed seems *way* too small to me; might as well have
    an SUV or van at that point.

    If the truck is your primary vehicle, and you need a back seat (without >>>>>>> a huge cab), you might feel differently.  I'm fine with a single cab 8'
    bed since the truck is a secondary vehicle for me.

    An 8' bed with a standard cab is OK but with an extended cab or crew >>>>>> cab, the vehicle is simply too long.  It would be impossible to park. >>>>>> I wouldn't have a standard cab, so it's a 6-1/2' cab.

    I saw a RR work truck the other day that had a crew cab and 8' bed. It >>>>>> looked as long as a bus.

    I've driven one of those crew cab w/ 8' bed trucks before; an early 80's >>>>> F-250.  That was a lot of truck, but it wasn't terrible to drive.  I'm >>>>> fairly used to switching vehicles.  I got the hang of parallel parking >>>>> my '64 Olds 88 (boat-size) pretty quickly.


    Driving one of those crew cab long beds is not the issue. It's parking >>>> one in a parking lot and especially with straight in parking.


    .. don't forget the pintle hitch sticking out at the back ! :-)
    When my son was working-through-college doing landscape
    construction - he had more-than-one driver drive into his hitch
    at red lights ... then try to blame him for it sticking out ..
    This was a small dump truck rather than a pick-up.
    John T.


    The person at fault always tries to blame some one other than
    themselves. Seriously, if you hit a hitch you are at fault for not >>controlling your vehicle. My truck has one, its my bumper guard.

    It is pretty much universal that in a rear-end collision, the
    fault is with vehicle following too
    closely, not driving attentively, (or forgetting to engage autopilot :-).


    Yep.
    Years ago, the police were in the habit of issuing 2 charges
    to the at-fault driver - and - depending on circumstances -
    the prosecuter would often bargain it for a guilty plea
    on 1 of them. .. to save a trial.
    Careless driving & following too close ..
    John T.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DerbyDad03@21:1/5 to hub...@ccanoemail.com on Tue Jan 24 17:25:09 2023
    On Tuesday, January 24, 2023 at 2:18:59 PM UTC-5, hub...@ccanoemail.com wrote:
    On Tue, 24 Jan 2023 18:53:16 GMT, sc...@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal)
    wrote:
    Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> writes:
    On 1/24/2023 10:05 AM, hub...@ccanoemail.com wrote:
    On Tue, 24 Jan 2023 08:35:19 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/23/2023 10:06 PM, Michael Trew wrote:
    On 1/18/2023 0:34, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Tue, 17 Jan 2023 15:34:00 -0500, Michael Trew wrote:

    Me, I buy cheap old trucks, and use them primarily for utility. I, >>>>>>> personally, would not buy a full-size truck with any shorter than an 8'
    bed, where 4X8' sheets could lay flat between the wheel wells, with the
    tailgate shut. 5.5' bed seems *way* too small to me; might as well have
    an SUV or van at that point.

    If the truck is your primary vehicle, and you need a back seat (without
    a huge cab), you might feel differently. I'm fine with a single cab 8'
    bed since the truck is a secondary vehicle for me.

    An 8' bed with a standard cab is OK but with an extended cab or crew >>>>>> cab, the vehicle is simply too long. It would be impossible to park. >>>>>> I wouldn't have a standard cab, so it's a 6-1/2' cab.

    I saw a RR work truck the other day that had a crew cab and 8' bed. It >>>>>> looked as long as a bus.

    I've driven one of those crew cab w/ 8' bed trucks before; an early 80's
    F-250. That was a lot of truck, but it wasn't terrible to drive. I'm >>>>> fairly used to switching vehicles. I got the hang of parallel parking >>>>> my '64 Olds 88 (boat-size) pretty quickly.


    Driving one of those crew cab long beds is not the issue. It's parking >>>> one in a parking lot and especially with straight in parking.


    .. don't forget the pintle hitch sticking out at the back ! :-)
    When my son was working-through-college doing landscape
    construction - he had more-than-one driver drive into his hitch
    at red lights ... then try to blame him for it sticking out ..
    This was a small dump truck rather than a pick-up.
    John T.


    The person at fault always tries to blame some one other than
    themselves. Seriously, if you hit a hitch you are at fault for not >>controlling your vehicle. My truck has one, its my bumper guard.

    It is pretty much universal that in a rear-end collision, the
    fault is with vehicle following too
    closely, not driving attentively, (or forgetting to engage autopilot :-).

    Yep.
    Years ago, the police were in the habit of issuing 2 charges
    to the at-fault driver - and - depending on circumstances -
    the prosecuter would often bargain it for a guilty plea
    on 1 of them. .. to save a trial.
    Careless driving & following too close ..
    John T.

    I've been pulled over for speeding twice.

    Once was in a brand new rental car - less than 1K miles on it. I was
    ticketed for a bald tire and a noisy muffler. I pled guilty and mailed in
    the fine. ;-)

    The other time was in the Dodge Ram conversion van I drove when
    my kids were racing Soap Box Derby. I had *clear* Plexiglas over the
    my personalized license plates (DERBYDAD, of course). I got ticketed
    for an obstructed license plate. Mailed that one in too.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Michael Trew@21:1/5 to All on Thu Jan 26 19:25:52 2023
    On 1/24/2023 20:25, DerbyDad03 wrote:
    On Tuesday, January 24, 2023 at 2:18:59 PM UTC-5, hub...@ccanoemail.com wrote:

    Years ago, the police were in the habit of issuing 2 charges
    to the at-fault driver - and - depending on circumstances -
    the prosecuter would often bargain it for a guilty plea
    on 1 of them. .. to save a trial.
    Careless driving& following too close ..
    John T.

    I've been pulled over for speeding twice.

    Once was in a brand new rental car - less than 1K miles on it. I was
    ticketed for a bald tire and a noisy muffler. I pled guilty and mailed in
    the fine. ;-)

    Why? None of that would be your fault; especially not in a rental.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Scott Lurndal@21:1/5 to Michael Trew on Fri Jan 27 15:18:33 2023
    Michael Trew <michael.trew@att.net> writes:
    On 1/24/2023 20:25, DerbyDad03 wrote:
    On Tuesday, January 24, 2023 at 2:18:59 PM UTC-5, hub...@ccanoemail.com wrote:

    Years ago, the police were in the habit of issuing 2 charges
    to the at-fault driver - and - depending on circumstances -
    the prosecuter would often bargain it for a guilty plea
    on 1 of them. .. to save a trial.
    Careless driving& following too close ..
    John T.

    I've been pulled over for speeding twice.

    Once was in a brand new rental car - less than 1K miles on it. I was
    ticketed for a bald tire and a noisy muffler. I pled guilty and mailed in
    the fine. ;-)

    Why? None of that would be your fault; especially not in a rental.

    The officer was kind enough (or the c-note wrapped around the DL) to
    write the ticket for a non-moving-violation so Derby's insurance
    rate wouldn't rise.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DerbyDad03@21:1/5 to Scott Lurndal on Fri Jan 27 19:05:38 2023
    On Friday, January 27, 2023 at 10:18:38 AM UTC-5, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    Michael Trew <michae...@att.net> writes:
    On 1/24/2023 20:25, DerbyDad03 wrote:
    On Tuesday, January 24, 2023 at 2:18:59 PM UTC-5, hub...@ccanoemail.com wrote:

    Years ago, the police were in the habit of issuing 2 charges
    to the at-fault driver - and - depending on circumstances -
    the prosecuter would often bargain it for a guilty plea
    on 1 of them. .. to save a trial.
    Careless driving& following too close ..
    John T.

    I've been pulled over for speeding twice.

    Once was in a brand new rental car - less than 1K miles on it. I was
    ticketed for a bald tire and a noisy muffler. I pled guilty and mailed in >> the fine. ;-)

    Why? None of that would be your fault; especially not in a rental.
    The officer was kind enough (or the c-note wrapped around the DL) to
    write the ticket for a non-moving-violation so Derby's insurance
    rate wouldn't rise.

    No points on my license either, and a relatively cheap fine.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)