• New Festool Products?

    From Leon@21:1/5 to All on Sat Mar 19 12:37:04 2022
    Apparently Festool has been busy designing with their SawStop
    technology, and their Shaper Origin technology.


    Seems they have patents on a trackless track saw, that corrects for you.
    Hummmm.

    Same for the miter saw, correction and saw stop.

    And umm a light on a drill that knows where the light needs to be
    pointed as the bit goes into the work.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fWrcj6GcUlE

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to All on Sat Mar 19 14:18:55 2022
    On Sat, 19 Mar 2022 12:37:04 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    Apparently Festool has been busy designing with their SawStop
    technology, and their Shaper Origin technology.


    Seems they have patents on a trackless track saw, that corrects for you.
    Hummmm.

    I'm not buying that one. How does the blade change course in the
    workpiece? I guess it could "see" the line before it enters the piece
    then pull the arm in that direction, X-Y and direction. Why?

    A jigsaw, I could understand.

    Same for the miter saw, correction and saw stop.

    Same issue.
    And umm a light on a drill that knows where the light needs to be
    pointed as the bit goes into the work.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fWrcj6GcUlE

    Towards the tip of the bit, obviously. ;-)

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Leon@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Sat Mar 19 19:41:45 2022
    On 3/19/2022 1:18 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sat, 19 Mar 2022 12:37:04 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    Apparently Festool has been busy designing with their SawStop
    technology, and their Shaper Origin technology.


    Seems they have patents on a trackless track saw, that corrects for you.
    Hummmm.

    I'm not buying that one. How does the blade change course in the
    workpiece? I guess it could "see" the line before it enters the piece
    then pull the arm in that direction, X-Y and direction. Why?

    A jigsaw, I could understand.

    Same for the miter saw, correction and saw stop.

    Same issue.
    And umm a light on a drill that knows where the light needs to be
    pointed as the bit goes into the work.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fWrcj6GcUlE

    Towards the tip of the bit, obviously. ;-)



    In the beginning. but the tip moves away as it goes in. Apparently the
    light stays pointed at where the bit went in.

    Patents are not always the next great thing.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Leon@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Mon Mar 21 08:47:25 2022
    On 3/19/2022 10:46 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sat, 19 Mar 2022 19:41:45 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 3/19/2022 1:18 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sat, 19 Mar 2022 12:37:04 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    Apparently Festool has been busy designing with their SawStop
    technology, and their Shaper Origin technology.


    Seems they have patents on a trackless track saw, that corrects for you. >>>> Hummmm.

    I'm not buying that one. How does the blade change course in the
    workpiece? I guess it could "see" the line before it enters the piece
    then pull the arm in that direction, X-Y and direction. Why?

    A jigsaw, I could understand.

    Same for the miter saw, correction and saw stop.

    Same issue.
    And umm a light on a drill that knows where the light needs to be
    pointed as the bit goes into the work.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fWrcj6GcUlE

    Towards the tip of the bit, obviously. ;-)



    In the beginning. but the tip moves away as it goes in. Apparently the
    light stays pointed at where the bit went in.

    Why? It's not going anywhere.

    Well having the patent on the method/technology can lead to other uses.
    A patent on the technology used is a" weird/it aint gonna happen way"
    does not necessarily point at the tool that it could be used on. They
    figured out a way to get something to point in a direction and track that.

    For instance, still considering a drill, if they can track where the
    drill is, in relation to the surface, they could put in a laser in
    instead of a regular light to track how far the bit has entered below
    the surface. Like setting a depth stop in a DP. The drill could stop
    spinning once the bit had gone a certain depth. Just a thought.

    Not actually showing the exact use of the patent technology does not
    give the competition a hint as to where this might be headed.





    Patents are not always the next great thing.

    That's a fact. I have eight of them. They looked good on a resume but
    that and the incentive money is all they're good for. ;-)

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Leon@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Mon Mar 21 14:05:43 2022
    On 3/21/2022 1:17 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 21 Mar 2022 08:47:25 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 3/19/2022 10:46 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sat, 19 Mar 2022 19:41:45 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 3/19/2022 1:18 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sat, 19 Mar 2022 12:37:04 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    Apparently Festool has been busy designing with their SawStop
    technology, and their Shaper Origin technology.


    Seems they have patents on a trackless track saw, that corrects for you. >>>>>> Hummmm.

    I'm not buying that one. How does the blade change course in the
    workpiece? I guess it could "see" the line before it enters the piece >>>>> then pull the arm in that direction, X-Y and direction. Why?

    A jigsaw, I could understand.

    Same for the miter saw, correction and saw stop.

    Same issue.
    And umm a light on a drill that knows where the light needs to be
    pointed as the bit goes into the work.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fWrcj6GcUlE

    Towards the tip of the bit, obviously. ;-)



    In the beginning. but the tip moves away as it goes in. Apparently the >>>> light stays pointed at where the bit went in.

    Why? It's not going anywhere.

    Well having the patent on the method/technology can lead to other uses.
    A patent on the technology used is a" weird/it aint gonna happen way"
    does not necessarily point at the tool that it could be used on. They
    figured out a way to get something to point in a direction and track that. >>
    For instance, still considering a drill, if they can track where the
    drill is, in relation to the surface, they could put in a laser in
    instead of a regular light to track how far the bit has entered below
    the surface. Like setting a depth stop in a DP. The drill could stop
    spinning once the bit had gone a certain depth. Just a thought.

    Sounds like a damn expensive stop collar or rod.

    Well in tight spots..... One can use a template with a router or get
    an Origin. ;~)

    Not for everybody.

    FWIW Technatool has an electronic direct drive drill press. It can be programed to turn off when a certain depth has been reached. Along side
    the manual stop set up fount on most all drill presses.

    https://www.teknatool.com/products/drill-presses/nova-voyager-dvr-drill-press/

    Not for everybody.




    Not actually showing the exact use of the patent technology does not
    give the competition a hint as to where this might be headed.

    For a patent to be valid, the best (at the time of application) implementation and utility has to be disclosed.

    There may be something there or it might just be that they're hoping
    to shotgun the technology to lay some claim to beat others over the
    head with. When I worked at IBM (and likely still happens) when
    someone came to IBM with an infringement claim, the first thing IBM
    lawyers did was to pull everything out that the claimant could
    possibly be infringing on (I was on a few of the hunts). They'd put a
    pile of patents in front of their lawyers and play "Lets Make a Deal".
    Most patents are defensive - protecting from attacks on the flanks of
    the technology, as it were.

    OTOH, for several years, IBM made more on its patent licensing than it
    did with everything else combined. Hell, some years they would have
    shown a loss without the licensing of the mountain of patents.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to All on Mon Mar 21 14:17:46 2022
    On Mon, 21 Mar 2022 08:47:25 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 3/19/2022 10:46 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sat, 19 Mar 2022 19:41:45 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 3/19/2022 1:18 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sat, 19 Mar 2022 12:37:04 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    Apparently Festool has been busy designing with their SawStop
    technology, and their Shaper Origin technology.


    Seems they have patents on a trackless track saw, that corrects for you. >>>>> Hummmm.

    I'm not buying that one. How does the blade change course in the
    workpiece? I guess it could "see" the line before it enters the piece >>>> then pull the arm in that direction, X-Y and direction. Why?

    A jigsaw, I could understand.

    Same for the miter saw, correction and saw stop.

    Same issue.
    And umm a light on a drill that knows where the light needs to be
    pointed as the bit goes into the work.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fWrcj6GcUlE

    Towards the tip of the bit, obviously. ;-)



    In the beginning. but the tip moves away as it goes in. Apparently the >>> light stays pointed at where the bit went in.

    Why? It's not going anywhere.

    Well having the patent on the method/technology can lead to other uses.
    A patent on the technology used is a" weird/it aint gonna happen way"
    does not necessarily point at the tool that it could be used on. They >figured out a way to get something to point in a direction and track that.

    For instance, still considering a drill, if they can track where the
    drill is, in relation to the surface, they could put in a laser in
    instead of a regular light to track how far the bit has entered below
    the surface. Like setting a depth stop in a DP. The drill could stop >spinning once the bit had gone a certain depth. Just a thought.

    Sounds like a damn expensive stop collar or rod.

    Not actually showing the exact use of the patent technology does not
    give the competition a hint as to where this might be headed.

    For a patent to be valid, the best (at the time of application)
    implementation and utility has to be disclosed.

    There may be something there or it might just be that they're hoping
    to shotgun the technology to lay some claim to beat others over the
    head with. When I worked at IBM (and likely still happens) when
    someone came to IBM with an infringement claim, the first thing IBM
    lawyers did was to pull everything out that the claimant could
    possibly be infringing on (I was on a few of the hunts). They'd put a
    pile of patents in front of their lawyers and play "Lets Make a Deal".
    Most patents are defensive - protecting from attacks on the flanks of
    the technology, as it were.

    OTOH, for several years, IBM made more on its patent licensing than it
    did with everything else combined. Hell, some years they would have
    shown a loss without the licensing of the mountain of patents.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DerbyDad03@21:1/5 to Leon on Mon Mar 21 13:51:39 2022
    On Monday, March 21, 2022 at 3:05:53 PM UTC-4, Leon wrote:
    On 3/21/2022 1:17 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 21 Mar 2022 08:47:25 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 3/19/2022 10:46 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sat, 19 Mar 2022 19:41:45 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 3/19/2022 1:18 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sat, 19 Mar 2022 12:37:04 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    Apparently Festool has been busy designing with their SawStop
    technology, and their Shaper Origin technology.


    Seems they have patents on a trackless track saw, that corrects for you.
    Hummmm.

    I'm not buying that one. How does the blade change course in the
    workpiece? I guess it could "see" the line before it enters the piece >>>>> then pull the arm in that direction, X-Y and direction. Why?

    A jigsaw, I could understand.

    Same for the miter saw, correction and saw stop.

    Same issue.
    And umm a light on a drill that knows where the light needs to be >>>>>> pointed as the bit goes into the work.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fWrcj6GcUlE

    Towards the tip of the bit, obviously. ;-)



    In the beginning. but the tip moves away as it goes in. Apparently the >>>> light stays pointed at where the bit went in.

    Why? It's not going anywhere.

    Well having the patent on the method/technology can lead to other uses.
    A patent on the technology used is a" weird/it aint gonna happen way"
    does not necessarily point at the tool that it could be used on. They
    figured out a way to get something to point in a direction and track that. >>
    For instance, still considering a drill, if they can track where the
    drill is, in relation to the surface, they could put in a laser in
    instead of a regular light to track how far the bit has entered below
    the surface. Like setting a depth stop in a DP. The drill could stop
    spinning once the bit had gone a certain depth. Just a thought.

    Sounds like a damn expensive stop collar or rod.
    Well in tight spots..... One can use a template with a router or get
    an Origin. ;~)

    Not for everybody.

    FWIW Technatool has an electronic direct drive drill press. It can be programed to turn off when a certain depth has been reached. Along side
    the manual stop set up fount on most all drill presses.

    https://www.teknatool.com/products/drill-presses/nova-voyager-dvr-drill-press/

    Not for everybody.

    Not something you see very often on a page for a "basic" shop tool:

    "Click here for Firmware Upgrade"

    Eventually it will be the norm, considering 3D printers, CNC routers, etc. Smart
    technology in a drill press. Who woulda thunk it? ;-)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9iwsnkvfhI4


    Not actually showing the exact use of the patent technology does not
    give the competition a hint as to where this might be headed.

    For a patent to be valid, the best (at the time of application) implementation and utility has to be disclosed.

    There may be something there or it might just be that they're hoping
    to shotgun the technology to lay some claim to beat others over the
    head with. When I worked at IBM (and likely still happens) when
    someone came to IBM with an infringement claim, the first thing IBM
    lawyers did was to pull everything out that the claimant could
    possibly be infringing on (I was on a few of the hunts). They'd put a
    pile of patents in front of their lawyers and play "Lets Make a Deal".
    Most patents are defensive - protecting from attacks on the flanks of
    the technology, as it were.

    OTOH, for several years, IBM made more on its patent licensing than it
    did with everything else combined. Hell, some years they would have
    shown a loss without the licensing of the mountain of patents.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Leon@21:1/5 to All on Tue Mar 22 10:49:08 2022
    On 3/21/2022 3:51 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
    On Monday, March 21, 2022 at 3:05:53 PM UTC-4, Leon wrote:
    On 3/21/2022 1:17 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 21 Mar 2022 08:47:25 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 3/19/2022 10:46 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sat, 19 Mar 2022 19:41:45 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 3/19/2022 1:18 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sat, 19 Mar 2022 12:37:04 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> >>>>>>> wrote:

    Apparently Festool has been busy designing with their SawStop
    technology, and their Shaper Origin technology.


    Seems they have patents on a trackless track saw, that corrects for you.
    Hummmm.

    I'm not buying that one. How does the blade change course in the >>>>>>> workpiece? I guess it could "see" the line before it enters the piece >>>>>>> then pull the arm in that direction, X-Y and direction. Why?

    A jigsaw, I could understand.

    Same for the miter saw, correction and saw stop.

    Same issue.
    And umm a light on a drill that knows where the light needs to be >>>>>>>> pointed as the bit goes into the work.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fWrcj6GcUlE

    Towards the tip of the bit, obviously. ;-)



    In the beginning. but the tip moves away as it goes in. Apparently the >>>>>> light stays pointed at where the bit went in.

    Why? It's not going anywhere.

    Well having the patent on the method/technology can lead to other uses. >>>> A patent on the technology used is a" weird/it aint gonna happen way"
    does not necessarily point at the tool that it could be used on. They
    figured out a way to get something to point in a direction and track that. >>>>
    For instance, still considering a drill, if they can track where the
    drill is, in relation to the surface, they could put in a laser in
    instead of a regular light to track how far the bit has entered below
    the surface. Like setting a depth stop in a DP. The drill could stop
    spinning once the bit had gone a certain depth. Just a thought.

    Sounds like a damn expensive stop collar or rod.
    Well in tight spots..... One can use a template with a router or get
    an Origin. ;~)

    Not for everybody.

    FWIW Technatool has an electronic direct drive drill press. It can be
    programed to turn off when a certain depth has been reached. Along side
    the manual stop set up fount on most all drill presses.

    https://www.teknatool.com/products/drill-presses/nova-voyager-dvr-drill-press/

    Not for everybody.

    Not something you see very often on a page for a "basic" shop tool:

    "Click here for Firmware Upgrade"

    Eventually it will be the norm, considering 3D printers, CNC routers, etc. Smart
    technology in a drill press. Who woulda thunk it? ;-)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9iwsnkvfhI4



    Can't waif for the day that you take a dull tool, toss it in a box for 5 minutes, and it comes out sharp and true!

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DerbyDad03@21:1/5 to Leon on Tue Mar 22 09:17:50 2022
    On Tuesday, March 22, 2022 at 11:49:17 AM UTC-4, Leon wrote:
    On 3/21/2022 3:51 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
    On Monday, March 21, 2022 at 3:05:53 PM UTC-4, Leon wrote:
    On 3/21/2022 1:17 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 21 Mar 2022 08:47:25 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 3/19/2022 10:46 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sat, 19 Mar 2022 19:41:45 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 3/19/2022 1:18 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sat, 19 Mar 2022 12:37:04 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> >>>>>>> wrote:

    Apparently Festool has been busy designing with their SawStop >>>>>>>> technology, and their Shaper Origin technology.


    Seems they have patents on a trackless track saw, that corrects for you.
    Hummmm.

    I'm not buying that one. How does the blade change course in the >>>>>>> workpiece? I guess it could "see" the line before it enters the piece >>>>>>> then pull the arm in that direction, X-Y and direction. Why?

    A jigsaw, I could understand.

    Same for the miter saw, correction and saw stop.

    Same issue.
    And umm a light on a drill that knows where the light needs to be >>>>>>>> pointed as the bit goes into the work.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fWrcj6GcUlE

    Towards the tip of the bit, obviously. ;-)



    In the beginning. but the tip moves away as it goes in. Apparently the >>>>>> light stays pointed at where the bit went in.

    Why? It's not going anywhere.

    Well having the patent on the method/technology can lead to other uses. >>>> A patent on the technology used is a" weird/it aint gonna happen way" >>>> does not necessarily point at the tool that it could be used on. They >>>> figured out a way to get something to point in a direction and track that.

    For instance, still considering a drill, if they can track where the >>>> drill is, in relation to the surface, they could put in a laser in
    instead of a regular light to track how far the bit has entered below >>>> the surface. Like setting a depth stop in a DP. The drill could stop >>>> spinning once the bit had gone a certain depth. Just a thought.

    Sounds like a damn expensive stop collar or rod.
    Well in tight spots..... One can use a template with a router or get
    an Origin. ;~)

    Not for everybody.

    FWIW Technatool has an electronic direct drive drill press. It can be
    programed to turn off when a certain depth has been reached. Along side
    the manual stop set up fount on most all drill presses.

    https://www.teknatool.com/products/drill-presses/nova-voyager-dvr-drill-press/

    Not for everybody.

    Not something you see very often on a page for a "basic" shop tool:

    "Click here for Firmware Upgrade"

    Eventually it will be the norm, considering 3D printers, CNC routers, etc. Smart
    technology in a drill press. Who woulda thunk it? ;-)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9iwsnkvfhI4

    Can't waif for the day that you take a dull tool, toss it in a box for 5 minutes, and it comes out sharp and true!

    This closest I've seen is the kitchen knife block that my daughter has.

    Apparently/supposedly each time you remove and replace a knife into it's assigned slot, it gets a quick tune-up. There is definitely something in the slots because you can hear the metallic "sharpening sound" as you slide it in.

    No electronics, no firmware, just "mechanical".

    Am I gullible enough to believe that all slots are set at the perfect angle, etc.?
    Not really, but she's happy with it and I'm not going to take that away from her.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to teamarrows@eznet.net on Tue Mar 22 14:14:33 2022
    On Tue, 22 Mar 2022 09:17:50 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Tuesday, March 22, 2022 at 11:49:17 AM UTC-4, Leon wrote:
    On 3/21/2022 3:51 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
    On Monday, March 21, 2022 at 3:05:53 PM UTC-4, Leon wrote:
    On 3/21/2022 1:17 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 21 Mar 2022 08:47:25 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 3/19/2022 10:46 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sat, 19 Mar 2022 19:41:45 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 3/19/2022 1:18 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sat, 19 Mar 2022 12:37:04 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    Apparently Festool has been busy designing with their SawStop
    technology, and their Shaper Origin technology.


    Seems they have patents on a trackless track saw, that corrects for you.
    Hummmm.

    I'm not buying that one. How does the blade change course in the
    workpiece? I guess it could "see" the line before it enters the piece
    then pull the arm in that direction, X-Y and direction. Why?

    A jigsaw, I could understand.

    Same for the miter saw, correction and saw stop.

    Same issue.
    And umm a light on a drill that knows where the light needs to be >> >>>>>>>> pointed as the bit goes into the work.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fWrcj6GcUlE

    Towards the tip of the bit, obviously. ;-)



    In the beginning. but the tip moves away as it goes in. Apparently the
    light stays pointed at where the bit went in.

    Why? It's not going anywhere.

    Well having the patent on the method/technology can lead to other uses. >> >>>> A patent on the technology used is a" weird/it aint gonna happen way" >> >>>> does not necessarily point at the tool that it could be used on. They >> >>>> figured out a way to get something to point in a direction and track that.

    For instance, still considering a drill, if they can track where the
    drill is, in relation to the surface, they could put in a laser in
    instead of a regular light to track how far the bit has entered below >> >>>> the surface. Like setting a depth stop in a DP. The drill could stop
    spinning once the bit had gone a certain depth. Just a thought.

    Sounds like a damn expensive stop collar or rod.
    Well in tight spots..... One can use a template with a router or get
    an Origin. ;~)

    Not for everybody.

    FWIW Technatool has an electronic direct drive drill press. It can be
    programed to turn off when a certain depth has been reached. Along side >> >> the manual stop set up fount on most all drill presses.

    https://www.teknatool.com/products/drill-presses/nova-voyager-dvr-drill-press/

    Not for everybody.

    Not something you see very often on a page for a "basic" shop tool:

    "Click here for Firmware Upgrade"

    Eventually it will be the norm, considering 3D printers, CNC routers, etc. Smart
    technology in a drill press. Who woulda thunk it? ;-)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9iwsnkvfhI4

    Can't waif for the day that you take a dull tool, toss it in a box for 5
    minutes, and it comes out sharp and true!

    This closest I've seen is the kitchen knife block that my daughter has.

    Apparently/supposedly each time you remove and replace a knife into it's >assigned slot, it gets a quick tune-up. There is definitely something in the >slots because you can hear the metallic "sharpening sound" as you slide it in.

    No electronics, no firmware, just "mechanical".

    Am I gullible enough to believe that all slots are set at the perfect angle, etc.?
    Not really, but she's happy with it and I'm not going to take that away from her.

    Is there a perfect angle for a kitchen knife? How does it handle
    serrated knives. Those are the problems. It's hard to find anyone to
    sharpen good knives.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Markem618@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Tue Mar 22 13:27:41 2022
    On Tue, 22 Mar 2022 14:14:33 -0400, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    On Tue, 22 Mar 2022 09:17:50 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    Am I gullible enough to believe that all slots are set at the perfect angle, etc.?
    Not really, but she's happy with it and I'm not going to take that away from her.

    Is there a perfect angle for a kitchen knife? How does it handle
    serrated knives. Those are the problems. It's hard to find anyone to >sharpen good knives.

    Put two quarters down, that can get you the "right" angle for kitchen
    knives. I sharpen the metal knives once every two years on a water
    stone with fine and ultrafine sides.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DerbyDad03@21:1/5 to k...@notreal.com on Tue Mar 22 11:37:35 2022
    On Tuesday, March 22, 2022 at 2:14:38 PM UTC-4, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Tue, 22 Mar 2022 09:17:50 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03
    <teama...@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Tuesday, March 22, 2022 at 11:49:17 AM UTC-4, Leon wrote:
    On 3/21/2022 3:51 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
    On Monday, March 21, 2022 at 3:05:53 PM UTC-4, Leon wrote:
    On 3/21/2022 1:17 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 21 Mar 2022 08:47:25 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 3/19/2022 10:46 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sat, 19 Mar 2022 19:41:45 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 3/19/2022 1:18 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sat, 19 Mar 2022 12:37:04 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> >> >>>>>>> wrote:

    Apparently Festool has been busy designing with their SawStop
    technology, and their Shaper Origin technology.


    Seems they have patents on a trackless track saw, that corrects for you.
    Hummmm.

    I'm not buying that one. How does the blade change course in the >> >>>>>>> workpiece? I guess it could "see" the line before it enters the piece
    then pull the arm in that direction, X-Y and direction. Why?

    A jigsaw, I could understand.

    Same for the miter saw, correction and saw stop.

    Same issue.
    And umm a light on a drill that knows where the light needs to be
    pointed as the bit goes into the work.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fWrcj6GcUlE

    Towards the tip of the bit, obviously. ;-)



    In the beginning. but the tip moves away as it goes in. Apparently the
    light stays pointed at where the bit went in.

    Why? It's not going anywhere.

    Well having the patent on the method/technology can lead to other uses.
    A patent on the technology used is a" weird/it aint gonna happen way"
    does not necessarily point at the tool that it could be used on. They
    figured out a way to get something to point in a direction and track that.

    For instance, still considering a drill, if they can track where the >> >>>> drill is, in relation to the surface, they could put in a laser in >> >>>> instead of a regular light to track how far the bit has entered below
    the surface. Like setting a depth stop in a DP. The drill could stop >> >>>> spinning once the bit had gone a certain depth. Just a thought.

    Sounds like a damn expensive stop collar or rod.
    Well in tight spots..... One can use a template with a router or get >> >> an Origin. ;~)

    Not for everybody.

    FWIW Technatool has an electronic direct drive drill press. It can be >> >> programed to turn off when a certain depth has been reached. Along side
    the manual stop set up fount on most all drill presses.

    https://www.teknatool.com/products/drill-presses/nova-voyager-dvr-drill-press/

    Not for everybody.

    Not something you see very often on a page for a "basic" shop tool:

    "Click here for Firmware Upgrade"

    Eventually it will be the norm, considering 3D printers, CNC routers, etc. Smart
    technology in a drill press. Who woulda thunk it? ;-)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9iwsnkvfhI4

    Can't waif for the day that you take a dull tool, toss it in a box for 5 >> minutes, and it comes out sharp and true!

    This closest I've seen is the kitchen knife block that my daughter has.

    Apparently/supposedly each time you remove and replace a knife into it's >assigned slot, it gets a quick tune-up. There is definitely something in the
    slots because you can hear the metallic "sharpening sound" as you slide it in.

    No electronics, no firmware, just "mechanical".

    Am I gullible enough to believe that all slots are set at the perfect angle, etc.?
    Not really, but she's happy with it and I'm not going to take that away from her.
    Is there a perfect angle for a kitchen knife? How does it handle
    serrated knives. Those are the problems. It's hard to find anyone to
    sharpen good knives.

    15° - 20° is the "standard" for chef's knifes, although 15° is at the very low end
    of durability.

    Japanese chef's tend to sharpen their knifes at 17° but most of what they are cutting is fairly soft. 20° is used for most western knifes. "Tomato sharp" but
    durable enough to last a decent amount of time.

    I use the Work Sharp WSKTS which provides a 20° guide bracket. I also use a steel before each use.

    The WSKTS has a guide for serrated knifes, but my only serrated knife is our bread
    knife which never seems to get dull. It is *only* used for bread.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Leon@21:1/5 to All on Wed Mar 23 10:39:28 2022
    On 3/22/2022 11:17 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
    On Tuesday, March 22, 2022 at 11:49:17 AM UTC-4, Leon wrote:
    On 3/21/2022 3:51 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
    On Monday, March 21, 2022 at 3:05:53 PM UTC-4, Leon wrote:
    On 3/21/2022 1:17 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 21 Mar 2022 08:47:25 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 3/19/2022 10:46 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sat, 19 Mar 2022 19:41:45 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> >>>>>>> wrote:

    On 3/19/2022 1:18 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sat, 19 Mar 2022 12:37:04 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> >>>>>>>>> wrote:

    Apparently Festool has been busy designing with their SawStop >>>>>>>>>> technology, and their Shaper Origin technology.


    Seems they have patents on a trackless track saw, that corrects for you.
    Hummmm.

    I'm not buying that one. How does the blade change course in the >>>>>>>>> workpiece? I guess it could "see" the line before it enters the piece >>>>>>>>> then pull the arm in that direction, X-Y and direction. Why? >>>>>>>>>
    A jigsaw, I could understand.

    Same for the miter saw, correction and saw stop.

    Same issue.
    And umm a light on a drill that knows where the light needs to be >>>>>>>>>> pointed as the bit goes into the work.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fWrcj6GcUlE

    Towards the tip of the bit, obviously. ;-)



    In the beginning. but the tip moves away as it goes in. Apparently the >>>>>>>> light stays pointed at where the bit went in.

    Why? It's not going anywhere.

    Well having the patent on the method/technology can lead to other uses. >>>>>> A patent on the technology used is a" weird/it aint gonna happen way" >>>>>> does not necessarily point at the tool that it could be used on. They >>>>>> figured out a way to get something to point in a direction and track that.

    For instance, still considering a drill, if they can track where the >>>>>> drill is, in relation to the surface, they could put in a laser in >>>>>> instead of a regular light to track how far the bit has entered below >>>>>> the surface. Like setting a depth stop in a DP. The drill could stop >>>>>> spinning once the bit had gone a certain depth. Just a thought.

    Sounds like a damn expensive stop collar or rod.
    Well in tight spots..... One can use a template with a router or get
    an Origin. ;~)

    Not for everybody.

    FWIW Technatool has an electronic direct drive drill press. It can be
    programed to turn off when a certain depth has been reached. Along side >>>> the manual stop set up fount on most all drill presses.

    https://www.teknatool.com/products/drill-presses/nova-voyager-dvr-drill-press/

    Not for everybody.

    Not something you see very often on a page for a "basic" shop tool:

    "Click here for Firmware Upgrade"

    Eventually it will be the norm, considering 3D printers, CNC routers, etc. Smart
    technology in a drill press. Who woulda thunk it? ;-)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9iwsnkvfhI4

    Can't waif for the day that you take a dull tool, toss it in a box for 5
    minutes, and it comes out sharp and true!

    This closest I've seen is the kitchen knife block that my daughter has.

    Apparently/supposedly each time you remove and replace a knife into it's assigned slot, it gets a quick tune-up. There is definitely something in the slots because you can hear the metallic "sharpening sound" as you slide it in.

    No electronics, no firmware, just "mechanical".

    Am I gullible enough to believe that all slots are set at the perfect angle, etc.?
    Not really, but she's happy with it and I'm not going to take that away from her.


    I finally got a Ken Onion Work Sharp sharpener. It WORKS. Almost fool
    proof and will make a dull knife sharp in a matter if minutes. Or scary
    sharp.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Leon@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Wed Mar 23 10:45:34 2022
    On 3/22/2022 1:14 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Tue, 22 Mar 2022 09:17:50 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Tuesday, March 22, 2022 at 11:49:17 AM UTC-4, Leon wrote:
    On 3/21/2022 3:51 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
    On Monday, March 21, 2022 at 3:05:53 PM UTC-4, Leon wrote:
    On 3/21/2022 1:17 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 21 Mar 2022 08:47:25 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 3/19/2022 10:46 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sat, 19 Mar 2022 19:41:45 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> >>>>>>>> wrote:

    On 3/19/2022 1:18 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sat, 19 Mar 2022 12:37:04 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> >>>>>>>>>> wrote:

    Apparently Festool has been busy designing with their SawStop >>>>>>>>>>> technology, and their Shaper Origin technology.


    Seems they have patents on a trackless track saw, that corrects for you.
    Hummmm.

    I'm not buying that one. How does the blade change course in the >>>>>>>>>> workpiece? I guess it could "see" the line before it enters the piece
    then pull the arm in that direction, X-Y and direction. Why? >>>>>>>>>>
    A jigsaw, I could understand.

    Same for the miter saw, correction and saw stop.

    Same issue.
    And umm a light on a drill that knows where the light needs to be >>>>>>>>>>> pointed as the bit goes into the work.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fWrcj6GcUlE

    Towards the tip of the bit, obviously. ;-)



    In the beginning. but the tip moves away as it goes in. Apparently the
    light stays pointed at where the bit went in.

    Why? It's not going anywhere.

    Well having the patent on the method/technology can lead to other uses. >>>>>>> A patent on the technology used is a" weird/it aint gonna happen way" >>>>>>> does not necessarily point at the tool that it could be used on. They >>>>>>> figured out a way to get something to point in a direction and track that.

    For instance, still considering a drill, if they can track where the >>>>>>> drill is, in relation to the surface, they could put in a laser in >>>>>>> instead of a regular light to track how far the bit has entered below >>>>>>> the surface. Like setting a depth stop in a DP. The drill could stop >>>>>>> spinning once the bit had gone a certain depth. Just a thought.

    Sounds like a damn expensive stop collar or rod.
    Well in tight spots..... One can use a template with a router or get >>>>> an Origin. ;~)

    Not for everybody.

    FWIW Technatool has an electronic direct drive drill press. It can be >>>>> programed to turn off when a certain depth has been reached. Along side >>>>> the manual stop set up fount on most all drill presses.

    https://www.teknatool.com/products/drill-presses/nova-voyager-dvr-drill-press/

    Not for everybody.

    Not something you see very often on a page for a "basic" shop tool:

    "Click here for Firmware Upgrade"

    Eventually it will be the norm, considering 3D printers, CNC routers, etc. Smart
    technology in a drill press. Who woulda thunk it? ;-)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9iwsnkvfhI4

    Can't waif for the day that you take a dull tool, toss it in a box for 5 >>> minutes, and it comes out sharp and true!

    This closest I've seen is the kitchen knife block that my daughter has.

    Apparently/supposedly each time you remove and replace a knife into it's
    assigned slot, it gets a quick tune-up. There is definitely something in the >> slots because you can hear the metallic "sharpening sound" as you slide it in.

    No electronics, no firmware, just "mechanical".

    Am I gullible enough to believe that all slots are set at the perfect angle, etc.?
    Not really, but she's happy with it and I'm not going to take that away from her.

    Is there a perfect angle for a kitchen knife? How does it handle
    serrated knives. Those are the problems. It's hard to find anyone to sharpen good knives.

    IIRC 20~25 degrees. One is for kitchen knives and the other for a
    pocket knife. I keep having to check my chart when sharpening.

    So the WorkSharp system works very well for my son and his wife. I have
    the upper end Ken Onion Work Sharp system that does more and I am
    finally happy and satisfied after many styles of knife sharpeners. If
    you remember Nailshooter from here he is a knife collector and has one
    for his regular knives IIRC. He saw mine, was impressed, and bought one
    to charge clients to sharpen their knives.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DerbyDad03@21:1/5 to Leon on Wed Mar 23 10:58:51 2022
    On Wednesday, March 23, 2022 at 11:39:35 AM UTC-4, Leon wrote:
    On 3/22/2022 11:17 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
    On Tuesday, March 22, 2022 at 11:49:17 AM UTC-4, Leon wrote:
    On 3/21/2022 3:51 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
    On Monday, March 21, 2022 at 3:05:53 PM UTC-4, Leon wrote:
    On 3/21/2022 1:17 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 21 Mar 2022 08:47:25 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 3/19/2022 10:46 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sat, 19 Mar 2022 19:41:45 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> >>>>>>> wrote:

    On 3/19/2022 1:18 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sat, 19 Mar 2022 12:37:04 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> >>>>>>>>> wrote:

    Apparently Festool has been busy designing with their SawStop >>>>>>>>>> technology, and their Shaper Origin technology.


    Seems they have patents on a trackless track saw, that corrects for you.
    Hummmm.

    I'm not buying that one. How does the blade change course in the >>>>>>>>> workpiece? I guess it could "see" the line before it enters the piece
    then pull the arm in that direction, X-Y and direction. Why? >>>>>>>>>
    A jigsaw, I could understand.

    Same for the miter saw, correction and saw stop.

    Same issue.
    And umm a light on a drill that knows where the light needs to be >>>>>>>>>> pointed as the bit goes into the work.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fWrcj6GcUlE

    Towards the tip of the bit, obviously. ;-)



    In the beginning. but the tip moves away as it goes in. Apparently the
    light stays pointed at where the bit went in.

    Why? It's not going anywhere.

    Well having the patent on the method/technology can lead to other uses.
    A patent on the technology used is a" weird/it aint gonna happen way" >>>>>> does not necessarily point at the tool that it could be used on. They >>>>>> figured out a way to get something to point in a direction and track that.

    For instance, still considering a drill, if they can track where the >>>>>> drill is, in relation to the surface, they could put in a laser in >>>>>> instead of a regular light to track how far the bit has entered below >>>>>> the surface. Like setting a depth stop in a DP. The drill could stop >>>>>> spinning once the bit had gone a certain depth. Just a thought.

    Sounds like a damn expensive stop collar or rod.
    Well in tight spots..... One can use a template with a router or get >>>> an Origin. ;~)

    Not for everybody.

    FWIW Technatool has an electronic direct drive drill press. It can be >>>> programed to turn off when a certain depth has been reached. Along side >>>> the manual stop set up fount on most all drill presses.

    https://www.teknatool.com/products/drill-presses/nova-voyager-dvr-drill-press/

    Not for everybody.

    Not something you see very often on a page for a "basic" shop tool:

    "Click here for Firmware Upgrade"

    Eventually it will be the norm, considering 3D printers, CNC routers, etc. Smart
    technology in a drill press. Who woulda thunk it? ;-)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9iwsnkvfhI4

    Can't waif for the day that you take a dull tool, toss it in a box for 5 >> minutes, and it comes out sharp and true!

    This closest I've seen is the kitchen knife block that my daughter has.

    Apparently/supposedly each time you remove and replace a knife into it's assigned slot, it gets a quick tune-up. There is definitely something in the
    slots because you can hear the metallic "sharpening sound" as you slide it in.

    No electronics, no firmware, just "mechanical".

    Am I gullible enough to believe that all slots are set at the perfect angle, etc.?
    Not really, but she's happy with it and I'm not going to take that away from her.
    I finally got a Ken Onion Work Sharp sharpener. It WORKS. Almost fool
    proof and will make a dull knife sharp in a matter if minutes. Or scary sharp.

    I use the Work Sharp WSKTS which provides 20°, 25° and 32.5° guide brackets.

    Seems like the main difference between the WSKTS and WSKTS-KO is that the
    KO version has a dial to set the angle, while mine has different slots for different
    angles. More angle choices on the KO, but that's not something I need.

    I assume the sharpening ability at a given angle is the same for both versions.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to All on Wed Mar 23 22:26:58 2022
    On Wed, 23 Mar 2022 10:45:34 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 3/22/2022 1:14 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Tue, 22 Mar 2022 09:17:50 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Tuesday, March 22, 2022 at 11:49:17 AM UTC-4, Leon wrote:
    On 3/21/2022 3:51 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
    On Monday, March 21, 2022 at 3:05:53 PM UTC-4, Leon wrote:
    On 3/21/2022 1:17 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 21 Mar 2022 08:47:25 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> >>>>>>> wrote:

    On 3/19/2022 10:46 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sat, 19 Mar 2022 19:41:45 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> >>>>>>>>> wrote:

    On 3/19/2022 1:18 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sat, 19 Mar 2022 12:37:04 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> >>>>>>>>>>> wrote:

    Apparently Festool has been busy designing with their SawStop >>>>>>>>>>>> technology, and their Shaper Origin technology.


    Seems they have patents on a trackless track saw, that corrects for you.
    Hummmm.

    I'm not buying that one. How does the blade change course in the >>>>>>>>>>> workpiece? I guess it could "see" the line before it enters the piece
    then pull the arm in that direction, X-Y and direction. Why? >>>>>>>>>>>
    A jigsaw, I could understand.

    Same for the miter saw, correction and saw stop.

    Same issue.
    And umm a light on a drill that knows where the light needs to be >>>>>>>>>>>> pointed as the bit goes into the work.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fWrcj6GcUlE

    Towards the tip of the bit, obviously. ;-)



    In the beginning. but the tip moves away as it goes in. Apparently the
    light stays pointed at where the bit went in.

    Why? It's not going anywhere.

    Well having the patent on the method/technology can lead to other uses.
    A patent on the technology used is a" weird/it aint gonna happen way" >>>>>>>> does not necessarily point at the tool that it could be used on. They >>>>>>>> figured out a way to get something to point in a direction and track that.

    For instance, still considering a drill, if they can track where the >>>>>>>> drill is, in relation to the surface, they could put in a laser in >>>>>>>> instead of a regular light to track how far the bit has entered below >>>>>>>> the surface. Like setting a depth stop in a DP. The drill could stop >>>>>>>> spinning once the bit had gone a certain depth. Just a thought. >>>>>>>
    Sounds like a damn expensive stop collar or rod.
    Well in tight spots..... One can use a template with a router or get >>>>>> an Origin. ;~)

    Not for everybody.

    FWIW Technatool has an electronic direct drive drill press. It can be >>>>>> programed to turn off when a certain depth has been reached. Along side >>>>>> the manual stop set up fount on most all drill presses.

    https://www.teknatool.com/products/drill-presses/nova-voyager-dvr-drill-press/

    Not for everybody.

    Not something you see very often on a page for a "basic" shop tool:

    "Click here for Firmware Upgrade"

    Eventually it will be the norm, considering 3D printers, CNC routers, etc. Smart
    technology in a drill press. Who woulda thunk it? ;-)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9iwsnkvfhI4

    Can't waif for the day that you take a dull tool, toss it in a box for 5 >>>> minutes, and it comes out sharp and true!

    This closest I've seen is the kitchen knife block that my daughter has.

    Apparently/supposedly each time you remove and replace a knife into it's >>> assigned slot, it gets a quick tune-up. There is definitely something in the
    slots because you can hear the metallic "sharpening sound" as you slide it in.

    No electronics, no firmware, just "mechanical".

    Am I gullible enough to believe that all slots are set at the perfect angle, etc.?
    Not really, but she's happy with it and I'm not going to take that away from her.

    Is there a perfect angle for a kitchen knife? How does it handle
    serrated knives. Those are the problems. It's hard to find anyone to
    sharpen good knives.

    IIRC 20~25 degrees. One is for kitchen knives and the other for a
    pocket knife. I keep having to check my chart when sharpening.

    So the WorkSharp system works very well for my son and his wife. I have
    the upper end Ken Onion Work Sharp system that does more and I am
    finally happy and satisfied after many styles of knife sharpeners. If
    you remember Nailshooter from here he is a knife collector and has one
    for his regular knives IIRC. He saw mine, was impressed, and bought one
    to charge clients to sharpen their knives.

    I'll have to look into it further. SWMBO was spending big bucks to
    have her knives sent out for sharpening by one of the high-price
    stores (initials WS). Who they sent them to, IDK, but they'll no
    longer take serrated knives. She has expensive Japanese knives (make
    Lie Nielson chisels look cheap) so it's worth keeping them up.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Leon@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Thu Mar 24 09:59:07 2022
    On 3/23/2022 9:26 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Wed, 23 Mar 2022 10:45:34 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 3/22/2022 1:14 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Tue, 22 Mar 2022 09:17:50 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Tuesday, March 22, 2022 at 11:49:17 AM UTC-4, Leon wrote:
    On 3/21/2022 3:51 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
    On Monday, March 21, 2022 at 3:05:53 PM UTC-4, Leon wrote:
    On 3/21/2022 1:17 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 21 Mar 2022 08:47:25 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> >>>>>>>> wrote:

    On 3/19/2022 10:46 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sat, 19 Mar 2022 19:41:45 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> >>>>>>>>>> wrote:

    On 3/19/2022 1:18 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sat, 19 Mar 2022 12:37:04 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> >>>>>>>>>>>> wrote:

    Apparently Festool has been busy designing with their SawStop >>>>>>>>>>>>> technology, and their Shaper Origin technology.


    Seems they have patents on a trackless track saw, that corrects for you.
    Hummmm.

    I'm not buying that one. How does the blade change course in the >>>>>>>>>>>> workpiece? I guess it could "see" the line before it enters the piece
    then pull the arm in that direction, X-Y and direction. Why? >>>>>>>>>>>>
    A jigsaw, I could understand.

    Same for the miter saw, correction and saw stop.

    Same issue.
    And umm a light on a drill that knows where the light needs to be >>>>>>>>>>>>> pointed as the bit goes into the work.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fWrcj6GcUlE

    Towards the tip of the bit, obviously. ;-)



    In the beginning. but the tip moves away as it goes in. Apparently the
    light stays pointed at where the bit went in.

    Why? It's not going anywhere.

    Well having the patent on the method/technology can lead to other uses.
    A patent on the technology used is a" weird/it aint gonna happen way" >>>>>>>>> does not necessarily point at the tool that it could be used on. They >>>>>>>>> figured out a way to get something to point in a direction and track that.

    For instance, still considering a drill, if they can track where the >>>>>>>>> drill is, in relation to the surface, they could put in a laser in >>>>>>>>> instead of a regular light to track how far the bit has entered below >>>>>>>>> the surface. Like setting a depth stop in a DP. The drill could stop >>>>>>>>> spinning once the bit had gone a certain depth. Just a thought. >>>>>>>>
    Sounds like a damn expensive stop collar or rod.
    Well in tight spots..... One can use a template with a router or get >>>>>>> an Origin. ;~)

    Not for everybody.

    FWIW Technatool has an electronic direct drive drill press. It can be >>>>>>> programed to turn off when a certain depth has been reached. Along side >>>>>>> the manual stop set up fount on most all drill presses.

    https://www.teknatool.com/products/drill-presses/nova-voyager-dvr-drill-press/

    Not for everybody.

    Not something you see very often on a page for a "basic" shop tool: >>>>>>
    "Click here for Firmware Upgrade"

    Eventually it will be the norm, considering 3D printers, CNC routers, etc. Smart
    technology in a drill press. Who woulda thunk it? ;-)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9iwsnkvfhI4

    Can't waif for the day that you take a dull tool, toss it in a box for 5 >>>>> minutes, and it comes out sharp and true!

    This closest I've seen is the kitchen knife block that my daughter has. >>>>
    Apparently/supposedly each time you remove and replace a knife into it's >>>> assigned slot, it gets a quick tune-up. There is definitely something in the
    slots because you can hear the metallic "sharpening sound" as you slide it in.

    No electronics, no firmware, just "mechanical".

    Am I gullible enough to believe that all slots are set at the perfect angle, etc.?
    Not really, but she's happy with it and I'm not going to take that away from her.

    Is there a perfect angle for a kitchen knife? How does it handle
    serrated knives. Those are the problems. It's hard to find anyone to
    sharpen good knives.

    IIRC 20~25 degrees. One is for kitchen knives and the other for a
    pocket knife. I keep having to check my chart when sharpening.

    So the WorkSharp system works very well for my son and his wife. I have
    the upper end Ken Onion Work Sharp system that does more and I am
    finally happy and satisfied after many styles of knife sharpeners. If
    you remember Nailshooter from here he is a knife collector and has one
    for his regular knives IIRC. He saw mine, was impressed, and bought one
    to charge clients to sharpen their knives.

    I'll have to look into it further. SWMBO was spending big bucks to
    have her knives sent out for sharpening by one of the high-price
    stores (initials WS). Who they sent them to, IDK, but they'll no
    longer take serrated knives. She has expensive Japanese knives (make
    Lie Nielson chisels look cheap) so it's worth keeping them up.



    IIRC serrated knives are only sharpened from the back side. Do check
    into that. But I have to say, we have a very inexpensive set of
    Tromentina serrated steak knives that we bought in Jan 2006. We throw
    them in the dishwasher and they have never been resharpened.
    These seem to cut as well as out 3 year old seldom used Japanese steak
    knives.
    By design the serrated knives stay sharp for a very long time.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to All on Thu Mar 24 17:12:04 2022
    On Thu, 24 Mar 2022 09:59:07 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 3/23/2022 9:26 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Wed, 23 Mar 2022 10:45:34 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 3/22/2022 1:14 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Tue, 22 Mar 2022 09:17:50 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Tuesday, March 22, 2022 at 11:49:17 AM UTC-4, Leon wrote:
    On 3/21/2022 3:51 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
    On Monday, March 21, 2022 at 3:05:53 PM UTC-4, Leon wrote:
    On 3/21/2022 1:17 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 21 Mar 2022 08:47:25 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> >>>>>>>>> wrote:

    On 3/19/2022 10:46 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sat, 19 Mar 2022 19:41:45 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> >>>>>>>>>>> wrote:

    On 3/19/2022 1:18 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sat, 19 Mar 2022 12:37:04 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> >>>>>>>>>>>>> wrote:

    Apparently Festool has been busy designing with their SawStop >>>>>>>>>>>>>> technology, and their Shaper Origin technology.


    Seems they have patents on a trackless track saw, that corrects for you.
    Hummmm.

    I'm not buying that one. How does the blade change course in the >>>>>>>>>>>>> workpiece? I guess it could "see" the line before it enters the piece
    then pull the arm in that direction, X-Y and direction. Why? >>>>>>>>>>>>>
    A jigsaw, I could understand.

    Same for the miter saw, correction and saw stop.

    Same issue.
    And umm a light on a drill that knows where the light needs to be
    pointed as the bit goes into the work.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fWrcj6GcUlE

    Towards the tip of the bit, obviously. ;-)



    In the beginning. but the tip moves away as it goes in. Apparently the
    light stays pointed at where the bit went in.

    Why? It's not going anywhere.

    Well having the patent on the method/technology can lead to other uses.
    A patent on the technology used is a" weird/it aint gonna happen way"
    does not necessarily point at the tool that it could be used on. They
    figured out a way to get something to point in a direction and track that.

    For instance, still considering a drill, if they can track where the >>>>>>>>>> drill is, in relation to the surface, they could put in a laser in >>>>>>>>>> instead of a regular light to track how far the bit has entered below
    the surface. Like setting a depth stop in a DP. The drill could stop >>>>>>>>>> spinning once the bit had gone a certain depth. Just a thought. >>>>>>>>>
    Sounds like a damn expensive stop collar or rod.
    Well in tight spots..... One can use a template with a router or get >>>>>>>> an Origin. ;~)

    Not for everybody.

    FWIW Technatool has an electronic direct drive drill press. It can be >>>>>>>> programed to turn off when a certain depth has been reached. Along side
    the manual stop set up fount on most all drill presses.

    https://www.teknatool.com/products/drill-presses/nova-voyager-dvr-drill-press/

    Not for everybody.

    Not something you see very often on a page for a "basic" shop tool: >>>>>>>
    "Click here for Firmware Upgrade"

    Eventually it will be the norm, considering 3D printers, CNC routers, etc. Smart
    technology in a drill press. Who woulda thunk it? ;-)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9iwsnkvfhI4

    Can't waif for the day that you take a dull tool, toss it in a box for 5 >>>>>> minutes, and it comes out sharp and true!

    This closest I've seen is the kitchen knife block that my daughter has. >>>>>
    Apparently/supposedly each time you remove and replace a knife into it's >>>>> assigned slot, it gets a quick tune-up. There is definitely something in the
    slots because you can hear the metallic "sharpening sound" as you slide it in.

    No electronics, no firmware, just "mechanical".

    Am I gullible enough to believe that all slots are set at the perfect angle, etc.?
    Not really, but she's happy with it and I'm not going to take that away from her.

    Is there a perfect angle for a kitchen knife? How does it handle
    serrated knives. Those are the problems. It's hard to find anyone to >>>> sharpen good knives.

    IIRC 20~25 degrees. One is for kitchen knives and the other for a
    pocket knife. I keep having to check my chart when sharpening.

    So the WorkSharp system works very well for my son and his wife. I have >>> the upper end Ken Onion Work Sharp system that does more and I am
    finally happy and satisfied after many styles of knife sharpeners. If
    you remember Nailshooter from here he is a knife collector and has one
    for his regular knives IIRC. He saw mine, was impressed, and bought one >>> to charge clients to sharpen their knives.

    I'll have to look into it further. SWMBO was spending big bucks to
    have her knives sent out for sharpening by one of the high-price
    stores (initials WS). Who they sent them to, IDK, but they'll no
    longer take serrated knives. She has expensive Japanese knives (make
    Lie Nielson chisels look cheap) so it's worth keeping them up.



    IIRC serrated knives are only sharpened from the back side. Do check
    into that. But I have to say, we have a very inexpensive set of
    Tromentina serrated steak knives that we bought in Jan 2006. We throw
    them in the dishwasher and they have never been resharpened.
    These seem to cut as well as out 3 year old seldom used Japanese steak >knives.
    By design the serrated knives stay sharp for a very long time.

    I looked at the knives. Most are normal with the bevel on the
    serrated side. I watched the WS demos and it's apparent from looking
    at the knives and the instructions that the back of the knife just has
    to be flattened. There isn't much bevel so it looks like it would
    take a light touch.

    Do they stay "sharp" because they're really saws? Obviously, the fine
    knives are made from a good steel so that helps.

    After looking at the YouTube videos on the WS system, I may get one.
    For $150, it wouldn't take too many knives to break even.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Markem618@21:1/5 to All on Thu Mar 24 16:23:42 2022
    On Thu, 24 Mar 2022 21:16:06 GMT, Puckdropper <puckdropper@yahoo.com>
    wrote:

    DerbyDad03 <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote in >news:931a4de0-4943-48b4-9bdc-207625006565n@googlegroups.com:


    15° - 20° is the "standard" for chef's knifes, although 15° is at
    the very low end of durability.

    Japanese chef's tend to sharpen their knifes at 17° but most of what
    they are cutting is fairly soft. 20° is used for most western knifes.
    "Tomato sharp" but durable enough to last a decent amount of time.

    I use the Work Sharp WSKTS which provides a 20° guide bracket. I also
    use a steel before each use.

    The WSKTS has a guide for serrated knifes, but my only serrated knife
    is our bread knife which never seems to get dull. It is *only* used
    for bread.

    My experiences with steels have been that they don't do anything to help
    the edge. Maybe I'm using the steel wrong?

    Puckdropper

    The steel is to straighten the edge of the knife, two passes changing
    side to side is all it takes. Problem being is you can not see whether
    the knife needs it or not, unless you have a microscope.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Puckdropper@21:1/5 to teamarrows@eznet.net on Thu Mar 24 21:16:06 2022
    DerbyDad03 <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote in news:931a4de0-4943-48b4-9bdc-207625006565n@googlegroups.com:


    15° - 20° is the "standard" for chef's knifes, although 15° is at
    the very low end of durability.

    Japanese chef's tend to sharpen their knifes at 17° but most of what
    they are cutting is fairly soft. 20° is used for most western knifes. "Tomato sharp" but durable enough to last a decent amount of time.

    I use the Work Sharp WSKTS which provides a 20° guide bracket. I also
    use a steel before each use.

    The WSKTS has a guide for serrated knifes, but my only serrated knife
    is our bread knife which never seems to get dull. It is *only* used
    for bread.

    My experiences with steels have been that they don't do anything to help
    the edge. Maybe I'm using the steel wrong?

    Puckdropper

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DerbyDad03@21:1/5 to All on Thu Mar 24 15:35:22 2022
    On Thursday, March 24, 2022 at 5:23:52 PM UTC-4, Markem618 wrote:
    On Thu, 24 Mar 2022 21:16:06 GMT, Puckdropper <puckd...@yahoo.com>
    wrote:
    DerbyDad03 <teama...@eznet.net> wrote in >news:931a4de0-4943-48b4...@googlegroups.com:


    15° - 20° is the "standard" for chef's knifes, although 15° is at
    the very low end of durability.

    Japanese chef's tend to sharpen their knifes at 17° but most of what
    they are cutting is fairly soft. 20° is used for most western knifes.
    "Tomato sharp" but durable enough to last a decent amount of time.

    I use the Work Sharp WSKTS which provides a 20° guide bracket. I also
    use a steel before each use.

    The WSKTS has a guide for serrated knifes, but my only serrated knife
    is our bread knife which never seems to get dull. It is *only* used
    for bread.

    My experiences with steels have been that they don't do anything to help >the edge. Maybe I'm using the steel wrong?

    Puckdropper
    The steel is to straighten the edge of the knife, two passes changing
    side to side is all it takes. Problem being is you can not see whether
    the knife needs it or not, unless you have a microscope.

    True, but it doesn't hurt anything to use the steel, so I don't see that as a "problem". Like you said, a couple of quick passes and you're done.

    If you always assume that the blade is wavy, you'll always feel that you've done some useful work. ;-)

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DerbyDad03@21:1/5 to Puckdropper on Thu Mar 24 15:31:42 2022
    On Thursday, March 24, 2022 at 5:16:13 PM UTC-4, Puckdropper wrote:
    DerbyDad03 <teama...@eznet.net> wrote in news:931a4de0-4943-48b4...@googlegroups.com:

    15° - 20° is the "standard" for chef's knifes, although 15° is at
    the very low end of durability.

    Japanese chef's tend to sharpen their knifes at 17° but most of what
    they are cutting is fairly soft. 20° is used for most western knifes. "Tomato sharp" but durable enough to last a decent amount of time.

    I use the Work Sharp WSKTS which provides a 20° guide bracket. I also
    use a steel before each use.

    The WSKTS has a guide for serrated knifes, but my only serrated knife
    is our bread knife which never seems to get dull. It is *only* used
    for bread.
    My experiences with steels have been that they don't do anything to help
    the edge. Maybe I'm using the steel wrong?

    Puckdropper

    What Markem618 said.

    I once saw a demo where the guy use a piece of folded tin foil to represent the blade.
    The edge was all wavy, acting as a exaggeration of the very thin edge of the knife blade.
    He pinched his fingers together and ran them along the tin foil, straightening the edge
    out.

    That's what a steel does. It doesn't sharpen, just straightens.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to teamarrows@eznet.net on Thu Mar 24 21:39:38 2022
    On Thu, 24 Mar 2022 15:35:22 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Thursday, March 24, 2022 at 5:23:52 PM UTC-4, Markem618 wrote:
    On Thu, 24 Mar 2022 21:16:06 GMT, Puckdropper <puckd...@yahoo.com>
    wrote:
    DerbyDad03 <teama...@eznet.net> wrote in
    news:931a4de0-4943-48b4...@googlegroups.com:


    15 - 20 is the "standard" for chef's knifes, although 15 is at
    the very low end of durability.

    Japanese chef's tend to sharpen their knifes at 17 but most of what
    they are cutting is fairly soft. 20 is used for most western knifes.
    "Tomato sharp" but durable enough to last a decent amount of time.

    I use the Work Sharp WSKTS which provides a 20 guide bracket. I also
    use a steel before each use.

    The WSKTS has a guide for serrated knifes, but my only serrated knife
    is our bread knife which never seems to get dull. It is *only* used
    for bread.

    My experiences with steels have been that they don't do anything to help
    the edge. Maybe I'm using the steel wrong?

    Puckdropper
    The steel is to straighten the edge of the knife, two passes changing
    side to side is all it takes. Problem being is you can not see whether
    the knife needs it or not, unless you have a microscope.

    True, but it doesn't hurt anything to use the steel, so I don't see that as a >"problem". Like you said, a couple of quick passes and you're done.

    I thought the steel was to knock the burr off the edge.

    If you always assume that the blade is wavy, you'll always feel that you've >done some useful work. ;-)

    Or didn't do enough. ;-)

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From J. Clarke@21:1/5 to All on Fri Mar 25 12:09:38 2022
    On Thu, 24 Mar 2022 21:16:06 GMT, Puckdropper <puckdropper@yahoo.com>
    wrote:

    DerbyDad03 <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote in >news:931a4de0-4943-48b4-9bdc-207625006565n@googlegroups.com:


    15° - 20° is the "standard" for chef's knifes, although 15° is at
    the very low end of durability.

    Japanese chef's tend to sharpen their knifes at 17° but most of what
    they are cutting is fairly soft. 20° is used for most western knifes.
    "Tomato sharp" but durable enough to last a decent amount of time.

    I use the Work Sharp WSKTS which provides a 20° guide bracket. I also
    use a steel before each use.

    The WSKTS has a guide for serrated knifes, but my only serrated knife
    is our bread knife which never seems to get dull. It is *only* used
    for bread.

    My experiences with steels have been that they don't do anything to help
    the edge. Maybe I'm using the steel wrong?

    It depends on the knife. For carbon steel they perform a burnishing
    function that can maintain edge sharpness. For stainless steels not
    so much.

    I have a diamond steel which does maintain an edge on stainless. There
    are ceramic steels which do the same but are a bit fragile.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to jclarke.873638@gmail.com on Fri Mar 25 15:14:01 2022
    On Fri, 25 Mar 2022 12:09:38 -0400, J. Clarke
    <jclarke.873638@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Thu, 24 Mar 2022 21:16:06 GMT, Puckdropper <puckdropper@yahoo.com>
    wrote:

    DerbyDad03 <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote in >>news:931a4de0-4943-48b4-9bdc-207625006565n@googlegroups.com:


    15 - 20 is the "standard" for chef's knifes, although 15 is at
    the very low end of durability.

    Japanese chef's tend to sharpen their knifes at 17 but most of what
    they are cutting is fairly soft. 20 is used for most western knifes.
    "Tomato sharp" but durable enough to last a decent amount of time.

    I use the Work Sharp WSKTS which provides a 20 guide bracket. I also
    use a steel before each use.

    The WSKTS has a guide for serrated knifes, but my only serrated knife
    is our bread knife which never seems to get dull. It is *only* used
    for bread.

    My experiences with steels have been that they don't do anything to help >>the edge. Maybe I'm using the steel wrong?

    It depends on the knife. For carbon steel they perform a burnishing
    function that can maintain edge sharpness. For stainless steels not
    so much.

    I have a diamond steel which does maintain an edge on stainless. There
    are ceramic steels which do the same but are a bit fragile.

    The issue is hardness? I thought stainless was fairly soft, so
    doesn't hold an edge very well.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Leon@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Fri Mar 25 14:19:09 2022
    On 3/24/2022 4:12 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Thu, 24 Mar 2022 09:59:07 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 3/23/2022 9:26 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Wed, 23 Mar 2022 10:45:34 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 3/22/2022 1:14 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Tue, 22 Mar 2022 09:17:50 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Tuesday, March 22, 2022 at 11:49:17 AM UTC-4, Leon wrote:
    On 3/21/2022 3:51 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
    On Monday, March 21, 2022 at 3:05:53 PM UTC-4, Leon wrote:
    On 3/21/2022 1:17 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 21 Mar 2022 08:47:25 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> >>>>>>>>>> wrote:

    On 3/19/2022 10:46 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sat, 19 Mar 2022 19:41:45 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> >>>>>>>>>>>> wrote:

    On 3/19/2022 1:18 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sat, 19 Mar 2022 12:37:04 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> >>>>>>>>>>>>>> wrote:

    Apparently Festool has been busy designing with their SawStop >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> technology, and their Shaper Origin technology.


    Seems they have patents on a trackless track saw, that corrects for you.
    Hummmm.

    I'm not buying that one. How does the blade change course in the >>>>>>>>>>>>>> workpiece? I guess it could "see" the line before it enters the piece
    then pull the arm in that direction, X-Y and direction. Why? >>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    A jigsaw, I could understand.

    Same for the miter saw, correction and saw stop.

    Same issue.
    And umm a light on a drill that knows where the light needs to be
    pointed as the bit goes into the work.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fWrcj6GcUlE

    Towards the tip of the bit, obviously. ;-)



    In the beginning. but the tip moves away as it goes in. Apparently the
    light stays pointed at where the bit went in.

    Why? It's not going anywhere.

    Well having the patent on the method/technology can lead to other uses.
    A patent on the technology used is a" weird/it aint gonna happen way"
    does not necessarily point at the tool that it could be used on. They
    figured out a way to get something to point in a direction and track that.

    For instance, still considering a drill, if they can track where the
    drill is, in relation to the surface, they could put in a laser in >>>>>>>>>>> instead of a regular light to track how far the bit has entered below
    the surface. Like setting a depth stop in a DP. The drill could stop
    spinning once the bit had gone a certain depth. Just a thought. >>>>>>>>>>
    Sounds like a damn expensive stop collar or rod.
    Well in tight spots..... One can use a template with a router or get >>>>>>>>> an Origin. ;~)

    Not for everybody.

    FWIW Technatool has an electronic direct drive drill press. It can be >>>>>>>>> programed to turn off when a certain depth has been reached. Along side
    the manual stop set up fount on most all drill presses.

    https://www.teknatool.com/products/drill-presses/nova-voyager-dvr-drill-press/

    Not for everybody.

    Not something you see very often on a page for a "basic" shop tool: >>>>>>>>
    "Click here for Firmware Upgrade"

    Eventually it will be the norm, considering 3D printers, CNC routers, etc. Smart
    technology in a drill press. Who woulda thunk it? ;-)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9iwsnkvfhI4

    Can't waif for the day that you take a dull tool, toss it in a box for 5
    minutes, and it comes out sharp and true!

    This closest I've seen is the kitchen knife block that my daughter has. >>>>>>
    Apparently/supposedly each time you remove and replace a knife into it's >>>>>> assigned slot, it gets a quick tune-up. There is definitely something in the
    slots because you can hear the metallic "sharpening sound" as you slide it in.

    No electronics, no firmware, just "mechanical".

    Am I gullible enough to believe that all slots are set at the perfect angle, etc.?
    Not really, but she's happy with it and I'm not going to take that away from her.

    Is there a perfect angle for a kitchen knife? How does it handle
    serrated knives. Those are the problems. It's hard to find anyone to >>>>> sharpen good knives.

    IIRC 20~25 degrees. One is for kitchen knives and the other for a
    pocket knife. I keep having to check my chart when sharpening.

    So the WorkSharp system works very well for my son and his wife. I have >>>> the upper end Ken Onion Work Sharp system that does more and I am
    finally happy and satisfied after many styles of knife sharpeners. If >>>> you remember Nailshooter from here he is a knife collector and has one >>>> for his regular knives IIRC. He saw mine, was impressed, and bought one >>>> to charge clients to sharpen their knives.

    I'll have to look into it further. SWMBO was spending big bucks to
    have her knives sent out for sharpening by one of the high-price
    stores (initials WS). Who they sent them to, IDK, but they'll no
    longer take serrated knives. She has expensive Japanese knives (make
    Lie Nielson chisels look cheap) so it's worth keeping them up.



    IIRC serrated knives are only sharpened from the back side. Do check
    into that. But I have to say, we have a very inexpensive set of
    Tromentina serrated steak knives that we bought in Jan 2006. We throw
    them in the dishwasher and they have never been resharpened.
    These seem to cut as well as out 3 year old seldom used Japanese steak
    knives.
    By design the serrated knives stay sharp for a very long time.

    I looked at the knives. Most are normal with the bevel on the
    serrated side. I watched the WS demos and it's apparent from looking
    at the knives and the instructions that the back of the knife just has
    to be flattened. There isn't much bevel so it looks like it would
    take a light touch.

    Do they stay "sharp" because they're really saws? Obviously, the fine
    knives are made from a good steel so that helps.

    Sharp enough that we have not tossed them and bought another set, IIRC
    we paid $10-$15. Mostly what dulls are the points against hard plate.
    The rounded Protected edge stays sharp for a very long time.




    After looking at the YouTube videos on the WS system, I may get one.
    For $150, it wouldn't take too many knives to break even.


    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DerbyDad03@21:1/5 to k...@notreal.com on Fri Mar 25 13:05:05 2022
    On Thursday, March 24, 2022 at 9:39:42 PM UTC-4, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Thu, 24 Mar 2022 15:35:22 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03
    <teama...@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Thursday, March 24, 2022 at 5:23:52 PM UTC-4, Markem618 wrote:
    On Thu, 24 Mar 2022 21:16:06 GMT, Puckdropper <puckd...@yahoo.com>
    wrote:
    DerbyDad03 <teama...@eznet.net> wrote in
    news:931a4de0-4943-48b4...@googlegroups.com:


    15° - 20° is the "standard" for chef's knifes, although 15° is at >> >> the very low end of durability.

    Japanese chef's tend to sharpen their knifes at 17° but most of what >> >> they are cutting is fairly soft. 20° is used for most western knifes. >> >> "Tomato sharp" but durable enough to last a decent amount of time.

    I use the Work Sharp WSKTS which provides a 20° guide bracket. I also >> >> use a steel before each use.

    The WSKTS has a guide for serrated knifes, but my only serrated knife >> >> is our bread knife which never seems to get dull. It is *only* used
    for bread.

    My experiences with steels have been that they don't do anything to help >> >the edge. Maybe I'm using the steel wrong?

    Puckdropper
    The steel is to straighten the edge of the knife, two passes changing
    side to side is all it takes. Problem being is you can not see whether
    the knife needs it or not, unless you have a microscope.

    True, but it doesn't hurt anything to use the steel, so I don't see that as a
    "problem". Like you said, a couple of quick passes and you're done.
    I thought the steel was to knock the burr off the edge.

    Where did the burr come from between uses?

    See my response to J. Clarke about different types of steels. (honing
    vs. sharpening)

    If you always assume that the blade is wavy, you'll always feel that you've >done some useful work. ;-)
    Or didn't do enough. ;-)

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DerbyDad03@21:1/5 to J. Clarke on Fri Mar 25 13:05:38 2022
    On Friday, March 25, 2022 at 12:09:42 PM UTC-4, J. Clarke wrote:
    On Thu, 24 Mar 2022 21:16:06 GMT, Puckdropper <puckd...@yahoo.com>
    wrote:
    DerbyDad03 <teama...@eznet.net> wrote in >news:931a4de0-4943-48b4...@googlegroups.com:


    15° - 20° is the "standard" for chef's knifes, although 15° is at
    the very low end of durability.

    Japanese chef's tend to sharpen their knifes at 17° but most of what
    they are cutting is fairly soft. 20° is used for most western knifes.
    "Tomato sharp" but durable enough to last a decent amount of time.

    I use the Work Sharp WSKTS which provides a 20° guide bracket. I also
    use a steel before each use.

    The WSKTS has a guide for serrated knifes, but my only serrated knife
    is our bread knife which never seems to get dull. It is *only* used
    for bread.

    My experiences with steels have been that they don't do anything to help >the edge. Maybe I'm using the steel wrong?
    It depends on the knife. For carbon steel they perform a burnishing
    function that can maintain edge sharpness. For stainless steels not
    so much.

    I have a diamond steel which does maintain an edge on stainless. There
    are ceramic steels which do the same but are a bit fragile.

    It depends on what type of steel you are using. There are sharpening steels and honing steels.

    Honing steels are made from steel that and have no sharpening function. Their job is to take the
    "curve" or "wave" out of the very edge of an already sharp blade. They remove very little (if any)
    material from the blade, so they don't actually sharpen it.

    Sharpening steels are ceramic or have a diamond coating and therefore actually sharpen the
    blade.

    https://www.knivesandtools.com/en/ct/difference-honing-steel-sharpening-steel.htm

    I choose to use a dedicated sharpening machine (the WorkSharp WSKTS) and a honing
    steel before each use.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to teamarrows@eznet.net on Fri Mar 25 23:04:46 2022
    On Fri, 25 Mar 2022 13:05:05 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Thursday, March 24, 2022 at 9:39:42 PM UTC-4, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Thu, 24 Mar 2022 15:35:22 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03
    <teama...@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Thursday, March 24, 2022 at 5:23:52 PM UTC-4, Markem618 wrote:
    On Thu, 24 Mar 2022 21:16:06 GMT, Puckdropper <puckd...@yahoo.com>
    wrote:
    DerbyDad03 <teama...@eznet.net> wrote in
    news:931a4de0-4943-48b4...@googlegroups.com:


    15 - 20 is the "standard" for chef's knifes, although 15 is at
    the very low end of durability.

    Japanese chef's tend to sharpen their knifes at 17 but most of what >> >> >> they are cutting is fairly soft. 20 is used for most western knifes. >> >> >> "Tomato sharp" but durable enough to last a decent amount of time.

    I use the Work Sharp WSKTS which provides a 20 guide bracket. I also >> >> >> use a steel before each use.

    The WSKTS has a guide for serrated knifes, but my only serrated knife >> >> >> is our bread knife which never seems to get dull. It is *only* used
    for bread.

    My experiences with steels have been that they don't do anything to help >> >> >the edge. Maybe I'm using the steel wrong?

    Puckdropper
    The steel is to straighten the edge of the knife, two passes changing
    side to side is all it takes. Problem being is you can not see whether
    the knife needs it or not, unless you have a microscope.

    True, but it doesn't hurt anything to use the steel, so I don't see that as a
    "problem". Like you said, a couple of quick passes and you're done.
    I thought the steel was to knock the burr off the edge.

    Where did the burr come from between uses?

    I understood that it came from (microscopic) rolling the edge over
    during use.

    See my response to J. Clarke about different types of steels. (honing
    vs. sharpening)



    If you always assume that the blade is wavy, you'll always feel that you've >> >done some useful work. ;-)
    Or didn't do enough. ;-)

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DerbyDad03@21:1/5 to k...@notreal.com on Fri Mar 25 20:39:13 2022
    On Friday, March 25, 2022 at 11:04:54 PM UTC-4, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Fri, 25 Mar 2022 13:05:05 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03
    <teama...@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Thursday, March 24, 2022 at 9:39:42 PM UTC-4, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Thu, 24 Mar 2022 15:35:22 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03
    <teama...@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Thursday, March 24, 2022 at 5:23:52 PM UTC-4, Markem618 wrote:
    On Thu, 24 Mar 2022 21:16:06 GMT, Puckdropper <puckd...@yahoo.com>
    wrote:
    DerbyDad03 <teama...@eznet.net> wrote in
    news:931a4de0-4943-48b4...@googlegroups.com:


    15° - 20° is the "standard" for chef's knifes, although 15° is at
    the very low end of durability.

    Japanese chef's tend to sharpen their knifes at 17° but most of what
    they are cutting is fairly soft. 20° is used for most western knifes.
    "Tomato sharp" but durable enough to last a decent amount of time. >> >> >>
    I use the Work Sharp WSKTS which provides a 20° guide bracket. I also
    use a steel before each use.

    The WSKTS has a guide for serrated knifes, but my only serrated knife
    is our bread knife which never seems to get dull. It is *only* used >> >> >> for bread.

    My experiences with steels have been that they don't do anything to help
    the edge. Maybe I'm using the steel wrong?

    Puckdropper
    The steel is to straighten the edge of the knife, two passes changing >> >> side to side is all it takes. Problem being is you can not see whether >> >> the knife needs it or not, unless you have a microscope.

    True, but it doesn't hurt anything to use the steel, so I don't see that as a
    "problem". Like you said, a couple of quick passes and you're done.
    I thought the steel was to knock the burr off the edge.

    Where did the burr come from between uses?
    I understood that it came from (microscopic) rolling the edge over
    during use.

    A burr is formed while sharpening and raising the burr is an important part
    of the sharpening process. The curve or wave that you get while using the
    knife is something completely different.

    https://www.google.com/search?q=burr+on+blade


    See my response to J. Clarke about different types of steels. (honing
    vs. sharpening)



    If you always assume that the blade is wavy, you'll always feel that you've
    done some useful work. ;-)
    Or didn't do enough. ;-)

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DaveInSoTex@21:1/5 to Leon on Sat Mar 26 08:06:24 2022
    On 3/23/2022 10:45 AM, Leon wrote:
    On 3/22/2022 1:14 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Tue, 22 Mar 2022 09:17:50 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Tuesday, March 22, 2022 at 11:49:17 AM UTC-4, Leon wrote:
    On 3/21/2022 3:51 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
    On Monday, March 21, 2022 at 3:05:53 PM UTC-4, Leon wrote:
    On 3/21/2022 1:17 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 21 Mar 2022 08:47:25 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> >>>>>>> wrote:

    On 3/19/2022 10:46 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sat, 19 Mar 2022 19:41:45 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> >>>>>>>>> wrote:

    On 3/19/2022 1:18 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sat, 19 Mar 2022 12:37:04 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> >>>>>>>>>>> wrote:

    Apparently Festool has been busy designing with their SawStop >>>>>>>>>>>> technology, and their Shaper Origin technology.


    Seems they have patents on a trackless track saw, that >>>>>>>>>>>> corrects for you.
    Hummmm.

    I'm not buying that one. How does the blade change course in the >>>>>>>>>>> workpiece? I guess it could "see" the line before it enters >>>>>>>>>>> the piece
    then pull the arm in that direction, X-Y and direction. Why? >>>>>>>>>>>
    A jigsaw, I could understand.

    Same for the miter saw, correction and saw stop.

    Same issue.
    And umm a light on a drill that knows where the light needs >>>>>>>>>>>> to be
    pointed as the bit goes into the work.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fWrcj6GcUlE

    Towards the tip of the bit, obviously. ;-)



    In the beginning. but the tip moves away as it goes in.
    Apparently the
    light stays pointed at where the bit went in.

    Why? It's not going anywhere.

    Well having the patent on the method/technology can lead to
    other uses.
    A patent on the technology used is a" weird/it aint gonna happen >>>>>>>> way"
    does not necessarily point at the tool that it could be used on. >>>>>>>> They
    figured out a way to get something to point in a direction and >>>>>>>> track that.

    For instance, still considering a drill, if they can track where >>>>>>>> the
    drill is, in relation to the surface, they could put in a laser in >>>>>>>> instead of a regular light to track how far the bit has entered >>>>>>>> below
    the surface. Like setting a depth stop in a DP. The drill could >>>>>>>> stop
    spinning once the bit had gone a certain depth. Just a thought. >>>>>>>
    Sounds like a damn expensive stop collar or rod.
    Well in tight spots..... One can use a template with a router or get >>>>>> an Origin. ;~)

    Not for everybody.

    FWIW Technatool has an electronic direct drive drill press. It can be >>>>>> programed to turn off when a certain depth has been reached. Along >>>>>> side
    the manual stop set up fount on most all drill presses.

    https://www.teknatool.com/products/drill-presses/nova-voyager-dvr-drill-press/


    Not for everybody.

    Not something you see very often on a page for a "basic" shop tool:

    "Click here for Firmware Upgrade"

    Eventually it will be the norm, considering 3D printers, CNC
    routers, etc. Smart
    technology in a drill press. Who woulda thunk it? ;-)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9iwsnkvfhI4

    Can't waif for the day that you take a dull tool, toss it in a box
    for 5
    minutes, and it comes out sharp and true!

    This closest I've seen is the kitchen knife block that my daughter has.

    Apparently/supposedly each time you remove and replace a knife into it's >>> assigned slot, it gets a quick tune-up. There is definitely something
    in the
    slots because you can hear the metallic "sharpening sound" as you
    slide it in.

    No electronics, no firmware, just "mechanical".

    Am I gullible enough to believe that all slots are set at the perfect
    angle, etc.?
    Not really, but she's happy with it and I'm not going to take that
    away from her.

    Is there a perfect angle for a kitchen knife? How does it handle
    serrated knives.  Those are the problems.  It's hard to find anyone to
    sharpen good knives.

    IIRC 20~25 degrees.  One is for kitchen knives and the other for a
    pocket knife.  I keep having to check my chart when sharpening.

    So the WorkSharp system works very well for my son and his wife.  I have
    the upper end Ken Onion Work Sharp system that does more and I am
    finally happy and satisfied  after many styles of knife sharpeners.  If
    you remember Nailshooter from here he is a knife collector and has one
    for his regular knives I IRC. He saw mine, was impressed, and bought one
    to charge clients to sharpen their knives.


    I've used a Spyderco set of ceramic sticks
    for several decades with good results for several decades and inherited
    both my late father's and late father-in-law's sets which I had given
    each of them as Christmas presents long ago.
    One of those sets stays with my hunting knives and the other lives
    at a small cabin in Colorado.
    Our Faberware set of kitchen cutlery gets touched up every three
    or four months and the sticks keep a pretty fair edge on a couple of 50
    year old wooden handled Chicago Cutlery knives; the hunting knives at
    the beginning of deer season and before every deer for those years when
    there are more than one.

    FWIW
    --
    Dave in SoTex

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Scott Lurndal@21:1/5 to DaveInSoTex on Sat Mar 26 14:41:25 2022
    DaveInSoTex <DJMCB@att.net> writes:
    On 3/23/2022 10:45 AM, Leon wrote:
    On 3/22/2022 1:14 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Tue, 22 Mar 2022 09:17:50 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Tuesday, March 22, 2022 at 11:49:17 AM UTC-4, Leon wrote:
    On 3/21/2022 3:51 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
    On Monday, March 21, 2022 at 3:05:53 PM UTC-4, Leon wrote:
    On 3/21/2022 1:17 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 21 Mar 2022 08:47:25 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> >>>>>>>> wrote:

    On 3/19/2022 10:46 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sat, 19 Mar 2022 19:41:45 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> >>>>>>>>>> wrote:

    On 3/19/2022 1:18 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sat, 19 Mar 2022 12:37:04 -0500, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> >>>>>>>>>>>> wrote:

    Apparently Festool has been busy designing with their SawStop >>>>>>>>>>>>> technology, and their Shaper Origin technology.


    Seems they have patents on a trackless track saw, that >>>>>>>>>>>>> corrects for you.
    Hummmm.

    I'm not buying that one. How does the blade change course in the >>>>>>>>>>>> workpiece? I guess it could "see" the line before it enters >>>>>>>>>>>> the piece
    then pull the arm in that direction, X-Y and direction. Why? >>>>>>>>>>>>
    A jigsaw, I could understand.

    Same for the miter saw, correction and saw stop.

    Same issue.
    And umm a light on a drill that knows where the light needs >>>>>>>>>>>>> to be
    pointed as the bit goes into the work.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fWrcj6GcUlE

    Towards the tip of the bit, obviously. ;-)



    In the beginning. but the tip moves away as it goes in.
    Apparently the
    light stays pointed at where the bit went in.

    Why? It's not going anywhere.

    Well having the patent on the method/technology can lead to
    other uses.
    A patent on the technology used is a" weird/it aint gonna happen >>>>>>>>> way"
    does not necessarily point at the tool that it could be used on. >>>>>>>>> They
    figured out a way to get something to point in a direction and >>>>>>>>> track that.

    For instance, still considering a drill, if they can track where >>>>>>>>> the
    drill is, in relation to the surface, they could put in a laser in >>>>>>>>> instead of a regular light to track how far the bit has entered >>>>>>>>> below
    the surface. Like setting a depth stop in a DP. The drill could >>>>>>>>> stop
    spinning once the bit had gone a certain depth. Just a thought. >>>>>>>>
    Sounds like a damn expensive stop collar or rod.
    Well in tight spots..... One can use a template with a router or get >>>>>>> an Origin. ;~)

    Not for everybody.

    FWIW Technatool has an electronic direct drive drill press. It can be >>>>>>> programed to turn off when a certain depth has been reached. Along >>>>>>> side
    the manual stop set up fount on most all drill presses.

    https://www.teknatool.com/products/drill-presses/nova-voyager-dvr-drill-press/


    Not for everybody.

    Not something you see very often on a page for a "basic" shop tool: >>>>>>
    "Click here for Firmware Upgrade"

    Eventually it will be the norm, considering 3D printers, CNC
    routers, etc. Smart
    technology in a drill press. Who woulda thunk it? ;-)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9iwsnkvfhI4

    Can't waif for the day that you take a dull tool, toss it in a box
    for 5
    minutes, and it comes out sharp and true!

    This closest I've seen is the kitchen knife block that my daughter has. >>>>
    Apparently/supposedly each time you remove and replace a knife into it's >>>> assigned slot, it gets a quick tune-up. There is definitely something
    in the
    slots because you can hear the metallic "sharpening sound" as you
    slide it in.

    No electronics, no firmware, just "mechanical".

    Am I gullible enough to believe that all slots are set at the perfect
    angle, etc.?
    Not really, but she's happy with it and I'm not going to take that
    away from her.

    Is there a perfect angle for a kitchen knife? How does it handle
    serrated knives.  Those are the problems.  It's hard to find anyone to >>> sharpen good knives.

    IIRC 20~25 degrees.  One is for kitchen knives and the other for a
    pocket knife.  I keep having to check my chart when sharpening.

    So the WorkSharp system works very well for my son and his wife.  I have
    the upper end Ken Onion Work Sharp system that does more and I am
    finally happy and satisfied  after many styles of knife sharpeners.  If
    you remember Nailshooter from here he is a knife collector and has one
    for his regular knives I IRC. He saw mine, was impressed, and bought one
    to charge clients to sharpen their knives.


    I've used a Spyderco set of ceramic sticks
    for several decades with good results for several decades and inherited
    both my late father's and late father-in-law's sets which I had given
    each of them as Christmas presents long ago.
    One of those sets stays with my hunting knives and the other lives
    at a small cabin in Colorado.
    Our Faberware set of kitchen cutlery gets touched up every three
    or four months and the sticks keep a pretty fair edge on a couple of 50
    year old wooden handled Chicago Cutlery knives; the hunting knives at
    the beginning of deer season and before every deer for those years when
    there are more than one.

    I just buy a new paring knife annually. The ceramic ones
    at harbor freight are on clearance now for under $5 each. :-)

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Leon@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Sat Mar 26 16:38:16 2022
    On 3/25/2022 10:04 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Fri, 25 Mar 2022 13:05:05 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Thursday, March 24, 2022 at 9:39:42 PM UTC-4, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Thu, 24 Mar 2022 15:35:22 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03
    <teama...@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Thursday, March 24, 2022 at 5:23:52 PM UTC-4, Markem618 wrote:
    On Thu, 24 Mar 2022 21:16:06 GMT, Puckdropper <puckd...@yahoo.com>
    wrote:
    DerbyDad03 <teama...@eznet.net> wrote in
    news:931a4de0-4943-48b4...@googlegroups.com:


    15° - 20° is the "standard" for chef's knifes, although 15° is at >>>>>>> the very low end of durability.

    Japanese chef's tend to sharpen their knifes at 17° but most of what >>>>>>> they are cutting is fairly soft. 20° is used for most western knifes. >>>>>>> "Tomato sharp" but durable enough to last a decent amount of time. >>>>>>>
    I use the Work Sharp WSKTS which provides a 20° guide bracket. I also >>>>>>> use a steel before each use.

    The WSKTS has a guide for serrated knifes, but my only serrated knife >>>>>>> is our bread knife which never seems to get dull. It is *only* used >>>>>>> for bread.

    My experiences with steels have been that they don't do anything to help >>>>>> the edge. Maybe I'm using the steel wrong?

    Puckdropper
    The steel is to straighten the edge of the knife, two passes changing >>>>> side to side is all it takes. Problem being is you can not see whether >>>>> the knife needs it or not, unless you have a microscope.

    True, but it doesn't hurt anything to use the steel, so I don't see that as a
    "problem". Like you said, a couple of quick passes and you're done.
    I thought the steel was to knock the burr off the edge.

    Where did the burr come from between uses?

    I understood that it came from (microscopic) rolling the edge over
    during use.

    See my response to J. Clarke about different types of steels. (honing
    vs. sharpening)



    If you always assume that the blade is wavy, you'll always feel that you've
    done some useful work. ;-)
    Or didn't do enough. ;-)



    You might be confusing the burr when sharpening a scraper to one that is created during the sharpening of a knife.

    When sharpening a scraper you actually want to create a burr.

    Typically you also get a burr when sharpening a knife and that is
    normally removed by simply cutting directly and lightly in to a piece of
    wood.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DerbyDad03@21:1/5 to Leon on Sun Mar 27 06:04:10 2022
    On Saturday, March 26, 2022 at 5:38:25 PM UTC-4, Leon wrote:
    On 3/25/2022 10:04 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Fri, 25 Mar 2022 13:05:05 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03
    <teama...@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Thursday, March 24, 2022 at 9:39:42 PM UTC-4, k...@notreal.com wrote: >>> On Thu, 24 Mar 2022 15:35:22 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03
    <teama...@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Thursday, March 24, 2022 at 5:23:52 PM UTC-4, Markem618 wrote:
    On Thu, 24 Mar 2022 21:16:06 GMT, Puckdropper <puckd...@yahoo.com> >>>>> wrote:
    DerbyDad03 <teama...@eznet.net> wrote in
    news:931a4de0-4943-48b4...@googlegroups.com:


    15° - 20° is the "standard" for chef's knifes, although 15° is at >>>>>>> the very low end of durability.

    Japanese chef's tend to sharpen their knifes at 17° but most of what
    they are cutting is fairly soft. 20° is used for most western knifes.
    "Tomato sharp" but durable enough to last a decent amount of time. >>>>>>>
    I use the Work Sharp WSKTS which provides a 20° guide bracket. I also
    use a steel before each use.

    The WSKTS has a guide for serrated knifes, but my only serrated knife
    is our bread knife which never seems to get dull. It is *only* used >>>>>>> for bread.

    My experiences with steels have been that they don't do anything to help
    the edge. Maybe I'm using the steel wrong?

    Puckdropper
    The steel is to straighten the edge of the knife, two passes changing >>>>> side to side is all it takes. Problem being is you can not see whether >>>>> the knife needs it or not, unless you have a microscope.

    True, but it doesn't hurt anything to use the steel, so I don't see that as a
    "problem". Like you said, a couple of quick passes and you're done.
    I thought the steel was to knock the burr off the edge.

    Where did the burr come from between uses?

    I understood that it came from (microscopic) rolling the edge over
    during use.

    See my response to J. Clarke about different types of steels. (honing
    vs. sharpening)



    If you always assume that the blade is wavy, you'll always feel that you've
    done some useful work. ;-)
    Or didn't do enough. ;-)
    You might be confusing the burr when sharpening a scraper to one that is created during the sharpening of a knife.

    When sharpening a scraper you actually want to create a burr.

    It's the same when sharpening a knife. Both of the following quotes
    are from:

    https://lansky.com/blog/burr-what-it-and-why-its-important/

    "Raising a burr is an essential part of any sharpening ritual."


    Typically you also get a burr when sharpening a knife and that is
    normally removed by simply cutting directly and lightly in to a piece of wood.

    "Once you have formed a burr on each side using your coarsest stone
    then you can progress to using finer and finer stones to polish and
    reform the burr until you end up with super tiny burr that often can’t
    even be felt. This final burr (which is often a wire edge) can be polished
    off with a high grit stone or a leather strop."

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)