• A fun ppportunity to overdesign something! : )

    From Bill@21:1/5 to All on Fri Sep 30 17:07:15 2022
    My current solution for a "graphics card prop", is a 3/4" x 1.5" x h"
    piece of wood where, h is "just the right length". A rectangular box
    has been cut from the top, leaving a supporting shape (like an "L"), to
    cradle the corner of the card. The computer case holds one end very
    securely, but the other end hangs; hence the need for a support like
    this. What I described above took me about 10 minutes from design to implementation and has been serving just fine.

    But I am planning to get a new (used) graphics card soon, and thought it appropriate to try to improve on my design! ; ) Incidentally, my
    design only works provided you don't move the computer, but this is not
    a significant problem for me.

    Here is Amazon's solution:

    https://www.amazon.com/EZDIY-FAB-Graphics-GPU-Anodized-Aluminum/dp/B08T98DSG3/ref=sr_1_3?crid=2WQ344BSQKVK1&keywords=EZDIY-FAB-Graphics-GPU-Anodized-Aluminum&qid=1664570048&qu=eyJxc2MiOiIxLjE4IiwicXNhIjoiMC4wMCIsInFzcCI6IjAuMDAifQ%3D%3D&s=electronics&
    sprefix=ezdiy-fab-graphics-gpu-anodized-aluminum%2Celectronics%2C103&sr=1-3&th=1

    Probably few here would pay $20 for the product above. But graphics
    cards have become so expensive that you can't afford to not take care of
    them! What would be Your design so that the "product" is "adjustable"
    (like the product above).

    I'm been thinking about this for a few minutes, and I have an idea or
    two, but I thought it might be fun to give us a collective design
    project--sort of like they do at MIT! : )

    Guidelines are "Fast, simple and cheap", with readily available
    materials! Have fun! Don't overthink it! "Adjustability" with
    the turn of a screw would be a desirable feature. Something you can have confidence in (without the need to check it) would be nice too.
    If you are really successful you can probably make hundreds of dollars
    at Amazon! Besides for notoriety here, you'll have to "cash-in" there!
    : ) I know this is not everyone's cup of tea! Obviously, if you don't
    want to think about it, then don't do it!

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Bill@21:1/5 to Bill on Mon Oct 3 10:11:50 2022
    On 9/30/2022 5:07 PM, Bill wrote:
    My current solution for a "graphics card prop", is a 3/4" x 1.5" x h"
    piece of wood where, h is "just the right length".  A rectangular box
    has been cut from the top, leaving a supporting shape (like an "L"), to cradle the corner of the card.
    Here is Amazon's solution:

    https://www.amazon.com/EZDIY-FAB-Graphics-GPU-Anodized-Aluminum/dp/B08T98DSG3/ref=sr_1_3?crid=2WQ344BSQKVK1&keywords=EZDIY-FAB-Graphics-GPU-Anodized-Aluminum&qid=1664570048&qu=eyJxc2MiOiIxLjE4IiwicXNhIjoiMC4wMCIsInFzcCI6IjAuMDAifQ%3D%3D&s=electronics&
    sprefix=ezdiy-fab-graphics-gpu-anodized-aluminum%2Celectronics%2C103&sr=1-3&th=1


    Probably few here would pay $20 for the product above. But graphics
    cards have become so expensive that you can't afford to not take care of them!  What would be Your design so that the "product" is "adjustable"
    (like the product above). Obviously, if you don't
    want to think about it, then don't do it!

    No interest at all? I still think this holds its own as an "interesting problem". I think "threaded rod" might be very helpful, but if I cut it
    with a hack-saw, it seems like I might require a tap/die (actually a
    die), to get a nut on it and I lack any of those. Would a file suffice
    to clean up the damage left by a hack saw (so that nuts would go on)?

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Leon@21:1/5 to Bill on Mon Oct 3 09:44:44 2022
    On 10/3/2022 9:11 AM, Bill wrote:
    On 9/30/2022 5:07 PM, Bill wrote:
    My current solution for a "graphics card prop", is a 3/4" x 1.5" x h"
    piece of wood where, h is "just the right length".  A rectangular box
    has been cut from the top, leaving a supporting shape (like an "L"),
    to cradle the corner of the card. Here is Amazon's solution:

    https://www.amazon.com/EZDIY-FAB-Graphics-GPU-Anodized-Aluminum/dp/B08T98DSG3/ref=sr_1_3?crid=2WQ344BSQKVK1&keywords=EZDIY-FAB-Graphics-GPU-Anodized-Aluminum&qid=1664570048&qu=eyJxc2MiOiIxLjE4IiwicXNhIjoiMC4wMCIsInFzcCI6IjAuMDAifQ%3D%3D&s=electronics&
    sprefix=ezdiy-fab-graphics-gpu-anodized-aluminum%2Celectronics%2C103&sr=1-3&th=1


    Probably few here would pay $20 for the product above. But graphics
    cards have become so expensive that you can't afford to not take care
    of them!  What would be Your design so that the "product" is
    "adjustable" (like the product above). Obviously, if you don't want to
    think about it, then don't do it!

    No interest at all? I still think this holds its own as an "interesting problem". I think "threaded rod" might be very helpful, but if I cut it
    with a hack-saw, it seems like I might require a tap/die (actually a
    die), to get a nut on it and I lack any of those. Would a file suffice
    to clean up the damage left by a hack saw (so that nuts would go on)?


    Ummm.. Screw a nut on the threaded rod before cutting the rod. Then
    remove the nut and it will retread the rod. Cleanup any burrs with a
    file or wire brush before removing the nut.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Bill@21:1/5 to Leon on Mon Oct 3 11:06:03 2022
    On 10/3/2022 10:44 AM, Leon wrote:
    On 10/3/2022 9:11 AM, Bill wrote:
    On 9/30/2022 5:07 PM, Bill wrote:
    My current solution for a "graphics card prop", is a 3/4" x 1.5" x h"
    piece of wood where, h is "just the right length".  A rectangular box
    has been cut from the top, leaving a supporting shape (like an "L"),
    to cradle the corner of the card. Here is Amazon's solution:

    https://www.amazon.com/EZDIY-FAB-Graphics-GPU-Anodized-Aluminum/dp/B08T98DSG3/ref=sr_1_3?crid=2WQ344BSQKVK1&keywords=EZDIY-FAB-Graphics-GPU-Anodized-Aluminum&qid=1664570048&qu=eyJxc2MiOiIxLjE4IiwicXNhIjoiMC4wMCIsInFzcCI6IjAuMDAifQ%3D%3D&s=electronics&
    sprefix=ezdiy-fab-graphics-gpu-anodized-aluminum%2Celectronics%2C103&sr=1-3&th=1


    Probably few here would pay $20 for the product above. But graphics
    cards have become so expensive that you can't afford to not take care
    of them!  What would be Your design so that the "product" is
    "adjustable" (like the product above). Obviously, if you don't want
    to think about it, then don't do it!

    No interest at all? I still think this holds its own as an
    "interesting problem". I think "threaded rod" might be very helpful,
    but if I cut it with a hack-saw, it seems like I might require a
    tap/die (actually a die), to get a nut on it and I lack any of those.
    Would a file suffice to clean up the damage left by a hack saw (so
    that nuts would go on)?


    Ummm..   Screw a nut on the threaded rod before cutting the rod.   Then remove the nut and it will retread the rod.  Cleanup any burrs with a
    file or wire brush before removing the nut.

    Thank you!

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to Bill on Mon Oct 3 14:35:16 2022
    On Mon, 3 Oct 2022 11:06:03 -0400, Bill <nonegiven@att.net> wrote:

    On 10/3/2022 10:44 AM, Leon wrote:
    On 10/3/2022 9:11 AM, Bill wrote:
    On 9/30/2022 5:07 PM, Bill wrote:
    My current solution for a "graphics card prop", is a 3/4" x 1.5" x h"
    piece of wood where, h is "just the right length". A rectangular box
    has been cut from the top, leaving a supporting shape (like an "L"),
    to cradle the corner of the card. Here is Amazon's solution:

    https://www.amazon.com/EZDIY-FAB-Graphics-GPU-Anodized-Aluminum/dp/B08T98DSG3/ref=sr_1_3?crid=2WQ344BSQKVK1&keywords=EZDIY-FAB-Graphics-GPU-Anodized-Aluminum&qid=1664570048&qu=eyJxc2MiOiIxLjE4IiwicXNhIjoiMC4wMCIsInFzcCI6IjAuMDAifQ%3D%3D&s=
    electronics&sprefix=ezdiy-fab-graphics-gpu-anodized-aluminum%2Celectronics%2C103&sr=1-3&th=1


    Probably few here would pay $20 for the product above. But graphics
    cards have become so expensive that you can't afford to not take care
    of them! What would be Your design so that the "product" is
    "adjustable" (like the product above). Obviously, if you don't want
    to think about it, then don't do it!

    No interest at all? I still think this holds its own as an
    "interesting problem". I think "threaded rod" might be very helpful,
    but if I cut it with a hack-saw, it seems like I might require a
    tap/die (actually a die), to get a nut on it and I lack any of those.
    Would a file suffice to clean up the damage left by a hack saw (so
    that nuts would go on)?


    Ummm.. Screw a nut on the threaded rod before cutting the rod. Then
    remove the nut and it will retread the rod. Cleanup any burrs with a
    file or wire brush before removing the nut.

    Thank you!

    I thought you were looking for a woodworking solution, though I guess
    you could use a wood screw (as opposed to a woodscrew).

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Bill@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Mon Oct 3 15:19:57 2022
    On 10/3/2022 2:35 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 3 Oct 2022 11:06:03 -0400, Bill <nonegiven@att.net> wrote:

    On 10/3/2022 10:44 AM, Leon wrote:
    On 10/3/2022 9:11 AM, Bill wrote:
    On 9/30/2022 5:07 PM, Bill wrote:
    My current solution for a "graphics card prop", is a 3/4" x 1.5" x h" >>>>> piece of wood where, h is "just the right length".  A rectangular box >>>>> has been cut from the top, leaving a supporting shape (like an "L"), >>>>> to cradle the corner of the card. Here is Amazon's solution:

    https://www.amazon.com/EZDIY-FAB-Graphics-GPU-Anodized-Aluminum/dp/B08T98DSG3/ref=sr_1_3?crid=2WQ344BSQKVK1&keywords=EZDIY-FAB-Graphics-GPU-Anodized-Aluminum&qid=1664570048&qu=eyJxc2MiOiIxLjE4IiwicXNhIjoiMC4wMCIsInFzcCI6IjAuMDAifQ%3D%3D&s=
    electronics&sprefix=ezdiy-fab-graphics-gpu-anodized-aluminum%2Celectronics%2C103&sr=1-3&th=1


    Probably few here would pay $20 for the product above. But graphics
    cards have become so expensive that you can't afford to not take care >>>>> of them!  What would be Your design so that the "product" is
    "adjustable" (like the product above). Obviously, if you don't want
    to think about it, then don't do it!

    No interest at all? I still think this holds its own as an
    "interesting problem". I think "threaded rod" might be very helpful,
    but if I cut it with a hack-saw, it seems like I might require a
    tap/die (actually a die), to get a nut on it and I lack any of those.
    Would a file suffice to clean up the damage left by a hack saw (so
    that nuts would go on)?


    Ummm..   Screw a nut on the threaded rod before cutting the rod.   Then >>> remove the nut and it will retread the rod.  Cleanup any burrs with a
    file or wire brush before removing the nut.

    Thank you!

    I thought you were looking for a woodworking solution, though I guess
    you could use a wood screw (as opposed to a woodscrew).

    Well, I would to use as much wood as possible (though I doubt I will
    apply a laquer finish). I was thinking of a wooden base with a threaded
    rod firmly secured. The threaded rod is one technique to support making
    the supports "easily adjustable". What would you propose? When I first
    posted the question, it didn't get a single reply!

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to Bill on Mon Oct 3 20:36:00 2022
    On Mon, 3 Oct 2022 15:19:57 -0400, Bill <nonegiven@att.net> wrote:

    On 10/3/2022 2:35 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 3 Oct 2022 11:06:03 -0400, Bill <nonegiven@att.net> wrote:

    On 10/3/2022 10:44 AM, Leon wrote:
    On 10/3/2022 9:11 AM, Bill wrote:
    On 9/30/2022 5:07 PM, Bill wrote:
    My current solution for a "graphics card prop", is a 3/4" x 1.5" x h" >>>>>> piece of wood where, h is "just the right length". A rectangular box >>>>>> has been cut from the top, leaving a supporting shape (like an "L"), >>>>>> to cradle the corner of the card. Here is Amazon's solution:

    https://www.amazon.com/EZDIY-FAB-Graphics-GPU-Anodized-Aluminum/dp/B08T98DSG3/ref=sr_1_3?crid=2WQ344BSQKVK1&keywords=EZDIY-FAB-Graphics-GPU-Anodized-Aluminum&qid=1664570048&qu=eyJxc2MiOiIxLjE4IiwicXNhIjoiMC4wMCIsInFzcCI6IjAuMDAifQ%3D%3D&s=
    electronics&sprefix=ezdiy-fab-graphics-gpu-anodized-aluminum%2Celectronics%2C103&sr=1-3&th=1


    Probably few here would pay $20 for the product above. But graphics >>>>>> cards have become so expensive that you can't afford to not take care >>>>>> of them! What would be Your design so that the "product" is
    "adjustable" (like the product above). Obviously, if you don't want >>>>>> to think about it, then don't do it!

    No interest at all? I still think this holds its own as an
    "interesting problem". I think "threaded rod" might be very helpful, >>>>> but if I cut it with a hack-saw, it seems like I might require a
    tap/die (actually a die), to get a nut on it and I lack any of those. >>>>> Would a file suffice to clean up the damage left by a hack saw (so
    that nuts would go on)?


    Ummm.. Screw a nut on the threaded rod before cutting the rod. Then >>>> remove the nut and it will retread the rod. Cleanup any burrs with a
    file or wire brush before removing the nut.

    Thank you!

    I thought you were looking for a woodworking solution, though I guess
    you could use a wood screw (as opposed to a woodscrew).

    Well, I would to use as much wood as possible (though I doubt I will
    apply a laquer finish). I was thinking of a wooden base with a threaded
    rod firmly secured. The threaded rod is one technique to support making
    the supports "easily adjustable". What would you propose? When I first >posted the question, it didn't get a single reply!

    I didn't reply because I couldn't think of a way to do it with wood,
    at least one that would be even close to the one you showed. Even
    that seemed like a strange solution for a problem that shouldn't need
    solving.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Bill@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Mon Oct 3 23:10:35 2022
    On 10/3/2022 8:36 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 3 Oct 2022 15:19:57 -0400, Bill <nonegiven@att.net> wrote:

    On 10/3/2022 2:35 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 3 Oct 2022 11:06:03 -0400, Bill <nonegiven@att.net> wrote:

    On 10/3/2022 10:44 AM, Leon wrote:
    On 10/3/2022 9:11 AM, Bill wrote:
    On 9/30/2022 5:07 PM, Bill wrote:
    My current solution for a "graphics card prop", is a 3/4" x 1.5" x h" >>>>>>> piece of wood where, h is "just the right length".  A rectangular box >>>>>>> has been cut from the top, leaving a supporting shape (like an "L"), >>>>>>> to cradle the corner of the card. Here is Amazon's solution:

    https://www.amazon.com/EZDIY-FAB-Graphics-GPU-Anodized-Aluminum/dp/B08T98DSG3/ref=sr_1_3?crid=2WQ344BSQKVK1&keywords=EZDIY-FAB-Graphics-GPU-Anodized-Aluminum&qid=1664570048&qu=eyJxc2MiOiIxLjE4IiwicXNhIjoiMC4wMCIsInFzcCI6IjAuMDAifQ%3D%3D&s=
    electronics&sprefix=ezdiy-fab-graphics-gpu-anodized-aluminum%2Celectronics%2C103&sr=1-3&th=1


    Probably few here would pay $20 for the product above. But graphics >>>>>>> cards have become so expensive that you can't afford to not take care >>>>>>> of them!  What would be Your design so that the "product" is
    "adjustable" (like the product above). Obviously, if you don't want >>>>>>> to think about it, then don't do it!

    No interest at all? I still think this holds its own as an
    "interesting problem". I think "threaded rod" might be very helpful, >>>>>> but if I cut it with a hack-saw, it seems like I might require a
    tap/die (actually a die), to get a nut on it and I lack any of those. >>>>>> Would a file suffice to clean up the damage left by a hack saw (so >>>>>> that nuts would go on)?


    Ummm..   Screw a nut on the threaded rod before cutting the rod.   Then
    remove the nut and it will retread the rod.  Cleanup any burrs with a >>>>> file or wire brush before removing the nut.

    Thank you!

    I thought you were looking for a woodworking solution, though I guess
    you could use a wood screw (as opposed to a woodscrew).

    Well, I would to use as much wood as possible (though I doubt I will
    apply a laquer finish). I was thinking of a wooden base with a threaded
    rod firmly secured. The threaded rod is one technique to support making
    the supports "easily adjustable". What would you propose? When I first
    posted the question, it didn't get a single reply!

    I didn't reply because I couldn't think of a way to do it with wood,
    at least one that would be even close to the one you showed. Even
    that seemed like a strange solution for a problem that shouldn't need solving.

    Well, every computer case/motherboard/gpu combination is different.As
    you may know, some gpus are well over 10 inches long. If you have a long
    heavy gpu that occupies more than 2 PCI slots, it needs some support. Compatibility is addressed by the standards, but not physical
    configuration issues like this one. Intel and AMD aren't even including
    CPU coolers with their CPUs any longer, as needs vary so much from user
    to user.
    If you don't want to deal with "problems" like this, then you buy a
    pre-built system from an OEM like HP or Dell (who may even leave the GPU hanging like a cantilever, I'm not sure), or even Apple.

    Here is a question: If the problem "shouldn't need solving", then whose
    job should it be to provide a solution. Case manufacturers? GPU
    manufacturers? motherboard manufacturers? Or the system builders. Yep.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DerbyDad03@21:1/5 to Bill on Mon Oct 3 20:01:38 2022
    On Friday, September 30, 2022 at 5:07:20 PM UTC-4, Bill wrote:
    My current solution for a "graphics card prop", is a 3/4" x 1.5" x h"
    piece of wood where, h is "just the right length". A rectangular box
    has been cut from the top, leaving a supporting shape (like an "L"), to cradle the corner of the card. The computer case holds one end very securely, but the other end hangs; hence the need for a support like
    this. What I described above took me about 10 minutes from design to implementation and has been serving just fine.

    But I am planning to get a new (used) graphics card soon, and thought it appropriate to try to improve on my design! ; ) Incidentally, my
    design only works provided you don't move the computer, but this is not
    a significant problem for me.

    Here is Amazon's solution:

    https://www.amazon.com/EZDIY-FAB-Graphics-GPU-Anodized-Aluminum/dp/B08T98DSG3/ref=sr_1_3?crid=2WQ344BSQKVK1&keywords=EZDIY-FAB-Graphics-GPU-Anodized-Aluminum&qid=1664570048&qu=eyJxc2MiOiIxLjE4IiwicXNhIjoiMC4wMCIsInFzcCI6IjAuMDAifQ%3D%3D&s=electronics&
    sprefix=ezdiy-fab-graphics-gpu-anodized-aluminum%2Celectronics%2C103&sr=1-3&th=1

    Probably few here would pay $20 for the product above. But graphics
    cards have become so expensive that you can't afford to not take care of them! What would be Your design so that the "product" is "adjustable"
    (like the product above).

    I'm been thinking about this for a few minutes, and I have an idea or
    two, but I thought it might be fun to give us a collective design project--sort of like they do at MIT! : )

    Guidelines are "Fast, simple and cheap", with readily available
    materials! Have fun! Don't overthink it! "Adjustability" with
    the turn of a screw would be a desirable feature. Something you can have confidence in (without the need to check it) would be nice too.
    If you are really successful you can probably make hundreds of dollars
    at Amazon! Besides for notoriety here, you'll have to "cash-in" there!
    : ) I know this is not everyone's cup of tea! Obviously, if you don't
    want to think about it, then don't do it!

    This is just a concept, not a final product...modify the steps as required.

    1 - Get a hardwood dowel of whatever diameter you want, like maybe 1.5".
    2 - Glue the dowel into a base that has magnets embedded in the bottom
    like the Amazon ones so it stands up inside the case and stays where you
    put it.
    3 - Drill a 1.5" hole in a piece of 3/4 hardwood stock and slip it over the dowel.
    Place the hole off center lengthwise so that you leave enough of a shelf to support the graphics card and "just enough" wood on the opposite side of
    the dowel for the next step.
    4 - Tap the portion of the 3/4" stock that is opposite the shelf to accept a bolt.

    With a nice snug hole for the dowel, you should be able to position the shelf right
    where you need it and then tighten the bolt against the dowel to prevent it from
    sliding. The bolt really won't be doing much so it shouldn't need to be so tight that
    it causes any damage to the dowel or the threads.

    If you want to get "all woody with it" look up some YouTube's on making wooden bolts. Then make a wooden bolt to match whatever tap you choose.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to Bill on Tue Oct 4 15:52:21 2022
    On Mon, 3 Oct 2022 23:10:35 -0400, Bill <nonegiven@att.net> wrote:

    On 10/3/2022 8:36 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 3 Oct 2022 15:19:57 -0400, Bill <nonegiven@att.net> wrote:

    On 10/3/2022 2:35 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 3 Oct 2022 11:06:03 -0400, Bill <nonegiven@att.net> wrote:

    On 10/3/2022 10:44 AM, Leon wrote:
    On 10/3/2022 9:11 AM, Bill wrote:
    On 9/30/2022 5:07 PM, Bill wrote:
    My current solution for a "graphics card prop", is a 3/4" x 1.5" x h" >>>>>>>> piece of wood where, h is "just the right length". A rectangular box >>>>>>>> has been cut from the top, leaving a supporting shape (like an "L"), >>>>>>>> to cradle the corner of the card. Here is Amazon's solution:

    https://www.amazon.com/EZDIY-FAB-Graphics-GPU-Anodized-Aluminum/dp/B08T98DSG3/ref=sr_1_3?crid=2WQ344BSQKVK1&keywords=EZDIY-FAB-Graphics-GPU-Anodized-Aluminum&qid=1664570048&qu=eyJxc2MiOiIxLjE4IiwicXNhIjoiMC4wMCIsInFzcCI6IjAuMDAifQ%3D%3D&s=
    electronics&sprefix=ezdiy-fab-graphics-gpu-anodized-aluminum%2Celectronics%2C103&sr=1-3&th=1


    Probably few here would pay $20 for the product above. But graphics >>>>>>>> cards have become so expensive that you can't afford to not take care >>>>>>>> of them! What would be Your design so that the "product" is
    "adjustable" (like the product above). Obviously, if you don't want >>>>>>>> to think about it, then don't do it!

    No interest at all? I still think this holds its own as an
    "interesting problem". I think "threaded rod" might be very helpful, >>>>>>> but if I cut it with a hack-saw, it seems like I might require a >>>>>>> tap/die (actually a die), to get a nut on it and I lack any of those. >>>>>>> Would a file suffice to clean up the damage left by a hack saw (so >>>>>>> that nuts would go on)?


    Ummm.. Screw a nut on the threaded rod before cutting the rod. Then >>>>>> remove the nut and it will retread the rod. Cleanup any burrs with a >>>>>> file or wire brush before removing the nut.

    Thank you!

    I thought you were looking for a woodworking solution, though I guess
    you could use a wood screw (as opposed to a woodscrew).

    Well, I would to use as much wood as possible (though I doubt I will
    apply a laquer finish). I was thinking of a wooden base with a threaded >>> rod firmly secured. The threaded rod is one technique to support making
    the supports "easily adjustable". What would you propose? When I first
    posted the question, it didn't get a single reply!

    I didn't reply because I couldn't think of a way to do it with wood,
    at least one that would be even close to the one you showed. Even
    that seemed like a strange solution for a problem that shouldn't need
    solving.

    Well, every computer case/motherboard/gpu combination is different.As
    you may know, some gpus are well over 10 inches long. If you have a long >heavy gpu that occupies more than 2 PCI slots, it needs some support. >Compatibility is addressed by the standards, but not physical
    configuration issues like this one. Intel and AMD aren't even including
    CPU coolers with their CPUs any longer, as needs vary so much from user
    to user.
    If you don't want to deal with "problems" like this, then you buy a
    pre-built system from an OEM like HP or Dell (who may even leave the GPU >hanging like a cantilever, I'm not sure), or even Apple.

    Here is a question: If the problem "shouldn't need solving", then whose
    job should it be to provide a solution. Case manufacturers? GPU >manufacturers? motherboard manufacturers? Or the system builders. Yep.

    The case manufacturers. It's easier for them since they already have
    the physical structure. Since gamers are the only ones who assemble
    computers anymore it would seem to be an integral component of the
    case.

    I haven't built one in 20 years. I've used nothing but laptops since
    their (non-gamer) performance increased more than I really need. I
    think Adventure was the only game I really got into. Soon after that
    they became too complicated to play casually.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Markem618@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Tue Oct 4 16:12:00 2022
    On Tue, 04 Oct 2022 15:52:21 -0400, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    The case manufacturers. It's easier for them since they already have
    the physical structure. Since gamers are the only ones who assemble
    computers anymore it would seem to be an integral component of the
    case.

    I build my own have since my third system I bought at a store in '94.
    On the sixth now, motherboards come with video on board, so all you
    need is a case, power supply, memory and drives. Do not like laptops
    as batteries suck, tablets nope. Preload crap on store bought systems
    are why I avoid them.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Leon@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Tue Oct 4 15:57:06 2022
    On 10/4/2022 2:52 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    Snip


    I haven't built one in 20 years. I've used nothing but laptops since
    their (non-gamer) performance increased more than I really need. I
    think Adventure was the only game I really got into. Soon after that
    they became too complicated to play casually.



    I like Bubble Shooter.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to All on Tue Oct 4 20:48:05 2022
    On Tue, 04 Oct 2022 16:12:00 -0500, Markem618 <markrm618@hotmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Tue, 04 Oct 2022 15:52:21 -0400, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    The case manufacturers. It's easier for them since they already have
    the physical structure. Since gamers are the only ones who assemble >>computers anymore it would seem to be an integral component of the
    case.

    I build my own have since my third system I bought at a store in '94.
    On the sixth now, motherboards come with video on board, so all you
    need is a case, power supply, memory and drives. Do not like laptops
    as batteries suck, tablets nope. Preload crap on store bought systems
    are why I avoid them.

    I can't count the number of systems I've built. I think my first was
    in '93 and built a couple more before I changed jobs. I spent a few
    years evaluating computer hardware so I had access to hundreds of
    different components (motherboards, graphics cards, disk drives...).

    Since Li-Ion replaced NiCd, I haven't had a problem with batteries
    (same with tools). I use a tablet for the gym and I have another that
    I use at home, pretty much for YouTube. I bought it for the gym but
    it's an 11" (the other is a 7" and a lot more rugged) so I have to
    figure out a way of keeping it from falling off the treadmill.

    My current laptop has a 4K display and can support three displays, two
    at 4K, though one is pretty slow. It's nice for CAD (Sketchup).

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Leon@21:1/5 to All on Wed Oct 5 09:08:46 2022
    On 10/4/2022 4:12 PM, Markem618 wrote:
    On Tue, 04 Oct 2022 15:52:21 -0400, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    The case manufacturers. It's easier for them since they already have
    the physical structure. Since gamers are the only ones who assemble
    computers anymore it would seem to be an integral component of the
    case.

    I build my own have since my third system I bought at a store in '94.
    On the sixth now, motherboards come with video on board, so all you
    need is a case, power supply, memory and drives. Do not like laptops
    as batteries suck, tablets nope. Preload crap on store bought systems
    are why I avoid them.


    I wish I was only on my 6th computer. LOL. Bought my first in 1986.

    The video card on board does not suite my needs. I have my computers
    built locally and the Radeon video card, for Sketchup, is pretty large physically, with it's own fans.

    From what I understand Dell no longer loads their computers with
    anything but what you order.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Leon@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Wed Oct 5 09:15:38 2022
    On 10/4/2022 7:48 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Tue, 04 Oct 2022 16:12:00 -0500, Markem618 <markrm618@hotmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Tue, 04 Oct 2022 15:52:21 -0400, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    The case manufacturers. It's easier for them since they already have
    the physical structure. Since gamers are the only ones who assemble
    computers anymore it would seem to be an integral component of the
    case.

    I build my own have since my third system I bought at a store in '94.
    On the sixth now, motherboards come with video on board, so all you
    need is a case, power supply, memory and drives. Do not like laptops
    as batteries suck, tablets nope. Preload crap on store bought systems
    are why I avoid them.

    I can't count the number of systems I've built. I think my first was
    in '93 and built a couple more before I changed jobs. I spent a few
    years evaluating computer hardware so I had access to hundreds of
    different components (motherboards, graphics cards, disk drives...).

    Since Li-Ion replaced NiCd, I haven't had a problem with batteries
    (same with tools). I use a tablet for the gym and I have another that
    I use at home, pretty much for YouTube. I bought it for the gym but
    it's an 11" (the other is a 7" and a lot more rugged) so I have to
    figure out a way of keeping it from falling off the treadmill.

    My current laptop has a 4K display and can support three displays, two
    at 4K, though one is pretty slow. It's nice for CAD (Sketchup).



    4K displays and the video cards to support them are cool. CAD/Sketchup drawing's diagonal/angled lines are straight and not jagged zig zag any
    more.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Bill@21:1/5 to Bill on Wed Oct 5 17:03:04 2022
    On 10/3/2022 11:06 AM, Bill wrote:
    On 10/3/2022 10:44 AM, Leon wrote:
    On 10/3/2022 9:11 AM, Bill wrote:
    On 9/30/2022 5:07 PM, Bill wrote:
    My current solution for a "graphics card prop", is a 3/4" x 1.5" x
    h" piece of wood where, h is "just the right length".  A rectangular
    box
    has been cut from the top, leaving a supporting shape (like an "L"),
    to cradle the corner of the card. Here is Amazon's solution:

    https://www.amazon.com/EZDIY-FAB-Graphics-GPU-Anodized-Aluminum/dp/B08T98DSG3/ref=sr_1_3?crid=2WQ344BSQKVK1&keywords=EZDIY-FAB-Graphics-GPU-Anodized-Aluminum&qid=1664570048&qu=eyJxc2MiOiIxLjE4IiwicXNhIjoiMC4wMCIsInFzcCI6IjAuMDAifQ%3D%3D&s=
    electronics&sprefix=ezdiy-fab-graphics-gpu-anodized-aluminum%2Celectronics%2C103&sr=1-3&th=1


    Probably few here would pay $20 for the product above. But graphics
    cards have become so expensive that you can't afford to not take
    care of them!  What would be Your design so that the "product" is
    "adjustable" (like the product above). Obviously, if you don't want
    to think about it, then don't do it!

    No interest at all? I still think this holds its own as an
    "interesting problem". I think "threaded rod" might be very helpful,
    but if I cut it with a hack-saw, it seems like I might require a
    tap/die (actually a die), to get a nut on it and I lack any of those.
    Would a file suffice to clean up the damage left by a hack saw (so
    that nuts would go on)?


    Ummm..   Screw a nut on the threaded rod before cutting the rod.
    Then remove the nut and it will retread the rod.  Cleanup any burrs
    with a file or wire brush before removing the nut.

    Thank you!


    Just for fun, I made a SketchUp model (I think everyone should use that software at least once a year whether they like it or not! : ) )
    I looked inside my computer case, and realized there probably won't be
    room in my case for a support on the end of the card, so I will likely
    support it from underneath, between the middle and the end of the card,
    but not *from* the end.

    I posted two jpg's to alt.binaries.pictures.woodworking for your
    possible entertainment.
    Washers, nuts and other hardware is not illustrated, and it's not
    exactly to scale.

    I still need to see if can find a "threaded sleeve" to fit in the top
    support, fitting the 3/8" threaded rod. That will be where the vertical adjustment lies. Please let me know if this "threaded sleeve" is easily available? I thought of gluing 3 or 4 nuts together, but that doesn't
    seem right.

    At least I tried to make this fun (for you!) : )

    P.S. I took another look, and I didn't see anything on the market long
    enough for a case as tall as mine. Most of the GPU "Props" don't go to 8
    or 9 inches. So it is nice to be able to scrounge something together
    myself. My next GPU Auction is Saturday! I can't afford or justify the
    current market prices of buying "new"--or at least, I like what I can
    get "used" better than what I can get buying new, for almost exactly the
    same price. Cheers! -Bill

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to Bill on Wed Oct 5 19:57:37 2022
    On Wed, 5 Oct 2022 17:03:04 -0400, Bill <nonegiven@att.net> wrote:

    On 10/3/2022 11:06 AM, Bill wrote:
    On 10/3/2022 10:44 AM, Leon wrote:
    On 10/3/2022 9:11 AM, Bill wrote:
    On 9/30/2022 5:07 PM, Bill wrote:
    My current solution for a "graphics card prop", is a 3/4" x 1.5" x
    h" piece of wood where, h is "just the right length". A rectangular >>>>> box
    has been cut from the top, leaving a supporting shape (like an "L"), >>>>> to cradle the corner of the card. Here is Amazon's solution:

    https://www.amazon.com/EZDIY-FAB-Graphics-GPU-Anodized-Aluminum/dp/B08T98DSG3/ref=sr_1_3?crid=2WQ344BSQKVK1&keywords=EZDIY-FAB-Graphics-GPU-Anodized-Aluminum&qid=1664570048&qu=eyJxc2MiOiIxLjE4IiwicXNhIjoiMC4wMCIsInFzcCI6IjAuMDAifQ%3D%3D&s=
    electronics&sprefix=ezdiy-fab-graphics-gpu-anodized-aluminum%2Celectronics%2C103&sr=1-3&th=1


    Probably few here would pay $20 for the product above. But graphics
    cards have become so expensive that you can't afford to not take
    care of them! What would be Your design so that the "product" is
    "adjustable" (like the product above). Obviously, if you don't want
    to think about it, then don't do it!

    No interest at all? I still think this holds its own as an
    "interesting problem". I think "threaded rod" might be very helpful,
    but if I cut it with a hack-saw, it seems like I might require a
    tap/die (actually a die), to get a nut on it and I lack any of those.
    Would a file suffice to clean up the damage left by a hack saw (so
    that nuts would go on)?


    Ummm.. Screw a nut on the threaded rod before cutting the rod.
    Then remove the nut and it will retread the rod. Cleanup any burrs
    with a file or wire brush before removing the nut.

    Thank you!


    Just for fun, I made a SketchUp model (I think everyone should use that >software at least once a year whether they like it or not! : ) )
    I looked inside my computer case, and realized there probably won't be
    room in my case for a support on the end of the card, so I will likely >support it from underneath, between the middle and the end of the card,
    but not *from* the end.

    I posted two jpg's to alt.binaries.pictures.woodworking for your
    possible entertainment.
    Washers, nuts and other hardware is not illustrated, and it's not
    exactly to scale.

    I understand it but how do you keep it in place? I have the same
    question about the retail version.

    I still need to see if can find a "threaded sleeve" to fit in the top >support, fitting the 3/8" threaded rod. That will be where the vertical >adjustment lies. Please let me know if this "threaded sleeve" is easily >available? I thought of gluing 3 or 4 nuts together, but that doesn't
    seem right.

    How about threaded inserts? Put as many in the hole as floats your
    boat.

    At least I tried to make this fun (for you!) : )

    P.S. I took another look, and I didn't see anything on the market long
    enough for a case as tall as mine. Most of the GPU "Props" don't go to 8
    or 9 inches. So it is nice to be able to scrounge something together
    myself. My next GPU Auction is Saturday! I can't afford or justify the >current market prices of buying "new"--or at least, I like what I can
    get "used" better than what I can get buying new, for almost exactly the
    same price. Cheers! -Bill



    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Bill@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Wed Oct 5 23:06:00 2022
    On 10/5/2022 7:57 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    I understand it but how do you keep it in place? I have the same
    question about the retail version.

    Some of them have magnets on the bottom and some of them have adhesive
    pads. I am going to see if Menards has some sort of "easy to apply"
    magnetic pads. If I raise to to high enough, so that it's snug, I feel
    pretty confident that it won't be going anywhere. Gravity will do it's
    job. The other end of the card is firmly attached to the case--we're
    just supporting the "cantilever".

    The primitive wooden support I am currently using worked fine until
    after I "disturbed" the case (it sits along a "path" and I inadvertently
    bumped into it). The monitor started not waking from sleep with the
    rest of the computer. It was a month before I (mentally) made the
    possible association, and took off the cover to take a look. But after
    I re-positioned the wooden support, that problem mysteriously
    disappeared. So the moral of that experience is that support for a long graphics card matters. Maybe not always, but sometimes (for sure)!

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to Bill on Wed Oct 5 23:53:00 2022
    On Wed, 5 Oct 2022 23:06:00 -0400, Bill <nonegiven@att.net> wrote:

    On 10/5/2022 7:57 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    I understand it but how do you keep it in place? I have the same
    question about the retail version.

    Some of them have magnets on the bottom and some of them have adhesive
    pads. I am going to see if Menards has some sort of "easy to apply"
    magnetic pads. If I raise to to high enough, so that it's snug, I feel >pretty confident that it won't be going anywhere. Gravity will do it's
    job. The other end of the card is firmly attached to the case--we're
    just supporting the "cantilever".

    The magnetic pads I've seen aren't all that great. A rare-earth
    magnet recessed into the support would work better. Even better yet: <https://www.harborfreight.com/multi-position-magnetic-base-with-fine-adjustment-63663.html>
    I don't think you'll ever find a mag-switch cheaper than this. IIRC,
    they're threaded for 1/4-20 so great for photographic accessories.
    They aren't wimps, either.

    The primitive wooden support I am currently using worked fine until
    after I "disturbed" the case (it sits along a "path" and I inadvertently >bumped into it). The monitor started not waking from sleep with the
    rest of the computer. It was a month before I (mentally) made the
    possible association, and took off the cover to take a look. But after
    I re-positioned the wooden support, that problem mysteriously
    disappeared. So the moral of that experience is that support for a long >graphics card matters. Maybe not always, but sometimes (for sure)!

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Markem618@21:1/5 to Bill on Wed Oct 5 23:45:47 2022
    On Wed, 5 Oct 2022 23:06:00 -0400, Bill <nonegiven@att.net> wrote:

    On 10/5/2022 7:57 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    I understand it but how do you keep it in place? I have the same
    question about the retail version.

    Some of them have magnets on the bottom and some of them have adhesive
    pads. I am going to see if Menards has some sort of "easy to apply"
    magnetic pads. If I raise to to high enough, so that it's snug, I feel >pretty confident that it won't be going anywhere. Gravity will do it's
    job. The other end of the card is firmly attached to the case--we're
    just supporting the "cantilever".

    The primitive wooden support I am currently using worked fine until
    after I "disturbed" the case (it sits along a "path" and I inadvertently >bumped into it). The monitor started not waking from sleep with the
    rest of the computer. It was a month before I (mentally) made the
    possible association, and took off the cover to take a look. But after
    I re-positioned the wooden support, that problem mysteriously
    disappeared. So the moral of that experience is that support for a long >graphics card matters. Maybe not always, but sometimes (for sure)!

    Might 19 to many in the pack, but a bit of super glue on one of these.

    https://totalelement.com/products/1-2-x-1-8-inch-strong-neodymium-rare-earth-disc-magnets-n52-24-pack?

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Bill@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Thu Oct 6 01:44:31 2022
    On 10/5/2022 11:53 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    The magnetic pads I've seen aren't all that great. A rare-earth
    magnet recessed into the support would work better. Even better yet: <https://www.harborfreight.com/multi-position-magnetic-base-with-fine-adjustment-63663.html>
    I don't think you'll ever find a mag-switch cheaper than this. IIRC,
    they're threaded for 1/4-20 so great for photographic accessories.
    They aren't wimps, either.

    Certainly that would work. But I don't think that much "complexity" is
    called for in this application, a thin rubber pad would probably
    suffice. Size is an issue too, as my front case fan has to blow air
    passed it. it will sit right in front of a 140mm case fan, and the only
    source of air coming into my computer case (there is a fan in the back
    and two on top, a CPU-AIO cooler, forcing air out). I agree that the
    price is very good, I paid twice as much for a similar one from Grizzly.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Bill@21:1/5 to All on Thu Oct 6 02:25:02 2022
    On 10/6/2022 12:45 AM, Markem618 wrote:

    Might 19 to many in the pack, but a bit of super glue on one of these.

    https://totalelement.com/products/1-2-x-1-8-inch-strong-neodymium-rare-earth-disc-magnets-n52-24-pack?

    Thank you for your suggestion! I happen to have a few similar magnets.
    Keep in mind that the GPU has strong (vibrating) fans, that go on and
    off repeatedly. While I wish it would, I'm not sure I trust a super glue
    joint to hold up to that for as many years as I typically use my system
    for. I'm on year 8 for my current system, and intend to also re-use the graphics card I am searching for now (Nvidia 3000 series) in my next
    system. One can get a used RTX 3070 for the *same* price as a new
    (entry level) RTX 3050, and the RTX 3050, being relatively new, is not
    really available used. Nvidia has decided they
    want to sell their cards for quite a bit more money than they used to,
    and I really don't wish to encourage them by buying a new card. I'm not
    a "gamer", but I do have one AI-related program whose performance
    depends on OpenCL performance (it is AI related, "does a lot of math",
    and prefers to do it on a GPU over the CPU).
    Doing a web search with "OpenCl Benchmarks" yields a website with a
    benchmark score for every GPU you can think of, which I have found handy.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Markem618@21:1/5 to Bill on Thu Oct 6 11:14:50 2022
    On Thu, 6 Oct 2022 02:25:02 -0400, Bill <nonegiven@att.net> wrote:

    On 10/6/2022 12:45 AM, Markem618 wrote:

    Might 19 to many in the pack, but a bit of super glue on one of these.

    https://totalelement.com/products/1-2-x-1-8-inch-strong-neodymium-rare-earth-disc-magnets-n52-24-pack?

    Thank you for your suggestion! I happen to have a few similar magnets.
    Keep in mind that the GPU has strong (vibrating) fans, that go on and
    off repeatedly. While I wish it would, I'm not sure I trust a super glue >joint to hold up to that for as many years as I typically use my system
    for. I'm on year 8 for my current system, and intend to also re-use the >graphics card I am searching for now (Nvidia 3000 series) in my next
    system. One can get a used RTX 3070 for the *same* price as a new
    (entry level) RTX 3050, and the RTX 3050, being relatively new, is not
    really available used. Nvidia has decided they
    want to sell their cards for quite a bit more money than they used to,
    and I really don't wish to encourage them by buying a new card. I'm not
    a "gamer", but I do have one AI-related program whose performance
    depends on OpenCL performance (it is AI related, "does a lot of math",
    and prefers to do it on a GPU over the CPU).
    Doing a web search with "OpenCl Benchmarks" yields a website with a
    benchmark score for every GPU you can think of, which I have found handy.

    Heat will degrade super glue over time, but at the bottom of your
    support sticking to the case not so much, right.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Bill@21:1/5 to All on Thu Oct 6 13:59:51 2022
    On 10/6/2022 12:14 PM, Markem618 wrote:
    On Thu, 6 Oct 2022 02:25:02 -0400, Bill <nonegiven@att.net> wrote:

    On 10/6/2022 12:45 AM, Markem618 wrote:

    Might 19 to many in the pack, but a bit of super glue on one of these.

    https://totalelement.com/products/1-2-x-1-8-inch-strong-neodymium-rare-earth-disc-magnets-n52-24-pack?

    Thank you for your suggestion! I happen to have a few similar magnets.
    Keep in mind that the GPU has strong (vibrating) fans, that go on and
    off repeatedly. While I wish it would, I'm not sure I trust a super glue
    joint to hold up to that for as many years as I typically use my system
    for. I'm on year 8 for my current system, and intend to also re-use the
    graphics card I am searching for now (Nvidia 3000 series) in my next
    system. One can get a used RTX 3070 for the *same* price as a new
    (entry level) RTX 3050, and the RTX 3050, being relatively new, is not
    really available used. Nvidia has decided they
    want to sell their cards for quite a bit more money than they used to,
    and I really don't wish to encourage them by buying a new card. I'm not
    a "gamer", but I do have one AI-related program whose performance
    depends on OpenCL performance (it is AI related, "does a lot of math",
    and prefers to do it on a GPU over the CPU).
    Doing a web search with "OpenCl Benchmarks" yields a website with a
    benchmark score for every GPU you can think of, which I have found handy.

    Heat will degrade super glue over time, but at the bottom of your
    support sticking to the case not so much, right.


    I didn't have so much concern about heat, but about the vibrations
    coming from other end of the support. Although it says online that
    super glue works on wood, I have concerns about the durability of the connection (to unfinished wood). I really don't know. As my magnets
    (which came out of old disk drives) are not round, it would be a fair
    amount of work to inset them, and use epoxy adhesive, which I thought of
    doing. If I locate a thin sheet of rubber (something like an old inner
    tube from a bicycle) I may test that to see if it "sticks" to the bottom
    of the case (which has a nice shiny finish). Where is that old inner
    tube when you need it! ; ) My next graphics card auction isn't for a
    couple days, so I still have time! One seller had 4 cards on E-bay the
    other day, all closing within 6 minutes. And my computer went blue
    screen after placing a bid at the end of one of the 2nd auction, so I
    missed the rest. E-bay was very interested in learning all of the
    details, but they did nothing to recompense me for my inconvenience
    (even after I hinted!--I said, "Maybe you could offer me a coupon or
    something for my inconvenience?". But those details fell on deaf ears!).

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Scott Lurndal@21:1/5 to markrm618@hotmail.com on Thu Oct 6 20:11:09 2022
    Markem618 <markrm618@hotmail.com> writes:
    On Thu, 6 Oct 2022 13:59:51 -0400, Bill <nonegiven@att.net> wrote:

    On 10/6/2022 12:14 PM, Markem618 wrote:
    On Thu, 6 Oct 2022 02:25:02 -0400, Bill <nonegiven@att.net> wrote:

    On 10/6/2022 12:45 AM, Markem618 wrote:

    Might 19 to many in the pack, but a bit of super glue on one of these. >>>>>
    https://totalelement.com/products/1-2-x-1-8-inch-strong-neodymium-rare-earth-disc-magnets-n52-24-pack?

    Thank you for your suggestion! I happen to have a few similar magnets. >>>> Keep in mind that the GPU has strong (vibrating) fans, that go on and
    off repeatedly. While I wish it would, I'm not sure I trust a super glue >>>> joint to hold up to that for as many years as I typically use my system >>>> for. I'm on year 8 for my current system, and intend to also re-use the >>>> graphics card I am searching for now (Nvidia 3000 series) in my next
    system. One can get a used RTX 3070 for the *same* price as a new
    (entry level) RTX 3050, and the RTX 3050, being relatively new, is not >>>> really available used. Nvidia has decided they
    want to sell their cards for quite a bit more money than they used to, >>>> and I really don't wish to encourage them by buying a new card. I'm not >>>> a "gamer", but I do have one AI-related program whose performance
    depends on OpenCL performance (it is AI related, "does a lot of math", >>>> and prefers to do it on a GPU over the CPU).
    Doing a web search with "OpenCl Benchmarks" yields a website with a
    benchmark score for every GPU you can think of, which I have found handy. >>>
    Heat will degrade super glue over time, but at the bottom of your
    support sticking to the case not so much, right.


    I didn't have so much concern about heat, but about the vibrations
    coming from other end of the support. Although it says online that
    super glue works on wood, I have concerns about the durability of the >>connection (to unfinished wood). I really don't know. As my magnets
    (which came out of old disk drives) are not round, it would be a fair >>amount of work to inset them, and use epoxy adhesive, which I thought of >>doing. If I locate a thin sheet of rubber (something like an old inner
    tube from a bicycle) I may test that to see if it "sticks" to the bottom
    of the case (which has a nice shiny finish). Where is that old inner
    tube when you need it! ; ) My next graphics card auction isn't for a >>couple days, so I still have time! One seller had 4 cards on E-bay the >>other day, all closing within 6 minutes. And my computer went blue
    screen after placing a bid at the end of one of the 2nd auction, so I >>missed the rest. E-bay was very interested in learning all of the
    details, but they did nothing to recompense me for my inconvenience
    (even after I hinted!--I said, "Maybe you could offer me a coupon or >>something for my inconvenience?". But those details fell on deaf ears!).

    Actually I would probably just use some plumbing pipe insulation
    between the cards, it would keep the cards in place and offer some >cushioning.

    Be careful, as the foam may be conductive, or may melt when in
    contact with a power transistor on the card.

    I'd also avoid placing magnets anywhere near the motherboard.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to Bill on Thu Oct 6 15:16:46 2022
    On Thu, 6 Oct 2022 01:44:31 -0400, Bill <nonegiven@att.net> wrote:

    On 10/5/2022 11:53 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    The magnetic pads I've seen aren't all that great. A rare-earth
    magnet recessed into the support would work better. Even better yet:
    <https://www.harborfreight.com/multi-position-magnetic-base-with-fine-adjustment-63663.html>
    I don't think you'll ever find a mag-switch cheaper than this. IIRC,
    they're threaded for 1/4-20 so great for photographic accessories.
    They aren't wimps, either.

    Certainly that would work. But I don't think that much "complexity" is >called for in this application, a thin rubber pad would probably
    suffice. Size is an issue too, as my front case fan has to blow air
    passed it. it will sit right in front of a 140mm case fan, and the only >source of air coming into my computer case (there is a fan in the back
    and two on top, a CPU-AIO cooler, forcing air out). I agree that the
    price is very good, I paid twice as much for a similar one from Grizzly.

    What I meant was to use the base as a starting point. I believe the
    thread on the top is 1/4-20 so it would be easy to mount some sort of
    support tower on that. I didn't mean to use the rest of the tool.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Markem618@21:1/5 to Bill on Thu Oct 6 14:21:24 2022
    On Thu, 6 Oct 2022 13:59:51 -0400, Bill <nonegiven@att.net> wrote:

    On 10/6/2022 12:14 PM, Markem618 wrote:
    On Thu, 6 Oct 2022 02:25:02 -0400, Bill <nonegiven@att.net> wrote:

    On 10/6/2022 12:45 AM, Markem618 wrote:

    Might 19 to many in the pack, but a bit of super glue on one of these. >>>>
    https://totalelement.com/products/1-2-x-1-8-inch-strong-neodymium-rare-earth-disc-magnets-n52-24-pack?

    Thank you for your suggestion! I happen to have a few similar magnets.
    Keep in mind that the GPU has strong (vibrating) fans, that go on and
    off repeatedly. While I wish it would, I'm not sure I trust a super glue >>> joint to hold up to that for as many years as I typically use my system
    for. I'm on year 8 for my current system, and intend to also re-use the
    graphics card I am searching for now (Nvidia 3000 series) in my next
    system. One can get a used RTX 3070 for the *same* price as a new
    (entry level) RTX 3050, and the RTX 3050, being relatively new, is not
    really available used. Nvidia has decided they
    want to sell their cards for quite a bit more money than they used to,
    and I really don't wish to encourage them by buying a new card. I'm not >>> a "gamer", but I do have one AI-related program whose performance
    depends on OpenCL performance (it is AI related, "does a lot of math",
    and prefers to do it on a GPU over the CPU).
    Doing a web search with "OpenCl Benchmarks" yields a website with a
    benchmark score for every GPU you can think of, which I have found handy. >>
    Heat will degrade super glue over time, but at the bottom of your
    support sticking to the case not so much, right.


    I didn't have so much concern about heat, but about the vibrations
    coming from other end of the support. Although it says online that
    super glue works on wood, I have concerns about the durability of the >connection (to unfinished wood). I really don't know. As my magnets
    (which came out of old disk drives) are not round, it would be a fair
    amount of work to inset them, and use epoxy adhesive, which I thought of >doing. If I locate a thin sheet of rubber (something like an old inner
    tube from a bicycle) I may test that to see if it "sticks" to the bottom
    of the case (which has a nice shiny finish). Where is that old inner
    tube when you need it! ; ) My next graphics card auction isn't for a
    couple days, so I still have time! One seller had 4 cards on E-bay the
    other day, all closing within 6 minutes. And my computer went blue
    screen after placing a bid at the end of one of the 2nd auction, so I
    missed the rest. E-bay was very interested in learning all of the
    details, but they did nothing to recompense me for my inconvenience
    (even after I hinted!--I said, "Maybe you could offer me a coupon or >something for my inconvenience?". But those details fell on deaf ears!).

    Actually I would probably just use some plumbing pipe insulation
    between the cards, it would keep the cards in place and offer some
    cushioning.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Bill@21:1/5 to Scott Lurndal on Thu Oct 6 16:30:35 2022
    On 10/6/2022 4:11 PM, Scott Lurndal wrote:

    I'd also avoid placing magnets anywhere near the motherboard.


    Yes, that would be "really funny" (not ha ha) if you flashed your own
    bios! : )

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Bill@21:1/5 to All on Thu Oct 6 16:37:20 2022
    On 10/6/2022 4:23 PM, Markem618 wrote:

    Better yet find a real desktop case rather than a tower, but I believe
    they have gone extinct.

    Why do you sugggest that? That sounds like a waste of valuable desk
    space (if I am understanding you correctly). Wait til they come out
    with cases to better support the new Nvidia 4090, it's huge, and it has
    huge power demands (and cooling demands).

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Bill@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Thu Oct 6 16:21:08 2022
    On 10/6/2022 3:16 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Thu, 6 Oct 2022 01:44:31 -0400, Bill <nonegiven@att.net> wrote:

    On 10/5/2022 11:53 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    The magnetic pads I've seen aren't all that great. A rare-earth
    magnet recessed into the support would work better. Even better yet:
    <https://www.harborfreight.com/multi-position-magnetic-base-with-fine-adjustment-63663.html>
    I don't think you'll ever find a mag-switch cheaper than this. IIRC,
    they're threaded for 1/4-20 so great for photographic accessories.
    They aren't wimps, either.

    Certainly that would work. But I don't think that much "complexity" is
    called for in this application, a thin rubber pad would probably
    suffice. Size is an issue too, as my front case fan has to blow air
    passed it. it will sit right in front of a 140mm case fan, and the only
    source of air coming into my computer case (there is a fan in the back
    and two on top, a CPU-AIO cooler, forcing air out). I agree that the
    price is very good, I paid twice as much for a similar one from Grizzly.

    What I meant was to use the base as a starting point. I believe the
    thread on the top is 1/4-20 so it would be easy to mount some sort of
    support tower on that. I didn't mean to use the rest of the tool.

    Yes, that makes sense. It would be rock solid! I'm pretty sure my case
    is made of steel, but it someone had an aluminum case they might be out
    of luck. I'll take another look my case tonight!

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Bill@21:1/5 to All on Thu Oct 6 16:28:50 2022
    On 10/6/2022 3:21 PM, Markem618 wrote:
    On Thu, 6 Oct 2022 13:59:51 -0400, Bill <nonegiven@att.net> wrote:

    On 10/6/2022 12:14 PM, Markem618 wrote:
    On Thu, 6 Oct 2022 02:25:02 -0400, Bill <nonegiven@att.net> wrote:

    On 10/6/2022 12:45 AM, Markem618 wrote:

    Might 19 to many in the pack, but a bit of super glue on one of these. >>>>>
    https://totalelement.com/products/1-2-x-1-8-inch-strong-neodymium-rare-earth-disc-magnets-n52-24-pack?

    Thank you for your suggestion! I happen to have a few similar magnets. >>>> Keep in mind that the GPU has strong (vibrating) fans, that go on and
    off repeatedly. While I wish it would, I'm not sure I trust a super glue >>>> joint to hold up to that for as many years as I typically use my system >>>> for. I'm on year 8 for my current system, and intend to also re-use the >>>> graphics card I am searching for now (Nvidia 3000 series) in my next
    system. One can get a used RTX 3070 for the *same* price as a new
    (entry level) RTX 3050, and the RTX 3050, being relatively new, is not >>>> really available used. Nvidia has decided they
    want to sell their cards for quite a bit more money than they used to, >>>> and I really don't wish to encourage them by buying a new card. I'm not >>>> a "gamer", but I do have one AI-related program whose performance
    depends on OpenCL performance (it is AI related, "does a lot of math", >>>> and prefers to do it on a GPU over the CPU).
    Doing a web search with "OpenCl Benchmarks" yields a website with a
    benchmark score for every GPU you can think of, which I have found handy. >>>
    Heat will degrade super glue over time, but at the bottom of your
    support sticking to the case not so much, right.


    I didn't have so much concern about heat, but about the vibrations
    coming from other end of the support. Although it says online that
    super glue works on wood, I have concerns about the durability of the
    connection (to unfinished wood). I really don't know. As my magnets
    (which came out of old disk drives) are not round, it would be a fair
    amount of work to inset them, and use epoxy adhesive, which I thought of
    doing. If I locate a thin sheet of rubber (something like an old inner
    tube from a bicycle) I may test that to see if it "sticks" to the bottom
    of the case (which has a nice shiny finish). Where is that old inner
    tube when you need it! ; ) My next graphics card auction isn't for a
    couple days, so I still have time!

    Actually I would probably just use some plumbing pipe insulation
    between the cards, it would keep the cards in place and offer some cushioning.

    Cushioning is a nice thought, but if it "gives" an 1/4" over time,
    you've defeated the whole purpose. You could always readjust, but I'm
    striving for something that "just works" without requiring any further intervention or maintenance from me. : ) I think our model so far is
    pretty good.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Markem618@21:1/5 to All on Thu Oct 6 15:23:59 2022
    On Thu, 06 Oct 2022 20:11:09 GMT, scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal)
    wrote:

    Markem618 <markrm618@hotmail.com> writes:
    On Thu, 6 Oct 2022 13:59:51 -0400, Bill <nonegiven@att.net> wrote:

    On 10/6/2022 12:14 PM, Markem618 wrote:
    On Thu, 6 Oct 2022 02:25:02 -0400, Bill <nonegiven@att.net> wrote:

    On 10/6/2022 12:45 AM, Markem618 wrote:

    Might 19 to many in the pack, but a bit of super glue on one of these. >>>>>>
    https://totalelement.com/products/1-2-x-1-8-inch-strong-neodymium-rare-earth-disc-magnets-n52-24-pack?

    Thank you for your suggestion! I happen to have a few similar magnets. >>>>> Keep in mind that the GPU has strong (vibrating) fans, that go on and >>>>> off repeatedly. While I wish it would, I'm not sure I trust a super glue >>>>> joint to hold up to that for as many years as I typically use my system >>>>> for. I'm on year 8 for my current system, and intend to also re-use the >>>>> graphics card I am searching for now (Nvidia 3000 series) in my next >>>>> system. One can get a used RTX 3070 for the *same* price as a new
    (entry level) RTX 3050, and the RTX 3050, being relatively new, is not >>>>> really available used. Nvidia has decided they
    want to sell their cards for quite a bit more money than they used to, >>>>> and I really don't wish to encourage them by buying a new card. I'm not >>>>> a "gamer", but I do have one AI-related program whose performance
    depends on OpenCL performance (it is AI related, "does a lot of math", >>>>> and prefers to do it on a GPU over the CPU).
    Doing a web search with "OpenCl Benchmarks" yields a website with a
    benchmark score for every GPU you can think of, which I have found handy. >>>>
    Heat will degrade super glue over time, but at the bottom of your
    support sticking to the case not so much, right.


    I didn't have so much concern about heat, but about the vibrations
    coming from other end of the support. Although it says online that
    super glue works on wood, I have concerns about the durability of the >>>connection (to unfinished wood). I really don't know. As my magnets >>>(which came out of old disk drives) are not round, it would be a fair >>>amount of work to inset them, and use epoxy adhesive, which I thought of >>>doing. If I locate a thin sheet of rubber (something like an old inner >>>tube from a bicycle) I may test that to see if it "sticks" to the bottom >>>of the case (which has a nice shiny finish). Where is that old inner >>>tube when you need it! ; ) My next graphics card auction isn't for a >>>couple days, so I still have time! One seller had 4 cards on E-bay the >>>other day, all closing within 6 minutes. And my computer went blue
    screen after placing a bid at the end of one of the 2nd auction, so I >>>missed the rest. E-bay was very interested in learning all of the >>>details, but they did nothing to recompense me for my inconvenience
    (even after I hinted!--I said, "Maybe you could offer me a coupon or >>>something for my inconvenience?". But those details fell on deaf ears!).

    Actually I would probably just use some plumbing pipe insulation
    between the cards, it would keep the cards in place and offer some >>cushioning.

    Be careful, as the foam may be conductive, or may melt when in
    contact with a power transistor on the card.

    I'd also avoid placing magnets anywhere near the motherboard.

    Better yet find a real desktop case rather than a tower, but I believe
    they have gone extinct.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Markem618@21:1/5 to Bill on Thu Oct 6 16:24:12 2022
    On Thu, 6 Oct 2022 16:37:20 -0400, Bill <nonegiven@att.net> wrote:

    On 10/6/2022 4:23 PM, Markem618 wrote:

    Better yet find a real desktop case rather than a tower, but I believe
    they have gone extinct.

    Why do you sugggest that? That sounds like a waste of valuable desk
    space (if I am understanding you correctly). Wait til they come out
    with cases to better support the new Nvidia 4090, it's huge, and it has
    huge power demands (and cooling demands).

    A desktop case would put the cards in a vertical postition gravity
    would no longer be a problem.

    I have no need of the latest and greatest.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Bill@21:1/5 to All on Thu Oct 6 17:57:00 2022
    On 10/6/2022 5:24 PM, Markem618 wrote:
    On Thu, 6 Oct 2022 16:37:20 -0400, Bill <nonegiven@att.net> wrote:

    On 10/6/2022 4:23 PM, Markem618 wrote:

    Better yet find a real desktop case rather than a tower, but I believe
    they have gone extinct.

    Why do you sugggest that? That sounds like a waste of valuable desk
    space (if I am understanding you correctly). Wait til they come out
    with cases to better support the new Nvidia 4090, it's huge, and it has
    huge power demands (and cooling demands).

    A desktop case would put the cards in a vertical postition gravity
    would no longer be a problem.

    Ah, I agree that these big cards should go in vertically, or at least
    be better supported. The current situation is silly!

    I have no need of the latest and greatest.

    I have been thinking that way more and more. How many "cores" do we
    need?... But you won't find lower end graphics cards like the Nvidia
    1660 super discounted much either (priced almost exactly the same as RTX
    3050). Nvidia doesn't seem to care for us folks who are seeking a good
    deal! : )

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Markem618@21:1/5 to Bill on Thu Oct 6 17:14:13 2022
    On Thu, 6 Oct 2022 17:57:00 -0400, Bill <nonegiven@att.net> wrote:

    On 10/6/2022 5:24 PM, Markem618 wrote:
    On Thu, 6 Oct 2022 16:37:20 -0400, Bill <nonegiven@att.net> wrote:

    On 10/6/2022 4:23 PM, Markem618 wrote:

    Better yet find a real desktop case rather than a tower, but I believe >>>> they have gone extinct.

    Why do you sugggest that? That sounds like a waste of valuable desk
    space (if I am understanding you correctly). Wait til they come out
    with cases to better support the new Nvidia 4090, it's huge, and it has
    huge power demands (and cooling demands).

    A desktop case would put the cards in a vertical postition gravity
    would no longer be a problem.

    Ah, I agree that these big cards should go in vertically, or at least
    be better supported. The current situation is silly!

    I have no need of the latest and greatest.

    I have been thinking that way more and more. How many "cores" do we
    need?... But you won't find lower end graphics cards like the Nvidia
    1660 super discounted much either (priced almost exactly the same as RTX >3050). Nvidia doesn't seem to care for us folks who are seeking a good
    deal! : )

    Bitcoin mining inflated prices of high end video cards.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Bill@21:1/5 to All on Thu Oct 6 18:47:40 2022
    On 10/6/2022 6:19 PM, Markem618 wrote:
    On Thu, 6 Oct 2022 17:57:00 -0400, Bill <nonegiven@att.net> wrote:

    On 10/6/2022 5:24 PM, Markem618 wrote:
    On Thu, 6 Oct 2022 16:37:20 -0400, Bill <nonegiven@att.net> wrote:

    On 10/6/2022 4:23 PM, Markem618 wrote:

    Better yet find a real desktop case rather than a tower, but I believe >>>>> they have gone extinct.

    Why do you sugggest that? That sounds like a waste of valuable desk
    space (if I am understanding you correctly). Wait til they come out
    with cases to better support the new Nvidia 4090, it's huge, and it has >>>> huge power demands (and cooling demands).

    A desktop case would put the cards in a vertical postition gravity
    would no longer be a problem.

    Ah, I agree that these big cards should go in vertically, or at least
    be better supported. The current situation is silly!

    I have no need of the latest and greatest.

    I have been thinking that way more and more. How many "cores" do we
    need?... But you won't find lower end graphics cards like the Nvidia
    1660 super discounted much either (priced almost exactly the same as RTX
    3050). Nvidia doesn't seem to care for us folks who are seeking a good
    deal! : )

    Looked at Newegg for old style desktop cases found this,

    https://www.newegg.com/p/2AM-000Z-00057

    Bit pricey though.


    Wow. I have never seen anything like that. If you need something like
    that, you might as well build it yourself out of wood. I recall hearing
    long ago that a PC wouldn't run if it wasn't in a case, but I never
    understood why. I don't see how the components would "know". Can you
    confirm or deny?

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Markem618@21:1/5 to Bill on Thu Oct 6 17:19:17 2022
    On Thu, 6 Oct 2022 17:57:00 -0400, Bill <nonegiven@att.net> wrote:

    On 10/6/2022 5:24 PM, Markem618 wrote:
    On Thu, 6 Oct 2022 16:37:20 -0400, Bill <nonegiven@att.net> wrote:

    On 10/6/2022 4:23 PM, Markem618 wrote:

    Better yet find a real desktop case rather than a tower, but I believe >>>> they have gone extinct.

    Why do you sugggest that? That sounds like a waste of valuable desk
    space (if I am understanding you correctly). Wait til they come out
    with cases to better support the new Nvidia 4090, it's huge, and it has
    huge power demands (and cooling demands).

    A desktop case would put the cards in a vertical postition gravity
    would no longer be a problem.

    Ah, I agree that these big cards should go in vertically, or at least
    be better supported. The current situation is silly!

    I have no need of the latest and greatest.

    I have been thinking that way more and more. How many "cores" do we
    need?... But you won't find lower end graphics cards like the Nvidia
    1660 super discounted much either (priced almost exactly the same as RTX >3050). Nvidia doesn't seem to care for us folks who are seeking a good
    deal! : )

    Looked at Newegg for old style desktop cases found this,

    https://www.newegg.com/p/2AM-000Z-00057

    Bit pricey though.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Scott Lurndal@21:1/5 to Bill on Thu Oct 6 22:59:56 2022
    Bill <nonegiven@att.net> writes:
    On 10/6/2022 4:11 PM, Scott Lurndal wrote:

    I'd also avoid placing magnets anywhere near the motherboard.


    Yes, that would be "really funny" (not ha ha) if you flashed your own
    bios! : )

    That would be unlikely, as flash is not magnetic media.

    On the other hand, a magnet near the mainboard can affect
    with the high frequency signal paths between DRAM and the processor
    socket (and between the processor/southbridge and any high-speed
    PCIexpress adapters). A great deal of engineering goes into
    ensuring SI (Signal Integrity) on mainboards.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Markem618@21:1/5 to Bill on Thu Oct 6 18:22:02 2022
    On Thu, 6 Oct 2022 18:47:40 -0400, Bill <nonegiven@att.net> wrote:

    On 10/6/2022 6:19 PM, Markem618 wrote:
    On Thu, 6 Oct 2022 17:57:00 -0400, Bill <nonegiven@att.net> wrote:

    On 10/6/2022 5:24 PM, Markem618 wrote:
    On Thu, 6 Oct 2022 16:37:20 -0400, Bill <nonegiven@att.net> wrote:

    On 10/6/2022 4:23 PM, Markem618 wrote:

    Better yet find a real desktop case rather than a tower, but I believe >>>>>> they have gone extinct.

    Why do you sugggest that? That sounds like a waste of valuable desk
    space (if I am understanding you correctly). Wait til they come out >>>>> with cases to better support the new Nvidia 4090, it's huge, and it has >>>>> huge power demands (and cooling demands).

    A desktop case would put the cards in a vertical postition gravity
    would no longer be a problem.

    Ah, I agree that these big cards should go in vertically, or at least
    be better supported. The current situation is silly!

    I have no need of the latest and greatest.

    I have been thinking that way more and more. How many "cores" do we
    need?... But you won't find lower end graphics cards like the Nvidia
    1660 super discounted much either (priced almost exactly the same as RTX >>> 3050). Nvidia doesn't seem to care for us folks who are seeking a good
    deal! : )

    Looked at Newegg for old style desktop cases found this,

    https://www.newegg.com/p/2AM-000Z-00057

    Bit pricey though.


    Wow. I have never seen anything like that. If you need something like
    that, you might as well build it yourself out of wood. I recall hearing
    long ago that a PC wouldn't run if it wasn't in a case, but I never >understood why. I don't see how the components would "know". Can you
    confirm or deny?

    Not sure, but you would need the power switch setup. Lack of a ground
    plane could trouble with stray RF, hard drives, power supply wires. It
    would be messy.

    I did take an old hard drive with the top remove built in a wood box
    with power and a acrylic window on top for someone, you could watch
    the disk spin.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to Bill on Thu Oct 6 19:39:35 2022
    On Thu, 6 Oct 2022 18:47:40 -0400, Bill <nonegiven@att.net> wrote:

    On 10/6/2022 6:19 PM, Markem618 wrote:
    On Thu, 6 Oct 2022 17:57:00 -0400, Bill <nonegiven@att.net> wrote:

    On 10/6/2022 5:24 PM, Markem618 wrote:
    On Thu, 6 Oct 2022 16:37:20 -0400, Bill <nonegiven@att.net> wrote:

    On 10/6/2022 4:23 PM, Markem618 wrote:

    Better yet find a real desktop case rather than a tower, but I believe >>>>>> they have gone extinct.

    Why do you sugggest that? That sounds like a waste of valuable desk
    space (if I am understanding you correctly). Wait til they come out >>>>> with cases to better support the new Nvidia 4090, it's huge, and it has >>>>> huge power demands (and cooling demands).

    A desktop case would put the cards in a vertical postition gravity
    would no longer be a problem.

    Ah, I agree that these big cards should go in vertically, or at least
    be better supported. The current situation is silly!

    I have no need of the latest and greatest.

    I have been thinking that way more and more. How many "cores" do we
    need?... But you won't find lower end graphics cards like the Nvidia
    1660 super discounted much either (priced almost exactly the same as RTX >>> 3050). Nvidia doesn't seem to care for us folks who are seeking a good
    deal! : )

    Looked at Newegg for old style desktop cases found this,

    https://www.newegg.com/p/2AM-000Z-00057

    Bit pricey though.


    Wow. I have never seen anything like that. If you need something like
    that, you might as well build it yourself out of wood. I recall hearing
    long ago that a PC wouldn't run if it wasn't in a case, but I never >understood why. I don't see how the components would "know". Can you
    confirm or deny?

    They'll work but won't make EMI regs (thought not miss by much).

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to All on Thu Oct 6 19:44:05 2022
    On Thu, 06 Oct 2022 22:59:56 GMT, scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal)
    wrote:

    Bill <nonegiven@att.net> writes:
    On 10/6/2022 4:11 PM, Scott Lurndal wrote:

    I'd also avoid placing magnets anywhere near the motherboard.


    Yes, that would be "really funny" (not ha ha) if you flashed your own
    bios! : )

    That would be unlikely, as flash is not magnetic media.

    On the other hand, a magnet near the mainboard can affect
    with the high frequency signal paths between DRAM and the processor
    socket (and between the processor/southbridge and any high-speed
    PCIexpress adapters). A great deal of engineering goes into
    ensuring SI (Signal Integrity) on mainboards.

    How is a static magnetic field going to bother anything? There aren't
    any hall-effect parts on the board, particularly in the high-speed
    data paths.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to Bill on Thu Oct 6 19:37:36 2022
    On Thu, 6 Oct 2022 16:37:20 -0400, Bill <nonegiven@att.net> wrote:

    On 10/6/2022 4:23 PM, Markem618 wrote:

    Better yet find a real desktop case rather than a tower, but I believe
    they have gone extinct.

    Why do you sugggest that? That sounds like a waste of valuable desk
    space (if I am understanding you correctly). Wait til they come out
    with cases to better support the new Nvidia 4090, it's huge, and it has
    huge power demands (and cooling demands).

    Lay it on its side and throw it under the desk.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Puckdropper@21:1/5 to Bill on Fri Oct 7 05:39:40 2022
    Bill <nonegiven@att.net> wrote in
    news:dim%K.515999$6Il8.407042@fx14.iad:

    I still need to see if can find a "threaded sleeve" to fit in the top support, fitting the 3/8" threaded rod. That will be where the
    vertical adjustment lies. Please let me know if this "threaded
    sleeve" is easily available? I thought of gluing 3 or 4 nuts
    together, but that doesn't seem right.

    Take a look at Menards. They might have something that will fit in their weldable steel/aluminum angle display. Personally, I'd just use a single
    nut or 3D print something if it had to look pretty. You can also search
    for "Internally threaded rod" (If you have a lathe, it's also pretty
    easy to make. Just use a tap in your drill chuck and turn the lathe by
    hand as you cut the threads.)

    Oh, regarding the rare earth magnets: Super glue will probably hold just
    fine. Use good stuff, I like the Loctite brand from Walmart and Menards.
    There are different thicknesses and qualities available, it might be
    worth looking in to if you regularly glue stuff where a thicker slower to
    set super glue would be handy. (Woodcraft had some options as well as
    Hobby Lobby, but I'm only able to speak about Loctite brand from
    experience.)

    If you're at all serious about super glue, you NEED accelerator. I use
    cheap enough to be disposable small paint bruses to apply it. Some come
    with a spritzer but that just wastes it. There's some stuff from Bob
    Smith Industries that really works well.

    Puckdropper

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Bill@21:1/5 to Puckdropper on Fri Oct 7 03:35:07 2022
    On 10/7/2022 1:39 AM, Puckdropper wrote:

    If you're at all serious about super glue, you NEED accelerator. I use
    cheap enough to be disposable small paint bruses to apply it. Some come
    with a spritzer but that just wastes it. There's some stuff from Bob
    Smith Industries that really works well.

    To be honest, I had never heard about super glue accelerator until you mentioned it, and so I found and read an article about it. Thank you,
    it seem like handy knowledge to have.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Scott Lurndal@21:1/5 to Bill on Fri Oct 7 13:57:37 2022
    Bill <nonegiven@att.net> writes:
    On 10/6/2022 6:19 PM, Markem618 wrote:

    Looked at Newegg for old style desktop cases found this,

    https://www.newegg.com/p/2AM-000Z-00057

    Bit pricey though.


    Wow. I have never seen anything like that. If you need something like
    that, you might as well build it yourself out of wood. I recall hearing
    long ago that a PC wouldn't run if it wasn't in a case, but I never >understood why. I don't see how the components would "know". Can you
    confirm or deny?


    Deny. We run them outside of cases all the time.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Clare Snyder@21:1/5 to All on Fri Oct 7 12:38:48 2022
    On Fri, 07 Oct 2022 13:57:37 GMT, scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal)
    wrote:

    Bill <nonegiven@att.net> writes:
    On 10/6/2022 6:19 PM, Markem618 wrote:

    Looked at Newegg for old style desktop cases found this,

    https://www.newegg.com/p/2AM-000Z-00057

    Bit pricey though.


    Wow. I have never seen anything like that. If you need something like >>that, you might as well build it yourself out of wood. I recall hearing >>long ago that a PC wouldn't run if it wasn't in a case, but I never >>understood why. I don't see how the components would "know". Can you >>confirm or deny?


    Deny. We run them outside of cases all the time.
    The only issue with no case can be cooling. The case directs cooling
    air across the components, but as long as you have provisions for good
    air movement a case is not required to RUN.
    LEGALLY is a different story, as the case is required to sheild RFI
    and EMI - and the requirements for that are pretty stringent - with
    special coatings on plastics (or special plastics) and specific
    designs for cover fitting. I was involved for several years with a
    small computer manufacturer - and getting case designs certified was
    always a pain inthe A$$!!!

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Bill@21:1/5 to Clare Snyder on Fri Oct 7 13:30:44 2022
    On 10/7/2022 12:38 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Fri, 07 Oct 2022 13:57:37 GMT, scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal)
    wrote:

    Bill <nonegiven@att.net> writes:
    On 10/6/2022 6:19 PM, Markem618 wrote:

    Looked at Newegg for old style desktop cases found this,

    https://www.newegg.com/p/2AM-000Z-00057

    Bit pricey though.


    Wow. I have never seen anything like that. If you need something like
    that, you might as well build it yourself out of wood. I recall hearing >>> long ago that a PC wouldn't run if it wasn't in a case, but I never
    understood why. I don't see how the components would "know". Can you
    confirm or deny?


    Deny. We run them outside of cases all the time.
    The only issue with no case can be cooling. The case directs cooling
    air across the components, but as long as you have provisions for good
    air movement a case is not required to RUN.
    LEGALLY is a different story, as the case is required to sheild RFI
    and EMI

    Now that's an interesting perspective (that had in no way occurred to
    me). Is there anything "special" about the large clear panels that they
    use in many computer cases?

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Bill@21:1/5 to All on Fri Oct 7 13:53:13 2022
    On 10/6/2022 12:45 AM, Markem618 wrote:

    Might 19 to many in the pack, but a bit of super glue on one of these.

    https://totalelement.com/products/1-2-x-1-8-inch-strong-neodymium-rare-earth-disc-magnets-n52-24-pack?


    It occurred to me that if one affixed a steel plate to the base, then
    super glue would not be unnecessary. I took a magnet to test the bottom
    of the case, and there was "plenty" of attraction. But there were a some
    folds or seems which kept the bottom from being perfectly flat. I will investigate again with a flashlight when I am more in the mood. There
    were alot of wires in the way! %-)

    Incidentally, I found a graphics card to bid on this morning, but some
    "meanie" pushed the price high enough that I didn't even bother to watch
    the way it ended. More often than not, most of the bidding action is in
    the last 15 minutes (as many have figured out that there is not much of
    an incentive to bid early, and give someone more time to respond to your
    bid). A 3 day auction on graphics card seems to get the same attention
    as a 7 day auction--there are a lot of "watchers" (40-50+ on the
    graphics cards I have been looking at). Surely, not every watcher is
    watching to buy, but still....

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to Bill on Fri Oct 7 14:19:05 2022
    On Fri, 7 Oct 2022 13:30:44 -0400, Bill <nonegiven@att.net> wrote:

    On 10/7/2022 12:38 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Fri, 07 Oct 2022 13:57:37 GMT, scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal)
    wrote:

    Bill <nonegiven@att.net> writes:
    On 10/6/2022 6:19 PM, Markem618 wrote:

    Looked at Newegg for old style desktop cases found this,

    https://www.newegg.com/p/2AM-000Z-00057

    Bit pricey though.


    Wow. I have never seen anything like that. If you need something like >>>> that, you might as well build it yourself out of wood. I recall hearing >>>> long ago that a PC wouldn't run if it wasn't in a case, but I never
    understood why. I don't see how the components would "know". Can you
    confirm or deny?


    Deny. We run them outside of cases all the time.
    The only issue with no case can be cooling. The case directs cooling
    air across the components, but as long as you have provisions for good
    air movement a case is not required to RUN.
    LEGALLY is a different story, as the case is required to sheild RFI
    and EMI

    Now that's an interesting perspective (that had in no way occurred to
    me). Is there anything "special" about the large clear panels that they
    use in many computer cases?

    None of the third-party cases meet EMI regs. If there were a test for
    them, these manufacturers would just ignore the tests, just as they do
    now. As I mentioned in my last post, board and accessory
    manufacturers were left to do the heavy lifting.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to All on Fri Oct 7 14:16:29 2022
    On Fri, 07 Oct 2022 12:38:48 -0400, Clare Snyder <clare@snyder.on.ca>
    wrote:

    On Fri, 07 Oct 2022 13:57:37 GMT, scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal)
    wrote:

    Bill <nonegiven@att.net> writes:
    On 10/6/2022 6:19 PM, Markem618 wrote:

    Looked at Newegg for old style desktop cases found this,

    https://www.newegg.com/p/2AM-000Z-00057

    Bit pricey though.


    Wow. I have never seen anything like that. If you need something like >>>that, you might as well build it yourself out of wood. I recall hearing >>>long ago that a PC wouldn't run if it wasn't in a case, but I never >>>understood why. I don't see how the components would "know". Can you >>>confirm or deny?


    Deny. We run them outside of cases all the time.
    The only issue with no case can be cooling. The case directs cooling
    air across the components, but as long as you have provisions for good
    air movement a case is not required to RUN.
    LEGALLY is a different story, as the case is required to sheild RFI
    and EMI - and the requirements for that are pretty stringent - with
    special coatings on plastics (or special plastics) and specific
    designs for cover fitting. I was involved for several years with a
    small computer manufacturer - and getting case designs certified was
    always a pain inthe A$$!!!

    When I was in that business, components designed for personal
    computers had to pass EMI tests +6db. IOW, there was only 6dB allowed
    for the case. Cases really are bad - slot city.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Markem618@21:1/5 to Bill on Fri Oct 7 14:16:04 2022
    On Fri, 7 Oct 2022 13:30:44 -0400, Bill <nonegiven@att.net> wrote:

    On 10/7/2022 12:38 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Fri, 07 Oct 2022 13:57:37 GMT, scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal)
    wrote:

    Bill <nonegiven@att.net> writes:
    On 10/6/2022 6:19 PM, Markem618 wrote:

    Looked at Newegg for old style desktop cases found this,

    https://www.newegg.com/p/2AM-000Z-00057

    Bit pricey though.


    Wow. I have never seen anything like that. If you need something like >>>> that, you might as well build it yourself out of wood. I recall hearing >>>> long ago that a PC wouldn't run if it wasn't in a case, but I never
    understood why. I don't see how the components would "know". Can you
    confirm or deny?


    Deny. We run them outside of cases all the time.
    The only issue with no case can be cooling. The case directs cooling
    air across the components, but as long as you have provisions for good
    air movement a case is not required to RUN.
    LEGALLY is a different story, as the case is required to sheild RFI
    and EMI

    Now that's an interesting perspective (that had in no way occurred to
    me). Is there anything "special" about the large clear panels that they
    use in many computer cases?

    Plastic can be coated with metal, did that with the ST2500
    teleconferencing system at Shure to meet RFI and EFI emissions.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Clare Snyder@21:1/5 to Bill on Sat Oct 8 00:16:09 2022
    On Fri, 7 Oct 2022 13:30:44 -0400, Bill <nonegiven@att.net> wrote:

    On 10/7/2022 12:38 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Fri, 07 Oct 2022 13:57:37 GMT, scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal)
    wrote:

    Bill <nonegiven@att.net> writes:
    On 10/6/2022 6:19 PM, Markem618 wrote:

    Looked at Newegg for old style desktop cases found this,

    https://www.newegg.com/p/2AM-000Z-00057

    Bit pricey though.


    Wow. I have never seen anything like that. If you need something like >>>> that, you might as well build it yourself out of wood. I recall hearing >>>> long ago that a PC wouldn't run if it wasn't in a case, but I never
    understood why. I don't see how the components would "know". Can you
    confirm or deny?


    Deny. We run them outside of cases all the time.
    The only issue with no case can be cooling. The case directs cooling
    air across the components, but as long as you have provisions for good
    air movement a case is not required to RUN.
    LEGALLY is a different story, as the case is required to sheild RFI
    and EMI

    Now that's an interesting perspective (that had in no way occurred to
    me). Is there anything "special" about the large clear panels that they
    use in many computer cases?
    A LOT of them are NOT approved - -the ones that are will have a
    special plastic - as I noted. You would be surprized how many "gamer"
    machines sold in North America can not be used in many businesses
    because they don't meet FCC requirements - or UL requirements.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Puckdropper@21:1/5 to Bill on Mon Oct 10 09:04:51 2022
    Bill <nonegiven@att.net> wrote in news:MEQ%K.566144$iiS8.307035@fx17.iad:

    On 10/7/2022 1:39 AM, Puckdropper wrote:

    If you're at all serious about super glue, you NEED accelerator. I use
    cheap enough to be disposable small paint bruses to apply it. Some come
    with a spritzer but that just wastes it. There's some stuff from Bob
    Smith Industries that really works well.

    To be honest, I had never heard about super glue accelerator until you mentioned it, and so I found and read an article about it. Thank you,
    it seem like handy knowledge to have.


    I picked up another tip from Adam Savage. Baking soda can be used as an accelerator. If you are using super glue to form a butt joint, you can add
    the baking soda to the joint and it will form a small gusset that adds significant strength to the joint.

    Puckdropper

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Puckdropper@21:1/5 to Bill on Mon Oct 10 09:00:59 2022
    Bill <nonegiven@att.net> wrote in
    news:gWI%K.750032$BKL8.183350@fx15.iad:



    Wow. I have never seen anything like that. If you need something
    like that, you might as well build it yourself out of wood. I recall
    hearing long ago that a PC wouldn't run if it wasn't in a case, but I
    never understood why. I don't see how the components would "know". Can
    you confirm or deny?



    I used to run them outside a case when I was building them as a teenager.
    But this was when CPUs were topping out at 500 mHz max. I put the
    motherboard on wooden blocks so the expansion cards could hang down and
    would let them run overnight at least.

    I don't know that I'd try that now, mainly because I'd find the whole thing
    a bother. SATA cables are so much smaller than IDE cables it's just much easier to route everything in a case than to build it and transfer it.

    Puckdropper

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)