• Ultrasonic cleaners on tools

    From Michael@21:1/5 to All on Sun Jun 12 07:41:52 2022
    Has anyone tried using ultrasonic cleaners to knock the rust off tools? It looks like an easy way to do it, if it works.

    https://www.amazon.com/Industrial-Liters-Digital-Ultrasonic-Cleaner/dp/B01NCJ0N6O/

    Thanks,

    Mike

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From John McGaw@21:1/5 to Leon on Sun Jun 12 11:29:17 2022
    On 6/12/2022 11:16 AM, Leon wrote:
    On 6/12/2022 9:41 AM, Michael wrote:
    Has anyone tried using ultrasonic cleaners to knock the rust off tools?
    It looks like an easy way to do it, if it works.

    https://www.amazon.com/Industrial-Liters-Digital-Ultrasonic-Cleaner/dp/B01NCJ0N6O/


    Thanks,

    Mike



    I may be wrong but ultrasonic cleaners remove dirt, not oxidation.   It may remove loose rust but probably not surface rust.   It will likely not get down to the metal surface.

    You might ask at a jewelry store.  They might be able to tell you what
    their ultrasonic cleaners will remove.

    What gets removed is really a function of whatever cleaning solution is
    being used -- the ultrasonics just accelerate the activity. Cleaning
    jewelry calls for a mild detergent. Cleaning rust would require a chemical concoction that attacks rust and there are many on the market. Of course
    most of the commercial rust removers are pretty aggressive and usually
    don't need much more than soaking the metal for a while and then a scrub
    with a stiff brush followed by a rinse and dry.

    --
    Noli sinere pessimi nequissimique te tristificare!

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Leon@21:1/5 to Michael on Sun Jun 12 10:16:02 2022
    On 6/12/2022 9:41 AM, Michael wrote:
    Has anyone tried using ultrasonic cleaners to knock the rust off tools? It looks like an easy way to do it, if it works.

    https://www.amazon.com/Industrial-Liters-Digital-Ultrasonic-Cleaner/dp/B01NCJ0N6O/

    Thanks,

    Mike



    I may be wrong but ultrasonic cleaners remove dirt, not oxidation. It
    may remove loose rust but probably not surface rust. It will likely
    not get down to the metal surface.

    You might ask at a jewelry store. They might be able to tell you what
    their ultrasonic cleaners will remove.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to michaeldwilson2@gmail.com on Sun Jun 12 16:35:45 2022
    On Sun, 12 Jun 2022 07:41:52 -0700 (PDT), Michael
    <michaeldwilson2@gmail.com> wrote:

    Has anyone tried using ultrasonic cleaners to knock the rust off tools? It looks like an easy way to do it, if it works.

    https://www.amazon.com/Industrial-Liters-Digital-Ultrasonic-Cleaner/dp/B01NCJ0N6O/

    How about Coke? Phosphoric or tannic acid will convert rust to a more
    stable form. The advantage is that they don't actually remove metal,
    rather convert it from iron oxide to the more stable ferric phosphate
    or ferric tannate. Most acids will remove the rust, etching the metal.
    It does blacken the surface though.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Markem618@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Sun Jun 12 17:14:14 2022
    On Sun, 12 Jun 2022 16:35:45 -0400, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    On Sun, 12 Jun 2022 07:41:52 -0700 (PDT), Michael
    <michaeldwilson2@gmail.com> wrote:

    Has anyone tried using ultrasonic cleaners to knock the rust off tools? It looks like an easy way to do it, if it works.
    https://www.amazon.com/Industrial-Liters-Digital-Ultrasonic-Cleaner/dp/B01NCJ0N6O/

    How about Coke? Phosphoric or tannic acid will convert rust to a more
    stable form. The advantage is that they don't actually remove metal,
    rather convert it from iron oxide to the more stable ferric phosphate
    or ferric tannate. Most acids will remove the rust, etching the metal.
    It does blacken the surface though.

    Electroysis is another way if you have a good dc power supply.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to All on Sun Jun 12 21:06:48 2022
    On Sun, 12 Jun 2022 17:14:14 -0500, Markem618 <markrm618@hotmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Sun, 12 Jun 2022 16:35:45 -0400, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    On Sun, 12 Jun 2022 07:41:52 -0700 (PDT), Michael >><michaeldwilson2@gmail.com> wrote:

    Has anyone tried using ultrasonic cleaners to knock the rust off tools? It looks like an easy way to do it, if it works.
    https://www.amazon.com/Industrial-Liters-Digital-Ultrasonic-Cleaner/dp/B01NCJ0N6O/

    How about Coke? Phosphoric or tannic acid will convert rust to a more >>stable form. The advantage is that they don't actually remove metal,
    rather convert it from iron oxide to the more stable ferric phosphate
    or ferric tannate. Most acids will remove the rust, etching the metal.
    It does blacken the surface though.

    Electroysis is another way if you have a good dc power supply.

    Electrolysis will plate or deplate the surface, either adding or
    removing material. Sometimes that's the right answer. Conversion
    doesn't remove or add to the metal, rather replaces the oxygen atom
    for a different atom in the metal. Sometimes that matters, sometimes
    not.

    Iron oxide is porous and will continue until there is no more iron to
    oxidize. If it's removed, the oxidation will continue on the exposed
    metal. The converted forms aren't porous and will prevent/resist
    further oxidation.

    Conversion only allows Model-T colors (any you want, as long as it's
    black). Plating can do pretty much anything, as we know.

    Again, what is the goal? Sometimes a Brillo pad is the right answer.
    It's what I do on my cast iron tables.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Markem618@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Sun Jun 12 20:41:59 2022
    On Sun, 12 Jun 2022 21:06:48 -0400, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    On Sun, 12 Jun 2022 17:14:14 -0500, Markem618 <markrm618@hotmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Sun, 12 Jun 2022 16:35:45 -0400, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    On Sun, 12 Jun 2022 07:41:52 -0700 (PDT), Michael >>><michaeldwilson2@gmail.com> wrote:

    Has anyone tried using ultrasonic cleaners to knock the rust off tools? It looks like an easy way to do it, if it works.
    https://www.amazon.com/Industrial-Liters-Digital-Ultrasonic-Cleaner/dp/B01NCJ0N6O/

    How about Coke? Phosphoric or tannic acid will convert rust to a more >>>stable form. The advantage is that they don't actually remove metal, >>>rather convert it from iron oxide to the more stable ferric phosphate
    or ferric tannate. Most acids will remove the rust, etching the metal.
    It does blacken the surface though.

    Electroysis is another way if you have a good dc power supply.

    Electrolysis will plate or deplate the surface, either adding or
    removing material. Sometimes that's the right answer. Conversion
    doesn't remove or add to the metal, rather replaces the oxygen atom
    for a different atom in the metal. Sometimes that matters, sometimes
    not.

    Iron oxide is porous and will continue until there is no more iron to >oxidize. If it's removed, the oxidation will continue on the exposed
    metal. The converted forms aren't porous and will prevent/resist
    further oxidation.

    Conversion only allows Model-T colors (any you want, as long as it's
    black). Plating can do pretty much anything, as we know.

    Again, what is the goal? Sometimes a Brillo pad is the right answer.
    It's what I do on my cast iron tables.

    My general go to to clean surface rust WD40 and 0000 steel wool.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Puckdropper@21:1/5 to Michael on Mon Jun 13 06:49:44 2022
    Michael <michaeldwilson2@gmail.com> wrote in news:960f59f7-d91d-4137-89b0-1e16cd701d94n@googlegroups.com:

    Has anyone tried using ultrasonic cleaners to knock the rust off
    tools? It looks like an easy way to do it, if it works.

    https://www.amazon.com/Industrial-Liters-Digital-Ultrasonic-Cleaner/dp/ B01NCJ0N6O/

    Thanks,

    Mike

    I have, it took forever. I had to run the parts through several 8-minute cycles (max of the tool) to make anything happen. I was using just hot
    water.

    Evaporust worked much better.

    Puckdropper

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Bob Davis@21:1/5 to All on Mon Jun 13 07:58:49 2022
    On Sunday, June 12, 2022 at 5:14:36 PM UTC-5, Markem618 wrote:
    On Sun, 12 Jun 2022 16:35:45 -0400, k...@notreal.com wrote:

    On Sun, 12 Jun 2022 07:41:52 -0700 (PDT), Michael
    <michael...@gmail.com> wrote:

    Has anyone tried using ultrasonic cleaners to knock the rust off tools? It looks like an easy way to do it, if it works.
    https://www.amazon.com/Industrial-Liters-Digital-Ultrasonic-Cleaner/dp/B01NCJ0N6O/

    How about Coke? Phosphoric or tannic acid will convert rust to a more >stable form. The advantage is that they don't actually remove metal,
    rather convert it from iron oxide to the more stable ferric phosphate
    or ferric tannate. Most acids will remove the rust, etching the metal.
    It does blacken the surface though.
    Electroysis is another way if you have a good dc power supply.

    I built an electrolysis setup years ago. I have had 100% success with it. I believe it gets into nooks and crannies better than a wire brush and steel wool. I like the idea that it requires no elbow grease.

    Bob

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Clare Snyder@21:1/5 to All on Mon Jun 13 23:23:31 2022
    On Sun, 12 Jun 2022 11:29:17 -0400, John McGaw <Nobody@Nowh.ere>
    wrote:

    On 6/12/2022 11:16 AM, Leon wrote:
    On 6/12/2022 9:41 AM, Michael wrote:
    Has anyone tried using ultrasonic cleaners to knock the rust off tools?
    It looks like an easy way to do it, if it works.

    https://www.amazon.com/Industrial-Liters-Digital-Ultrasonic-Cleaner/dp/B01NCJ0N6O/


    Thanks,

    Mike



    I may be wrong but ultrasonic cleaners remove dirt, not oxidation. It may >> remove loose rust but probably not surface rust. It will likely not get
    down to the metal surface.

    You might ask at a jewelry store. They might be able to tell you what
    their ultrasonic cleaners will remove.

    What gets removed is really a function of whatever cleaning solution is
    being used -- the ultrasonics just accelerate the activity. Cleaning
    jewelry calls for a mild detergent. Cleaning rust would require a chemical >concoction that attacks rust and there are many on the market. Of course
    most of the commercial rust removers are pretty aggressive and usually
    don't need much more than soaking the metal for a while and then a scrub
    with a stiff brush followed by a rinse and dry.
    Use Enviro Rust. The ultrasonic will speed it up somewhat.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to wrobertdavis@gmail.com on Tue Jun 14 10:37:04 2022
    On Mon, 13 Jun 2022 07:58:49 -0700 (PDT), Bob Davis
    <wrobertdavis@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Sunday, June 12, 2022 at 5:14:36 PM UTC-5, Markem618 wrote:
    On Sun, 12 Jun 2022 16:35:45 -0400, k...@notreal.com wrote:

    On Sun, 12 Jun 2022 07:41:52 -0700 (PDT), Michael
    <michael...@gmail.com> wrote:

    Has anyone tried using ultrasonic cleaners to knock the rust off tools? It looks like an easy way to do it, if it works.

    https://www.amazon.com/Industrial-Liters-Digital-Ultrasonic-Cleaner/dp/B01NCJ0N6O/

    How about Coke? Phosphoric or tannic acid will convert rust to a more
    stable form. The advantage is that they don't actually remove metal,
    rather convert it from iron oxide to the more stable ferric phosphate
    or ferric tannate. Most acids will remove the rust, etching the metal.
    It does blacken the surface though.
    Electroysis is another way if you have a good dc power supply.

    I built an electrolysis setup years ago. I have had 100% success with it. I believe it gets into nooks and crannies better than a wire brush and steel wool. I like the idea that it requires no elbow grease.

    It still removes material, much like the wire brush. A strong acid
    will do the same. These might matter in those nooks and crannies
    (bearings, ways, ...).

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Bob Davis@21:1/5 to k...@notreal.com on Tue Jun 14 13:23:45 2022
    On Tuesday, June 14, 2022 at 9:37:09 AM UTC-5, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 13 Jun 2022 07:58:49 -0700 (PDT), Bob Davis
    <wrober...@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Sunday, June 12, 2022 at 5:14:36 PM UTC-5, Markem618 wrote:
    On Sun, 12 Jun 2022 16:35:45 -0400, k...@notreal.com wrote:

    On Sun, 12 Jun 2022 07:41:52 -0700 (PDT), Michael
    <michael...@gmail.com> wrote:

    Has anyone tried using ultrasonic cleaners to knock the rust off tools? It looks like an easy way to do it, if it works.

    https://www.amazon.com/Industrial-Liters-Digital-Ultrasonic-Cleaner/dp/B01NCJ0N6O/

    How about Coke? Phosphoric or tannic acid will convert rust to a more
    stable form. The advantage is that they don't actually remove metal,
    rather convert it from iron oxide to the more stable ferric phosphate
    or ferric tannate. Most acids will remove the rust, etching the metal. >> >It does blacken the surface though.
    Electroysis is another way if you have a good dc power supply.

    I built an electrolysis setup years ago. I have had 100% success with it. I believe it gets into nooks and crannies better than a wire brush and steel wool. I like the idea that it requires no elbow grease.
    It still removes material, much like the wire brush. A strong acid
    will do the same. These might matter in those nooks and crannies
    (bearings, ways, ...).

    Can you give an example of an object that has bearings, ways, etc that might be of interest for removing rust? I've never put anything like that in electrolysis. If it has fine machined surfaces, I will be concerned with preserving that and probably
    not trying to remove cosmetic rust.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to wrobertdavis@gmail.com on Tue Jun 14 22:26:30 2022
    On Tue, 14 Jun 2022 13:23:45 -0700 (PDT), Bob Davis
    <wrobertdavis@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Tuesday, June 14, 2022 at 9:37:09 AM UTC-5, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 13 Jun 2022 07:58:49 -0700 (PDT), Bob Davis
    <wrober...@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Sunday, June 12, 2022 at 5:14:36 PM UTC-5, Markem618 wrote:
    On Sun, 12 Jun 2022 16:35:45 -0400, k...@notreal.com wrote:

    On Sun, 12 Jun 2022 07:41:52 -0700 (PDT), Michael
    <michael...@gmail.com> wrote:

    Has anyone tried using ultrasonic cleaners to knock the rust off tools? It looks like an easy way to do it, if it works.

    https://www.amazon.com/Industrial-Liters-Digital-Ultrasonic-Cleaner/dp/B01NCJ0N6O/

    How about Coke? Phosphoric or tannic acid will convert rust to a more
    stable form. The advantage is that they don't actually remove metal,
    rather convert it from iron oxide to the more stable ferric phosphate
    or ferric tannate. Most acids will remove the rust, etching the metal. >> >> >It does blacken the surface though.
    Electroysis is another way if you have a good dc power supply.

    I built an electrolysis setup years ago. I have had 100% success with it. I believe it gets into nooks and crannies better than a wire brush and steel wool. I like the idea that it requires no elbow grease.
    It still removes material, much like the wire brush. A strong acid
    will do the same. These might matter in those nooks and crannies
    (bearings, ways, ...).

    Can you give an example of an object that has bearings, ways, etc that might be of interest for removing rust? I've never put anything like that in electrolysis. If it has fine machined surfaces, I will be concerned with preserving that and probably
    not trying to remove cosmetic rust.

    Bearings: pliers, ways:jointers, Screws: planes.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Michael@21:1/5 to All on Wed Jun 22 18:33:06 2022
    On Sunday, June 12, 2022 at 5:14:36 PM UTC-5, Markem618 wrote:
    On Sun, 12 Jun 2022 16:35:45 -0400, k...@notreal.com wrote:

    On Sun, 12 Jun 2022 07:41:52 -0700 (PDT), Michael
    <michael...@gmail.com> wrote:

    Has anyone tried using ultrasonic cleaners to knock the rust off tools? It looks like an easy way to do it, if it works.
    https://www.amazon.com/Industrial-Liters-Digital-Ultrasonic-Cleaner/dp/B01NCJ0N6O/

    How about Coke? Phosphoric or tannic acid will convert rust to a more >stable form. The advantage is that they don't actually remove metal,
    rather convert it from iron oxide to the more stable ferric phosphate
    or ferric tannate. Most acids will remove the rust, etching the metal.
    It does blacken the surface though.
    Electroysis is another way if you have a good dc power supply.

    I'm going to try electrolysis to get rid of rust on some tools. I paid 25 bucks for a used car battery charger with a 2 amp trickle charge that should work. I have a question, though. What do you do with the sodium carbonate/rust water? Is it hazardous?

    Thanks.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to michaeldwilson2@gmail.com on Thu Jun 23 17:54:19 2022
    On Wed, 22 Jun 2022 18:33:06 -0700 (PDT), Michael
    <michaeldwilson2@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Sunday, June 12, 2022 at 5:14:36 PM UTC-5, Markem618 wrote:
    On Sun, 12 Jun 2022 16:35:45 -0400, k...@notreal.com wrote:

    On Sun, 12 Jun 2022 07:41:52 -0700 (PDT), Michael
    <michael...@gmail.com> wrote:

    Has anyone tried using ultrasonic cleaners to knock the rust off tools? It looks like an easy way to do it, if it works.

    https://www.amazon.com/Industrial-Liters-Digital-Ultrasonic-Cleaner/dp/B01NCJ0N6O/

    How about Coke? Phosphoric or tannic acid will convert rust to a more
    stable form. The advantage is that they don't actually remove metal,
    rather convert it from iron oxide to the more stable ferric phosphate
    or ferric tannate. Most acids will remove the rust, etching the metal.
    It does blacken the surface though.
    Electroysis is another way if you have a good dc power supply.

    I'm going to try electrolysis to get rid of rust on some tools. I paid 25 bucks for a used car battery charger with a 2 amp trickle charge that should work. I have a question, though. What do you do with the sodium carbonate/rust water? Is it hazardous?

    No, not in the concentration or volume you're talking about (it is a
    pretty strong base). There probably is some greenie out there who
    will clutch their pearls and scream at you for polluting the planet or
    causing global warming, or some other nonsense.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)