• Re: Advice needed on painting outdoor teak furniture.

    From nancy@21:1/5 to All on Sat Dec 3 19:01:28 2022
    5 years ago I painted a teak loveseat rocker and table on my front outdoor porch. Everyone advised me not to. It was a big job - cleaning, sanding, laquer primer and 2 coats of paint. It still looks beautiful I'm so happy I did it. Could be because
    the set was over 5 years old and had no or little teak oils left in it - but it is still gorgeous 5 years later.

    --
    For full context, visit https://www.homeownershub.com/construction/gfci-operation-question-1337-.htm

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  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to 8fb10b326339ef2912a0542ac031b2d0@ex on Sat Dec 3 21:03:14 2022
    On Sat, 03 Dec 2022 19:01:28 +0000, nancy <8fb10b326339ef2912a0542ac031b2d0@example.com> wrote:

    5 years ago I painted a teak loveseat rocker and table on my front outdoor porch. Everyone advised me not to. It was a big job - cleaning, sanding, laquer primer and 2 coats of paint. It still looks beautiful I'm so happy I did it. Could be because
    the set was over 5 years old and had no or little teak oils left in it - but it is still gorgeous 5 years later.

    Did you paint your cherry dresser red, too? BTW, nice troll. Back to
    your bridge.

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  • From Markem618@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Sun Dec 4 14:27:18 2022
    On Sat, 03 Dec 2022 21:03:14 -0500, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    Did you paint your cherry dresser red, too? BTW, nice troll. Back to
    your bridge.

    Our defender

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  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to All on Sun Dec 4 20:58:02 2022
    On Sun, 04 Dec 2022 14:27:18 -0600, Markem618 <markrm618@hotmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Sat, 03 Dec 2022 21:03:14 -0500, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    Did you paint your cherry dresser red, too? BTW, nice troll. Back to
    your bridge.

    Our defender

    Did you click the link? Idiot.

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  • From Markem618@21:1/5 to ritzannaseaton@gmail.com on Sun Dec 4 20:57:42 2022
    On Sun, 4 Dec 2022 18:28:25 -0800 (PST), "russellseaton1@yahoo.com" <ritzannaseaton@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Sunday, December 4, 2022 at 7:58:06 PM UTC-6, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 04 Dec 2022 14:27:18 -0600, Markem618 <mark...@hotmail.com>
    wrote:
    On Sat, 03 Dec 2022 21:03:14 -0500, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    Did you paint your cherry dresser red, too? BTW, nice troll. Back to
    your bridge.

    Our defender
    Did you click the link? Idiot.


    Disregarding the potential dispute going on. I see the link to a website at the bottom of the original post. And agree that is uncalled for in a public forum. But back to the original post. Why would you paint teak? I think teak is naturally
    resistant to everything. So paint is not needed for preservation. Kind of like titanium for bicycles. Titanium when used to make a bicycle frame is usually left unpainted. Raw color. Which is kind of gray, gold color. But some frame makers do add
    accent panels with paint. Most of the frame is raw titanium with some small painted panels to add color and prettiness to the frame.

    Why would you paint teak? If you don't like the dark brown, black color, then why did you buy it in the first place? That is teak's natural color. If you wanted a different color then you could go with cedar. Or furniture is made out of plastic,
    like that plastic decking that never needs staining or paint or anything. Paint does provide weather resistance. But teak already has that naturally. So why not go with something much much much cheaper if you want paint. If you want orange or red or
    yellow deck furniture, then buy something much cheaper and paint it. Kind of goofy to spend a thousand dollars on teak and then an extra hundred to paint it. Just spend a hundred on pine and a hundred on paint.

    Back when the 4th Fighter wing was to change over to F 15s, they took
    all the tools and stripped them of chrome. Do titanium bike frames
    suffer from chrome causing corrosion.

    Answer to why paint it is because she wanted to. I would have just
    used a teak oil over the greyed teak.

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  • From Markem618@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Sun Dec 4 20:51:25 2022
    On Sun, 04 Dec 2022 20:58:02 -0500, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    On Sun, 04 Dec 2022 14:27:18 -0600, Markem618 <markrm618@hotmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Sat, 03 Dec 2022 21:03:14 -0500, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    Did you paint your cherry dresser red, too? BTW, nice troll. Back to >>>your bridge.

    Our defender

    Did you click the link? Idiot.

    No I clipped the link! Why would I venture to the ad filled site? I
    get it for $2.95 a month.

    Our defender The Man of La Macha Alabama.

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  • From ritzannaseaton@gmail.com@21:1/5 to k...@notreal.com on Sun Dec 4 18:28:25 2022
    On Sunday, December 4, 2022 at 7:58:06 PM UTC-6, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 04 Dec 2022 14:27:18 -0600, Markem618 <mark...@hotmail.com>
    wrote:
    On Sat, 03 Dec 2022 21:03:14 -0500, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    Did you paint your cherry dresser red, too? BTW, nice troll. Back to >>your bridge.

    Our defender
    Did you click the link? Idiot.


    Disregarding the potential dispute going on. I see the link to a website at the bottom of the original post. And agree that is uncalled for in a public forum. But back to the original post. Why would you paint teak? I think teak is naturally
    resistant to everything. So paint is not needed for preservation. Kind of like titanium for bicycles. Titanium when used to make a bicycle frame is usually left unpainted. Raw color. Which is kind of gray, gold color. But some frame makers do add
    accent panels with paint. Most of the frame is raw titanium with some small painted panels to add color and prettiness to the frame.

    Why would you paint teak? If you don't like the dark brown, black color, then why did you buy it in the first place? That is teak's natural color. If you wanted a different color then you could go with cedar. Or furniture is made out of plastic, like
    that plastic decking that never needs staining or paint or anything. Paint does provide weather resistance. But teak already has that naturally. So why not go with something much much much cheaper if you want paint. If you want orange or red or
    yellow deck furniture, then buy something much cheaper and paint it. Kind of goofy to spend a thousand dollars on teak and then an extra hundred to paint it. Just spend a hundred on pine and a hundred on paint.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From DerbyDad03@21:1/5 to russellseaton1@yahoo.com on Mon Dec 5 00:53:54 2022
    On Sunday, December 4, 2022 at 9:28:28 PM UTC-5, russellseaton1@yahoo.com wrote:
    On Sunday, December 4, 2022 at 7:58:06 PM UTC-6, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 04 Dec 2022 14:27:18 -0600, Markem618 <mark...@hotmail.com>
    wrote:
    On Sat, 03 Dec 2022 21:03:14 -0500, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    Did you paint your cherry dresser red, too? BTW, nice troll. Back to >>your bridge.

    Our defender
    Did you click the link? Idiot.
    Disregarding the potential dispute going on. I see the link to a website at the bottom of the original post. And agree that is uncalled for in a public forum. But back to the original post. Why would you paint teak? I think teak is naturally resistant
    to everything. So paint is not needed for preservation. Kind of like titanium for bicycles. Titanium when used to make a bicycle frame is usually left unpainted. Raw color. Which is kind of gray, gold color. But some frame makers do add accent panels
    with paint. Most of the frame is raw titanium with some small painted panels to add color and prettiness to the frame.

    Why would you paint teak? If you don't like the dark brown, black color, then why did you buy it in the first place? That is teak's natural color. If you wanted a different color then you could go with cedar. Or furniture is made out of plastic, like
    that plastic decking that never needs staining or paint or anything. Paint does provide weather resistance. But teak already has that naturally. So why not go with something much much much cheaper if you want paint. If you want orange or red or yellow
    deck furniture, then buy something much cheaper and paint it. Kind of goofy to spend a thousand dollars on teak and then an extra hundred to paint it. Just spend a hundred on pine and a hundred on paint.

    Perhaps the design of the piece fit the OP’s decor/desires but the color did not.
    The OP did not say that she built then painted the piece, she simply said that she
    painted it.

    She also didn’t say that she spent thousands on it. Perhaps she inherited it.
    Perhaps it was a curb find or Craigslist/estate sale item. She did say that she cleaned/sanded it, so apparently it was not new.

    We don’t know enough to suggest other options (plastic or pine) because we don’t why she painted it. Asking the question is fine…maybe we’ll find out, but I
    doubt it. Posts that are ported to the wRec from HOH by their automated system rarely have much follow up from the OP.

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  • From Leon@21:1/5 to nancy on Mon Dec 5 08:39:14 2022
    On 12/3/2022 1:01 PM, nancy wrote:
    5 years ago I painted a teak loveseat rocker and table on my front
    outdoor porch.  Everyone advised me not to.  It was a big job -
    cleaning, sanding, laquer primer and 2 coats of paint.  It still looks beautiful  I'm so happy I did it.  Could be because the set was over 5 years old and had no or little teak oils left in it - but it is still gorgeous 5 years later.



    If you thought that was work, wait till you grow tired of the color and
    want to restore the natural finish.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From ritzannaseaton@gmail.com@21:1/5 to All on Mon Dec 5 12:18:35 2022
    On Sunday, December 4, 2022 at 8:57:52 PM UTC-6, Markem618 wrote:
    On Sun, 4 Dec 2022 18:28:25 -0800 (PST), "russell...@yahoo.com" <ritzann...@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Sunday, December 4, 2022 at 7:58:06 PM UTC-6, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 04 Dec 2022 14:27:18 -0600, Markem618 <mark...@hotmail.com>
    wrote:
    On Sat, 03 Dec 2022 21:03:14 -0500, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    Did you paint your cherry dresser red, too? BTW, nice troll. Back to
    your bridge.

    Our defender
    Did you click the link? Idiot.


    Disregarding the potential dispute going on. I see the link to a website at the bottom of the original post. And agree that is uncalled for in a public forum. But back to the original post. Why would you paint teak? I think teak is naturally resistant
    to everything. So paint is not needed for preservation. Kind of like titanium for bicycles. Titanium when used to make a bicycle frame is usually left unpainted. Raw color. Which is kind of gray, gold color. But some frame makers do add accent panels
    with paint. Most of the frame is raw titanium with some small painted panels to add color and prettiness to the frame.

    Why would you paint teak? If you don't like the dark brown, black color, then why did you buy it in the first place? That is teak's natural color. If you wanted a different color then you could go with cedar. Or furniture is made out of plastic, like
    that plastic decking that never needs staining or paint or anything. Paint does provide weather resistance. But teak already has that naturally. So why not go with something much much much cheaper if you want paint. If you want orange or red or yellow
    deck furniture, then buy something much cheaper and paint it. Kind of goofy to spend a thousand dollars on teak and then an extra hundred to paint it. Just spend a hundred on pine and a hundred on paint.
    Back when the 4th Fighter wing was to change over to F 15s, they took
    all the tools and stripped them of chrome. Do titanium bike frames
    suffer from chrome causing corrosion.

    Answer to why paint it is because she wanted to. I would have just
    used a teak oil over the greyed teak.

    Concerning titanium, its inert to everything. So no practical reason to paint it. But some frames are painted. Usually with accent panels on the frame. Add some color. Titanium in its raw form is kind of grayish. Not a real exciting color.
    Titanium is used for bicycle frames for its corrosion resistance, and lighter weight than steel. And sort of extra strength. I say sort of because titanium is weaker than steel. But its lighter weight than steel. So you can use more titanium volume,
    but end up with less weight, and equal to steel in strength. Or even stronger strength. And end up with a good bike. Titanium is also a lot more expensive too. Plusses and minuses. BUT, if you want to paint titanium, then its better to use aluminum.
    Which is much lighter weight, and cheaper. And if you use enough aluminum to get the same strength as steel or titanium, it will still be lighter weight. Everyone paints aluminum. Although I guess you might not need to since aluminum is also anti
    corrosion. But aluminum does oxidize. So everyone paints aluminum. And everyone paints steel too of course. But it does not make sense to paint titanium. Except smaller panels for accents. Add some prettiness to the dull gray titanium color. There
    are cheaper and lighter and easier to work with alternatives to titanium if you want to paint the frame. Titanium is also very difficult to weld and bend.

    Kind of like teak. If you want to paint teak, then why not just use a cheaper wood to begin with and paint it. Or kind of like a Rolex watch. If you keep your Rolex locked away in a safe and unseen by human eyes and only wear your Timex, what is the
    point of buying the Rolex. Or you buy every single tool in the Festool, Mafell, Fein, and Lamello catalog. But keep them locked away in the basement because you don't want to get them dirty. Why buy them?

    Regarding the chrome causing corrosion. I would say no since there are chrome bolts holding the water bottle cages on and chrome clamps/bolts around the seattube, and chrome quick releases holding the wheels on. All touching the titanium frame. No
    corrosion in any of these places.

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  • From ritzannaseaton@gmail.com@21:1/5 to russellseaton1@yahoo.com on Mon Dec 5 12:28:09 2022
    On Monday, December 5, 2022 at 2:21:35 PM UTC-6, russellseaton1@yahoo.com wrote:
    On Monday, December 5, 2022 at 8:39:21 AM UTC-6, Leon wrote:
    On 12/3/2022 1:01 PM, nancy wrote:
    5 years ago I painted a teak loveseat rocker and table on my front outdoor porch. Everyone advised me not to. It was a big job -
    cleaning, sanding, laquer primer and 2 coats of paint. It still looks beautiful I'm so happy I did it. Could be because the set was over 5 years old and had no or little teak oils left in it - but it is still gorgeous 5 years later.

    If you thought that was work, wait till you grow tired of the color and want to restore the natural finish.
    Could you restore the teak to its natural color/finish by using paint stripper to remove the paint? Is teak immune from harm by paint stripper? Then you would probably need to re-sand the whole thing, and then apply oil to bring back the natural teak
    look. Would that work?

    I should also add I am vaguely aware of how paint stripper works. You wipe it on, let it sit for awhile, then use a putty knife, scraper, wire brush, to rub and dig the paint off the wood. Paint stripper does not automatically make the paint disappear.
    Wipe on, wipe off, and everything is sunny and happy in the world. Paint stripper requires lots of hard work to use.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Scott Lurndal@21:1/5 to Leon on Mon Dec 5 21:10:11 2022
    Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> writes:
    On 12/5/2022 2:21 PM, russellseaton1@yahoo.com wrote:
    On Monday, December 5, 2022 at 8:39:21 AM UTC-6, Leon wrote:
    On 12/3/2022 1:01 PM, nancy wrote:
    5 years ago I painted a teak loveseat rocker and table on my front
    outdoor porch. Everyone advised me not to. It was a big job -
    cleaning, sanding, laquer primer and 2 coats of paint. It still looks >>>> beautiful I'm so happy I did it. Could be because the set was over 5 >>>> years old and had no or little teak oils left in it - but it is still
    gorgeous 5 years later.

    If you thought that was work, wait till you grow tired of the color and
    want to restore the natural finish.

    Could you restore the teak to its natural color/finish by using paint stripper to remove the paint? Is teak immune from harm by paint stripper? Then you would probably need to re-sand the whole thing, and then apply oil to bring back the natural
    teak look. Would that work?


    All above would help to remove the paint but I highly suspect that the >sanding that was done before painting did not get into all of the
    cracks, the paint covered that.

    But restoring a natural finish the paint will be difficult to remove
    from all of the cracks.

    The OP was pleased with her painted teak chairs. That's really all that matters, regardless of opinions about painting teak (or cherry, for that matter).

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From ritzannaseaton@gmail.com@21:1/5 to Leon on Mon Dec 5 12:21:32 2022
    On Monday, December 5, 2022 at 8:39:21 AM UTC-6, Leon wrote:
    On 12/3/2022 1:01 PM, nancy wrote:
    5 years ago I painted a teak loveseat rocker and table on my front
    outdoor porch. Everyone advised me not to. It was a big job -
    cleaning, sanding, laquer primer and 2 coats of paint. It still looks beautiful I'm so happy I did it. Could be because the set was over 5 years old and had no or little teak oils left in it - but it is still gorgeous 5 years later.

    If you thought that was work, wait till you grow tired of the color and
    want to restore the natural finish.

    Could you restore the teak to its natural color/finish by using paint stripper to remove the paint? Is teak immune from harm by paint stripper? Then you would probably need to re-sand the whole thing, and then apply oil to bring back the natural teak
    look. Would that work?

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Markem618@21:1/5 to ritzannaseaton@gmail.com on Mon Dec 5 15:04:56 2022
    On Mon, 5 Dec 2022 12:18:35 -0800 (PST), "russellseaton1@yahoo.com" <ritzannaseaton@gmail.com> wrote:

    Regarding the chrome causing corrosion. I would say no since there are chrome bolts holding the water bottle cages on and chrome clamps/bolts around the seattube, and chrome quick releases holding the wheels on. All touching the titanium frame. No
    corrosion in any of these places.

    The orders were given from up on high, whether those were based on
    real science do not know. In general an E4 does what you tell them to.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Leon@21:1/5 to russellseaton1@yahoo.com on Mon Dec 5 14:43:14 2022
    On 12/5/2022 2:21 PM, russellseaton1@yahoo.com wrote:
    On Monday, December 5, 2022 at 8:39:21 AM UTC-6, Leon wrote:
    On 12/3/2022 1:01 PM, nancy wrote:
    5 years ago I painted a teak loveseat rocker and table on my front
    outdoor porch. Everyone advised me not to. It was a big job -
    cleaning, sanding, laquer primer and 2 coats of paint. It still looks
    beautiful I'm so happy I did it. Could be because the set was over 5
    years old and had no or little teak oils left in it - but it is still
    gorgeous 5 years later.

    If you thought that was work, wait till you grow tired of the color and
    want to restore the natural finish.

    Could you restore the teak to its natural color/finish by using paint stripper to remove the paint? Is teak immune from harm by paint stripper? Then you would probably need to re-sand the whole thing, and then apply oil to bring back the natural teak
    look. Would that work?


    All above would help to remove the paint but I highly suspect that the
    sanding that was done before painting did not get into all of the
    cracks, the paint covered that.

    But restoring a natural finish the paint will be difficult to remove
    from all of the cracks.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Leon@21:1/5 to Scott Lurndal on Mon Dec 5 15:51:15 2022
    On 12/5/2022 3:10 PM, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> writes:
    On 12/5/2022 2:21 PM, russellseaton1@yahoo.com wrote:
    On Monday, December 5, 2022 at 8:39:21 AM UTC-6, Leon wrote:
    On 12/3/2022 1:01 PM, nancy wrote:
    5 years ago I painted a teak loveseat rocker and table on my front
    outdoor porch. Everyone advised me not to. It was a big job -
    cleaning, sanding, laquer primer and 2 coats of paint. It still looks >>>>> beautiful I'm so happy I did it. Could be because the set was over 5 >>>>> years old and had no or little teak oils left in it - but it is still >>>>> gorgeous 5 years later.

    If you thought that was work, wait till you grow tired of the color and >>>> want to restore the natural finish.

    Could you restore the teak to its natural color/finish by using paint stripper to remove the paint? Is teak immune from harm by paint stripper? Then you would probably need to re-sand the whole thing, and then apply oil to bring back the natural
    teak look. Would that work?


    All above would help to remove the paint but I highly suspect that the
    sanding that was done before painting did not get into all of the
    cracks, the paint covered that.

    But restoring a natural finish the paint will be difficult to remove
    from all of the cracks.

    The OP was pleased with her painted teak chairs. That's really all that matters, regardless of opinions about painting teak (or cherry, for that matter).


    Absolutely but people change their minds and this finish will be hard to
    do if the natural look is the next finish of choice.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to Leon on Mon Dec 5 19:34:09 2022
    On Mon, 5 Dec 2022 15:51:15 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 12/5/2022 3:10 PM, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> writes:
    On 12/5/2022 2:21 PM, russellseaton1@yahoo.com wrote:
    On Monday, December 5, 2022 at 8:39:21 AM UTC-6, Leon wrote:
    On 12/3/2022 1:01 PM, nancy wrote:
    5 years ago I painted a teak loveseat rocker and table on my front >>>>>> outdoor porch. Everyone advised me not to. It was a big job -
    cleaning, sanding, laquer primer and 2 coats of paint. It still looks >>>>>> beautiful I'm so happy I did it. Could be because the set was over 5 >>>>>> years old and had no or little teak oils left in it - but it is still >>>>>> gorgeous 5 years later.

    If you thought that was work, wait till you grow tired of the color and >>>>> want to restore the natural finish.

    Could you restore the teak to its natural color/finish by using paint stripper to remove the paint? Is teak immune from harm by paint stripper? Then you would probably need to re-sand the whole thing, and then apply oil to bring back the natural
    teak look. Would that work?


    All above would help to remove the paint but I highly suspect that the
    sanding that was done before painting did not get into all of the
    cracks, the paint covered that.

    But restoring a natural finish the paint will be difficult to remove >>>from all of the cracks.

    The OP was pleased with her painted teak chairs. That's really all that
    matters, regardless of opinions about painting teak (or cherry, for that
    matter).


    Absolutely but people change their minds and this finish will be hard to
    do if the natural look is the next finish of choice.

    Absolutely but still criminal. ;-)

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From ritzannaseaton@gmail.com@21:1/5 to Scott Lurndal on Tue Dec 6 12:28:56 2022
    On Monday, December 5, 2022 at 3:10:16 PM UTC-6, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> writes:
    On 12/5/2022 2:21 PM, russell...@yahoo.com wrote:
    On Monday, December 5, 2022 at 8:39:21 AM UTC-6, Leon wrote:
    On 12/3/2022 1:01 PM, nancy wrote:
    5 years ago I painted a teak loveseat rocker and table on my front
    outdoor porch. Everyone advised me not to. It was a big job -
    cleaning, sanding, laquer primer and 2 coats of paint. It still looks >>>> beautiful I'm so happy I did it. Could be because the set was over 5 >>>> years old and had no or little teak oils left in it - but it is still >>>> gorgeous 5 years later.

    If you thought that was work, wait till you grow tired of the color and >>> want to restore the natural finish.

    Could you restore the teak to its natural color/finish by using paint stripper to remove the paint? Is teak immune from harm by paint stripper? Then you would probably need to re-sand the whole thing, and then apply oil to bring back the natural
    teak look. Would that work?


    All above would help to remove the paint but I highly suspect that the >sanding that was done before painting did not get into all of the
    cracks, the paint covered that.

    But restoring a natural finish the paint will be difficult to remove
    from all of the cracks.
    The OP was pleased with her painted teak chairs. That's really all that matters, regardless of opinions about painting teak (or cherry, for that matter).

    But we can still argue the logic and rationale behind the choice to paint teak chairs. One of the hallmarks of teak is its immunity to water and rot. As well as its look. Teak is very expensive and looks expensive too. When you see teak wood in its
    natural state, you say "that's expensive". So painting teak is illogical. Its already immune to water, so painting teak to protect it from water makes no sense. And paint covers up the fact its teak.

    Kind of like if you plane a piece of wood with your super duper sharp smoothing plane and take a translucent shaving. And then sand the wood with 220 grit or even 320 grit sandpaper. Why? The wood was smoother off the plane than after the paper.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Scott Lurndal@21:1/5 to russellseaton1@yahoo.com on Tue Dec 6 21:05:33 2022
    "russellseaton1@yahoo.com" <ritzannaseaton@gmail.com> writes:
    On Monday, December 5, 2022 at 3:10:16 PM UTC-6, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> writes:=20
    On 12/5/2022 2:21 PM, russell...@yahoo.com wrote:=20
    On Monday, December 5, 2022 at 8:39:21 AM UTC-6, Leon wrote:=20
    On 12/3/2022 1:01 PM, nancy wrote:=20
    5 years ago I painted a teak loveseat rocker and table on my front= >=20
    outdoor porch. Everyone advised me not to. It was a big job -=20
    cleaning, sanding, laquer primer and 2 coats of paint. It still look= >s=20
    beautiful I'm so happy I did it. Could be because the set was over 5= >=20
    years old and had no or little teak oils left in it - but it is stil= >l=20
    gorgeous 5 years later.=20
    =20
    If you thought that was work, wait till you grow tired of the color a= >nd=20
    want to restore the natural finish.=20
    =20
    Could you restore the teak to its natural color/finish by using paint = >stripper to remove the paint? Is teak immune from harm by paint stripper? T= >hen you would probably need to re-sand the whole thing, and then apply oil = >to bring back the natural teak look. Would that work?=20
    =20
    =20
    All above would help to remove the paint but I highly suspect that the= >=20
    sanding that was done before painting did not get into all of the=20
    cracks, the paint covered that.=20
    =20
    But restoring a natural finish the paint will be difficult to remove=20
    from all of the cracks.
    The OP was pleased with her painted teak chairs. That's really all that= >=20
    matters, regardless of opinions about painting teak (or cherry, for that= >=20
    matter).

    But we can still argue the logic and rationale behind the choice to paint t= >eak chairs. One of the hallmarks of teak is its immunity to water and rot.=
    As well as its look. Teak is very expensive and looks expensive too.

    While a typical woodworker might be aware that teak is expensive
    (dalbergia nigra is _very_ expensive), the average homeowner isn't. And
    in this case she wanted to paint an old chair. Who are you to decry
    her choice?

    Once it turns silver-grey, it's a lot of work return teak to its original "expensive" appearance and given any solar exposure, that's going to be
    an ongoing routine. Let her have her painted chair.

    There is no accounting for taste. On either side.

    (I have teak deck & porch, and have replaced the slats in an old cast iron bench with natural teak, so I'm familiar with the labor required to
    keep it "pretty" in an area with 300+ sunny days annually).

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DerbyDad03@21:1/5 to russellseaton1@yahoo.com on Tue Dec 6 15:14:14 2022
    On Tuesday, December 6, 2022 at 3:28:59 PM UTC-5, russellseaton1@yahoo.com wrote:
    On Monday, December 5, 2022 at 3:10:16 PM UTC-6, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> writes:
    On 12/5/2022 2:21 PM, russell...@yahoo.com wrote:
    On Monday, December 5, 2022 at 8:39:21 AM UTC-6, Leon wrote:
    On 12/3/2022 1:01 PM, nancy wrote:
    5 years ago I painted a teak loveseat rocker and table on my front >>>> outdoor porch. Everyone advised me not to. It was a big job -
    cleaning, sanding, laquer primer and 2 coats of paint. It still looks >>>> beautiful I'm so happy I did it. Could be because the set was over 5 >>>> years old and had no or little teak oils left in it - but it is still >>>> gorgeous 5 years later.

    If you thought that was work, wait till you grow tired of the color and
    want to restore the natural finish.

    Could you restore the teak to its natural color/finish by using paint stripper to remove the paint? Is teak immune from harm by paint stripper? Then you would probably need to re-sand the whole thing, and then apply oil to bring back the natural
    teak look. Would that work?


    All above would help to remove the paint but I highly suspect that the >sanding that was done before painting did not get into all of the >cracks, the paint covered that.

    But restoring a natural finish the paint will be difficult to remove >from all of the cracks.
    The OP was pleased with her painted teak chairs. That's really all that matters, regardless of opinions about painting teak (or cherry, for that matter).
    But we can still argue the logic and rationale behind the choice to paint teak chairs. One of the hallmarks of teak is its immunity to water and rot. As well as its look. Teak is very expensive and looks expensive too. When you see teak wood in its
    natural state, you say "that's expensive". So painting teak is illogical. Its already immune to water, so painting teak to protect it from water makes no sense. And paint covers up the fact its teak.

    You can't really argue the logic without knowing the rationale. As I said in my original
    response to you:

    "Perhaps the design of the piece fit the OP’s décor/desires but the color did not."

    Your reasons for not painting teak are all perfectly valid. For all we know (which is
    not much) nancy's reasons *for* painting it may also be perfectly valid. You appear
    to be of the opinion that there is never a reason to paint teak. I don't have that strong
    of an overall, unbending opinion. I'm *not* saying that nancy did the right thing by
    painting it, I'm just saying that until I know *why* she painted it, I can't say that she
    shouldn't have.

    A personal example:

    I built this bench for my adult daughter. It's 5 ft long, built from rough sawn poplar that
    I milled to size. It's really quite pretty in it's natural form.

    https://i.imgur.com/lKWXiTy.jpg

    Did she seal so that the natural color of the wood remained? Nope. Did she stain it
    so at least the grain showed through? Nope. She painted it pink. Why? Because pink
    is the right color for where it is being used.

    People have quietly said to me "Isn't it a shame that she painted that beautiful
    bench *pink*? You must be so disappointed." I always politely respond "First, it's
    her bench. What kind of gift would be if I dictated how it should be finished or
    didn't accept her choice? Second, you have to admit that it fits the décor perfectly."


    Kind of like if you plane a piece of wood with your super duper sharp smoothing plane and take a translucent shaving. And then sand the wood with 220 grit or even 320 grit sandpaper. Why? The wood was smoother off the plane than after the paper.

    Apples and oranges - unless nancy comes back and tells that she painted the piece to
    protect it from the elements. Your example of sanding is a great example of unnecessary
    - and probably detrimental - work, just like painting teak for protection would be. However,
    if you can accept that there might be other reasons why she painted it, you will see that
    your example may not fit the situation.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DerbyDad03@21:1/5 to Scott Lurndal on Tue Dec 6 15:24:08 2022
    On Tuesday, December 6, 2022 at 4:05:38 PM UTC-5, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    "russell...@yahoo.com" <ritzann...@gmail.com> writes:
    On Monday, December 5, 2022 at 3:10:16 PM UTC-6, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> writes:=20
    On 12/5/2022 2:21 PM, russell...@yahoo.com wrote:=20
    On Monday, December 5, 2022 at 8:39:21 AM UTC-6, Leon wrote:=20
    On 12/3/2022 1:01 PM, nancy wrote:=20
    5 years ago I painted a teak loveseat rocker and table on my front= >=20
    outdoor porch. Everyone advised me not to. It was a big job -=20
    cleaning, sanding, laquer primer and 2 coats of paint. It still look= >s=20
    beautiful I'm so happy I did it. Could be because the set was over 5= >=20
    years old and had no or little teak oils left in it - but it is stil= >l=20
    gorgeous 5 years later.=20
    =20
    If you thought that was work, wait till you grow tired of the color a= >nd=20
    want to restore the natural finish.=20
    =20
    Could you restore the teak to its natural color/finish by using paint = >stripper to remove the paint? Is teak immune from harm by paint stripper? T= >hen you would probably need to re-sand the whole thing, and then apply oil = >to bring back the natural teak look. Would that work?=20
    =20
    =20
    All above would help to remove the paint but I highly suspect that the= >=20
    sanding that was done before painting did not get into all of the=20
    cracks, the paint covered that.=20
    =20
    But restoring a natural finish the paint will be difficult to remove=20 >> >from all of the cracks.
    The OP was pleased with her painted teak chairs. That's really all that= >=20
    matters, regardless of opinions about painting teak (or cherry, for that= >=20
    matter).

    But we can still argue the logic and rationale behind the choice to paint t= >eak chairs. One of the hallmarks of teak is its immunity to water and rot.=
    As well as its look. Teak is very expensive and looks expensive too.
    While a typical woodworker might be aware that teak is expensive
    (dalbergia nigra is _very_ expensive), the average homeowner isn't. And
    in this case she wanted to paint an old chair. Who are you to decry
    her choice?

    ...and we don't know what nancy knew. For all we know, she knew exactly
    what she was doing. As a possible clue, look at what she said in her post: "Everyone advised me not to."

    Going out on the proverbial assumptive limb, I'll bet that someone(s) explained to her that the properties of teak meant that there was no need to paint it. If I'm
    correct, then it's very possible that she knew everything she needed to know and
    - for reasons unknown to us - she chose to paint it anyway.

    As you noted, who is anyone to decry her choice, especially without knowing why she chose to paint it even after all the advice not to?


    Once it turns silver-grey, it's a lot of work return teak to its original "expensive" appearance and given any solar exposure, that's going to be
    an ongoing routine. Let her have her painted chair.

    There is no accounting for taste. On either side.

    (I have teak deck & porch, and have replaced the slats in an old cast iron bench with natural teak, so I'm familiar with the labor required to
    keep it "pretty" in an area with 300+ sunny days annually).

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Leon@21:1/5 to russellseaton1@yahoo.com on Wed Dec 7 17:14:25 2022
    On 12/6/2022 2:28 PM, russellseaton1@yahoo.com wrote:
    On Monday, December 5, 2022 at 3:10:16 PM UTC-6, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> writes:
    On 12/5/2022 2:21 PM, russell...@yahoo.com wrote:
    On Monday, December 5, 2022 at 8:39:21 AM UTC-6, Leon wrote:
    On 12/3/2022 1:01 PM, nancy wrote:
    5 years ago I painted a teak loveseat rocker and table on my front >>>>>> outdoor porch. Everyone advised me not to. It was a big job -
    cleaning, sanding, laquer primer and 2 coats of paint. It still looks >>>>>> beautiful I'm so happy I did it. Could be because the set was over 5 >>>>>> years old and had no or little teak oils left in it - but it is still >>>>>> gorgeous 5 years later.

    If you thought that was work, wait till you grow tired of the color and >>>>> want to restore the natural finish.

    Could you restore the teak to its natural color/finish by using paint stripper to remove the paint? Is teak immune from harm by paint stripper? Then you would probably need to re-sand the whole thing, and then apply oil to bring back the natural
    teak look. Would that work?


    All above would help to remove the paint but I highly suspect that the
    sanding that was done before painting did not get into all of the
    cracks, the paint covered that.

    But restoring a natural finish the paint will be difficult to remove
    from all of the cracks.
    The OP was pleased with her painted teak chairs. That's really all that
    matters, regardless of opinions about painting teak (or cherry, for that
    matter).

    But we can still argue the logic and rationale behind the choice to paint teak chairs. One of the hallmarks of teak is its immunity to water and rot. As well as its look. Teak is very expensive and looks expensive too. When you see teak wood in its
    natural state, you say "that's expensive". So painting teak is illogical. Its already immune to water, so painting teak to protect it from water makes no sense. And paint covers up the fact its teak.

    Kind of like if you plane a piece of wood with your super duper sharp smoothing plane and take a translucent shaving. And then sand the wood with 220 grit or even 320 grit sandpaper. Why? The wood was smoother off the plane than after the paper.



    Well Not really. Teak has to be maintained and probably stained to
    keep its natural color. It WILL fade in sun light like any wood. So
    once it fades, unless it is on a boat, it looks like most any other wood.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Michael Trew@21:1/5 to russellseaton1@yahoo.com on Wed Dec 7 18:12:09 2022
    On 12/6/2022 15:28, russellseaton1@yahoo.com wrote:

    But we can still argue the logic and rationale behind the choice to
    paint teak chairs. One of the hallmarks of teak is its immunity to
    water and rot. As well as its look. Teak is very expensive and
    looks expensive too. When you see teak wood in its natural state,
    you say "that's expensive". So painting teak is illogical.

    That reminds me of very nice old red-wood bench seats which my
    step-grandmother has on her back deck. The look beautiful with just
    clear seal on them. I doubt that you could even source that wood any
    longer (legally). She was rather irritated with the person staining her
    deck (red-wood color), because he put solid red-wood color stain over
    her real red-wood benches.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From hubops@ccanoemail.com@21:1/5 to michael.trew@att.net on Wed Dec 7 19:16:38 2022
    On Wed, 07 Dec 2022 18:12:09 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    On 12/6/2022 15:28, russellseaton1@yahoo.com wrote:

    But we can still argue the logic and rationale behind the choice to
    paint teak chairs. One of the hallmarks of teak is its immunity to
    water and rot. As well as its look. Teak is very expensive and
    looks expensive too. When you see teak wood in its natural state,
    you say "that's expensive". So painting teak is illogical.

    That reminds me of very nice old red-wood bench seats which my >step-grandmother has on her back deck. The look beautiful with just
    clear seal on them. I doubt that you could even source that wood any
    longer (legally). She was rather irritated with the person staining her
    deck (red-wood color), because he put solid red-wood color stain over
    her real red-wood benches.


    Many years ago, a buddy bought a portable bandsaw mill to use
    as a side-job business and possible retirement business.
    Because of his day-job as a power company worker -
    knowing many of the trades-folk Lines & Forestry
    he would occasionally find work in sawing-up old cedar
    utility poles - there's some nice < ~ free > lumber inside
    those old grey weathered-looking poles. ...
    On occasion there was some _big stuff_ to saw-up -
    - very old transmission line poles - not roadside poles -
    .. it was beautiful stuff .. prime clear western red cedar
    The sawdust would be shredded consistency ;
    the smell was like sawing into a fresh red cedar tree
    even though the poles were 70 years old - trees were
    probably another hundred ?
    Eventually the utility started to re-sell the poles
    plus the supply ran out ..
    Nice-while-it-lasted though ..
    John T.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Scott Lurndal@21:1/5 to Michael Trew on Thu Dec 8 14:33:45 2022
    Michael Trew <michael.trew@att.net> writes:
    On 12/6/2022 15:28, russellseaton1@yahoo.com wrote:

    But we can still argue the logic and rationale behind the choice to
    paint teak chairs. One of the hallmarks of teak is its immunity to
    water and rot. As well as its look. Teak is very expensive and
    looks expensive too. When you see teak wood in its natural state,
    you say "that's expensive". So painting teak is illogical.

    That reminds me of very nice old red-wood bench seats which my >step-grandmother has on her back deck. The look beautiful with just
    clear seal on them. I doubt that you could even source that wood any
    longer (legally). She was rather irritated with the person staining her
    deck (red-wood color), because he put solid red-wood color stain over
    her real red-wood benches.

    Real redwood turns silver-grey with time and exposure to sunlight and moisture.

    Real redwood is still available legally.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to Leon on Thu Dec 8 22:10:04 2022
    On Wed, 7 Dec 2022 17:14:25 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 12/6/2022 2:28 PM, russellseaton1@yahoo.com wrote:
    On Monday, December 5, 2022 at 3:10:16 PM UTC-6, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> writes:
    On 12/5/2022 2:21 PM, russell...@yahoo.com wrote:
    On Monday, December 5, 2022 at 8:39:21 AM UTC-6, Leon wrote:
    On 12/3/2022 1:01 PM, nancy wrote:
    5 years ago I painted a teak loveseat rocker and table on my front >>>>>>> outdoor porch. Everyone advised me not to. It was a big job -
    cleaning, sanding, laquer primer and 2 coats of paint. It still looks >>>>>>> beautiful I'm so happy I did it. Could be because the set was over 5 >>>>>>> years old and had no or little teak oils left in it - but it is still >>>>>>> gorgeous 5 years later.

    If you thought that was work, wait till you grow tired of the color and >>>>>> want to restore the natural finish.

    Could you restore the teak to its natural color/finish by using paint stripper to remove the paint? Is teak immune from harm by paint stripper? Then you would probably need to re-sand the whole thing, and then apply oil to bring back the natural
    teak look. Would that work?


    All above would help to remove the paint but I highly suspect that the >>>> sanding that was done before painting did not get into all of the
    cracks, the paint covered that.

    But restoring a natural finish the paint will be difficult to remove
    from all of the cracks.
    The OP was pleased with her painted teak chairs. That's really all that
    matters, regardless of opinions about painting teak (or cherry, for that >>> matter).

    But we can still argue the logic and rationale behind the choice to paint teak chairs. One of the hallmarks of teak is its immunity to water and rot. As well as its look. Teak is very expensive and looks expensive too. When you see teak wood in
    its natural state, you say "that's expensive". So painting teak is illogical. Its already immune to water, so painting teak to protect it from water makes no sense. And paint covers up the fact its teak.

    Kind of like if you plane a piece of wood with your super duper sharp smoothing plane and take a translucent shaving. And then sand the wood with 220 grit or even 320 grit sandpaper. Why? The wood was smoother off the plane than after the paper.



    Well Not really. Teak has to be maintained and probably stained to
    keep its natural color. It WILL fade in sun light like any wood. So
    once it fades, unless it is on a boat, it looks like most any other wood.

    It doesn't look like most other wood after five or ten years.

    It's truly amazing that the decks on WWII battleships were teak. My
    FIL was on a carrier but he visited his brother on a destroyer when
    they were in port together. He commented that there wasn't much of
    the decks left. The teak was in splinters.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Michael Trew@21:1/5 to Scott Lurndal on Thu Dec 8 22:35:30 2022
    On 12/8/2022 9:33, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    Michael Trew<michael.trew@att.net> writes:
    On 12/6/2022 15:28, russellseaton1@yahoo.com wrote:

    But we can still argue the logic and rationale behind the choice to
    paint teak chairs. One of the hallmarks of teak is its immunity to
    water and rot.

    That reminds me of very nice old red-wood bench seats which my
    step-grandmother has on her back deck. The look beautiful with just
    clear seal on them. I doubt that you could even source that wood any
    longer (legally). She was rather irritated with the person staining her
    deck (red-wood color), because he put solid red-wood color stain over
    her real red-wood benches.

    Real redwood turns silver-grey with time and exposure to sunlight and moisture.

    Even if it's pressure washed clean, or kept sealed?

    Real redwood is still available legally.

    I thought that the ancient redwoods were all protected and illegal to
    poach. Of course, I don't know what I'm talking about, but is there
    newer (probably poorer quality) "farmed" redwood available?

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Markem618@21:1/5 to michael.trew@att.net on Thu Dec 8 22:42:51 2022
    On Thu, 08 Dec 2022 22:35:30 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    On 12/8/2022 9:33, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    Michael Trew<michael.trew@att.net> writes:
    On 12/6/2022 15:28, russellseaton1@yahoo.com wrote:

    But we can still argue the logic and rationale behind the choice to
    paint teak chairs. One of the hallmarks of teak is its immunity to
    water and rot.

    That reminds me of very nice old red-wood bench seats which my
    step-grandmother has on her back deck. The look beautiful with just
    clear seal on them. I doubt that you could even source that wood any
    longer (legally). She was rather irritated with the person staining her >>> deck (red-wood color), because he put solid red-wood color stain over
    her real red-wood benches.

    Real redwood turns silver-grey with time and exposure to sunlight and moisture.

    Even if it's pressure washed clean, or kept sealed?

    Real redwood is still available legally.

    I thought that the ancient redwoods were all protected and illegal to
    poach. Of course, I don't know what I'm talking about, but is there
    newer (probably poorer quality) "farmed" redwood available?

    Old growth redwoods are protected, the majority of redwood sold today
    is from young trees.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Scott Lurndal@21:1/5 to Michael Trew on Fri Dec 9 14:13:50 2022
    Michael Trew <michael.trew@att.net> writes:
    On 12/8/2022 9:33, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    Michael Trew<michael.trew@att.net> writes:
    On 12/6/2022 15:28, russellseaton1@yahoo.com wrote:

    But we can still argue the logic and rationale behind the choice to
    paint teak chairs. One of the hallmarks of teak is its immunity to
    water and rot.

    That reminds me of very nice old red-wood bench seats which my
    step-grandmother has on her back deck. The look beautiful with just
    clear seal on them. I doubt that you could even source that wood any
    longer (legally). She was rather irritated with the person staining her >>> deck (red-wood color), because he put solid red-wood color stain over
    her real red-wood benches.

    Real redwood turns silver-grey with time and exposure to sunlight and moisture.

    Even if it's pressure washed clean, or kept sealed?

    Real redwood is still available legally.

    I thought that the ancient redwoods were all protected and illegal to
    poach. Of course, I don't know what I'm talking about, but is there
    newer (probably poorer quality) "farmed" redwood available?

    There is a considerable amount of sustainably farmed redwood available;
    it's still the primary fence wood in California.

    Most of the old-growth is protected; although the fires a couple years
    ago at Big Basin killed some of the protected old-growth.

    There's also a fair amount of reclaimed old-growth redwood available here and there.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Leon@21:1/5 to Michael Trew on Fri Dec 9 08:23:46 2022
    On 12/8/2022 9:35 PM, Michael Trew wrote:
    On 12/8/2022 9:33, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    Michael Trew<michael.trew@att.net>  writes:
    On 12/6/2022 15:28, russellseaton1@yahoo.com wrote:

    But we can still argue the logic and rationale behind the choice to
    paint teak chairs.  One of the hallmarks of teak is its immunity to
    water and rot.

    That reminds me of very nice old red-wood bench seats which my
    step-grandmother has on her back deck.  The look beautiful with just
    clear seal on them.  I doubt that you could even source that wood any
    longer (legally).  She was rather irritated with the person staining her >>> deck (red-wood color), because he put solid red-wood color stain over
    her real red-wood benches.

    Real redwood turns silver-grey with time and exposure to sunlight and
    moisture.

    Even if it's pressure washed clean, or kept sealed?

    The grey, that almost all woods turn when exposed to direct sunlight,
    can be sanded or pressure washed away. Pressure washing however is
    pretty severe treatment of any wood surface and likely will have to be
    followed up with sanding if a smooth surface is desired. And that
    treatment will have a shelf life before it has to be done again.




    Real redwood is still available legally.

    I thought that the ancient redwoods were all protected and illegal to poach.  Of course, I don't know what I'm talking about, but is there
    newer (probably poorer quality) "farmed" redwood available?

    Redwood comes from other than ancient redwoods. It is available in
    Houston but expensive.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to Leon on Fri Dec 9 14:54:15 2022
    On Fri, 9 Dec 2022 08:23:46 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 12/8/2022 9:35 PM, Michael Trew wrote:
    On 12/8/2022 9:33, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    Michael Trew<michael.trew@att.net> writes:
    On 12/6/2022 15:28, russellseaton1@yahoo.com wrote:

    But we can still argue the logic and rationale behind the choice to
    paint teak chairs. One of the hallmarks of teak is its immunity to
    water and rot.

    That reminds me of very nice old red-wood bench seats which my
    step-grandmother has on her back deck. The look beautiful with just
    clear seal on them. I doubt that you could even source that wood any
    longer (legally). She was rather irritated with the person staining her >>>> deck (red-wood color), because he put solid red-wood color stain over
    her real red-wood benches.

    Real redwood turns silver-grey with time and exposure to sunlight and
    moisture.

    Even if it's pressure washed clean, or kept sealed?

    The grey, that almost all woods turn when exposed to direct sunlight,
    can be sanded or pressure washed away. Pressure washing however is
    pretty severe treatment of any wood surface and likely will have to be >followed up with sanding if a smooth surface is desired. And that
    treatment will have a shelf life before it has to be done again.

    Though I haven't done it with redwood, I've found that oxalic acid
    works well.


    Real redwood is still available legally.

    I thought that the ancient redwoods were all protected and illegal to
    poach. Of course, I don't know what I'm talking about, but is there
    newer (probably poorer quality) "farmed" redwood available?

    Redwood comes from other than ancient redwoods. It is available in
    Houston but expensive.

    I see redwood mail box posts at the BORG all the time. I used a lot
    of it residing my house in VT.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From ritzannaseaton@gmail.com@21:1/5 to k...@notreal.com on Fri Dec 9 16:20:15 2022
    On Thursday, December 8, 2022 at 9:10:10 PM UTC-6, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Wed, 7 Dec 2022 17:14:25 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 12/6/2022 2:28 PM, russell...@yahoo.com wrote:
    On Monday, December 5, 2022 at 3:10:16 PM UTC-6, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> writes:
    On 12/5/2022 2:21 PM, russell...@yahoo.com wrote:
    On Monday, December 5, 2022 at 8:39:21 AM UTC-6, Leon wrote:
    On 12/3/2022 1:01 PM, nancy wrote:
    5 years ago I painted a teak loveseat rocker and table on my front >>>>>>> outdoor porch. Everyone advised me not to. It was a big job - >>>>>>> cleaning, sanding, laquer primer and 2 coats of paint. It still looks
    beautiful I'm so happy I did it. Could be because the set was over 5 >>>>>>> years old and had no or little teak oils left in it - but it is still
    gorgeous 5 years later.

    If you thought that was work, wait till you grow tired of the color and
    want to restore the natural finish.

    Could you restore the teak to its natural color/finish by using paint stripper to remove the paint? Is teak immune from harm by paint stripper? Then you would probably need to re-sand the whole thing, and then apply oil to bring back the natural
    teak look. Would that work?


    All above would help to remove the paint but I highly suspect that the >>>> sanding that was done before painting did not get into all of the
    cracks, the paint covered that.

    But restoring a natural finish the paint will be difficult to remove >>> >from all of the cracks.
    The OP was pleased with her painted teak chairs. That's really all that >>> matters, regardless of opinions about painting teak (or cherry, for that >>> matter).

    But we can still argue the logic and rationale behind the choice to paint teak chairs. One of the hallmarks of teak is its immunity to water and rot. As well as its look. Teak is very expensive and looks expensive too. When you see teak wood in its
    natural state, you say "that's expensive". So painting teak is illogical. Its already immune to water, so painting teak to protect it from water makes no sense. And paint covers up the fact its teak.

    Kind of like if you plane a piece of wood with your super duper sharp smoothing plane and take a translucent shaving. And then sand the wood with 220 grit or even 320 grit sandpaper. Why? The wood was smoother off the plane than after the paper.



    Well Not really. Teak has to be maintained and probably stained to
    keep its natural color. It WILL fade in sun light like any wood. So
    once it fades, unless it is on a boat, it looks like most any other wood.
    It doesn't look like most other wood after five or ten years.

    It's truly amazing that the decks on WWII battleships were teak. My
    FIL was on a carrier but he visited his brother on a destroyer when
    they were in port together. He commented that there wasn't much of
    the decks left. The teak was in splinters.

    Your post confused me a bit. You started by saying battleships were teak in WW2. Battleships are a specific boat in the Navy. Then your next sentence was about your father in law being on a carrier. Aircraft carriers are specific boats in the Navy.
    And then your third sentence was about your uncle in law being on a destroyer. Destroyers are specific boats in the Navy. So, did "battleships" or "destroyers" only have teak decks? And all the other boats have metal decks? Or did every boat in the
    Navy have teak decks?

    As for teak not lasting and being in splinters on the battleship or was it a destroyer, that could be due to several reasons. Navy boats are in salt water. Salt water is much more corrosive than fresh water. Rain is fresh water. And heavy munitions
    are rolled over the decks of destroyers. The heavy weight and wear and tear could have caused the destruction. And as shown in movies anyway, Navy crew are always scrubbing the decks of Navy ships with hard bristled brushes. So that may also
    contribute to the degradation of the teak deck.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Scott Lurndal@21:1/5 to russellseaton1@yahoo.com on Sat Dec 10 00:22:58 2022
    "russellseaton1@yahoo.com" <ritzannaseaton@gmail.com> writes:
    On Thursday, December 8, 2022 at 9:10:10 PM UTC-6, k...@notreal.com wrote:

    It's truly amazing that the decks on WWII battleships were teak. My=20
    FIL was on a carrier but he visited his brother on a destroyer when=20
    they were in port together. He commented that there wasn't much of=20
    the decks left. The teak was in splinters.

    Your post confused me a bit. You started by saying battleships were teak i= >n WW2. Battleships are a specific boat in the Navy. Then your next senten= >ce was about your father in law being on a carrier. Aircraft carriers are = >specific boats in the Navy. And then your third sentence was about your un= >cle in law being on a destroyer. Destroyers are specific boats in the Navy= >. So, did "battleships" or "destroyers" only have teak decks? And all the=
    other boats have metal decks? Or did every boat in the Navy have teak dec=
    ks?

    As for teak not lasting and being in splinters on the battleship or was it = >a destroyer, that could be due to several reasons. Navy boats are in salt = >water. Salt water is much more corrosive than fresh water. Rain is fresh = >water. And heavy munitions are rolled over the decks of destroyers. The h= >eavy weight and wear and tear could have caused the destruction. And as sh= >own in movies anyway, Navy crew are always scrubbing the decks of Navy ship= >s with hard bristled brushes. So that may also contribute to the degradati= >on of the teak deck.

    I suspect that in WWII, it was "splinters" due to battle damage.

    Most Navy vessels at the time had wood decks, including the early
    carriers.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to ritzannaseaton@gmail.com on Fri Dec 9 23:54:04 2022
    On Fri, 9 Dec 2022 16:20:15 -0800 (PST), "russellseaton1@yahoo.com" <ritzannaseaton@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Thursday, December 8, 2022 at 9:10:10 PM UTC-6, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Wed, 7 Dec 2022 17:14:25 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 12/6/2022 2:28 PM, russell...@yahoo.com wrote:
    On Monday, December 5, 2022 at 3:10:16 PM UTC-6, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> writes:
    On 12/5/2022 2:21 PM, russell...@yahoo.com wrote:
    On Monday, December 5, 2022 at 8:39:21 AM UTC-6, Leon wrote:
    On 12/3/2022 1:01 PM, nancy wrote:
    5 years ago I painted a teak loveseat rocker and table on my front >> >>>>>>> outdoor porch. Everyone advised me not to. It was a big job -
    cleaning, sanding, laquer primer and 2 coats of paint. It still looks
    beautiful I'm so happy I did it. Could be because the set was over 5 >> >>>>>>> years old and had no or little teak oils left in it - but it is still
    gorgeous 5 years later.

    If you thought that was work, wait till you grow tired of the color and
    want to restore the natural finish.

    Could you restore the teak to its natural color/finish by using paint stripper to remove the paint? Is teak immune from harm by paint stripper? Then you would probably need to re-sand the whole thing, and then apply oil to bring back the natural
    teak look. Would that work?


    All above would help to remove the paint but I highly suspect that the >> >>>> sanding that was done before painting did not get into all of the
    cracks, the paint covered that.

    But restoring a natural finish the paint will be difficult to remove
    from all of the cracks.
    The OP was pleased with her painted teak chairs. That's really all that >> >>> matters, regardless of opinions about painting teak (or cherry, for that >> >>> matter).

    But we can still argue the logic and rationale behind the choice to paint teak chairs. One of the hallmarks of teak is its immunity to water and rot. As well as its look. Teak is very expensive and looks expensive too. When you see teak wood in its
    natural state, you say "that's expensive". So painting teak is illogical. Its already immune to water, so painting teak to protect it from water makes no sense. And paint covers up the fact its teak.

    Kind of like if you plane a piece of wood with your super duper sharp smoothing plane and take a translucent shaving. And then sand the wood with 220 grit or even 320 grit sandpaper. Why? The wood was smoother off the plane than after the paper.



    Well Not really. Teak has to be maintained and probably stained to
    keep its natural color. It WILL fade in sun light like any wood. So
    once it fades, unless it is on a boat, it looks like most any other wood. >> It doesn't look like most other wood after five or ten years.

    It's truly amazing that the decks on WWII battleships were teak. My
    FIL was on a carrier but he visited his brother on a destroyer when
    they were in port together. He commented that there wasn't much of
    the decks left. The teak was in splinters.

    Your post confused me a bit. You started by saying battleships were teak in WW2. Battleships are a specific boat in the Navy. Then your next sentence was about your father in law being on a carrier. Aircraft carriers are specific boats in the Navy.
    And then your third sentence was about your uncle in law being on a destroyer. Destroyers are specific boats in the Navy. So, did "battleships" or "destroyers" only have teak decks? And all the other boats have metal decks? Or did every boat in the
    Navy have teak decks?

    Pedantic much?

    Battleships are not boats. They're ships. See, I can be a pedant
    too.

    As for teak not lasting and being in splinters on the battleship or was it a destroyer, that could be due to several reasons. Navy boats are in salt water. Salt water is much more corrosive than fresh water. Rain is fresh water. And heavy munitions
    are rolled over the decks of destroyers. The heavy weight and wear and tear could have caused the destruction. And as shown in movies anyway, Navy crew are always scrubbing the decks of Navy ships with hard bristled brushes. So that may also
    contribute to the degradation of the teak deck.

    Moron, I said specifically that it was a destroyer. Sheesh!

    The reason which I thought would have been clear, being in the middle
    of WWII, was that the thing had been seriously shot up. If it was a
    rotting hull, it wouldn't have been all that notable. US navy ships
    aren't known to be rotting hulls. They did see action once or twice in
    WWII. It's a fuckin' destroyer. Their whole purpose is to get
    up-front and take the heat, instead of the capital ships.

    Again, Sheesh!

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From ritzannaseaton@gmail.com@21:1/5 to Scott Lurndal on Fri Dec 9 20:54:14 2022
    On Friday, December 9, 2022 at 6:23:03 PM UTC-6, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    "russell...@yahoo.com" <ritzann...@gmail.com> writes:
    On Thursday, December 8, 2022 at 9:10:10 PM UTC-6, k...@notreal.com wrote: >> It's truly amazing that the decks on WWII battleships were teak. My=20
    FIL was on a carrier but he visited his brother on a destroyer when=20
    they were in port together. He commented that there wasn't much of=20
    the decks left. The teak was in splinters.

    Your post confused me a bit. You started by saying battleships were teak i= >n WW2. Battleships are a specific boat in the Navy. Then your next senten= >ce was about your father in law being on a carrier. Aircraft carriers are = >specific boats in the Navy. And then your third sentence was about your un= >cle in law being on a destroyer. Destroyers are specific boats in the Navy= >. So, did "battleships" or "destroyers" only have teak decks? And all the=
    other boats have metal decks? Or did every boat in the Navy have teak dec=
    ks?

    As for teak not lasting and being in splinters on the battleship or was it =
    a destroyer, that could be due to several reasons. Navy boats are in salt = >water. Salt water is much more corrosive than fresh water. Rain is fresh = >water. And heavy munitions are rolled over the decks of destroyers. The h= >eavy weight and wear and tear could have caused the destruction. And as sh= >own in movies anyway, Navy crew are always scrubbing the decks of Navy ship=
    s with hard bristled brushes. So that may also contribute to the degradati= >on of the teak deck.

    I suspect that in WWII, it was "splinters" due to battle damage.

    Most Navy vessels at the time had wood decks, including the early
    carriers.

    No kidding. Wood decks? I have an uncle who was in the Navy in the 1970s. I'll try to remember to ask him next time I see him what the decks were on the ships he was on. My knowledge of Navy ships is what I have seen in movies. They always look like
    metal in the movies. Can't believe a movie would mislead me. Just like I know there were gunfights at noon on the main street of every western town in the old west of the 1800s. All using Colt Peacemakers and Colt 45 ammunition. And every horse had a
    scabbard with a Winchester Model 1873 lever action rifle in it.

    As for splinters due to battle damage, I am not sure on that. Obviously, some boats were hit and damaged from shells, bombs, torpedoes, etc. But they would have been repaired once they got back to a friendly port. The damaged decks would have been
    replaced with new decks. So no splinters. I took from your original comment that your relatives were all on functional working boats. In port. Not boats that had just come in from a battle and not even repaired yet. I took splinters to mean the
    natural decay of wood left out in the weather and used and abused over time. Weathered wood.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to All on Sat Dec 10 00:03:53 2022
    On Sat, 10 Dec 2022 00:22:58 GMT, scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal)
    wrote:

    "russellseaton1@yahoo.com" <ritzannaseaton@gmail.com> writes:
    On Thursday, December 8, 2022 at 9:10:10 PM UTC-6, k...@notreal.com wrote:

    It's truly amazing that the decks on WWII battleships were teak. My=20
    FIL was on a carrier but he visited his brother on a destroyer when=20
    they were in port together. He commented that there wasn't much of=20
    the decks left. The teak was in splinters.

    Your post confused me a bit. You started by saying battleships were teak i= >>n WW2. Battleships are a specific boat in the Navy. Then your next senten= >>ce was about your father in law being on a carrier. Aircraft carriers are = >>specific boats in the Navy. And then your third sentence was about your un= >>cle in law being on a destroyer. Destroyers are specific boats in the Navy= >>. So, did "battleships" or "destroyers" only have teak decks? And all the= >> other boats have metal decks? Or did every boat in the Navy have teak dec= >>ks?

    As for teak not lasting and being in splinters on the battleship or was it = >>a destroyer, that could be due to several reasons. Navy boats are in salt = >>water. Salt water is much more corrosive than fresh water. Rain is fresh = >>water. And heavy munitions are rolled over the decks of destroyers. The h= >>eavy weight and wear and tear could have caused the destruction. And as sh= >>own in movies anyway, Navy crew are always scrubbing the decks of Navy ship= >>s with hard bristled brushes. So that may also contribute to the degradati= >>on of the teak deck.

    I suspect that in WWII, it was "splinters" due to battle damage.

    Most Navy vessels at the time had wood decks, including the early
    carriers.

    I think he was on the Intrepid but I'm not 100% sure.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Leon@21:1/5 to russellseaton1@yahoo.com on Sat Dec 10 09:23:27 2022
    On 12/9/2022 10:54 PM, russellseaton1@yahoo.com wrote:
    On Friday, December 9, 2022 at 6:23:03 PM UTC-6, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    "russell...@yahoo.com" <ritzann...@gmail.com> writes:
    On Thursday, December 8, 2022 at 9:10:10 PM UTC-6, k...@notreal.com wrote: >>>> It's truly amazing that the decks on WWII battleships were teak. My=20 >>>> FIL was on a carrier but he visited his brother on a destroyer when=20 >>>> they were in port together. He commented that there wasn't much of=20
    the decks left. The teak was in splinters.

    Your post confused me a bit. You started by saying battleships were teak i= >>> n WW2. Battleships are a specific boat in the Navy. Then your next senten= >>> ce was about your father in law being on a carrier. Aircraft carriers are = >>> specific boats in the Navy. And then your third sentence was about your un= >>> cle in law being on a destroyer. Destroyers are specific boats in the Navy= >>> . So, did "battleships" or "destroyers" only have teak decks? And all the= >>> other boats have metal decks? Or did every boat in the Navy have teak dec= >>> ks?

    As for teak not lasting and being in splinters on the battleship or was it =
    a destroyer, that could be due to several reasons. Navy boats are in salt = >>> water. Salt water is much more corrosive than fresh water. Rain is fresh = >>> water. And heavy munitions are rolled over the decks of destroyers. The h= >>> eavy weight and wear and tear could have caused the destruction. And as sh= >>> own in movies anyway, Navy crew are always scrubbing the decks of Navy ship=
    s with hard bristled brushes. So that may also contribute to the degradati= >>> on of the teak deck.

    I suspect that in WWII, it was "splinters" due to battle damage.

    Most Navy vessels at the time had wood decks, including the early
    carriers.

    No kidding. Wood decks? I have an uncle who was in the Navy in the 1970s. I'll try to remember to ask him next time I see him what the decks were on the ships he was on. My knowledge of Navy ships is what I have seen in movies. They always look
    like metal in the movies. Can't believe a movie would mislead me. Just like I know there were gunfights at noon on the main street of every western town in the old west of the 1800s. All using Colt Peacemakers and Colt 45 ammunition. And every horse
    had a scabbard with a Winchester Model 1873 lever action rifle in it.

    I have been on the USS Lexington, a carrier, and the Battle Ship Texas.
    They had wooden decks. AND both had woodworking shops on board. A
    wooden deck is easier and faster and lighter weight to repair than a
    steel deck.




    As for splinters due to battle damage, I am not sure on that. Obviously, some boats were hit and damaged from shells, bombs, torpedoes, etc. But they would have been repaired once they got back to a friendly port. The damaged decks would have been
    replaced with new decks. So no splinters. I took from your original comment that your relatives were all on functional working boats. In port. Not boats that had just come in from a battle and not even repaired yet. I took splinters to mean the
    natural decay of wood left out in the weather and used and abused over time. Weathered wood.


    You are living in the modern world. During the great wars those ships
    did not always have the luxury to go to a friendly port for repairs.
    They had to be battle ready quick.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to ritzannaseaton@gmail.com on Sat Dec 10 20:48:19 2022
    On Fri, 9 Dec 2022 20:54:14 -0800 (PST), "russellseaton1@yahoo.com" <ritzannaseaton@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Friday, December 9, 2022 at 6:23:03 PM UTC-6, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    "russell...@yahoo.com" <ritzann...@gmail.com> writes:
    On Thursday, December 8, 2022 at 9:10:10 PM UTC-6, k...@notreal.com wrote: >> >> It's truly amazing that the decks on WWII battleships were teak. My=20
    FIL was on a carrier but he visited his brother on a destroyer when=20
    they were in port together. He commented that there wasn't much of=20
    the decks left. The teak was in splinters.

    Your post confused me a bit. You started by saying battleships were teak i= >> >n WW2. Battleships are a specific boat in the Navy. Then your next senten= >> >ce was about your father in law being on a carrier. Aircraft carriers are = >> >specific boats in the Navy. And then your third sentence was about your un= >> >cle in law being on a destroyer. Destroyers are specific boats in the Navy= >> >. So, did "battleships" or "destroyers" only have teak decks? And all the= >> > other boats have metal decks? Or did every boat in the Navy have teak dec= >> >ks?

    As for teak not lasting and being in splinters on the battleship or was it =
    a destroyer, that could be due to several reasons. Navy boats are in salt = >> >water. Salt water is much more corrosive than fresh water. Rain is fresh = >> >water. And heavy munitions are rolled over the decks of destroyers. The h= >> >eavy weight and wear and tear could have caused the destruction. And as sh= >> >own in movies anyway, Navy crew are always scrubbing the decks of Navy ship=
    s with hard bristled brushes. So that may also contribute to the degradati= >> >on of the teak deck.

    I suspect that in WWII, it was "splinters" due to battle damage.

    Most Navy vessels at the time had wood decks, including the early
    carriers.

    No kidding. Wood decks? I have an uncle who was in the Navy in the 1970s. I'll try to remember to ask him next time I see him what the decks were on the ships he was on. My knowledge of Navy ships is what I have seen in movies. They always look
    like metal in the movies. Can't believe a movie would mislead me. Just like I know there were gunfights at noon on the main street of every western town in the old west of the 1800s. All using Colt Peacemakers and Colt 45 ammunition. And every horse
    had a scabbard with a Winchester Model 1873 lever action rifle in it.

    Remember, this was in the '40s. Of course the ships were steel and
    there was armor but what you walked on was wood (above the steel).

    As for splinters due to battle damage, I am not sure on that. Obviously, some boats were hit and damaged from shells, bombs, torpedoes, etc. But they would have been repaired once they got back to a friendly port. The damaged decks would have been
    replaced with new decks. So no splinters. I took from your original comment that your relatives were all on functional working boats. In port. Not boats that had just come in from a battle and not even repaired yet. I took splinters to mean the
    natural decay of wood left out in the weather and used and abused over time. Weathered wood.

    Ships don't go home after every battle. No, decks weren't even on the
    radar for maintenance items. Holes, particularly below the water line, propulsion, and re-supply were a tad more important. Hell, shore leave
    and getting drunk was more important. The idea was to turn the ships
    and their crew around as fast as possible.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From ritzannaseaton@gmail.com@21:1/5 to k...@notreal.com on Sat Dec 10 22:20:05 2022
    On Friday, December 9, 2022 at 10:54:10 PM UTC-6, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Fri, 9 Dec 2022 16:20:15 -0800 (PST), "russell...@yahoo.com" <ritzann...@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Thursday, December 8, 2022 at 9:10:10 PM UTC-6, k...@notreal.com wrote: >> On Wed, 7 Dec 2022 17:14:25 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 12/6/2022 2:28 PM, russell...@yahoo.com wrote:
    On Monday, December 5, 2022 at 3:10:16 PM UTC-6, Scott Lurndal wrote: >> >>> Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> writes:
    On 12/5/2022 2:21 PM, russell...@yahoo.com wrote:
    On Monday, December 5, 2022 at 8:39:21 AM UTC-6, Leon wrote:
    On 12/3/2022 1:01 PM, nancy wrote:
    5 years ago I painted a teak loveseat rocker and table on my front
    outdoor porch. Everyone advised me not to. It was a big job -
    cleaning, sanding, laquer primer and 2 coats of paint. It still looks
    beautiful I'm so happy I did it. Could be because the set was over 5
    years old and had no or little teak oils left in it - but it is still
    gorgeous 5 years later.

    If you thought that was work, wait till you grow tired of the color and
    want to restore the natural finish.

    Could you restore the teak to its natural color/finish by using paint stripper to remove the paint? Is teak immune from harm by paint stripper? Then you would probably need to re-sand the whole thing, and then apply oil to bring back the
    natural teak look. Would that work?


    All above would help to remove the paint but I highly suspect that the
    sanding that was done before painting did not get into all of the
    cracks, the paint covered that.

    But restoring a natural finish the paint will be difficult to remove >> >>> >from all of the cracks.
    The OP was pleased with her painted teak chairs. That's really all that
    matters, regardless of opinions about painting teak (or cherry, for that
    matter).

    But we can still argue the logic and rationale behind the choice to paint teak chairs. One of the hallmarks of teak is its immunity to water and rot. As well as its look. Teak is very expensive and looks expensive too. When you see teak wood in
    its natural state, you say "that's expensive". So painting teak is illogical. Its already immune to water, so painting teak to protect it from water makes no sense. And paint covers up the fact its teak.

    Kind of like if you plane a piece of wood with your super duper sharp smoothing plane and take a translucent shaving. And then sand the wood with 220 grit or even 320 grit sandpaper. Why? The wood was smoother off the plane than after the paper.



    Well Not really. Teak has to be maintained and probably stained to
    keep its natural color. It WILL fade in sun light like any wood. So
    once it fades, unless it is on a boat, it looks like most any other wood.
    It doesn't look like most other wood after five or ten years.

    It's truly amazing that the decks on WWII battleships were teak. My
    FIL was on a carrier but he visited his brother on a destroyer when
    they were in port together. He commented that there wasn't much of
    the decks left. The teak was in splinters.

    Your post confused me a bit. You started by saying battleships were teak in WW2. Battleships are a specific boat in the Navy. Then your next sentence was about your father in law being on a carrier. Aircraft carriers are specific boats in the Navy.
    And then your third sentence was about your uncle in law being on a destroyer. Destroyers are specific boats in the Navy. So, did "battleships" or "destroyers" only have teak decks? And all the other boats have metal decks? Or did every boat in the Navy
    have teak decks?
    Pedantic much?

    Battleships are not boats. They're ships. See, I can be a pedant
    too.
    As for teak not lasting and being in splinters on the battleship or was it a destroyer, that could be due to several reasons. Navy boats are in salt water. Salt water is much more corrosive than fresh water. Rain is fresh water. And heavy munitions
    are rolled over the decks of destroyers. The heavy weight and wear and tear could have caused the destruction. And as shown in movies anyway, Navy crew are always scrubbing the decks of Navy ships with hard bristled brushes. So that may also contribute
    to the degradation of the teak deck.
    Moron, I said specifically that it was a destroyer. Sheesh!

    Here is what you wrote previously:

    It's truly amazing that the decks on WWII battleships were teak. My
    FIL was on a carrier but he visited his brother on a destroyer when
    they were in port together. He commented that there wasn't much of
    the decks left. The teak was in splinters.

    Please note, you used the words "battleships", "destroyer", and "carrier". In the US Navy, those are three distinct types of ships. They are not interchangeable. Such as the word boat or ship would be. So you started by saying battleships have teak/
    wood decks. And your comments indicate your uncle in law's destroyer had a teak deck. Leon said the carrier he visited also had a wood deck. So all the ships had wooden decks? Wikipedia says teak is naturally from southeast Asia and India. The
    former British colonies. It was also setup on plantations in Africa along the equator. Did the US have a large stockpile of teak for Navy ships before WW2 started? I doubt much teak was shipped from the British colonies after Japan seized them. And
    after Germany invaded norther Africa, I suspect that put a damper on shipping from the plantations further south.



    The reason which I thought would have been clear, being in the middle
    of WWII, was that the thing had been seriously shot up. If it was a
    rotting hull, it wouldn't have been all that notable. US navy ships
    aren't known to be rotting hulls. They did see action once or twice in
    WWII. It's a fuckin' destroyer. Their whole purpose is to get
    up-front and take the heat, instead of the capital ships.

    Please reread what you wrote previously. You talked about your father in law visiting his brother in port. When both ships happened to be there together. You did not mention it was during WW2. And you did not mention it was after battles. I got the
    impression they happened to be docked near each other by happenstance. Maybe they had communicated with each other by mail and learned each other were going to be at the same port. You did say "My FIL was on a carrier but he visited his brother on a
    destroyer when they were in port together." I am not knowledgeable about Navies during war. But I do not get the impression that crews from different ships just visit each other. Especially not during a war and in between battles. Visiting is a more
    leisurely activity. I find it hard to believe a ship damaged in a battle gets to port and the crew just get time off to run around to all the other ships and visit the crews on other ships. Especially not when they are under repair. Or when being
    resupplied as quickly as possible so they can get back into action.




    Again, Sheesh!

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  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to ritzannaseaton@gmail.com on Sun Dec 11 12:05:30 2022
    On Sat, 10 Dec 2022 22:20:05 -0800 (PST), "russellseaton1@yahoo.com" <ritzannaseaton@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Friday, December 9, 2022 at 10:54:10 PM UTC-6, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Fri, 9 Dec 2022 16:20:15 -0800 (PST), "russell...@yahoo.com"
    <ritzann...@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Thursday, December 8, 2022 at 9:10:10 PM UTC-6, k...@notreal.com wrote: >> >> On Wed, 7 Dec 2022 17:14:25 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 12/6/2022 2:28 PM, russell...@yahoo.com wrote:
    On Monday, December 5, 2022 at 3:10:16 PM UTC-6, Scott Lurndal wrote: >> >> >>> Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> writes:
    On 12/5/2022 2:21 PM, russell...@yahoo.com wrote:
    On Monday, December 5, 2022 at 8:39:21 AM UTC-6, Leon wrote:
    On 12/3/2022 1:01 PM, nancy wrote:
    5 years ago I painted a teak loveseat rocker and table on my front
    outdoor porch. Everyone advised me not to. It was a big job -
    cleaning, sanding, laquer primer and 2 coats of paint. It still looks
    beautiful I'm so happy I did it. Could be because the set was over 5
    years old and had no or little teak oils left in it - but it is still
    gorgeous 5 years later.

    If you thought that was work, wait till you grow tired of the color and
    want to restore the natural finish.

    Could you restore the teak to its natural color/finish by using paint stripper to remove the paint? Is teak immune from harm by paint stripper? Then you would probably need to re-sand the whole thing, and then apply oil to bring back the
    natural teak look. Would that work?


    All above would help to remove the paint but I highly suspect that the
    sanding that was done before painting did not get into all of the
    cracks, the paint covered that.

    But restoring a natural finish the paint will be difficult to remove >> >> >>> >from all of the cracks.
    The OP was pleased with her painted teak chairs. That's really all that
    matters, regardless of opinions about painting teak (or cherry, for that
    matter).

    But we can still argue the logic and rationale behind the choice to paint teak chairs. One of the hallmarks of teak is its immunity to water and rot. As well as its look. Teak is very expensive and looks expensive too. When you see teak wood in
    its natural state, you say "that's expensive". So painting teak is illogical. Its already immune to water, so painting teak to protect it from water makes no sense. And paint covers up the fact its teak.

    Kind of like if you plane a piece of wood with your super duper sharp smoothing plane and take a translucent shaving. And then sand the wood with 220 grit or even 320 grit sandpaper. Why? The wood was smoother off the plane than after the paper.



    Well Not really. Teak has to be maintained and probably stained to
    keep its natural color. It WILL fade in sun light like any wood. So
    once it fades, unless it is on a boat, it looks like most any other wood.
    It doesn't look like most other wood after five or ten years.

    It's truly amazing that the decks on WWII battleships were teak. My
    FIL was on a carrier but he visited his brother on a destroyer when
    they were in port together. He commented that there wasn't much of
    the decks left. The teak was in splinters.

    Your post confused me a bit. You started by saying battleships were teak in WW2. Battleships are a specific boat in the Navy. Then your next sentence was about your father in law being on a carrier. Aircraft carriers are specific boats in the Navy.
    And then your third sentence was about your uncle in law being on a destroyer. Destroyers are specific boats in the Navy. So, did "battleships" or "destroyers" only have teak decks? And all the other boats have metal decks? Or did every boat in the Navy
    have teak decks?
    Pedantic much?

    Battleships are not boats. They're ships. See, I can be a pedant
    too.
    As for teak not lasting and being in splinters on the battleship or was it a destroyer, that could be due to several reasons. Navy boats are in salt water. Salt water is much more corrosive than fresh water. Rain is fresh water. And heavy munitions
    are rolled over the decks of destroyers. The heavy weight and wear and tear could have caused the destruction. And as shown in movies anyway, Navy crew are always scrubbing the decks of Navy ships with hard bristled brushes. So that may also contribute
    to the degradation of the teak deck.
    Moron, I said specifically that it was a destroyer. Sheesh!

    Here is what you wrote previously:

    It's truly amazing that the decks on WWII battleships were teak. My
    FIL was on a carrier but he visited his brother on a destroyer when
    they were in port together. He commented that there wasn't much of
    the decks left. The teak was in splinters.

    Please note, you used the words "battleships", "destroyer", and "carrier". In the US Navy, those are three distinct types of ships. They are not interchangeable. Such as the word boat or ship would be. So you started by saying battleships have teak/
    wood decks. And your comments indicate your uncle in law's destroyer had a teak deck. Leon said the carrier he visited also had a wood deck. So all the ships had wooden decks? Wikipedia says teak is naturally from southeast Asia and India. The
    former British colonies. It was also setup on plantations in Africa along the equator. Did the US have a large stockpile of teak for Navy ships before WW2 started? I doubt much teak was shipped from the British colonies after Japan seized them. And
    after Germany invaded norther Africa, I suspect that put a damper on shipping from the plantations further south.

    In I also said "pedantic". Did you look it up yet?

    The reason which I thought would have been clear, being in the middle
    of WWII, was that the thing had been seriously shot up. If it was a
    rotting hull, it wouldn't have been all that notable. US navy ships
    aren't known to be rotting hulls. They did see action once or twice in
    WWII. It's a fuckin' destroyer. Their whole purpose is to get
    up-front and take the heat, instead of the capital ships.

    Please reread what you wrote previously. You talked about your father in law visiting his brother in port. When both ships happened to be there together. You did not mention it was during WW2. And you did not mention it was after battles. I got the
    impression they happened to be docked near each other by happenstance. Maybe they had communicated with each other by mail and learned each other were going to be at the same port. You did say "My FIL was on a carrier but he visited his brother on a
    destroyer when they were in port together." I am not knowledgeable about Navies during war. But I do not get the impression that crews from different ships just visit each other. Especially not during a war and in between battles. Visiting is a more
    leisurely activity. I find it hard to believe a ship damaged in a battle gets to port and the crew just get time off to run around to all the other ships and visit the crews on other ships. Especially not when they are under repair.
    Or
    when being resupplied as quickly as possible so they can get back into action.

    I guess not.


    Again, Sheesh!

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  • From John Grossbohlin@21:1/5 to All on Sun Dec 11 17:01:56 2022
    I "camped" on the battleship USS Massachusetts with Cub Scouts in 2005 and it had a woodworking shop.... many if not most of it's decks were clad in wood. Many of the military ships and subs I've seen had at least some wooden decking, including a WWII
    era aircraft carrier. I just confirmed those memories by looking through photos I took on various trips...

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