• at auction

    From hubops@ccanoemail.ca@21:1/5 to All on Wed Mar 30 09:23:17 2022
    One unusual looking plane - looks like a plane .. :-)
    that I've never seen before ...

    https://greatwestteam.hibid.com/lot/116724704/hand-planes-/?ipp=100&q=&ref=catalog

    John T.

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  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to hubops@ccanoemail.ca on Wed Mar 30 13:38:55 2022
    On Wed, 30 Mar 2022 09:23:17 -0400, hubops@ccanoemail.ca wrote:

    One unusual looking plane - looks like a plane .. :-)
    that I've never seen before ...

    https://greatwestteam.hibid.com/lot/116724704/hand-planes-/?ipp=100&q=&ref=catalog

    If you mean the one with the "120" on it, my guess is that it's a
    spokeshave.

    <https://framingnailersguide.com/spokeshave-vs-drawknife/>

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  • From hubops@ccanoemail.ca@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Wed Mar 30 14:41:17 2022
    On Wed, 30 Mar 2022 13:38:55 -0400, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    On Wed, 30 Mar 2022 09:23:17 -0400, hubops@ccanoemail.ca wrote:

    One unusual looking plane - looks like a plane .. :-)
    that I've never seen before ...
    https://greatwestteam.hibid.com/lot/116724704/hand-planes-/?ipp=100&q=&ref=catalog

    If you mean the one with the "120" on it, my guess is that it's a
    spokeshave.

    <https://framingnailersguide.com/spokeshave-vs-drawknife/>



    Lots of photos to browse online - I couldn't find one quite it ...

    https://www.letoolman.com/antique---vintage-tools.html

    http://www.greatplanestrading.com/OCT12/index.html#OCT12_003SY.jpg

    cabinet scrapers have similar handles .. dunno.

    John T.

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  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to hubops@ccanoemail.ca on Wed Mar 30 15:36:41 2022
    On Wed, 30 Mar 2022 14:41:17 -0400, hubops@ccanoemail.ca wrote:

    On Wed, 30 Mar 2022 13:38:55 -0400, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    On Wed, 30 Mar 2022 09:23:17 -0400, hubops@ccanoemail.ca wrote:

    One unusual looking plane - looks like a plane .. :-)
    that I've never seen before ...
    https://greatwestteam.hibid.com/lot/116724704/hand-planes-/?ipp=100&q=&ref=catalog

    If you mean the one with the "120" on it, my guess is that it's a >>spokeshave.

    <https://framingnailersguide.com/spokeshave-vs-drawknife/>



    Lots of photos to browse online - I couldn't find one quite it ...

    https://www.letoolman.com/antique---vintage-tools.html

    http://www.greatplanestrading.com/OCT12/index.html#OCT12_003SY.jpg

    cabinet scrapers have similar handles .. dunno.

    Can't really tell without seeing the blade.

    ...or it could be a University of Texas hood ornament. ;-)

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  • From Clare Snyder@21:1/5 to hubops@ccanoemail.ca on Wed Mar 30 16:59:48 2022
    On Wed, 30 Mar 2022 14:41:17 -0400, hubops@ccanoemail.ca wrote:

    On Wed, 30 Mar 2022 13:38:55 -0400, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    On Wed, 30 Mar 2022 09:23:17 -0400, hubops@ccanoemail.ca wrote:

    One unusual looking plane - looks like a plane .. :-)
    that I've never seen before ...
    https://greatwestteam.hibid.com/lot/116724704/hand-planes-/?ipp=100&q=&ref=catalog

    If you mean the one with the "120" on it, my guess is that it's a >>spokeshave.

    <https://framingnailersguide.com/spokeshave-vs-drawknife/>



    Lots of photos to browse online - I couldn't find one quite it ...

    https://www.letoolman.com/antique---vintage-tools.html

    http://www.greatplanestrading.com/OCT12/index.html#OCT12_003SY.jpg

    cabinet scrapers have similar handles .. dunno.

    John T.
    Looks to me like PART of a tool. Looks tohave a hole for a bolt up the
    center and 2 "teeth" that allow it to be afjusted / indexed to the
    tool below. Looks like a "draw handle" for something.

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  • From hubops@ccanoemail.ca@21:1/5 to nospam.grossboj@nospam.earthlink.ne on Thu Mar 31 13:39:35 2022
    On Thu, 31 Mar 2022 13:24:43 -0400, "John Grossbohlin" <nospam.grossboj@nospam.earthlink.net> wrote:

    wrote in message news:7bm84hpoc4ir4384nlv1itsglbi8su68i6@4ax.com...

    One unusual looking plane - looks like a plane .. :-)
    that I've never seen before ...

    https://greatwestteam.hibid.com/lot/116724704/hand-planes-/?ipp=100&q=&ref=catalog

    John T.

    That looks like a foot rest... it's not shaped well for holding/grabbing
    with one's hands and itís rather large.


    That occurred to me as well ...
    The <A> ? 120 seems too prominent for a footrest <?>
    I looked through hundreds of google images of scrapers and
    spoke-shaves etc and didn't see a single tool with up-swept ends -
    they were all flat or rounded downward < or wood knobs >
    The mystery remains.
    John T.

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  • From John Grossbohlin@21:1/5 to All on Thu Mar 31 13:24:43 2022
    wrote in message news:7bm84hpoc4ir4384nlv1itsglbi8su68i6@4ax.com...

    One unusual looking plane - looks like a plane .. :-)
    that I've never seen before ...

    https://greatwestteam.hibid.com/lot/116724704/hand-planes-/?ipp=100&q=&ref=catalog

    John T.

    That looks like a foot rest... it's not shaped well for holding/grabbing
    with one's hands and it’s rather large.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Bill@21:1/5 to John Grossbohlin on Fri Apr 1 01:05:16 2022
    On 3/31/2022 1:24 PM, John Grossbohlin wrote:
    wrote in message news:7bm84hpoc4ir4384nlv1itsglbi8su68i6@4ax.com...

    One unusual looking plane  -  looks like a plane  ..  :-)
    that I've never seen before  ...

    https://greatwestteam.hibid.com/lot/116724704/hand-planes-/?ipp=100&q=&ref=catalog


      John T.

    That looks like a foot rest... it's not shaped well for holding/grabbing
    with one's hands and it’s rather large.


    There is a picture of a wooden version on page 210 of Garrett Hack's,
    "The Handplane Book" (1999). It appears that the tool was designed for
    a cooper (barrel making). My "wild guess" is that the "120" implies that
    it is for shaping the outside of the barrel staves and that it cuts with
    a curve having a 12" radius. I could be mistaken.

    On a related note, I have seen a remarkable tool used for gauging the
    correct angle on the sides of the staves (as a function of radius) so
    that all of the staves fit together perfectly. Don't underestimate the technology of barrel or bucket making! : )

    The book above was one of the first books on woodworking that I read,
    and it cost me quite a few dollars (hundreds) after I finished reading
    it. For the uninitiated, it wouldn't take much to push an interest in
    planes into the thousands! If you like "molding planes", Bickford's
    book, "Moldings in Practice" was interesting, but being published by the
    "Lost Art Press", it is sort of pricey for what it is. But if you wish
    to dwell on the nuances of the molding on fine furniture, it may be one
    of the few options. However, As Leon has pointed out before, such
    details can get in the way of getting any work done! I sort of salivate
    when I examine antique fine furniture, but I am not anywhere near as
    successful in getting as much woodworking done as Leon does!

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From hubops@ccanoemail.ca@21:1/5 to Bill on Fri Apr 1 09:29:54 2022
    On Fri, 1 Apr 2022 01:05:16 -0400, Bill <nonegiven@att.net> wrote:

    On 3/31/2022 1:24 PM, John Grossbohlin wrote:
    wrote in message news:7bm84hpoc4ir4384nlv1itsglbi8su68i6@4ax.com...

    One unusual looking plane† -† looks like a plane† ..† :-)
    that I've never seen before† ...

    https://greatwestteam.hibid.com/lot/116724704/hand-planes-/?ipp=100&q=&ref=catalog


    † John T.

    That looks like a foot rest... it's not shaped well for holding/grabbing
    with one's hands and itís rather large.


    There is a picture of a wooden version on page 210 of Garrett Hack's,
    "The Handplane Book" (1999). It appears that the tool was designed for
    a cooper (barrel making). My "wild guess" is that the "120" implies that
    it is for shaping the outside of the barrel staves and that it cuts with
    a curve having a 12" radius. I could be mistaken.

    On a related note, I have seen a remarkable tool used for gauging the
    correct angle on the sides of the staves (as a function of radius) so
    that all of the staves fit together perfectly. Don't underestimate the >technology of barrel or bucket making! : )

    The book above was one of the first books on woodworking that I read,
    and it cost me quite a few dollars (hundreds) after I finished reading
    it. For the uninitiated, it wouldn't take much to push an interest in
    planes into the thousands! If you like "molding planes", Bickford's
    book, "Moldings in Practice" was interesting, but being published by the >"Lost Art Press", it is sort of pricey for what it is. But if you wish
    to dwell on the nuances of the molding on fine furniture, it may be one
    of the few options. However, As Leon has pointed out before, such
    details can get in the way of getting any work done! I sort of salivate
    when I examine antique fine furniture, but I am not anywhere near as >successful in getting as much woodworking done as Leon does!


    Thanks for your input, Bill.
    I tried various google image search key-words including
    "barrel" and "cooper" but alas google
    isn't what it used-to-be ...
    If you have a picture or web link of your wooden version
    I'd be happy to see it.
    Or even a unique word for a further web search.

    More image searches turned up this wooden tool :

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/154923909025?hash=item24122f3fa1:g:lXUAAOSwLV5iRCZ9

    John T.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Scott Lurndal@21:1/5 to hubops@ccanoemail.ca on Fri Apr 1 14:40:40 2022
    hubops@ccanoemail.ca writes:
    On Fri, 1 Apr 2022 01:05:16 -0400, Bill <nonegiven@att.net> wrote:

    On 3/31/2022 1:24 PM, John Grossbohlin wrote:
    wrote in message news:7bm84hpoc4ir4384nlv1itsglbi8su68i6@4ax.com...

    One unusual looking plane† -† looks like a plane† ..† :-)
    that I've never seen before† ...

    https://greatwestteam.hibid.com/lot/116724704/hand-planes-/?ipp=100&q=&ref=catalog


    There is a picture of a wooden version on page 210 of Garrett Hack's,
    "The Handplane Book" (1999). It appears that the tool was designed for
    a cooper (barrel making). My "wild guess" is that the "120" implies that
    it is for shaping the outside of the barrel staves and that it cuts with
    a curve having a 12" radius. I could be mistaken.

    Hack calls it a "buzz" (aka scraper shave).

    However, it still looks quite different from the '120' shown on
    the auction site.

    I think it's just as likely to be a footrest from a barbers chair;
    there is really no place to mount a blade or scraper cutter.

    https://www.google.com/books/edition/The_Handplane_Book/lSVMWpzqfNgC?hl=en&gbpv=1&dq=the+handplane+book&printsec=frontcover

    pg187 shows a couple of coopering planes. Unfortunately google doesn't show the page referenced above.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From DerbyDad03@21:1/5 to Scott Lurndal on Fri Apr 1 08:45:43 2022
    On Friday, April 1, 2022 at 10:40:45 AM UTC-4, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    hub...@ccanoemail.ca writes:
    On Fri, 1 Apr 2022 01:05:16 -0400, Bill <none...@att.net> wrote:

    On 3/31/2022 1:24 PM, John Grossbohlin wrote:
    wrote in message news:7bm84hpoc4ir4384n...@4ax.com...

    One unusual looking plane - looks like a plane .. :-)
    that I've never seen before ...

    https://greatwestteam.hibid.com/lot/116724704/hand-planes-/?ipp=100&q=&ref=catalog

    There is a picture of a wooden version on page 210 of Garrett Hack's, >>"The Handplane Book" (1999). It appears that the tool was designed for
    a cooper (barrel making). My "wild guess" is that the "120" implies that >>it is for shaping the outside of the barrel staves and that it cuts with >>a curve having a 12" radius. I could be mistaken.
    Hack calls it a "buzz" (aka scraper shave).

    However, it still looks quite different from the '120' shown on
    the auction site.

    I think it's just as likely to be a footrest from a barbers chair;

    Maybe a salon chair as opposed to a barbers chair.

    https://i.imgur.com/TnurQjR.png

    Barber's chairs seems to all have the wide, flat footrest.

    Even images with that type of foot rest on this page eventually lead to a "salon chair".

    https://www.google.com/search?q=antique+barber+chair+foot+rest&tbm=isch



    there is really no place to mount a blade or scraper cutter.

    https://www.google.com/books/edition/The_Handplane_Book/lSVMWpzqfNgC?hl=en&gbpv=1&dq=the+handplane+book&printsec=frontcover

    pg187 shows a couple of coopering planes. Unfortunately google doesn't show the page referenced above.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Leon@21:1/5 to Scott Lurndal on Fri Apr 1 17:32:43 2022
    On 4/1/2022 9:40 AM, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    hubops@ccanoemail.ca writes:
    On Fri, 1 Apr 2022 01:05:16 -0400, Bill <nonegiven@att.net> wrote:

    On 3/31/2022 1:24 PM, John Grossbohlin wrote:
    wrote in message news:7bm84hpoc4ir4384nlv1itsglbi8su68i6@4ax.com...

    One unusual looking plane  -  looks like a plane  ..  :-)
    that I've never seen before  ...

    https://greatwestteam.hibid.com/lot/116724704/hand-planes-/?ipp=100&q=&ref=catalog


    There is a picture of a wooden version on page 210 of Garrett Hack's,
    "The Handplane Book" (1999). It appears that the tool was designed for
    a cooper (barrel making). My "wild guess" is that the "120" implies that >>> it is for shaping the outside of the barrel staves and that it cuts with >>> a curve having a 12" radius. I could be mistaken.

    Hack calls it a "buzz" (aka scraper shave).

    However, it still looks quite different from the '120' shown on
    the auction site.

    I think it's just as likely to be a footrest from a barbers chair;
    there is really no place to mount a blade or scraper cutter.

    Seems odd that a barbers chair foot rest would be in with a bunch of
    planes. I know stuff gets mixed in but this is probably some type of
    cutting tool.



    https://www.google.com/books/edition/The_Handplane_Book/lSVMWpzqfNgC?hl=en&gbpv=1&dq=the+handplane+book&printsec=frontcover

    pg187 shows a couple of coopering planes. Unfortunately google doesn't show the page referenced above.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Bill@21:1/5 to hubops@ccanoemail.ca on Fri Apr 1 23:09:23 2022
    On 4/1/2022 9:29 AM, hubops@ccanoemail.ca wrote:
    On Fri, 1 Apr 2022 01:05:16 -0400, Bill <nonegiven@att.net> wrote:

    On 3/31/2022 1:24 PM, John Grossbohlin wrote:
    wrote in message news:7bm84hpoc4ir4384nlv1itsglbi8su68i6@4ax.com...

    One unusual looking plane  -  looks like a plane  ..  :-)
    that I've never seen before  ...

    https://greatwestteam.hibid.com/lot/116724704/hand-planes-/?ipp=100&q=&ref=catalog


      John T.

    That looks like a foot rest... it's not shaped well for holding/grabbing >>> with one's hands and it’s rather large.


    There is a picture of a wooden version on page 210 of Garrett Hack's,
    "The Handplane Book" (1999). It appears that the tool was designed for
    a cooper (barrel making). My "wild guess" is that the "120" implies that
    it is for shaping the outside of the barrel staves and that it cuts with
    a curve having a 12" radius. I could be mistaken.

    On a related note, I have seen a remarkable tool used for gauging the
    correct angle on the sides of the staves (as a function of radius) so
    that all of the staves fit together perfectly. Don't underestimate the
    technology of barrel or bucket making! : )

    The book above was one of the first books on woodworking that I read,
    and it cost me quite a few dollars (hundreds) after I finished reading
    it. For the uninitiated, it wouldn't take much to push an interest in
    planes into the thousands! If you like "molding planes", Bickford's
    book, "Moldings in Practice" was interesting, but being published by the
    "Lost Art Press", it is sort of pricey for what it is. But if you wish
    to dwell on the nuances of the molding on fine furniture, it may be one
    of the few options. However, As Leon has pointed out before, such
    details can get in the way of getting any work done! I sort of salivate
    when I examine antique fine furniture, but I am not anywhere near as
    successful in getting as much woodworking done as Leon does!


    Thanks for your input, Bill.
    I tried various google image search key-words including
    "barrel" and "cooper" but alas google
    isn't what it used-to-be ...
    If you have a picture or web link of your wooden version
    I'd be happy to see it.
    Or even a unique word for a further web search.


    John, I posted a photo (jpg) of the picture I mentioned to the
    newsgroup: alt.binaries.pictures.woodworking

    I hope that helps! I don't claim that it "settles" the matter! ; )
    You be the judge.



    More image searches turned up this wooden tool :

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/154923909025?hash=item24122f3fa1:g:lXUAAOSwLV5iRCZ9

    John T.


    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to hubops@ccanoemail.ca on Fri Apr 1 23:25:06 2022
    On Fri, 01 Apr 2022 09:29:54 -0400, hubops@ccanoemail.ca wrote:

    On Fri, 1 Apr 2022 01:05:16 -0400, Bill <nonegiven@att.net> wrote:

    On 3/31/2022 1:24 PM, John Grossbohlin wrote:
    wrote in message news:7bm84hpoc4ir4384nlv1itsglbi8su68i6@4ax.com...

    One unusual looking plane† -† looks like a plane† ..† :-)
    that I've never seen before† ...

    https://greatwestteam.hibid.com/lot/116724704/hand-planes-/?ipp=100&q=&ref=catalog


    † John T.

    That looks like a foot rest... it's not shaped well for holding/grabbing >>> with one's hands and itís rather large.


    There is a picture of a wooden version on page 210 of Garrett Hack's,
    "The Handplane Book" (1999). It appears that the tool was designed for
    a cooper (barrel making). My "wild guess" is that the "120" implies that
    it is for shaping the outside of the barrel staves and that it cuts with
    a curve having a 12" radius. I could be mistaken.

    On a related note, I have seen a remarkable tool used for gauging the >>correct angle on the sides of the staves (as a function of radius) so
    that all of the staves fit together perfectly. Don't underestimate the >>technology of barrel or bucket making! : )

    The book above was one of the first books on woodworking that I read,
    and it cost me quite a few dollars (hundreds) after I finished reading
    it. For the uninitiated, it wouldn't take much to push an interest in >>planes into the thousands! If you like "molding planes", Bickford's
    book, "Moldings in Practice" was interesting, but being published by the >>"Lost Art Press", it is sort of pricey for what it is. But if you wish
    to dwell on the nuances of the molding on fine furniture, it may be one
    of the few options. However, As Leon has pointed out before, such
    details can get in the way of getting any work done! I sort of salivate >>when I examine antique fine furniture, but I am not anywhere near as >>successful in getting as much woodworking done as Leon does!


    Thanks for your input, Bill.
    I tried various google image search key-words including
    "barrel" and "cooper" but alas google
    isn't what it used-to-be ...
    If you have a picture or web link of your wooden version
    I'd be happy to see it.
    Or even a unique word for a further web search.

    More image searches turned up this wooden tool :

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/154923909025?hash=item24122f3fa1:g:lXUAAOSwLV5iRCZ9

    I still vote for spokeshave but they may be close cousins.

    <https://www.ebay.com/itm/304413743609>

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From hubops@ccanoemail.ca@21:1/5 to Bill on Sat Apr 2 08:13:27 2022
    On Fri, 1 Apr 2022 23:09:23 -0400, Bill <nonegiven@att.net> wrote:

    On 4/1/2022 9:29 AM, hubops@ccanoemail.ca wrote:
    On Fri, 1 Apr 2022 01:05:16 -0400, Bill <nonegiven@att.net> wrote:

    On 3/31/2022 1:24 PM, John Grossbohlin wrote:
    wrote in message news:7bm84hpoc4ir4384nlv1itsglbi8su68i6@4ax.com...

    One unusual looking plane† -† looks like a plane† ..† :-)
    that I've never seen before† ...

    https://greatwestteam.hibid.com/lot/116724704/hand-planes-/?ipp=100&q=&ref=catalog


    † John T.

    That looks like a foot rest... it's not shaped well for holding/grabbing >>>> with one's hands and itís rather large.


    There is a picture of a wooden version on page 210 of Garrett Hack's,
    "The Handplane Book" (1999). It appears that the tool was designed for
    a cooper (barrel making). My "wild guess" is that the "120" implies that >>> it is for shaping the outside of the barrel staves and that it cuts with >>> a curve having a 12" radius. I could be mistaken.

    On a related note, I have seen a remarkable tool used for gauging the
    correct angle on the sides of the staves (as a function of radius) so
    that all of the staves fit together perfectly. Don't underestimate the
    technology of barrel or bucket making! : )

    The book above was one of the first books on woodworking that I read,
    and it cost me quite a few dollars (hundreds) after I finished reading
    it. For the uninitiated, it wouldn't take much to push an interest in
    planes into the thousands! If you like "molding planes", Bickford's
    book, "Moldings in Practice" was interesting, but being published by the >>> "Lost Art Press", it is sort of pricey for what it is. But if you wish
    to dwell on the nuances of the molding on fine furniture, it may be one
    of the few options. However, As Leon has pointed out before, such
    details can get in the way of getting any work done! I sort of salivate
    when I examine antique fine furniture, but I am not anywhere near as
    successful in getting as much woodworking done as Leon does!


    Thanks for your input, Bill.
    I tried various google image search key-words including
    "barrel" and "cooper" but alas google
    isn't what it used-to-be ...
    If you have a picture or web link of your wooden version
    I'd be happy to see it.
    Or even a unique word for a further web search.
    More image searches turned up this wooden tool :
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/154923909025?hash=item24122f3fa1:g:lXUAAOSwLV5iRCZ9 >> John T.



    John, I posted a photo (jpg) of the picture I mentioned to the
    newsgroup: alt.binaries.pictures.woodworking
    I hope that helps! I don't claim that it "settles" the matter! ; )
    You be the judge.



    Thanks Bill. My image searches for vintage cooper plane returns
    that exact photo from Fine Woodworking and lots of other designs.
    As Clare pointed out, the one in the auction had features that
    strongly suggested that some pieces were missing so the mystery
    remains.
    John T.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From hubops@ccanoemail.ca@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Sat Apr 2 08:16:28 2022
    On Fri, 01 Apr 2022 23:25:06 -0400, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    On Fri, 01 Apr 2022 09:29:54 -0400, hubops@ccanoemail.ca wrote:

    On Fri, 1 Apr 2022 01:05:16 -0400, Bill <nonegiven@att.net> wrote:

    On 3/31/2022 1:24 PM, John Grossbohlin wrote:
    wrote in message news:7bm84hpoc4ir4384nlv1itsglbi8su68i6@4ax.com...

    One unusual looking plane† -† looks like a plane† ..† :-)
    that I've never seen before† ...

    https://greatwestteam.hibid.com/lot/116724704/hand-planes-/?ipp=100&q=&ref=catalog


    † John T.

    That looks like a foot rest... it's not shaped well for holding/grabbing >>>> with one's hands and itís rather large.


    There is a picture of a wooden version on page 210 of Garrett Hack's, >>>"The Handplane Book" (1999). It appears that the tool was designed for
    a cooper (barrel making). My "wild guess" is that the "120" implies that >>>it is for shaping the outside of the barrel staves and that it cuts with >>>a curve having a 12" radius. I could be mistaken.

    On a related note, I have seen a remarkable tool used for gauging the >>>correct angle on the sides of the staves (as a function of radius) so >>>that all of the staves fit together perfectly. Don't underestimate the >>>technology of barrel or bucket making! : )

    The book above was one of the first books on woodworking that I read,
    and it cost me quite a few dollars (hundreds) after I finished reading >>>it. For the uninitiated, it wouldn't take much to push an interest in >>>planes into the thousands! If you like "molding planes", Bickford's >>>book, "Moldings in Practice" was interesting, but being published by the >>>"Lost Art Press", it is sort of pricey for what it is. But if you wish
    to dwell on the nuances of the molding on fine furniture, it may be one >>>of the few options. However, As Leon has pointed out before, such >>>details can get in the way of getting any work done! I sort of salivate >>>when I examine antique fine furniture, but I am not anywhere near as >>>successful in getting as much woodworking done as Leon does!


    Thanks for your input, Bill.
    I tried various google image search key-words including
    "barrel" and "cooper" but alas google
    isn't what it used-to-be ...
    If you have a picture or web link of your wooden version
    I'd be happy to see it.
    Or even a unique word for a further web search.

    More image searches turned up this wooden tool :
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/154923909025?hash=item24122f3fa1:g:lXUAAOSwLV5iRCZ9 >>
    I still vote for spokeshave but they may be close cousins.

    <https://www.ebay.com/itm/304413743609>


    I like the idea that it's some sort of plane / scraper because of
    the grouping in the auction sale - but with pieces missing -
    who knows ? ..
    John T.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Bill@21:1/5 to John Grossbohlin on Mon Apr 4 02:06:38 2022
    On 4/4/2022 1:17 AM, John Grossbohlin wrote:
    "Bill"  wrote in message news:D7P1K.304748$Lbb6.100637@fx45.iad...

    On 4/1/2022 9:29 AM, hubops@ccanoemail.ca wrote:
    On Fri, 1 Apr 2022 01:05:16 -0400, Bill <nonegiven@att.net> wrote:

    On 3/31/2022 1:24 PM, John Grossbohlin wrote:
    wrote in message news:7bm84hpoc4ir4384nlv1itsglbi8su68i6@4ax.com...

    One unusual looking plane  -  looks like a plane  ..  :-)
    that I've never seen before  ...

    https://greatwestteam.hibid.com/lot/116724704/hand-planes-/?ipp=100&q=&ref=catalog



        John T.

    That looks like a foot rest... it's not shaped well for
    holding/grabbing
    with one's hands and it’s rather large.


    There is a picture of a wooden version on page 210 of Garrett Hack's,
    "The Handplane Book" (1999).  It appears that the tool was designed for >>> a cooper (barrel making). My "wild guess" is that the "120" implies that >>> it is for shaping the outside of the barrel staves and that it cuts with >>> a curve having a 12" radius. I could be mistaken.

    On a related note, I have seen a remarkable tool used for gauging the
    correct angle on the sides of the staves (as a function of radius) so
    that all of the staves fit together perfectly.  Don't underestimate the >>> technology of barrel or bucket making!  : )

    The book above was one of the first books on woodworking that I read,
    and it cost me quite a few dollars (hundreds) after I finished reading
    it. For the uninitiated, it wouldn't take much to push an interest in
    planes into the thousands!  If you like "molding planes", Bickford's
    book, "Moldings in Practice" was interesting, but being published by the >>> "Lost Art Press", it is sort of pricey for what it is. But if you wish
    to dwell on the nuances of the molding on fine furniture, it may be one
    of the few options.  However, As Leon has pointed out before, such
    details can get in the way of getting any work done! I sort of salivate
    when I examine antique fine furniture, but I am not anywhere near as
    successful in getting as much woodworking done as Leon does!


       Thanks for your input,  Bill.
    I tried various google image search   key-words  including
      "barrel"  and  "cooper"   but  alas   google
            isn't    what it   used-to-be  ...
    If you have a picture  or  web link  of your wooden version
    I'd be happy to see it.
    Or  even  a  unique   word  for a further   web search.


    John, I posted a photo (jpg) of the picture I mentioned to the
    newsgroup:  alt.binaries.pictures.woodworking

    I hope that helps!  I don't claim that it "settles" the matter!  ; )
    You be the judge.



    More image searches turned up this wooden tool  :

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/154923909025?hash=item24122f3fa1:g:lXUAAOSwLV5iRCZ9 >>

        John T.



    I'm having a hard time wrapping my head around the notion that the item
    is intended for use with the hands. The majority of the antique tools
    I've used (original and reproduction -- I worked at an 18th century
    living history museum and have used many of more recent vintage) were generally more ergonomically shaped than this item. This thing doesn't
    appear to be comfortably graspable. The hatch pattern suggests to me
    that it was designed to prevent feet from slipping. Assuming the plane
    iron on the right is 2" wide that makes this thing about a foot long. It appears to have indexing humps on the bottom (note the two bumps on the
    close side in front of the hole) and a hole through which I can imaging
    a bolt/rod/hook of some sort with a washer and wing nut holding it in
    place.

    Regarding coopers' tools. The vast majority of those I've seen were
    wooden. A notable exception is those of a local cooperage that has made custom machines to perform tasks formerly done with hand tools.  From hearing the cooper at a couple presentations, and having discussions
    with him, I got the impression he did a lot of research into historical cooperage tools and had acquired a significant assortment of them. I've
    sent a copy of the photo off to the owner and asked his opinion.

    I've had people give me boxes of tools that belonged to their
    grandfathers' that went back to the early 1900s. It was not uncommon to
    find completely unrelated items in those boxes. Automotive parts, farm implement parts, etc. That leaves me wondering if this is a tool at all!

    I'll keep poking around with Google and see if anything jumps out.


    Thank you for your further contribution..interesting stuff.
    I had a hard time grasping why there would be "120" on it, were it not
    for it being a tool... But it *does" look like a footrest too (I've
    searched images including tractors and barber chairs!--maybe a dentists
    chair? :D ).

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Grossbohlin@21:1/5 to hubops@ccanoemail.ca on Mon Apr 4 01:17:52 2022
    "Bill" wrote in message news:D7P1K.304748$Lbb6.100637@fx45.iad...

    On 4/1/2022 9:29 AM, hubops@ccanoemail.ca wrote:
    On Fri, 1 Apr 2022 01:05:16 -0400, Bill <nonegiven@att.net> wrote:

    On 3/31/2022 1:24 PM, John Grossbohlin wrote:
    wrote in message news:7bm84hpoc4ir4384nlv1itsglbi8su68i6@4ax.com...

    One unusual looking plane - looks like a plane .. :-)
    that I've never seen before ...

    https://greatwestteam.hibid.com/lot/116724704/hand-planes-/?ipp=100&q=&ref=catalog


    John T.

    That looks like a foot rest... it's not shaped well for holding/grabbing >>> with one's hands and it’s rather large.


    There is a picture of a wooden version on page 210 of Garrett Hack's,
    "The Handplane Book" (1999). It appears that the tool was designed for
    a cooper (barrel making). My "wild guess" is that the "120" implies that
    it is for shaping the outside of the barrel staves and that it cuts with
    a curve having a 12" radius. I could be mistaken.

    On a related note, I have seen a remarkable tool used for gauging the
    correct angle on the sides of the staves (as a function of radius) so
    that all of the staves fit together perfectly. Don't underestimate the
    technology of barrel or bucket making! : )

    The book above was one of the first books on woodworking that I read,
    and it cost me quite a few dollars (hundreds) after I finished reading
    it. For the uninitiated, it wouldn't take much to push an interest in
    planes into the thousands! If you like "molding planes", Bickford's
    book, "Moldings in Practice" was interesting, but being published by the
    "Lost Art Press", it is sort of pricey for what it is. But if you wish
    to dwell on the nuances of the molding on fine furniture, it may be one
    of the few options. However, As Leon has pointed out before, such
    details can get in the way of getting any work done! I sort of salivate
    when I examine antique fine furniture, but I am not anywhere near as
    successful in getting as much woodworking done as Leon does!


    Thanks for your input, Bill.
    I tried various google image search key-words including
    "barrel" and "cooper" but alas google
    isn't what it used-to-be ...
    If you have a picture or web link of your wooden version
    I'd be happy to see it.
    Or even a unique word for a further web search.


    John, I posted a photo (jpg) of the picture I mentioned to the
    newsgroup: alt.binaries.pictures.woodworking

    I hope that helps! I don't claim that it "settles" the matter! ; )
    You be the judge.



    More image searches turned up this wooden tool :

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/154923909025?hash=item24122f3fa1:g:lXUAAOSwLV5iRCZ9

    John T.



    I'm having a hard time wrapping my head around the notion that the item is intended for use with the hands. The majority of the antique tools I've used (original and reproduction -- I worked at an 18th century living history
    museum and have used many of more recent vintage) were generally more ergonomically shaped than this item. This thing doesn't appear to be comfortably graspable. The hatch pattern suggests to me that it was designed
    to prevent feet from slipping. Assuming the plane iron on the right is 2"
    wide that makes this thing about a foot long. It appears to have indexing
    humps on the bottom (note the two bumps on the close side in front of the
    hole) and a hole through which I can imaging a bolt/rod/hook of some sort
    with a washer and wing nut holding it in place.

    Regarding coopers' tools. The vast majority of those I've seen were wooden.
    A notable exception is those of a local cooperage that has made custom
    machines to perform tasks formerly done with hand tools. From hearing the cooper at a couple presentations, and having discussions with him, I got the impression he did a lot of research into historical cooperage tools and had acquired a significant assortment of them. I've sent a copy of the photo off
    to the owner and asked his opinion.

    I've had people give me boxes of tools that belonged to their grandfathers' that went back to the early 1900s. It was not uncommon to find completely unrelated items in those boxes. Automotive parts, farm implement parts, etc. That leaves me wondering if this is a tool at all!

    I'll keep poking around with Google and see if anything jumps out.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DerbyDad03@21:1/5 to Bill on Mon Apr 4 19:15:21 2022
    On Monday, April 4, 2022 at 2:06:45 AM UTC-4, Bill wrote:
    On 4/4/2022 1:17 AM, John Grossbohlin wrote:
    "Bill" wrote in message news:D7P1K.304748$Lbb6....@fx45.iad...

    On 4/1/2022 9:29 AM, hub...@ccanoemail.ca wrote:
    On Fri, 1 Apr 2022 01:05:16 -0400, Bill <none...@att.net> wrote:

    On 3/31/2022 1:24 PM, John Grossbohlin wrote:
    wrote in message news:7bm84hpoc4ir4384n...@4ax.com...

    One unusual looking plane - looks like a plane .. :-)
    that I've never seen before ...

    https://greatwestteam.hibid.com/lot/116724704/hand-planes-/?ipp=100&q=&ref=catalog



    John T.

    That looks like a foot rest... it's not shaped well for
    holding/grabbing
    with one's hands and it’s rather large.


    There is a picture of a wooden version on page 210 of Garrett Hack's, >>> "The Handplane Book" (1999). It appears that the tool was designed for >>> a cooper (barrel making). My "wild guess" is that the "120" implies that >>> it is for shaping the outside of the barrel staves and that it cuts with >>> a curve having a 12" radius. I could be mistaken.

    On a related note, I have seen a remarkable tool used for gauging the >>> correct angle on the sides of the staves (as a function of radius) so >>> that all of the staves fit together perfectly. Don't underestimate the >>> technology of barrel or bucket making! : )

    The book above was one of the first books on woodworking that I read, >>> and it cost me quite a few dollars (hundreds) after I finished reading >>> it. For the uninitiated, it wouldn't take much to push an interest in >>> planes into the thousands! If you like "molding planes", Bickford's
    book, "Moldings in Practice" was interesting, but being published by the >>> "Lost Art Press", it is sort of pricey for what it is. But if you wish >>> to dwell on the nuances of the molding on fine furniture, it may be one >>> of the few options. However, As Leon has pointed out before, such
    details can get in the way of getting any work done! I sort of salivate >>> when I examine antique fine furniture, but I am not anywhere near as
    successful in getting as much woodworking done as Leon does!


    Thanks for your input, Bill.
    I tried various google image search key-words including
    "barrel" and "cooper" but alas google
    isn't what it used-to-be ...
    If you have a picture or web link of your wooden version
    I'd be happy to see it.
    Or even a unique word for a further web search.


    John, I posted a photo (jpg) of the picture I mentioned to the
    newsgroup: alt.binaries.pictures.woodworking

    I hope that helps! I don't claim that it "settles" the matter! ; )
    You be the judge.



    More image searches turned up this wooden tool :

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/154923909025?hash=item24122f3fa1:g:lXUAAOSwLV5iRCZ9


    John T.



    I'm having a hard time wrapping my head around the notion that the item
    is intended for use with the hands. The majority of the antique tools
    I've used (original and reproduction -- I worked at an 18th century
    living history museum and have used many of more recent vintage) were generally more ergonomically shaped than this item. This thing doesn't appear to be comfortably graspable. The hatch pattern suggests to me
    that it was designed to prevent feet from slipping. Assuming the plane iron on the right is 2" wide that makes this thing about a foot long. It appears to have indexing humps on the bottom (note the two bumps on the close side in front of the hole) and a hole through which I can imaging
    a bolt/rod/hook of some sort with a washer and wing nut holding it in place.

    Regarding coopers' tools. The vast majority of those I've seen were wooden. A notable exception is those of a local cooperage that has made custom machines to perform tasks formerly done with hand tools. From hearing the cooper at a couple presentations, and having discussions
    with him, I got the impression he did a lot of research into historical cooperage tools and had acquired a significant assortment of them. I've sent a copy of the photo off to the owner and asked his opinion.

    I've had people give me boxes of tools that belonged to their grandfathers' that went back to the early 1900s. It was not uncommon to find completely unrelated items in those boxes. Automotive parts, farm implement parts, etc. That leaves me wondering if this is a tool at all!

    I'll keep poking around with Google and see if anything jumps out.

    Thank you for your further contribution..interesting stuff.
    I had a hard time grasping why there would be "120" on it, were it not
    for it being a tool... But it *does" look like a footrest too (I've
    searched images including tractors and barber chairs!--maybe a dentists chair? :D ).

    As I mentioned earlier: Salon chairs have T shaped footrests, as opposed to barber's chairs that almost exclusively have full, flat surfaced footrests.

    A salon chair, albeit a somewhat modern one:

    https://i.imgur.com/TnurQjR.png

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Bill@21:1/5 to All on Tue Apr 5 02:14:16 2022
    On 4/4/2022 10:15 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
    On Monday, April 4, 2022 at 2:06:45 AM UTC-4, Bill wrote:
    On 4/4/2022 1:17 AM, John Grossbohlin wrote:
    "Bill" wrote in message news:D7P1K.304748$Lbb6....@fx45.iad...

    On 4/1/2022 9:29 AM, hub...@ccanoemail.ca wrote:
    On Fri, 1 Apr 2022 01:05:16 -0400, Bill <none...@att.net> wrote:

    On 3/31/2022 1:24 PM, John Grossbohlin wrote:
    wrote in message news:7bm84hpoc4ir4384n...@4ax.com...

    One unusual looking plane - looks like a plane .. :-)
    that I've never seen before ...

    https://greatwestteam.hibid.com/lot/116724704/hand-planes-/?ipp=100&q=&ref=catalog



    John T.

    That looks like a foot rest... it's not shaped well for
    holding/grabbing
    with one's hands and it’s rather large.


    There is a picture of a wooden version on page 210 of Garrett Hack's, >>>>> "The Handplane Book" (1999). It appears that the tool was designed for >>>>> a cooper (barrel making). My "wild guess" is that the "120" implies that >>>>> it is for shaping the outside of the barrel staves and that it cuts with >>>>> a curve having a 12" radius. I could be mistaken.

    On a related note, I have seen a remarkable tool used for gauging the >>>>> correct angle on the sides of the staves (as a function of radius) so >>>>> that all of the staves fit together perfectly. Don't underestimate the >>>>> technology of barrel or bucket making! : )

    The book above was one of the first books on woodworking that I read, >>>>> and it cost me quite a few dollars (hundreds) after I finished reading >>>>> it. For the uninitiated, it wouldn't take much to push an interest in >>>>> planes into the thousands! If you like "molding planes", Bickford's >>>>> book, "Moldings in Practice" was interesting, but being published by the >>>>> "Lost Art Press", it is sort of pricey for what it is. But if you wish >>>>> to dwell on the nuances of the molding on fine furniture, it may be one >>>>> of the few options. However, As Leon has pointed out before, such
    details can get in the way of getting any work done! I sort of salivate >>>>> when I examine antique fine furniture, but I am not anywhere near as >>>>> successful in getting as much woodworking done as Leon does!


    Thanks for your input, Bill.
    I tried various google image search key-words including
    "barrel" and "cooper" but alas google
    isn't what it used-to-be ...
    If you have a picture or web link of your wooden version
    I'd be happy to see it.
    Or even a unique word for a further web search.


    John, I posted a photo (jpg) of the picture I mentioned to the
    newsgroup: alt.binaries.pictures.woodworking

    I hope that helps! I don't claim that it "settles" the matter! ; )
    You be the judge.



    More image searches turned up this wooden tool :

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/154923909025?hash=item24122f3fa1:g:lXUAAOSwLV5iRCZ9


    John T.



    I'm having a hard time wrapping my head around the notion that the item
    is intended for use with the hands. The majority of the antique tools
    I've used (original and reproduction -- I worked at an 18th century
    living history museum and have used many of more recent vintage) were
    generally more ergonomically shaped than this item. This thing doesn't
    appear to be comfortably graspable. The hatch pattern suggests to me
    that it was designed to prevent feet from slipping. Assuming the plane
    iron on the right is 2" wide that makes this thing about a foot long. It >>> appears to have indexing humps on the bottom (note the two bumps on the
    close side in front of the hole) and a hole through which I can imaging
    a bolt/rod/hook of some sort with a washer and wing nut holding it in
    place.

    Regarding coopers' tools. The vast majority of those I've seen were
    wooden. A notable exception is those of a local cooperage that has made
    custom machines to perform tasks formerly done with hand tools. From
    hearing the cooper at a couple presentations, and having discussions
    with him, I got the impression he did a lot of research into historical
    cooperage tools and had acquired a significant assortment of them. I've
    sent a copy of the photo off to the owner and asked his opinion.

    I've had people give me boxes of tools that belonged to their
    grandfathers' that went back to the early 1900s. It was not uncommon to
    find completely unrelated items in those boxes. Automotive parts, farm
    implement parts, etc. That leaves me wondering if this is a tool at all! >>>
    I'll keep poking around with Google and see if anything jumps out.

    Thank you for your further contribution..interesting stuff.
    I had a hard time grasping why there would be "120" on it, were it not
    for it being a tool... But it *does" look like a footrest too (I've
    searched images including tractors and barber chairs!--maybe a dentists
    chair? :D ).

    As I mentioned earlier: Salon chairs have T shaped footrests, as opposed to barber's chairs that almost exclusively have full, flat surfaced footrests.

    A salon chair, albeit a somewhat modern one:

    https://i.imgur.com/TnurQjR.png


    It "makes sense" that a chair such as salon chair would have the "feet"
    so close together (to keep them out of the way). Good thinking.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Leon@21:1/5 to All on Tue Apr 5 08:53:15 2022
    On 4/4/2022 9:15 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
    On Monday, April 4, 2022 at 2:06:45 AM UTC-4, Bill wrote:
    On 4/4/2022 1:17 AM, John Grossbohlin wrote:
    "Bill" wrote in message news:D7P1K.304748$Lbb6....@fx45.iad...

    On 4/1/2022 9:29 AM, hub...@ccanoemail.ca wrote:
    On Fri, 1 Apr 2022 01:05:16 -0400, Bill <none...@att.net> wrote:

    On 3/31/2022 1:24 PM, John Grossbohlin wrote:
    wrote in message news:7bm84hpoc4ir4384n...@4ax.com...

    One unusual looking plane - looks like a plane .. :-)
    that I've never seen before ...

    https://greatwestteam.hibid.com/lot/116724704/hand-planes-/?ipp=100&q=&ref=catalog



    John T.

    That looks like a foot rest... it's not shaped well for
    holding/grabbing
    with one's hands and it’s rather large.


    There is a picture of a wooden version on page 210 of Garrett Hack's, >>>>> "The Handplane Book" (1999). It appears that the tool was designed for >>>>> a cooper (barrel making). My "wild guess" is that the "120" implies that >>>>> it is for shaping the outside of the barrel staves and that it cuts with >>>>> a curve having a 12" radius. I could be mistaken.

    On a related note, I have seen a remarkable tool used for gauging the >>>>> correct angle on the sides of the staves (as a function of radius) so >>>>> that all of the staves fit together perfectly. Don't underestimate the >>>>> technology of barrel or bucket making! : )

    The book above was one of the first books on woodworking that I read, >>>>> and it cost me quite a few dollars (hundreds) after I finished reading >>>>> it. For the uninitiated, it wouldn't take much to push an interest in >>>>> planes into the thousands! If you like "molding planes", Bickford's >>>>> book, "Moldings in Practice" was interesting, but being published by the >>>>> "Lost Art Press", it is sort of pricey for what it is. But if you wish >>>>> to dwell on the nuances of the molding on fine furniture, it may be one >>>>> of the few options. However, As Leon has pointed out before, such
    details can get in the way of getting any work done! I sort of salivate >>>>> when I examine antique fine furniture, but I am not anywhere near as >>>>> successful in getting as much woodworking done as Leon does!


    Thanks for your input, Bill.
    I tried various google image search key-words including
    "barrel" and "cooper" but alas google
    isn't what it used-to-be ...
    If you have a picture or web link of your wooden version
    I'd be happy to see it.
    Or even a unique word for a further web search.


    John, I posted a photo (jpg) of the picture I mentioned to the
    newsgroup: alt.binaries.pictures.woodworking

    I hope that helps! I don't claim that it "settles" the matter! ; )
    You be the judge.



    More image searches turned up this wooden tool :

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/154923909025?hash=item24122f3fa1:g:lXUAAOSwLV5iRCZ9


    John T.



    I'm having a hard time wrapping my head around the notion that the item
    is intended for use with the hands. The majority of the antique tools
    I've used (original and reproduction -- I worked at an 18th century
    living history museum and have used many of more recent vintage) were
    generally more ergonomically shaped than this item. This thing doesn't
    appear to be comfortably graspable. The hatch pattern suggests to me
    that it was designed to prevent feet from slipping. Assuming the plane
    iron on the right is 2" wide that makes this thing about a foot long. It >>> appears to have indexing humps on the bottom (note the two bumps on the
    close side in front of the hole) and a hole through which I can imaging
    a bolt/rod/hook of some sort with a washer and wing nut holding it in
    place.

    Regarding coopers' tools. The vast majority of those I've seen were
    wooden. A notable exception is those of a local cooperage that has made
    custom machines to perform tasks formerly done with hand tools. From
    hearing the cooper at a couple presentations, and having discussions
    with him, I got the impression he did a lot of research into historical
    cooperage tools and had acquired a significant assortment of them. I've
    sent a copy of the photo off to the owner and asked his opinion.

    I've had people give me boxes of tools that belonged to their
    grandfathers' that went back to the early 1900s. It was not uncommon to
    find completely unrelated items in those boxes. Automotive parts, farm
    implement parts, etc. That leaves me wondering if this is a tool at all! >>>
    I'll keep poking around with Google and see if anything jumps out.

    Thank you for your further contribution..interesting stuff.
    I had a hard time grasping why there would be "120" on it, were it not
    for it being a tool... But it *does" look like a footrest too (I've
    searched images including tractors and barber chairs!--maybe a dentists
    chair? :D ).

    As I mentioned earlier: Salon chairs have T shaped footrests, as opposed to barber's chairs that almost exclusively have full, flat surfaced footrests.

    A salon chair, albeit a somewhat modern one:

    https://i.imgur.com/TnurQjR.png



    Well that is a thought but the handle to my dad's old lawn mower had
    looked like that too.

    I have to suspect that a piece of furniture and or a lawn mower handle
    would have an identifying 120 molded in.

    Back to the barber chair, I recall a foot rest with a flat metal side,
    for your feet, and it would flip to offer a padded side to rest your
    legs when you were tipped back for a shave.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Grossbohlin@21:1/5 to Leon on Wed Apr 6 10:42:46 2022
    "Leon" wrote in message
    news:uaCdnZhsBshW1NH_nZ2dnUU7-eHNnZ2d@giganews.com...


    Well that is a thought but the handle to my dad's old lawn mower had looked >like that too.

    I have to suspect that a piece of furniture and or a lawn mower handle
    would have an identifying 120 molded in.

    Back to the barber chair, I recall a foot rest with a flat metal side, for >your feet, and it would flip to offer a padded side to rest your legs when >you were tipped back for a shave.

    It seems kind of short to be a lawn mower handle.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Leon@21:1/5 to John Grossbohlin on Wed Apr 6 10:40:10 2022
    On 4/6/2022 9:42 AM, John Grossbohlin wrote:
    "Leon"  wrote in message news:uaCdnZhsBshW1NH_nZ2dnUU7-eHNnZ2d@giganews.com...


    Well that is a thought but the handle to my dad's old lawn mower had
    looked like that too.

    I have to suspect that a piece of furniture and or a lawn mower handle
    would have an identifying 120 molded in.

    Back to the barber chair, I recall a foot rest with a flat metal side,
    for your feet, and it would flip to offer a padded side to rest your
    legs when you were tipped back for a shave.

    It seems kind of short to be a lawn mower handle.

    Think the top of the tubes that connect to the mower deck.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Grossbohlin@21:1/5 to Leon on Wed Apr 6 13:13:16 2022
    "John Grossbohlin" wrote in message news:I9idnR5lXL4IVND_nZ2dnUU7-ePNnZ2d@earthlink.com...

    "Leon" wrote in message
    news:-JidnVZsVaHHKdD_nZ2dnUU7-dWdnZ2d@giganews.com...

    On 4/6/2022 9:42 AM, John Grossbohlin wrote:
    "Leon" wrote in message
    news:uaCdnZhsBshW1NH_nZ2dnUU7-eHNnZ2d@giganews.com...


    Well that is a thought but the handle to my dad's old lawn mower had
    looked like that too.


    I have to suspect that a piece of furniture and or a lawn mower handle
    would have an identifying 120 molded in.

    It seems kind of short to be a lawn mower handle.

    Think the top of the tubes that connect to the mower deck.

    Yes, the part you'd hold on to. It is only about a foot wide which would
    make mowing unwieldy as your hands would be close together... Outside of the very small push reel mowers I've never seen one that narrow and most are one piece with the riser tubing. I'd be interested in seeing more antiques as obviously I've never seen all the offerings of the past!

    I didn't finish my thought... Or, they had wooden handles!

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Grossbohlin@21:1/5 to Leon on Wed Apr 6 13:10:44 2022
    "Leon" wrote in message
    news:-JidnVZsVaHHKdD_nZ2dnUU7-dWdnZ2d@giganews.com...

    On 4/6/2022 9:42 AM, John Grossbohlin wrote:
    "Leon" wrote in message
    news:uaCdnZhsBshW1NH_nZ2dnUU7-eHNnZ2d@giganews.com...


    Well that is a thought but the handle to my dad's old lawn mower had
    looked like that too.


    I have to suspect that a piece of furniture and or a lawn mower handle
    would have an identifying 120 molded in.

    It seems kind of short to be a lawn mower handle.

    Think the top of the tubes that connect to the mower deck.

    Yes, the part you'd hold on to. It is only about a foot wide which would
    make mowing unwieldy as your hands would be close together... Outside of the very small push reel mowers I've never seen one that narrow and most are one piece with the riser tubing. I'd be interested in seeing more antiques as obviously I've never seen all the offerings of the past!

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Clare Snyder@21:1/5 to nospam.grossboj@nospam.earthlink.ne on Wed Apr 6 15:26:27 2022
    On Wed, 6 Apr 2022 13:13:16 -0400, "John Grossbohlin" <nospam.grossboj@nospam.earthlink.net> wrote:

    "John Grossbohlin" wrote in message >news:I9idnR5lXL4IVND_nZ2dnUU7-ePNnZ2d@earthlink.com...

    "Leon" wrote in message >news:-JidnVZsVaHHKdD_nZ2dnUU7-dWdnZ2d@giganews.com...

    On 4/6/2022 9:42 AM, John Grossbohlin wrote:
    "Leon" wrote in message
    news:uaCdnZhsBshW1NH_nZ2dnUU7-eHNnZ2d@giganews.com...


    Well that is a thought but the handle to my dad's old lawn mower had
    looked like that too.


    I have to suspect that a piece of furniture and or a lawn mower handle
    would have an identifying 120 molded in.

    It seems kind of short to be a lawn mower handle.

    Think the top of the tubes that connect to the mower deck.

    Yes, the part you'd hold on to. It is only about a foot wide which would >make mowing unwieldy as your hands would be close together... Outside of the >very small push reel mowers I've never seen one that narrow and most are one >piece with the riser tubing. I'd be interested in seeing more antiques as >obviously I've never seen all the offerings of the past!

    I didn't finish my thought... Or, they had wooden handles!

    I was thinking something more like an edger/trimmer type tool - maybee something 12 inches wide??? - hence the "120" nomenclature?

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From hubops@ccanoemail.com@21:1/5 to All on Tue Jun 28 07:36:13 2022
    just for curiosity / comments :

    https://rockfordauctioncentre.hibid.com/lot/124577534/woodworking-station/?cpage=8&ipp=100&q=&ref=catalog

    John T.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Sonny@21:1/5 to hub...@ccanoemail.com on Tue Jun 28 06:04:33 2022
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 6:36:08 AM UTC-5, hub...@ccanoemail.com wrote:
    just for curiosity / comments :

    https://rockfordauctioncentre.hibid.com/lot/124577534/woodworking-station/?cpage=8&ipp=100&q=&ref=catalog

    John T.

    A lot of time and effort was put into building that cabinet. It alone is probably worth the $150 CA. Looks like a good assortment of tools and accessories and that's a plus. IMO, bench top saws are not so appealing, so I would think the saw is
    the weakest amenity. As nice as the cabinet is, I wonder why the original owner selected such a saw. But then again, maybe his/her projects didn't require anything more. Further more, the owner most likely took good care of his/her tools, so the
    saw is probably in very good shape, despite it being "small".

    For someone lacking a nice work station, with those amenities shown and having the funds, I would think a $300 price may be a good buy. As prices are now days, one would be hard pressed to build and acquire all of that for less than $500, I would think.

    Sonny

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Scott Lurndal@21:1/5 to Sonny on Tue Jun 28 14:19:51 2022
    Sonny <cedarsonny@aol.com> writes:
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 6:36:08 AM UTC-5, hub...@ccanoemail.com wrote:
    just for curiosity / comments :=20
    =20
    https://rockfordauctioncentre.hibid.com/lot/124577534/woodworking-station= >/?cpage=3D8&ipp=3D100&q=3D&ref=3Dcatalog=20
    =20
    John T.

    A lot of time and effort was put into building that cabinet. It alone is= probably worth the $150 CA. Looks like a good assortment of tools and a=
    ccessories and that's a plus. IMO, bench top saws are not so appealing, s= >o I would think the saw is the weakest amenity.

    That is not a bench saw, it's a 2HP contractors saw with a cast iron top,
    cast iron wings and a pretty nice bies-style fence. "King Canada"
    brand, late 90's. The tilt-up belt sander on the back is interesting, if unusual.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Scott Lurndal@21:1/5 to teamarrows@eznet.net on Tue Jun 28 16:43:16 2022
    DerbyDad03 <teamarrows@eznet.net> writes:
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 7:36:08 AM UTC-4, hub...@ccanoemail.com wrote:
    just for curiosity / comments :

    https://rockfordauctioncentre.hibid.com/lot/124577534/woodworking-station/?cpage=8&ipp=100&q=&ref=catalog

    John T.

    Rambling comments...

    The cabinet is rough - both roughly built and well used - but looks pretty sturdy.
    Other than the cheap drawer slides on the big drawer, the others appear to be wood
    on wood. Of course that's easy enough to upgrade. I think it would take a lot of time
    and work to get that cabinet into "finish carpentry" shape. That router table definitely
    needs a new top, insert and probably router. Certainly doable.

    Tools are questionable. It might be hard to find parts for the table saw. I did a quick
    search and while the King Canada website has a page full of "Buy Online" vendor choices,
    the half-dozen I tried don't show anything for a KC-10RC table saw. Since it's labeled
    as Taiwanese, it may be a "generic saw" with parts available if you can find a different
    but matching model, if you get my drift. But it is at least at 1/4 century old, so tracking
    down parts/part numbers might be troublesome.

    I think you are being quite critical. For a portable workstation, it's
    more than sufficient for finish carpentry and even fine furniture.

    I know a fellow that does extremely fine woodworking with an old
    delta 34-670 (that I sold him when I bought my JTAS-10 back in 1996).
    I had replaced one of the stamped wings with a laminate router table
    with insert befores selling. He replaced the fence a couple years ago with a biesmeyer clone. Recently he used it when doing some volunteer work
    cleaning up the interior of an old Victorian to be used as a women's shelter, doing some fine finish carpentry.

    In general, as-is it all seems OK for rough work, but it would need a lot of work to get it
    ready for finish carpentry - especially if the tools need to be replaced.

    What kind of finish carpentry are you considering here? A SCMS is much more useful for that type of work (mouldings, trim, etc.).

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DerbyDad03@21:1/5 to hub...@ccanoemail.com on Tue Jun 28 09:17:35 2022
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 7:36:08 AM UTC-4, hub...@ccanoemail.com wrote:
    just for curiosity / comments :

    https://rockfordauctioncentre.hibid.com/lot/124577534/woodworking-station/?cpage=8&ipp=100&q=&ref=catalog

    John T.

    Rambling comments...

    The cabinet is rough - both roughly built and well used - but looks pretty sturdy.
    Other than the cheap drawer slides on the big drawer, the others appear to be wood
    on wood. Of course that's easy enough to upgrade. I think it would take a lot of time
    and work to get that cabinet into "finish carpentry" shape. That router table definitely
    needs a new top, insert and probably router. Certainly doable.

    Tools are questionable. It might be hard to find parts for the table saw. I did a quick
    search and while the King Canada website has a page full of "Buy Online" vendor choices,
    the half-dozen I tried don't show anything for a KC-10RC table saw. Since it's labeled
    as Taiwanese, it may be a "generic saw" with parts available if you can find a different
    but matching model, if you get my drift. But it is at least at 1/4 century old, so tracking
    down parts/part numbers might be troublesome.

    FWIW it seems like King Canada now labels their tools as King Industrial.

    I'm not of fan of anything Ryobi so I don't know about that router. The current Vega fences
    get mixed reviews and that one looks pretty beat up.

    In general, as-is it all seems OK for rough work, but it would need a lot of work to get it
    ready for finish carpentry - especially if the tools need to be replaced.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Scott Lurndal@21:1/5 to teamarrows@eznet.net on Tue Jun 28 18:35:09 2022
    DerbyDad03 <teamarrows@eznet.net> writes:
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 12:43:21 PM UTC-4, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    DerbyDad03 <teama...@eznet.net> writes:

    In general, as-is it all seems OK for rough work, but it would need a lot of work to get it
    ready for finish carpentry - especially if the tools need to be replaced. >> What kind of finish carpentry are you considering here? A SCMS is much more >> useful for that type of work (mouldings, trim, etc.).

    My point was that the cabinet itself needs some TLC. I never specifically said that any
    of the tools *needed* to be replaced. I said it would be more work *if* the tools needed
    to be replaced.

    I guess that's where we differ. I find the cabinet to be perfect for
    it's purpose, there's no need to make it into a piece of fine furniture.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DerbyDad03@21:1/5 to Scott Lurndal on Tue Jun 28 11:15:44 2022
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 12:43:21 PM UTC-4, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    DerbyDad03 <teama...@eznet.net> writes:
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 7:36:08 AM UTC-4, hub...@ccanoemail.com wrote: >> just for curiosity / comments :

    https://rockfordauctioncentre.hibid.com/lot/124577534/woodworking-station/?cpage=8&ipp=100&q=&ref=catalog

    John T.

    Rambling comments...

    The cabinet is rough - both roughly built and well used - but looks pretty sturdy.
    Other than the cheap drawer slides on the big drawer, the others appear to be wood
    on wood. Of course that's easy enough to upgrade. I think it would take a lot of time
    and work to get that cabinet into "finish carpentry" shape. That router table definitely
    needs a new top, insert and probably router. Certainly doable.

    Tools are questionable. It might be hard to find parts for the table saw. I did a quick
    search and while the King Canada website has a page full of "Buy Online" vendor choices,
    the half-dozen I tried don't show anything for a KC-10RC table saw. Since it's labeled
    as Taiwanese, it may be a "generic saw" with parts available if you can find a different
    but matching model, if you get my drift. But it is at least at 1/4 century old, so tracking
    down parts/part numbers might be troublesome.
    I think you are being quite critical.

    And I think the same about your response.

    For a portable workstation, it's
    more than sufficient for finish carpentry and even fine furniture.

    I know a fellow that does extremely fine woodworking with an old
    delta 34-670 (that I sold him when I bought my JTAS-10 back in 1996).

    I never said the saw itself wasn't capable of doing fine work. The only thing I said
    about the saw is that parts might be hard to find.

    I was talking about the over all condition of the cabinet. IMO it looks rough and
    well used.

    I had replaced one of the stamped wings with a laminate router table
    with insert befores selling.

    And I said: "That router table definitely needs a new top, insert and probably router. Certainly doable."

    I too have replaced a stamped steel TS extension with a laminate (actually melamine)
    surface and aluminum insert. It sounds like we are in agreement there.

    He replaced the fence a couple years ago with a
    biesmeyer clone. Recently he used it when doing some volunteer work
    cleaning up the interior of an old Victorian to be used as a women's shelter, doing some fine finish carpentry.

    I too have replaced the fence on my Craftsman TS, using a Delta T-Square. As useful
    and important an upgrade as the router table. That item *may* need a new fence, It's sure looks well used and I've seen mixed reviews on current Vesa fences. We can't
    tell from the pictures, so that is another "if".

    In general, as-is it all seems OK for rough work, but it would need a lot of work to get it
    ready for finish carpentry - especially if the tools need to be replaced. What kind of finish carpentry are you considering here? A SCMS is much more useful for that type of work (mouldings, trim, etc.).

    My point was that the cabinet itself needs some TLC. I never specifically said that any
    of the tools *needed* to be replaced. I said it would be more work *if* the tools needed
    to be replaced.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to hubops@ccanoemail.com on Tue Jun 28 16:08:22 2022
    On Tue, 28 Jun 2022 07:36:13 -0400, hubops@ccanoemail.com wrote:

    just for curiosity / comments :

    https://rockfordauctioncentre.hibid.com/lot/124577534/woodworking-station/?cpage=8&ipp=100&q=&ref=catalog

    I think I had that same router (RE600) in my first lift/table.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to hubops@ccanoemail.com on Tue Jun 28 16:24:33 2022
    On Tue, 28 Jun 2022 07:36:13 -0400, hubops@ccanoemail.com wrote:

    just for curiosity / comments :

    https://rockfordauctioncentre.hibid.com/lot/124577534/woodworking-station/?cpage=8&ipp=100&q=&ref=catalog

    I kinda like that belt sander with the open pulleys, cords looped all
    over, and nose sticking out making it a perfect trip hazard.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DerbyDad03@21:1/5 to k...@notreal.com on Tue Jun 28 15:32:02 2022
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 4:08:26 PM UTC-4, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Tue, 28 Jun 2022 07:36:13 -0400, hub...@ccanoemail.com wrote:

    just for curiosity / comments :

    https://rockfordauctioncentre.hibid.com/lot/124577534/woodworking-station/?cpage=8&ipp=100&q=&ref=catalog
    I think I had that same router (RE600) in my first lift/table.

    Were older Ryobi tools better than the Ryobi's of today?

    I have a 30+ year old Ryobi reciprocating saw that just won't die, preventing me from
    getting new one. ;-)

    I've tried a few more recent Ryobi tools, including a cordless set, that I thought sucked.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DerbyDad03@21:1/5 to russellseaton1@yahoo.com on Tue Jun 28 15:57:37 2022
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 6:24:47 PM UTC-4, russellseaton1@yahoo.com wrote:
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 6:36:08 AM UTC-5, hub...@ccanoemail.com wrote:
    just for curiosity / comments :

    https://rockfordauctioncentre.hibid.com/lot/124577534/woodworking-station/?cpage=8&ipp=100&q=&ref=catalog

    John T.
    My OPINION. OPINION. OPINION.

    It looks old and rough and well used over the years. I have zero experience with used prices for tools so cannot make any comments about what it would sell for. I have a 1992 or 93 Delta Contractor saw. Similar or the same as the saw shown in the
    pictures. Except this one looks a lot older. The cast iron wings look nicer, sort of, than my sheet metal wings on my saw. I say sort of because it is nice that mine are solid, while these cast iron have lots of holes in them. I would not be surprised if
    this saw is 5-10-15 years older than my saw. The Vega fence appears to be an upgrade. Like I have a Biesemeyer/Delta fence on mine. But the Vega is well used. I hate router tables in table saws. I want separate. But the big Ryobi plunge router probably
    is 15-20-25 years old and likely works. So you could probably build a separate router table for it and be happy. The belt sander motor contraption on the backside is interesting. I assume it is just hanging there for storage. To use it you pick it up and
    place it on top of the router table. I use my big 4x24 Makita belt sander in a homemade jig or in my Record vice. So the belt sander contraption would be good to have I guess if you did not already own a belt sander. As for the quality of the cabinets,
    they are functional I guess. No high quality was put into them. Functional shop cabinets. Fine OK. I built cabinets under my side table on my saw. Functional, cheap, painted white. No fine carpentry.

    Personally, I would not BUY, PAY, for this table saw, router table, sander. If I owned it already or was given it, I would fix it up and put it in the outbuildings for rough use. I see it kind of as a project. Analogy: 1970s-80s Monte Carlo, Cutlass
    Supreme, Riviera. Cool cars, I thought. I'd love to have one to drive around. Be cool. If you found, bought several super cheap, and could do your own mechanic work, it would be fun to make a new, good one. Relive your youth and be cool again. But it
    would be worth less than the cost and time to make it.

    Rationally, I can't imagine why anyone would want this saw. Its rough now. It will take a lot of work to make useful. And ten times that to make it functional and pretty and something you are proud of owning. I think you could use your time and money
    in better ways.

    re: Table saw/Router table combos.

    In a semi-perfect world, combos wouldn't be needed. For folks like me with small shops, the
    combo is infinitely better than the other option: bench top/portable router tables.

    BTDT. They S-U-C-K.

    My solution: - Table saw, router table and "jointer" combo. I have a separate fence for the
    router table that has a port for dust collection.

    https://i.imgur.com/8dyS4kN.jpg

    As far as the belt sander on the auction item, zoom in. It's hinged to the main cabinet, which
    tells me that it swings up and I'll bet that there are hinged legs that hold it up.

    Never mind, here you go - a close up of the hinges.

    https://i.imgur.com/Bkewt8S.jpg

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From ritzannaseaton@gmail.com@21:1/5 to hub...@ccanoemail.com on Tue Jun 28 15:24:41 2022
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 6:36:08 AM UTC-5, hub...@ccanoemail.com wrote:
    just for curiosity / comments :

    https://rockfordauctioncentre.hibid.com/lot/124577534/woodworking-station/?cpage=8&ipp=100&q=&ref=catalog

    John T.

    My OPINION. OPINION. OPINION.

    It looks old and rough and well used over the years. I have zero experience with used prices for tools so cannot make any comments about what it would sell for. I have a 1992 or 93 Delta Contractor saw. Similar or the same as the saw shown in the
    pictures. Except this one looks a lot older. The cast iron wings look nicer, sort of, than my sheet metal wings on my saw. I say sort of because it is nice that mine are solid, while these cast iron have lots of holes in them. I would not be
    surprised if this saw is 5-10-15 years older than my saw. The Vega fence appears to be an upgrade. Like I have a Biesemeyer/Delta fence on mine. But the Vega is well used. I hate router tables in table saws. I want separate. But the big Ryobi
    plunge router probably is 15-20-25 years old and likely works. So you could probably build a separate router table for it and be happy. The belt sander motor contraption on the backside is interesting. I assume it is just hanging there for storage.
    To use it you pick it up and place it on top of the router table. I use my big 4x24 Makita belt sander in a homemade jig or in my Record vice. So the belt sander contraption would be good to have I guess if you did not already own a belt sander. As
    for the quality of the cabinets, they are functional I guess. No high quality was put into them. Functional shop cabinets. Fine OK. I built cabinets under my side table on my saw. Functional, cheap, painted white. No fine carpentry.

    Personally, I would not BUY, PAY, for this table saw, router table, sander. If I owned it already or was given it, I would fix it up and put it in the outbuildings for rough use. I see it kind of as a project. Analogy: 1970s-80s Monte Carlo, Cutlass
    Supreme, Riviera. Cool cars, I thought. I'd love to have one to drive around. Be cool. If you found, bought several super cheap, and could do your own mechanic work, it would be fun to make a new, good one. Relive your youth and be cool again. But
    it would be worth less than the cost and time to make it.

    Rationally, I can't imagine why anyone would want this saw. Its rough now. It will take a lot of work to make useful. And ten times that to make it functional and pretty and something you are proud of owning. I think you could use your time and money
    in better ways.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From hubops@ccanoemail.com@21:1/5 to teamarrows@eznet.net on Tue Jun 28 21:01:24 2022
    On Tue, 28 Jun 2022 15:32:02 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 4:08:26 PM UTC-4, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Tue, 28 Jun 2022 07:36:13 -0400, hub...@ccanoemail.com wrote:

    just for curiosity / comments :

    https://rockfordauctioncentre.hibid.com/lot/124577534/woodworking-station/?cpage=8&ipp=100&q=&ref=catalog
    I think I had that same router (RE600) in my first lift/table.

    Were older Ryobi tools better than the Ryobi's of today?

    I have a 30+ year old Ryobi reciprocating saw that just won't die, preventing me from
    getting new one. ;-)

    I've tried a few more recent Ryobi tools, including a cordless set, that I thought sucked.


    Without first-hand knowledge - I''ll say yes - based on -
    - a trusted old co-worker circa mid-late 1980's -
    who would rave about his little bench-top Ryobi planer -
    - back when they were a new thang ..
    .. this was a guy who built a round house - literally.
    .. just for the challenge.
    John T.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Clare Snyder@21:1/5 to All on Tue Jun 28 21:30:35 2022
    On Tue, 28 Jun 2022 18:35:09 GMT, scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal)
    wrote:

    DerbyDad03 <teamarrows@eznet.net> writes:
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 12:43:21 PM UTC-4, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    DerbyDad03 <teama...@eznet.net> writes:

    In general, as-is it all seems OK for rough work, but it would need a lot of work to get it
    ready for finish carpentry - especially if the tools need to be replaced. >>> What kind of finish carpentry are you considering here? A SCMS is much more >>> useful for that type of work (mouldings, trim, etc.).

    My point was that the cabinet itself needs some TLC. I never specifically said that any
    of the tools *needed* to be replaced. I said it would be more work *if* the tools needed
    to be replaced.

    I guess that's where we differ. I find the cabinet to be perfect for
    it's purpose, there's no need to make it into a piece of fine furniture.
    You do if it is going to hold $100,000 of "green tools" I guess - - -

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to teamarrows@eznet.net on Tue Jun 28 21:36:36 2022
    On Tue, 28 Jun 2022 15:32:02 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 4:08:26 PM UTC-4, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Tue, 28 Jun 2022 07:36:13 -0400, hub...@ccanoemail.com wrote:

    just for curiosity / comments :

    https://rockfordauctioncentre.hibid.com/lot/124577534/woodworking-station/?cpage=8&ipp=100&q=&ref=catalog
    I think I had that same router (RE600) in my first lift/table.

    Were older Ryobi tools better than the Ryobi's of today?

    Not sure about all of them but the router is a beast. The only other
    Ryobi I had from that time was a circular saw. It's been replaced
    several times so I guess it wasn't so great. I don't remember my
    problem with it though.

    I have a 30+ year old Ryobi reciprocating saw that just won't die, preventing me from
    getting new one. ;-)

    I've tried a few more recent Ryobi tools, including a cordless set, that I thought sucked.

    I have a bunch of the cordless tool. All of the weird tools. Some
    are quite good, for weird tools that aren't used very often. The work
    lights are awesome. I use them a lot when I'm working on wiring.

    I use the heat gun pretty often but most of the other stuff, not very
    often much. I have the reciprocating saw but I got the Ryobi because
    I use one maybe once a year. Same with the angle grinder. I guess I
    treat most of the stuff like some use Harbor Freight. Ryobi batteries
    are very good and relatively cheap. I don't know about HF. The older
    stuff I had was absolute crap.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Clare Snyder@21:1/5 to teamarrows@eznet.net on Tue Jun 28 21:31:57 2022
    On Tue, 28 Jun 2022 15:32:02 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 4:08:26 PM UTC-4, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Tue, 28 Jun 2022 07:36:13 -0400, hub...@ccanoemail.com wrote:

    just for curiosity / comments :

    https://rockfordauctioncentre.hibid.com/lot/124577534/woodworking-station/?cpage=8&ipp=100&q=&ref=catalog
    I think I had that same router (RE600) in my first lift/table.

    Were older Ryobi tools better than the Ryobi's of today?

    I have a 30+ year old Ryobi reciprocating saw that just won't die, preventing me from
    getting new one. ;-)

    I've tried a few more recent Ryobi tools, including a cordless set, that I thought sucked.
    Ryobi USED to build almost bullet-proof stuff. Just like Black and
    Decker USED to build.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to hubops@ccanoemail.com on Tue Jun 28 21:37:37 2022
    On Tue, 28 Jun 2022 21:01:24 -0400, hubops@ccanoemail.com wrote:

    On Tue, 28 Jun 2022 15:32:02 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 4:08:26 PM UTC-4, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Tue, 28 Jun 2022 07:36:13 -0400, hub...@ccanoemail.com wrote:

    just for curiosity / comments :

    https://rockfordauctioncentre.hibid.com/lot/124577534/woodworking-station/?cpage=8&ipp=100&q=&ref=catalog
    I think I had that same router (RE600) in my first lift/table.

    Were older Ryobi tools better than the Ryobi's of today?

    I have a 30+ year old Ryobi reciprocating saw that just won't die, preventing me from
    getting new one. ;-)

    I've tried a few more recent Ryobi tools, including a cordless set, that I thought sucked.


    Without first-hand knowledge - I''ll say yes - based on -
    - a trusted old co-worker circa mid-late 1980's -
    who would rave about his little bench-top Ryobi planer -
    - back when they were a new thang ..
    .. this was a guy who built a round house - literally.
    .. just for the challenge.


    Was that for his steam engines? ;-)

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to teamarrows@eznet.net on Tue Jun 28 21:46:33 2022
    On Tue, 28 Jun 2022 15:57:37 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 6:24:47 PM UTC-4, russellseaton1@yahoo.com wrote: >> On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 6:36:08 AM UTC-5, hub...@ccanoemail.com wrote: >> > just for curiosity / comments :

    https://rockfordauctioncentre.hibid.com/lot/124577534/woodworking-station/?cpage=8&ipp=100&q=&ref=catalog

    John T.
    My OPINION. OPINION. OPINION.

    It looks old and rough and well used over the years. I have zero experience with used prices for tools so cannot make any comments about what it would sell for. I have a 1992 or 93 Delta Contractor saw. Similar or the same as the saw shown in the
    pictures. Except this one looks a lot older. The cast iron wings look nicer, sort of, than my sheet metal wings on my saw. I say sort of because it is nice that mine are solid, while these cast iron have lots of holes in them. I would not be surprised if
    this saw is 5-10-15 years older than my saw. The Vega fence appears to be an upgrade. Like I have a Biesemeyer/Delta fence on mine. But the Vega is well used. I hate router tables in table saws. I want separate. But the big Ryobi plunge router probably
    is 15-20-25 years old and likely works. So you could probably build a separate router table for it and be happy. The belt sander motor contraption on the backside is interesting. I assume it is just hanging there for storage. To use it you
    pick it up and place it on top of the router table. I use my big 4x24 Makita belt sander in a homemade jig or in my Record vice. So the belt sander contraption would be good to have I guess if you did not already own a belt sander. As for the quality of
    the cabinets, they are functional I guess. No high quality was put into them. Functional shop cabinets. Fine OK. I built cabinets under my side table on my saw. Functional, cheap, painted white. No fine carpentry.

    Personally, I would not BUY, PAY, for this table saw, router table, sander. If I owned it already or was given it, I would fix it up and put it in the outbuildings for rough use. I see it kind of as a project. Analogy: 1970s-80s Monte Carlo, Cutlass
    Supreme, Riviera. Cool cars, I thought. I'd love to have one to drive around. Be cool. If you found, bought several super cheap, and could do your own mechanic work, it would be fun to make a new, good one. Relive your youth and be cool again. But it
    would be worth less than the cost and time to make it.

    Rationally, I can't imagine why anyone would want this saw. Its rough now. It will take a lot of work to make useful. And ten times that to make it functional and pretty and something you are proud of owning. I think you could use your time and money
    in better ways.

    re: Table saw/Router table combos.

    In a semi-perfect world, combos wouldn't be needed. For folks like me with small shops, the
    combo is infinitely better than the other option: bench top/portable router tables.

    BTDT. They S-U-C-K.

    My solution: - Table saw, router table and "jointer" combo. I have a separate fence for the
    router table that has a port for dust collection.

    https://i.imgur.com/8dyS4kN.jpg

    Is that CARPET?

    As far as the belt sander on the auction item, zoom in. It's hinged to the main cabinet, which
    tells me that it swings up and I'll bet that there are hinged legs that hold it up.

    Never mind, here you go - a close up of the hinges.

    https://i.imgur.com/Bkewt8S.jpg

    I saw that but the nose is still sticking out past the table, right at
    ankle height. It doen't have to be running to be a trip hazard.

    I don't like the way the cords are dressed either. Too much to go
    wrong. I'd have dressed everything neatly in the cabinet where it
    couldn't get in the way.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Tue Jun 28 21:41:30 2022
    On Tue, 28 Jun 2022 21:36:36 -0400, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    On Tue, 28 Jun 2022 15:32:02 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 4:08:26 PM UTC-4, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Tue, 28 Jun 2022 07:36:13 -0400, hub...@ccanoemail.com wrote:

    just for curiosity / comments :

    https://rockfordauctioncentre.hibid.com/lot/124577534/woodworking-station/?cpage=8&ipp=100&q=&ref=catalog
    I think I had that same router (RE600) in my first lift/table.

    Were older Ryobi tools better than the Ryobi's of today?

    Not sure about all of them but the router is a beast. The only other
    Ryobi I had from that time was a circular saw. It's been replaced
    several times so I guess it wasn't so great. I don't remember my
    problem with it though.

    A beast but you wouldn't want to drop it on your foot. I couldn't
    handle it freehand either.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Clare Snyder@21:1/5 to hubops@ccanoemail.com on Tue Jun 28 21:25:33 2022
    On Tue, 28 Jun 2022 07:36:13 -0400, hubops@ccanoemail.com wrote:

    just for curiosity / comments :

    https://rockfordauctioncentre.hibid.com/lot/124577534/woodworking-station/?cpage=8&ipp=100&q=&ref=catalog

    John T.
    I'd say someone got a killer deal!!!

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Bill@21:1/5 to hubops@ccanoemail.com on Wed Jun 29 00:05:19 2022
    On 6/28/2022 7:36 AM, hubops@ccanoemail.com wrote:
    just for curiosity / comments :

    https://rockfordauctioncentre.hibid.com/lot/124577534/woodworking-station/?cpage=8&ipp=100&q=&ref=catalog

    John T.

    Little to keep it from vibrating (unlike a cabinet saw), but a nice
    upgrade from a table saw. The work of someones inspiration (which is
    always nice to see!)

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From ritzannaseaton@gmail.com@21:1/5 to All on Tue Jun 28 21:46:41 2022
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 5:57:43 PM UTC-5, DerbyDad03 wrote:
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 6:24:47 PM UTC-4, russell...@yahoo.com wrote:
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 6:36:08 AM UTC-5, hub...@ccanoemail.com wrote:
    just for curiosity / comments :

    https://rockfordauctioncentre.hibid.com/lot/124577534/woodworking-station/?cpage=8&ipp=100&q=&ref=catalog

    John T.
    My OPINION. OPINION. OPINION.

    It looks old and rough and well used over the years. I have zero experience with used prices for tools so cannot make any comments about what it would sell for. I have a 1992 or 93 Delta Contractor saw. Similar or the same as the saw shown in the
    pictures. Except this one looks a lot older. The cast iron wings look nicer, sort of, than my sheet metal wings on my saw. I say sort of because it is nice that mine are solid, while these cast iron have lots of holes in them. I would not be surprised if
    this saw is 5-10-15 years older than my saw. The Vega fence appears to be an upgrade. Like I have a Biesemeyer/Delta fence on mine. But the Vega is well used. I hate router tables in table saws. I want separate. But the big Ryobi plunge router probably
    is 15-20-25 years old and likely works. So you could probably build a separate router table for it and be happy. The belt sander motor contraption on the backside is interesting. I assume it is just hanging there for storage. To use it you pick it up and
    place it on top of the router table. I use my big 4x24 Makita belt sander in a homemade jig or in my Record vice. So the belt sander contraption would be good to have I guess if you did not already own a belt sander. As for the quality of the cabinets,
    they are functional I guess. No high quality was put into them. Functional shop cabinets. Fine OK. I built cabinets under my side table on my saw. Functional, cheap, painted white. No fine carpentry.

    Personally, I would not BUY, PAY, for this table saw, router table, sander. If I owned it already or was given it, I would fix it up and put it in the outbuildings for rough use. I see it kind of as a project. Analogy: 1970s-80s Monte Carlo, Cutlass
    Supreme, Riviera. Cool cars, I thought. I'd love to have one to drive around. Be cool. If you found, bought several super cheap, and could do your own mechanic work, it would be fun to make a new, good one. Relive your youth and be cool again. But it
    would be worth less than the cost and time to make it.

    Rationally, I can't imagine why anyone would want this saw. Its rough now. It will take a lot of work to make useful. And ten times that to make it functional and pretty and something you are proud of owning. I think you could use your time and money
    in better ways.
    re: Table saw/Router table combos.

    In a semi-perfect world, combos wouldn't be needed. For folks like me with small shops, the
    combo is infinitely better than the other option: bench top/portable router tables.

    BTDT. They S-U-C-K.

    My solution: - Table saw, router table and "jointer" combo. I have a separate fence for the
    router table that has a port for dust collection.

    https://i.imgur.com/8dyS4kN.jpg

    Your table saw/router table combination unit looks real good. I've been fortunate to never have a space issue for a shop. So I am a fan of separates. But I can see where having the back side of the table saw fence to use with the router would be
    advantageous sometimes.



    As far as the belt sander on the auction item, zoom in. It's hinged to the main cabinet, which
    tells me that it swings up and I'll bet that there are hinged legs that hold it up.

    Never mind, here you go - a close up of the hinges.

    https://i.imgur.com/Bkewt8S.jpg

    I see that now. But if you used the hinges, and presumably the folding legs underneath, wouldn't it end up about 18 inches off the floor? Kind of low. Too low. Having to get down on your knees to sand something does not sound good. It is better than
    having no sander at all. But......

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DerbyDad03@21:1/5 to russellseaton1@yahoo.com on Tue Jun 28 22:29:23 2022
    On Wednesday, June 29, 2022 at 12:46:47 AM UTC-4, russellseaton1@yahoo.com wrote:
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 5:57:43 PM UTC-5, DerbyDad03 wrote:
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 6:24:47 PM UTC-4, russell...@yahoo.com wrote:
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 6:36:08 AM UTC-5, hub...@ccanoemail.com wrote:
    just for curiosity / comments :

    https://rockfordauctioncentre.hibid.com/lot/124577534/woodworking-station/?cpage=8&ipp=100&q=&ref=catalog

    John T.
    My OPINION. OPINION. OPINION.

    It looks old and rough and well used over the years. I have zero experience with used prices for tools so cannot make any comments about what it would sell for. I have a 1992 or 93 Delta Contractor saw. Similar or the same as the saw shown in the
    pictures. Except this one looks a lot older. The cast iron wings look nicer, sort of, than my sheet metal wings on my saw. I say sort of because it is nice that mine are solid, while these cast iron have lots of holes in them. I would not be surprised if
    this saw is 5-10-15 years older than my saw. The Vega fence appears to be an upgrade. Like I have a Biesemeyer/Delta fence on mine. But the Vega is well used. I hate router tables in table saws. I want separate. But the big Ryobi plunge router probably
    is 15-20-25 years old and likely works. So you could probably build a separate router table for it and be happy. The belt sander motor contraption on the backside is interesting. I assume it is just hanging there for storage. To use it you pick it up and
    place it on top of the router table. I use my big 4x24 Makita belt sander in a homemade jig or in my Record vice. So the belt sander contraption would be good to have I guess if you did not already own a belt sander. As for the quality of the cabinets,
    they are functional I guess. No high quality was put into them. Functional shop cabinets. Fine OK. I built cabinets under my side table on my saw. Functional, cheap, painted white. No fine carpentry.

    Personally, I would not BUY, PAY, for this table saw, router table, sander. If I owned it already or was given it, I would fix it up and put it in the outbuildings for rough use. I see it kind of as a project. Analogy: 1970s-80s Monte Carlo,
    Cutlass Supreme, Riviera. Cool cars, I thought. I'd love to have one to drive around. Be cool. If you found, bought several super cheap, and could do your own mechanic work, it would be fun to make a new, good one. Relive your youth and be cool again.
    But it would be worth less than the cost and time to make it.

    Rationally, I can't imagine why anyone would want this saw. Its rough now. It will take a lot of work to make useful. And ten times that to make it functional and pretty and something you are proud of owning. I think you could use your time and
    money in better ways.
    re: Table saw/Router table combos.

    In a semi-perfect world, combos wouldn't be needed. For folks like me with small shops, the
    combo is infinitely better than the other option: bench top/portable router tables.

    BTDT. They S-U-C-K.

    My solution: - Table saw, router table and "jointer" combo. I have a separate fence for the
    router table that has a port for dust collection.

    https://i.imgur.com/8dyS4kN.jpg
    Your table saw/router table combination unit looks real good. I've been fortunate to never have a space issue for a shop. So I am a fan of separates. But I can see where having the back side of the table saw fence to use with the router would be
    advantageous sometimes.

    But, as I said, I have a separate fence for the router table. One that has a dust collection port built in.
    It's actually a fence from a bench top miter table that I struggled with for a very short time before
    I trashed it. I saved the fence and modified it for use with my add-on router table. I clamp it to rails
    of the table saw and stick a dust collection hose up it's butt. :-)


    As far as the belt sander on the auction item, zoom in. It's hinged to the main cabinet, which
    tells me that it swings up and I'll bet that there are hinged legs that hold it up.

    Never mind, here you go - a close up of the hinges.

    https://i.imgur.com/Bkewt8S.jpg
    I see that now. But if you used the hinges, and presumably the folding legs underneath, wouldn't it end up about 18 inches off the floor? Kind of low. Too low. Having to get down on your knees to sand something does not sound good. It is better than
    having no sander at all. But......

    Are you serious or exaggerating? The table saw is listed at 37" high. Look
    at the picture. Those hinges are more than halfway up the side and the
    belt sander is mounted on a bracket that would make it even higher.

    I'm guessing that the sanding surface is at a very comfortable height
    once horizontal. Besides, it's mounted on hinges to a wooden board.
    Mount it higher if you want too. ;-)

    FWIW, my benchtop belt/disc sander and my 10" disc sander are stored
    under my workbench, about 4" off the floor. Yes, I have (often) gotten
    down on my knees for a quick use - round some corners, etc. It sure
    beats lifting it up, putting it on the bench then putting it away again
    just for a 20 second sanding session.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Sonny@21:1/5 to Clare Snyder on Wed Jun 29 06:03:20 2022
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 8:25:37 PM UTC-5, Clare Snyder wrote:

    I'd say someone got a killer deal!!!

    I'd agree with that, whole heartedly. It sold for $160 CA. I had previously only glanced at the pictures and may have been off on my assessment of the saw, but the original owner obviously took good care of the whole unit, which he/she put in some
    good time and effort into the construction and assembly. I doubt there's anything significantly wrong with the whole of the unit.

    Sonny

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From hubops@ccanoemail.com@21:1/5 to All on Wed Jun 29 09:07:28 2022
    On Tue, 28 Jun 2022 21:25:33 -0400, Clare Snyder <clare@snyder.on.ca>
    wrote:

    On Tue, 28 Jun 2022 07:36:13 -0400, hubops@ccanoemail.com wrote:

    just for curiosity / comments :
    https://rockfordauctioncentre.hibid.com/lot/124577534/woodworking-station/?cpage=8&ipp=100&q=&ref=catalog

    John T.

    I'd say someone got a killer deal!!!


    The pandemic forced many auctioneers to go online -
    - in general I think they get better prices for stuff
    but there are exceptions - like this one, I'd say.
    I'm betting that a few will stick to online rather than
    returning to live auction sales.
    At a recent live auction, <poorly attended> I saw a
    nice Roxton solid maple kitchen set sell for $ 20.
    .. table, chairs, buffet/china all in great shape.
    John T.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Scott Lurndal@21:1/5 to russellseaton1@yahoo.com on Wed Jun 29 14:06:49 2022
    "russellseaton1@yahoo.com" <ritzannaseaton@gmail.com> writes:
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 6:36:08 AM UTC-5, hub...@ccanoemail.com wrote:
    just for curiosity / comments :=20
    =20
    https://rockfordauctioncentre.hibid.com/lot/124577534/woodworking-station= >/?cpage=3D8&ipp=3D100&q=3D&ref=3Dcatalog=20
    =20
    John T.

    My OPINION. OPINION. OPINION.

    It looks old and rough and well used over the years. I have zero experienc= >e with used prices for tools so cannot make any comments about what it woul= >d sell for. I have a 1992 or 93 Delta Contractor saw. Similar or the same=
    as the saw shown in the pictures. Except this one looks a lot older.

    The nameplate on the saw shows that it was from the 1990s, same as yours.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Sonny@21:1/5 to hub...@ccanoemail.com on Wed Jun 29 07:19:22 2022
    On Wednesday, June 29, 2022 at 8:07:22 AM UTC-5, hub...@ccanoemail.com wrote:

    The pandemic forced many auctioneers to go online -
    - in general I think they get better prices for stuff
    but there are exceptions - like this one, I'd say.
    I'm betting that a few will stick to online rather than
    returning to live auction sales.
    At a recent live auction, <poorly attended> I saw a
    nice Roxton solid maple kitchen set sell for $ 20.
    .. table, chairs, buffet/china all in great shape.
    John T.

    Likewise, I saw this band saw, near my sister's home in N.C. I called her, with 2 hours remaining for bidding, trying to set up collection of the tool, as I was to bid, but we were unable to muster the resources for collecting it. Only one bid, $25.
    https://www.allsurplus.com/asset/522/15170

    Good deals are out there, just have to be patient and search.

    Sonny

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From ritzannaseaton@gmail.com@21:1/5 to And as I on Wed Jun 29 15:16:02 2022
    On Wednesday, June 29, 2022 at 12:29:29 AM UTC-5, DerbyDad03 wrote:
    On Wednesday, June 29, 2022 at 12:46:47 AM UTC-4, russell...@yahoo.com wrote:
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 5:57:43 PM UTC-5, DerbyDad03 wrote:
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 6:24:47 PM UTC-4, russell...@yahoo.com wrote:
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 6:36:08 AM UTC-5, hub...@ccanoemail.com wrote:
    just for curiosity / comments :

    https://rockfordauctioncentre.hibid.com/lot/124577534/woodworking-station/?cpage=8&ipp=100&q=&ref=catalog

    John T.
    My OPINION. OPINION. OPINION.

    It looks old and rough and well used over the years. I have zero experience with used prices for tools so cannot make any comments about what it would sell for. I have a 1992 or 93 Delta Contractor saw. Similar or the same as the saw shown in the
    pictures. Except this one looks a lot older. The cast iron wings look nicer, sort of, than my sheet metal wings on my saw. I say sort of because it is nice that mine are solid, while these cast iron have lots of holes in them. I would not be surprised if
    this saw is 5-10-15 years older than my saw. The Vega fence appears to be an upgrade. Like I have a Biesemeyer/Delta fence on mine. But the Vega is well used. I hate router tables in table saws. I want separate. But the big Ryobi plunge router probably
    is 15-20-25 years old and likely works. So you could probably build a separate router table for it and be happy. The belt sander motor contraption on the backside is interesting. I assume it is just hanging there for storage. To use it you pick it up and
    place it on top of the router table. I use my big 4x24 Makita belt sander in a homemade jig or in my Record vice. So the belt sander contraption would be good to have I guess if you did not already own a belt sander. As for the quality of the cabinets,
    they are functional I guess. No high quality was put into them. Functional shop cabinets. Fine OK. I built cabinets under my side table on my saw. Functional, cheap, painted white. No fine carpentry.

    Personally, I would not BUY, PAY, for this table saw, router table, sander. If I owned it already or was given it, I would fix it up and put it in the outbuildings for rough use. I see it kind of as a project. Analogy: 1970s-80s Monte Carlo,
    Cutlass Supreme, Riviera. Cool cars, I thought. I'd love to have one to drive around. Be cool. If you found, bought several super cheap, and could do your own mechanic work, it would be fun to make a new, good one. Relive your youth and be cool again.
    But it would be worth less than the cost and time to make it.

    Rationally, I can't imagine why anyone would want this saw. Its rough now. It will take a lot of work to make useful. And ten times that to make it functional and pretty and something you are proud of owning. I think you could use your time and
    money in better ways.
    re: Table saw/Router table combos.

    In a semi-perfect world, combos wouldn't be needed. For folks like me with small shops, the
    combo is infinitely better than the other option: bench top/portable router tables.

    BTDT. They S-U-C-K.

    My solution: - Table saw, router table and "jointer" combo. I have a separate fence for the
    router table that has a port for dust collection.

    https://i.imgur.com/8dyS4kN.jpg
    Your table saw/router table combination unit looks real good. I've been fortunate to never have a space issue for a shop. So I am a fan of separates. But I can see where having the back side of the table saw fence to use with the router would be
    advantageous sometimes.
    But, as I said, I have a separate fence for the router table. One that has a dust collection port built in.
    It's actually a fence from a bench top miter table that I struggled with for a very short time before
    I trashed it. I saved the fence and modified it for use with my add-on router table. I clamp it to rails
    of the table saw and stick a dust collection hose up it's butt. :-)

    As far as the belt sander on the auction item, zoom in. It's hinged to the main cabinet, which
    tells me that it swings up and I'll bet that there are hinged legs that hold it up.

    Never mind, here you go - a close up of the hinges.

    https://i.imgur.com/Bkewt8S.jpg
    I see that now. But if you used the hinges, and presumably the folding legs underneath, wouldn't it end up about 18 inches off the floor? Kind of low. Too low. Having to get down on your knees to sand something does not sound good. It is better than
    having no sander at all. But......
    Are you serious or exaggerating? The table saw is listed at 37" high. Look at the picture. Those hinges are more than halfway up the side and the
    belt sander is mounted on a bracket that would make it even higher.

    https://rockfordauctioncentre.hibid.com/lot/124577534/woodworking-station/?cpage=8&ipp=100&q=&ref=catalog
    Look at picture 8 of 18. The belt sander might be 24" off the ground. And if you look at the picture again, you will see that it is already mounted as high as it can be. The motor will just clear the bottom of the back rail on the table saw when the
    platform is tilted up. If you tried to move it higher using those hinges, the motor would hit the back fence and not be level. Or you could modify the hinges by putting a 4x4" piece of wood behind the hinges so the motor would stick out past the rail.
    Or you could just take the sander platform off and mount the whole thing to a table and use the sander at normal human height.

    As I said before, IF you do not already have a sander, this would be useful, sort of.

    And as I said before, this whole contraption would be OK to have in a barn or out building. Useful for rough work on the spot when you do not want to carry the wood to the shop and do precise work. And then carry it back to the barn. I've done some
    demolition work where I picked up a 2x4 or post laying on the ground. Worked OK. Easier than getting a proper sledge hammer from the shop. And that is how I feel about this saw/router/sander contraption.






    I'm guessing that the sanding surface is at a very comfortable height
    once horizontal. Besides, it's mounted on hinges to a wooden board.
    Mount it higher if you want too. ;-)

    FWIW, my benchtop belt/disc sander and my 10" disc sander are stored
    under my workbench, about 4" off the floor. Yes, I have (often) gotten
    down on my knees for a quick use - round some corners, etc. It sure
    beats lifting it up, putting it on the bench then putting it away again
    just for a 20 second sanding session.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From ritzannaseaton@gmail.com@21:1/5 to Scott Lurndal on Wed Jun 29 15:26:34 2022
    On Wednesday, June 29, 2022 at 9:06:54 AM UTC-5, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    "russell...@yahoo.com" <ritzann...@gmail.com> writes:
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 6:36:08 AM UTC-5, hub...@ccanoemail.com wrote: >> just for curiosity / comments :=20
    =20
    https://rockfordauctioncentre.hibid.com/lot/124577534/woodworking-station=
    /?cpage=3D8&ipp=3D100&q=3D&ref=3Dcatalog=20
    =20
    John T.

    My OPINION. OPINION. OPINION.

    It looks old and rough and well used over the years. I have zero experienc= >e with used prices for tools so cannot make any comments about what it woul=
    d sell for. I have a 1992 or 93 Delta Contractor saw. Similar or the same=
    as the saw shown in the pictures. Except this one looks a lot older.
    The nameplate on the saw shows that it was from the 1990s, same as yours.

    In picture 3 of 18 the label says MFG DATE 199 Which we can assume means sometime in the 1990s. Still looks older than my saw. Maybe because of the cast iron wings. Whereas my Contractor saw has stamped metal wings. "Newer" "Cheaper" Very
    similar gray paint to my Delta Contractor saw. This one is a slightly lighter shade of gray.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Leon@21:1/5 to All on Wed Jun 29 20:46:18 2022
    On 6/28/2022 5:32 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 4:08:26 PM UTC-4, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Tue, 28 Jun 2022 07:36:13 -0400, hub...@ccanoemail.com wrote:

    just for curiosity / comments :

    https://rockfordauctioncentre.hibid.com/lot/124577534/woodworking-station/?cpage=8&ipp=100&q=&ref=catalog
    I think I had that same router (RE600) in my first lift/table.

    Were older Ryobi tools better than the Ryobi's of today?

    Yes! I had the "original" bench top Ryobi AP10 planer back around
    1990. It was bullet proof.




    I have a 30+ year old Ryobi reciprocating saw that just won't die, preventing me from
    getting new one. ;-)

    I've tried a few more recent Ryobi tools, including a cordless set, that I thought sucked.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Leon@21:1/5 to Clare Snyder on Wed Jun 29 20:44:36 2022
    On 6/28/2022 8:30 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Tue, 28 Jun 2022 18:35:09 GMT, scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal)
    wrote:

    DerbyDad03 <teamarrows@eznet.net> writes:
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 12:43:21 PM UTC-4, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    DerbyDad03 <teama...@eznet.net> writes:

    In general, as-is it all seems OK for rough work, but it would need a lot of work to get it
    ready for finish carpentry - especially if the tools need to be replaced. >>>> What kind of finish carpentry are you considering here? A SCMS is much more
    useful for that type of work (mouldings, trim, etc.).

    My point was that the cabinet itself needs some TLC. I never specifically said that any
    of the tools *needed* to be replaced. I said it would be more work *if* the tools needed
    to be replaced.

    I guess that's where we differ. I find the cabinet to be perfect for
    it's purpose, there's no need to make it into a piece of fine furniture.
    You do if it is going to hold $100,000 of "green tools" I guess - - -


    That would be a lot of Ryobi.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DerbyDad03@21:1/5 to Leon on Wed Jun 29 19:10:20 2022
    On Wednesday, June 29, 2022 at 9:46:27 PM UTC-4, Leon wrote:
    On 6/28/2022 5:32 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 4:08:26 PM UTC-4, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Tue, 28 Jun 2022 07:36:13 -0400, hub...@ccanoemail.com wrote:

    just for curiosity / comments :

    https://rockfordauctioncentre.hibid.com/lot/124577534/woodworking-station/?cpage=8&ipp=100&q=&ref=catalog
    I think I had that same router (RE600) in my first lift/table.

    Were older Ryobi tools better than the Ryobi's of today?
    Yes! I had the "original" bench top Ryobi AP10 planer back around
    1990. It was bullet proof.

    My Ryobi recip saw has probably spent more time in the ground, throwing dirt in my
    face, than above ground. Lots of small stumps removed, roots cut so a post hole could be dug, etc. I've stuck it straight down in a hole, arm's length, while laying
    on the ground. Rattles the heck out of your shoulder. Maybe that's why I had rotator
    cuff surgery last year. ;-)

    Just a few weeks ago I removed a bush from my daughter's front yard and took the stump
    out with the Ryobi. Quite a few "blind" cuts were made. Yank on the stump, figure out where
    it's being held in, stick the saw in the dirt and cut something. Repeat until you can finally
    reach the tap root, cut it and out she comes.

    Lots of cuts, all the way around...

    https://i.imgur.com/oSWz3Iz.jpg


    I have a 30+ year old Ryobi reciprocating saw that just won't die, preventing me from
    getting new one. ;-)

    I've tried a few more recent Ryobi tools, including a cordless set, that I thought sucked.

    I was cleaning the shop earlier tonight. Found a Ryobi laser lever kit buried on a back shelf
    under the workbench. I think my dad gave it to me quite a while back. I took it out, tried it
    and it didn't work worth a shit. It's garbage night, so out it went.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Leon@21:1/5 to All on Thu Jun 30 09:51:21 2022
    On 6/29/2022 9:10 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
    On Wednesday, June 29, 2022 at 9:46:27 PM UTC-4, Leon wrote:
    On 6/28/2022 5:32 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 4:08:26 PM UTC-4, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Tue, 28 Jun 2022 07:36:13 -0400, hub...@ccanoemail.com wrote:

    just for curiosity / comments :

    https://rockfordauctioncentre.hibid.com/lot/124577534/woodworking-station/?cpage=8&ipp=100&q=&ref=catalog
    I think I had that same router (RE600) in my first lift/table.

    Were older Ryobi tools better than the Ryobi's of today?
    Yes! I had the "original" bench top Ryobi AP10 planer back around
    1990. It was bullet proof.

    My Ryobi recip saw has probably spent more time in the ground, throwing dirt in my
    face, than above ground. Lots of small stumps removed, roots cut so a post hole
    could be dug, etc. I've stuck it straight down in a hole, arm's length, while laying
    on the ground. Rattles the heck out of your shoulder. Maybe that's why I had rotator
    cuff surgery last year. ;-)

    Just a few weeks ago I removed a bush from my daughter's front yard and took the stump
    out with the Ryobi. Quite a few "blind" cuts were made. Yank on the stump, figure out where
    it's being held in, stick the saw in the dirt and cut something. Repeat until you can finally
    reach the tap root, cut it and out she comes.

    Lots of cuts, all the way around...

    https://i.imgur.com/oSWz3Iz.jpg


    I have a 30+ year old Ryobi reciprocating saw that just won't die, preventing me from
    getting new one. ;-)

    I've tried a few more recent Ryobi tools, including a cordless set, that I thought sucked.

    I was cleaning the shop earlier tonight. Found a Ryobi laser lever kit buried on a back shelf
    under the workbench. I think my dad gave it to me quite a while back. I took it out, tried it
    and it didn't work worth a shit. It's garbage night, so out it went.


    Oh yeah I had one of those Ryobi laser kits, it had a suction device
    and it was on clearance at HD... Not long after that it was on
    clearance to the garbage can.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DerbyDad03@21:1/5 to Leon on Thu Jun 30 08:09:33 2022
    On Thursday, June 30, 2022 at 10:51:29 AM UTC-4, Leon wrote:
    On 6/29/2022 9:10 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
    On Wednesday, June 29, 2022 at 9:46:27 PM UTC-4, Leon wrote:
    On 6/28/2022 5:32 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 4:08:26 PM UTC-4, k...@notreal.com wrote: >>>> On Tue, 28 Jun 2022 07:36:13 -0400, hub...@ccanoemail.com wrote:

    just for curiosity / comments :

    https://rockfordauctioncentre.hibid.com/lot/124577534/woodworking-station/?cpage=8&ipp=100&q=&ref=catalog
    I think I had that same router (RE600) in my first lift/table.

    Were older Ryobi tools better than the Ryobi's of today?
    Yes! I had the "original" bench top Ryobi AP10 planer back around
    1990. It was bullet proof.

    My Ryobi recip saw has probably spent more time in the ground, throwing dirt in my
    face, than above ground. Lots of small stumps removed, roots cut so a post hole
    could be dug, etc. I've stuck it straight down in a hole, arm's length, while laying
    on the ground. Rattles the heck out of your shoulder. Maybe that's why I had rotator
    cuff surgery last year. ;-)

    Just a few weeks ago I removed a bush from my daughter's front yard and took the stump
    out with the Ryobi. Quite a few "blind" cuts were made. Yank on the stump, figure out where
    it's being held in, stick the saw in the dirt and cut something. Repeat until you can finally
    reach the tap root, cut it and out she comes.

    Lots of cuts, all the way around...

    https://i.imgur.com/oSWz3Iz.jpg


    I have a 30+ year old Ryobi reciprocating saw that just won't die, preventing me from
    getting new one. ;-)

    I've tried a few more recent Ryobi tools, including a cordless set, that I thought sucked.

    I was cleaning the shop earlier tonight. Found a Ryobi laser lever kit buried on a back shelf
    under the workbench. I think my dad gave it to me quite a while back. I took it out, tried it
    and it didn't work worth a shit. It's garbage night, so out it went.
    Oh yeah I had one of those Ryobi laser kits, it had a suction device
    and it was on clearance at HD... Not long after that it was on
    clearance to the garbage can.

    In my case it was delegated to a dusty corner under my workbench.

    I have a bunch of stuff to take to a donation center, so I put batteries
    in the device to test it. The suction part made noise, but the laser didn't turn on.

    Into the trash it went.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to All on Thu Jun 30 13:05:08 2022
    On Wed, 29 Jun 2022 20:44:36 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 6/28/2022 8:30 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Tue, 28 Jun 2022 18:35:09 GMT, scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal)
    wrote:

    DerbyDad03 <teamarrows@eznet.net> writes:
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 12:43:21 PM UTC-4, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    DerbyDad03 <teama...@eznet.net> writes:

    In general, as-is it all seems OK for rough work, but it would need a lot of work to get it
    ready for finish carpentry - especially if the tools need to be replaced.
    What kind of finish carpentry are you considering here? A SCMS is much more
    useful for that type of work (mouldings, trim, etc.).

    My point was that the cabinet itself needs some TLC. I never specifically said that any
    of the tools *needed* to be replaced. I said it would be more work *if* the tools needed
    to be replaced.

    I guess that's where we differ. I find the cabinet to be perfect for
    it's purpose, there's no need to make it into a piece of fine furniture.
    You do if it is going to hold $100,000 of "green tools" I guess - - -


    That would be a lot of Ryobi.

    A sh!tload of Ryobi. Ryobi is more yellow fire engine/safety putrid
    yellow.

    https://colorcodes.io/yellow/safety-yellow-color-codes/>

    Makes them easy to find.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Clare Snyder@21:1/5 to hubops@ccanoemail.com on Thu Jun 30 23:07:19 2022
    On Wed, 29 Jun 2022 09:07:28 -0400, hubops@ccanoemail.com wrote:

    On Tue, 28 Jun 2022 21:25:33 -0400, Clare Snyder <clare@snyder.on.ca>
    wrote:

    On Tue, 28 Jun 2022 07:36:13 -0400, hubops@ccanoemail.com wrote:

    just for curiosity / comments :
    https://rockfordauctioncentre.hibid.com/lot/124577534/woodworking-station/?cpage=8&ipp=100&q=&ref=catalog

    John T.

    I'd say someone got a killer deal!!!


    The pandemic forced many auctioneers to go online -
    - in general I think they get better prices for stuff
    but there are exceptions - like this one, I'd say.
    I'm betting that a few will stick to online rather than
    returning to live auction sales.
    At a recent live auction, <poorly attended> I saw a
    nice Roxton solid maple kitchen set sell for $ 20.
    .. table, chairs, buffet/china all in great shape.
    John T.
    And for those not familiar with Canadian furniture, Roxton maple
    furniture is top-notch stuff - kinda like Ethan Allen in the USA.
    Mafe in my childhood home town of Elmira Ontario

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Clare Snyder@21:1/5 to All on Thu Jun 30 23:09:28 2022
    On Wed, 29 Jun 2022 20:44:36 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 6/28/2022 8:30 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Tue, 28 Jun 2022 18:35:09 GMT, scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal)
    wrote:

    DerbyDad03 <teamarrows@eznet.net> writes:
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 12:43:21 PM UTC-4, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    DerbyDad03 <teama...@eznet.net> writes:

    In general, as-is it all seems OK for rough work, but it would need a lot of work to get it
    ready for finish carpentry - especially if the tools need to be replaced.
    What kind of finish carpentry are you considering here? A SCMS is much more
    useful for that type of work (mouldings, trim, etc.).

    My point was that the cabinet itself needs some TLC. I never specifically said that any
    of the tools *needed* to be replaced. I said it would be more work *if* the tools needed
    to be replaced.

    I guess that's where we differ. I find the cabinet to be perfect for
    it's purpose, there's no need to make it into a piece of fine furniture.
    You do if it is going to hold $100,000 of "green tools" I guess - - -


    That would be a lot of Ryobi.
    And about 1/100 as much Festool

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to All on Fri Jul 1 11:47:14 2022
    On Thu, 30 Jun 2022 23:07:19 -0400, Clare Snyder <clare@snyder.on.ca>
    wrote:

    On Wed, 29 Jun 2022 09:07:28 -0400, hubops@ccanoemail.com wrote:

    On Tue, 28 Jun 2022 21:25:33 -0400, Clare Snyder <clare@snyder.on.ca> >>wrote:

    On Tue, 28 Jun 2022 07:36:13 -0400, hubops@ccanoemail.com wrote:

    just for curiosity / comments :
    https://rockfordauctioncentre.hibid.com/lot/124577534/woodworking-station/?cpage=8&ipp=100&q=&ref=catalog

    John T.

    I'd say someone got a killer deal!!!


    The pandemic forced many auctioneers to go online -
    - in general I think they get better prices for stuff
    but there are exceptions - like this one, I'd say.
    I'm betting that a few will stick to online rather than
    returning to live auction sales.
    At a recent live auction, <poorly attended> I saw a
    nice Roxton solid maple kitchen set sell for $ 20.
    .. table, chairs, buffet/china all in great shape.
    John T.
    And for those not familiar with Canadian furniture, Roxton maple
    furniture is top-notch stuff - kinda like Ethan Allen in the USA.
    Mafe in my childhood home town of Elmira Ontario

    That puts a reference beside HUBOPS' post. Wow! We have a nice set but
    we paid a tad over $20 (two and a half zeros over).

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to All on Fri Jul 1 11:42:18 2022
    On Thu, 30 Jun 2022 23:09:28 -0400, Clare Snyder <clare@snyder.on.ca>
    wrote:

    On Wed, 29 Jun 2022 20:44:36 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 6/28/2022 8:30 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Tue, 28 Jun 2022 18:35:09 GMT, scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal)
    wrote:

    DerbyDad03 <teamarrows@eznet.net> writes:
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 12:43:21 PM UTC-4, Scott Lurndal wrote: >>>>>> DerbyDad03 <teama...@eznet.net> writes:

    In general, as-is it all seems OK for rough work, but it would need a lot of work to get it
    ready for finish carpentry - especially if the tools need to be replaced.
    What kind of finish carpentry are you considering here? A SCMS is much more
    useful for that type of work (mouldings, trim, etc.).

    My point was that the cabinet itself needs some TLC. I never specifically said that any
    of the tools *needed* to be replaced. I said it would be more work *if* the tools needed
    to be replaced.

    I guess that's where we differ. I find the cabinet to be perfect for
    it's purpose, there's no need to make it into a piece of fine furniture. >>> You do if it is going to hold $100,000 of "green tools" I guess - - -


    That would be a lot of Ryobi.
    And about 1/100 as much Festool

    At a similar ratio of quality and utility/design.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Leon@21:1/5 to Clare Snyder on Mon Jul 4 13:58:51 2022
    On 6/30/2022 10:09 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Wed, 29 Jun 2022 20:44:36 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 6/28/2022 8:30 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Tue, 28 Jun 2022 18:35:09 GMT, scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal)
    wrote:

    DerbyDad03 <teamarrows@eznet.net> writes:
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 12:43:21 PM UTC-4, Scott Lurndal wrote: >>>>>> DerbyDad03 <teama...@eznet.net> writes:

    In general, as-is it all seems OK for rough work, but it would need a lot of work to get it
    ready for finish carpentry - especially if the tools need to be replaced.
    What kind of finish carpentry are you considering here? A SCMS is much more
    useful for that type of work (mouldings, trim, etc.).

    My point was that the cabinet itself needs some TLC. I never specifically said that any
    of the tools *needed* to be replaced. I said it would be more work *if* the tools needed
    to be replaced.

    I guess that's where we differ. I find the cabinet to be perfect for
    it's purpose, there's no need to make it into a piece of fine furniture. >>> You do if it is going to hold $100,000 of "green tools" I guess - - -


    That would be a lot of Ryobi.
    And about 1/100 as much Festool



    Not a Festool fan?

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to Leon on Mon Jul 4 16:22:45 2022
    On Mon, 4 Jul 2022 13:58:51 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 6/30/2022 10:09 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Wed, 29 Jun 2022 20:44:36 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 6/28/2022 8:30 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Tue, 28 Jun 2022 18:35:09 GMT, scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal)
    wrote:

    DerbyDad03 <teamarrows@eznet.net> writes:
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 12:43:21 PM UTC-4, Scott Lurndal wrote: >>>>>>> DerbyDad03 <teama...@eznet.net> writes:

    In general, as-is it all seems OK for rough work, but it would need a lot of work to get it
    ready for finish carpentry - especially if the tools need to be replaced.
    What kind of finish carpentry are you considering here? A SCMS is much more
    useful for that type of work (mouldings, trim, etc.).

    My point was that the cabinet itself needs some TLC. I never specifically said that any
    of the tools *needed* to be replaced. I said it would be more work *if* the tools needed
    to be replaced.

    I guess that's where we differ. I find the cabinet to be perfect for >>>>> it's purpose, there's no need to make it into a piece of fine furniture. >>>> You do if it is going to hold $100,000 of "green tools" I guess - - - >>>

    That would be a lot of Ryobi.
    And about 1/100 as much Festool



    Not a Festool fan?

    He likes sweeping. ;-)

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Clare Snyder@21:1/5 to Leon on Mon Jul 4 20:55:17 2022
    On Mon, 4 Jul 2022 13:58:51 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 6/30/2022 10:09 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Wed, 29 Jun 2022 20:44:36 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 6/28/2022 8:30 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Tue, 28 Jun 2022 18:35:09 GMT, scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal)
    wrote:

    DerbyDad03 <teamarrows@eznet.net> writes:
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 12:43:21 PM UTC-4, Scott Lurndal wrote: >>>>>>> DerbyDad03 <teama...@eznet.net> writes:

    In general, as-is it all seems OK for rough work, but it would need a lot of work to get it
    ready for finish carpentry - especially if the tools need to be replaced.
    What kind of finish carpentry are you considering here? A SCMS is much more
    useful for that type of work (mouldings, trim, etc.).

    My point was that the cabinet itself needs some TLC. I never specifically said that any
    of the tools *needed* to be replaced. I said it would be more work *if* the tools needed
    to be replaced.

    I guess that's where we differ. I find the cabinet to be perfect for >>>>> it's purpose, there's no need to make it into a piece of fine furniture. >>>> You do if it is going to hold $100,000 of "green tools" I guess - - - >>>

    That would be a lot of Ryobi.
    And about 1/100 as much Festool



    Not a Festool fan?
    That would be champaign living on a beer (or water) budget

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to All on Mon Jul 4 22:09:53 2022
    On Mon, 04 Jul 2022 20:55:17 -0400, Clare Snyder <clare@snyder.on.ca>
    wrote:

    On Mon, 4 Jul 2022 13:58:51 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 6/30/2022 10:09 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Wed, 29 Jun 2022 20:44:36 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 6/28/2022 8:30 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Tue, 28 Jun 2022 18:35:09 GMT, scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) >>>>> wrote:

    DerbyDad03 <teamarrows@eznet.net> writes:
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 12:43:21 PM UTC-4, Scott Lurndal wrote: >>>>>>>> DerbyDad03 <teama...@eznet.net> writes:

    In general, as-is it all seems OK for rough work, but it would need a lot of work to get it
    ready for finish carpentry - especially if the tools need to be replaced.
    What kind of finish carpentry are you considering here? A SCMS is much more
    useful for that type of work (mouldings, trim, etc.).

    My point was that the cabinet itself needs some TLC. I never specifically said that any
    of the tools *needed* to be replaced. I said it would be more work *if* the tools needed
    to be replaced.

    I guess that's where we differ. I find the cabinet to be perfect for >>>>>> it's purpose, there's no need to make it into a piece of fine furniture. >>>>> You do if it is going to hold $100,000 of "green tools" I guess - - - >>>>

    That would be a lot of Ryobi.
    And about 1/100 as much Festool



    Not a Festool fan?
    That would be champaign living on a beer (or water) budget

    Just a nit... That would be champagne. Champaign is a city in Illinois
    (where I grew up). ;-)

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DerbyDad03@21:1/5 to k...@notreal.com on Mon Jul 4 20:22:48 2022
    On Monday, July 4, 2022 at 10:09:59 PM UTC-4, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 04 Jul 2022 20:55:17 -0400, Clare Snyder <cl...@snyder.on.ca>
    wrote:
    On Mon, 4 Jul 2022 13:58:51 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 6/30/2022 10:09 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Wed, 29 Jun 2022 20:44:36 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 6/28/2022 8:30 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Tue, 28 Jun 2022 18:35:09 GMT, sc...@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) >>>>> wrote:

    DerbyDad03 <teama...@eznet.net> writes:
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 12:43:21 PM UTC-4, Scott Lurndal wrote: >>>>>>>> DerbyDad03 <teama...@eznet.net> writes:

    In general, as-is it all seems OK for rough work, but it would need a lot of work to get it
    ready for finish carpentry - especially if the tools need to be replaced.
    What kind of finish carpentry are you considering here? A SCMS is much more
    useful for that type of work (mouldings, trim, etc.).

    My point was that the cabinet itself needs some TLC. I never specifically said that any
    of the tools *needed* to be replaced. I said it would be more work *if* the tools needed
    to be replaced.

    I guess that's where we differ. I find the cabinet to be perfect for >>>>>> it's purpose, there's no need to make it into a piece of fine furniture.
    You do if it is going to hold $100,000 of "green tools" I guess - - - >>>>

    That would be a lot of Ryobi.
    And about 1/100 as much Festool



    Not a Festool fan?
    That would be champaign living on a beer (or water) budget
    Just a nit... That would be champagne. Champaign is a city in Illinois (where I grew up). ;-)

    Where you lived. ‚ÄúGrew up‚ÄĚ is open for debate. ;-)

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to teamarrows@eznet.net on Tue Jul 5 00:02:30 2022
    On Mon, 4 Jul 2022 20:22:48 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Monday, July 4, 2022 at 10:09:59 PM UTC-4, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 04 Jul 2022 20:55:17 -0400, Clare Snyder <cl...@snyder.on.ca>
    wrote:
    On Mon, 4 Jul 2022 13:58:51 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 6/30/2022 10:09 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Wed, 29 Jun 2022 20:44:36 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 6/28/2022 8:30 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Tue, 28 Jun 2022 18:35:09 GMT, sc...@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) >> >>>>> wrote:

    DerbyDad03 <teama...@eznet.net> writes:
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 12:43:21 PM UTC-4, Scott Lurndal wrote: >> >>>>>>>> DerbyDad03 <teama...@eznet.net> writes:

    In general, as-is it all seems OK for rough work, but it would need a lot of work to get it
    ready for finish carpentry - especially if the tools need to be replaced.
    What kind of finish carpentry are you considering here? A SCMS is much more
    useful for that type of work (mouldings, trim, etc.).

    My point was that the cabinet itself needs some TLC. I never specifically said that any
    of the tools *needed* to be replaced. I said it would be more work *if* the tools needed
    to be replaced.

    I guess that's where we differ. I find the cabinet to be perfect for >> >>>>>> it's purpose, there's no need to make it into a piece of fine furniture.
    You do if it is going to hold $100,000 of "green tools" I guess - - - >> >>>>

    That would be a lot of Ryobi.
    And about 1/100 as much Festool



    Not a Festool fan?
    That would be champaign living on a beer (or water) budget
    Just a nit... That would be champagne. Champaign is a city in Illinois
    (where I grew up). ;-)

    Where you lived. ďGrew upĒ is open for debate. ;-)

    Good point. There is good reason I tell people I'd _from_ Illinois.
    The next step for governors isn't the White House, rather the
    big-house.

    We moved 48 years ago, after I graduated from UI.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Leon@21:1/5 to Clare Snyder on Tue Jul 5 08:47:50 2022
    On 7/4/2022 7:55 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Mon, 4 Jul 2022 13:58:51 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 6/30/2022 10:09 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Wed, 29 Jun 2022 20:44:36 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 6/28/2022 8:30 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Tue, 28 Jun 2022 18:35:09 GMT, scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) >>>>> wrote:

    DerbyDad03 <teamarrows@eznet.net> writes:
    On Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 12:43:21 PM UTC-4, Scott Lurndal wrote: >>>>>>>> DerbyDad03 <teama...@eznet.net> writes:

    In general, as-is it all seems OK for rough work, but it would need a lot of work to get it
    ready for finish carpentry - especially if the tools need to be replaced.
    What kind of finish carpentry are you considering here? A SCMS is much more
    useful for that type of work (mouldings, trim, etc.).

    My point was that the cabinet itself needs some TLC. I never specifically said that any
    of the tools *needed* to be replaced. I said it would be more work *if* the tools needed
    to be replaced.

    I guess that's where we differ. I find the cabinet to be perfect for >>>>>> it's purpose, there's no need to make it into a piece of fine furniture. >>>>> You do if it is going to hold $100,000 of "green tools" I guess - - - >>>>

    That would be a lot of Ryobi.
    And about 1/100 as much Festool



    Not a Festool fan?
    That would be champaign living on a beer (or water) budget




    Ohhhhhhh. Got it.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From hubops@ccanoemail.com@21:1/5 to All on Tue Jan 3 12:30:47 2023
    ... the proverbial :-)

    https://jantziauctions.hibid.com/lot/141048097/bag-of-hammers/?cpage=3&ipp=100&q=&ref=catalog

    John T.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to hubops@ccanoemail.com on Wed Jan 4 22:56:08 2023
    On Tue, 03 Jan 2023 12:30:47 -0500, hubops@ccanoemail.com wrote:


    ... the proverbial :-)

    https://jantziauctions.hibid.com/lot/141048097/bag-of-hammers/?cpage=3&ipp=100&q=&ref=catalog

    The only thing dumber than that auction item is the winner.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Bill@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Thu Jan 5 03:17:54 2023
    On 1/4/2023 10:56 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Tue, 03 Jan 2023 12:30:47 -0500, hubops@ccanoemail.com wrote:


    ... the proverbial :-)

    https://jantziauctions.hibid.com/lot/141048097/bag-of-hammers/?cpage=3&ipp=100&q=&ref=catalog

    The only thing dumber than that auction item is the winner.


    At least the owner has them "all in one place". I'm sort of envious
    that all of mine aren't in one place (I'm talking mallets, ball-peens, a
    tack hammer, claw hammers, more?).. For Christmas, I got the 14' tree-cutting/lopping tool I asked for ("Fiskars" brand, at HD). I'm sort
    of looking forward to trying it out in the spring! It's not "industrial-strength", but I don't have an orchard. It actually feels
    stronger and heavier than I expected it to. It may lose some of that
    strength when it is extended from 7', we'll see.

    Wishing everyone here a great 2023!!!

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From ritzannaseaton@gmail.com@21:1/5 to Bill on Thu Jan 5 12:57:17 2023
    On Thursday, January 5, 2023 at 2:18:01 AM UTC-6, Bill wrote:
    On 1/4/2023 10:56 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Tue, 03 Jan 2023 12:30:47 -0500, hub...@ccanoemail.com wrote:


    ... the proverbial :-)

    https://jantziauctions.hibid.com/lot/141048097/bag-of-hammers/?cpage=3&ipp=100&q=&ref=catalog

    The only thing dumber than that auction item is the winner.
    At least the owner has them "all in one place". I'm sort of envious
    that all of mine aren't in one place (I'm talking mallets, ball-peens, a tack hammer, claw hammers, more?).. For Christmas, I got the 14' tree-cutting/lopping tool I asked for ("Fiskars" brand, at HD). I'm sort
    of looking forward to trying it out in the spring! It's not "industrial-strength", but I don't have an orchard. It actually feels stronger and heavier than I expected it to. It may lose some of that strength when it is extended from 7', we'll see.

    Wishing everyone here a great 2023!!!

    Had to look up your Fiskars tree pruner. Year ago I had need for something like that. Big dead branch was hanging down in the tree in the front yard. Been there for years. But the ladder was not long enough to get me close enough to cut it. And
    cutting a big heavy branch log a foot away while perched at the top of a 12 foot ladder was maybe not safe either. Fortunately things worked out and I had access to an all terrain diesel forklift for a few weeks. Put a pallet on the forks and lifted my
    brother up with a chainsaw. Got the tree branch cut off.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Bill@21:1/5 to russellseaton1@yahoo.com on Fri Jan 6 06:03:00 2023
    On 1/5/2023 3:57 PM, russellseaton1@yahoo.com wrote:
    On Thursday, January 5, 2023 at 2:18:01 AM UTC-6, Bill wrote:
    On 1/4/2023 10:56 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Tue, 03 Jan 2023 12:30:47 -0500, hub...@ccanoemail.com wrote:


    ... the proverbial :-)

    https://jantziauctions.hibid.com/lot/141048097/bag-of-hammers/?cpage=3&ipp=100&q=&ref=catalog

    The only thing dumber than that auction item is the winner.
    At least the owner has them "all in one place". I'm sort of envious
    that all of mine aren't in one place (I'm talking mallets, ball-peens, a
    tack hammer, claw hammers, more?).. For Christmas, I got the 14'
    tree-cutting/lopping tool I asked for ("Fiskars" brand, at HD). I'm sort
    of looking forward to trying it out in the spring! It's not
    "industrial-strength", but I don't have an orchard. It actually feels
    stronger and heavier than I expected it to. It may lose some of that
    strength when it is extended from 7', we'll see.

    Wishing everyone here a great 2023!!!

    Had to look up your Fiskars tree pruner. Year ago I had need for something like that. Big dead branch was hanging down in the tree in the front yard. Been there for years. But the ladder was not long enough to get me close enough to cut it. And
    cutting a big heavy branch log a foot away while perched at the top of a 12 foot ladder was maybe not safe either.

    I mainly have tall bushes along the back fence, and they are getting so
    tall I couldn't even reach the top of the fronts of them the last time. Hopefully tool will help. I also have a "Weeping Cherry" in the front
    yard that I've never been able to reach the top of (in 12 yrs). So
    hopefully this pruner will make spring cleanup a little more "fun".
    Don't get me wrong, if she had ruled against my request, and presented
    me a motorcycle instead, I would have been "cool with that"! : )

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Grossbohlin@21:1/5 to Bill on Fri Jan 6 08:27:16 2023
    On Friday, January 6, 2023 at 6:03:07 AM UTC-5, Bill wrote:
    On 1/5/2023 3:57 PM, russell...@yahoo.com wrote:
    On Thursday, January 5, 2023 at 2:18:01 AM UTC-6, Bill wrote:
    On 1/4/2023 10:56 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Tue, 03 Jan 2023 12:30:47 -0500, hub...@ccanoemail.com wrote:


    ... the proverbial :-)

    https://jantziauctions.hibid.com/lot/141048097/bag-of-hammers/?cpage=3&ipp=100&q=&ref=catalog

    The only thing dumber than that auction item is the winner.
    At least the owner has them "all in one place". I'm sort of envious
    that all of mine aren't in one place (I'm talking mallets, ball-peens, a >> tack hammer, claw hammers, more?).. For Christmas, I got the 14'
    tree-cutting/lopping tool I asked for ("Fiskars" brand, at HD). I'm sort >> of looking forward to trying it out in the spring! It's not
    "industrial-strength", but I don't have an orchard. It actually feels
    stronger and heavier than I expected it to. It may lose some of that
    strength when it is extended from 7', we'll see.

    Wishing everyone here a great 2023!!!

    Had to look up your Fiskars tree pruner. Year ago I had need for something like that. Big dead branch was hanging down in the tree in the front yard. Been there for years. But the ladder was not long enough to get me close enough to cut it. And
    cutting a big heavy branch log a foot away while perched at the top of a 12 foot ladder was maybe not safe either.
    I mainly have tall bushes along the back fence, and they are getting so
    tall I couldn't even reach the top of the fronts of them the last time. Hopefully tool will help. I also have a "Weeping Cherry" in the front
    yard that I've never been able to reach the top of (in 12 yrs). So
    hopefully this pruner will make spring cleanup a little more "fun".
    Don't get me wrong, if she had ruled against my request, and presented
    me a motorcycle instead, I would have been "cool with that"! : )

    I've had a Snap-Cut pole pruner for 30+ years that has been great for maintenance around the house. In the past decade I've taken on rail trail maintenance and also have a lot more maintenance on my family's properties so I bought a Stihl HT131 pole
    pruner (chainsaw on an extendable pole). The thing is a beast... I've cut off 12" branches while clearing storm damage. I enjoy the tree work and just bought my fifth chainsaw... a Stihl MS661... that I'll also be using in my Granberg Alaskan saw mill in
    place of the MS461. The tree work and Alaskan mill has given me access to free logs... I have maple, ash, walnut, and cherry in my lumber shed.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)