• what kind of glue metal to wood

    From Bob Davis@21:1/5 to All on Thu Jan 20 05:45:00 2022
    I need to glue pieces of a bandsaw blade into thin slots in mahogany. The teeth of the blade will be exposed to grip an artist's paint canvas. What kind of glue do you think would be best?

    Bob

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  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to wrobertdavis@gmail.com on Thu Jan 20 10:34:25 2022
    On Thu, 20 Jan 2022 05:45:00 -0800 (PST), Bob Davis
    <wrobertdavis@gmail.com> wrote:

    I need to glue pieces of a bandsaw blade into thin slots in mahogany. The teeth of the blade will be exposed to grip an artist's paint canvas. What kind of glue do you think would be best?

    Bob

    Is this a frame? If so, it sounds like the force will be lateral (to
    the blade). If so, glue may not be needed at all, or be just adding
    suspenders. The more important issue may be splitting the wood. If the
    force is longitudinal the job might be a little tougher but there is a
    lot more area to work with.

    I'd try both Epoxy and CA on a sample. If you can get the blade
    tight(ish) in the slot, CA might be better. Rough up the part of the
    blade that goes into the slot with coarse sandpaper, first.

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  • From Bill@21:1/5 to Bob Davis on Thu Jan 20 11:56:02 2022
    On 1/20/2022 8:45 AM, Bob Davis wrote:
    I need to glue pieces of a bandsaw blade into thin slots in mahogany. The teeth of the blade will be exposed to grip an artist's paint canvas. What kind of glue do you think would be best?

    Bob


    Looks like they have contact info at the site below (they appear to have
    a broad range of products).

    https://www.jbweld.com/products?surface=217416

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  • From J. Clarke@21:1/5 to wrobertdavis@gmail.com on Thu Jan 20 12:01:04 2022
    On Thu, 20 Jan 2022 05:45:00 -0800 (PST), Bob Davis
    <wrobertdavis@gmail.com> wrote:

    I need to glue pieces of a bandsaw blade into thin slots in mahogany. The teeth of the blade will be exposed to grip an artist's paint canvas. What kind of glue do you think would be best?

    While the conventional answer is "epoxy", try dripping some Titebond
    III onto a piece of your bandsaw blade and letting it dry. Make sure
    the blade is clean and oil-free first. If it sticks to your blade
    like it sticks to my clamps I think you'll find it quite sufficient.

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  • From Leon@21:1/5 to J. Clarke on Thu Jan 20 11:46:42 2022
    On 1/20/2022 11:01 AM, J. Clarke wrote:
    On Thu, 20 Jan 2022 05:45:00 -0800 (PST), Bob Davis
    <wrobertdavis@gmail.com> wrote:

    I need to glue pieces of a bandsaw blade into thin slots in mahogany. The teeth of the blade will be exposed to grip an artist's paint canvas. What kind of glue do you think would be best?

    While the conventional answer is "epoxy", try dripping some Titebond
    III onto a piece of your bandsaw blade and letting it dry. Make sure
    the blade is clean and oil-free first. If it sticks to your blade
    like it sticks to my clamps I think you'll find it quite sufficient.

    TB III and most any wood glue will stick to most anything, for a while
    and if non-stressed,

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  • From Joe Gwinn@21:1/5 to wrobertdavis@gmail.com on Thu Jan 20 14:45:29 2022
    On Thu, 20 Jan 2022 05:45:00 -0800 (PST), Bob Davis
    <wrobertdavis@gmail.com> wrote:

    I need to glue pieces of a bandsaw blade into thin slots in mahogany. The teeth of the blade will be exposed to grip an artist's paint canvas. What kind of glue do you think would be best?

    Wood and steel have very different coefficients of expansion in
    response to variations of temperature and of humidity. No rigid glue
    will long hold. You'll need some rivets, like the handles on knives.
    And that's where I'd look - there are lots of suppliers of
    knife-making raw materials.

    Joe Gwinn

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  • From DerbyDad03@21:1/5 to Joe Gwinn on Thu Jan 20 11:53:46 2022
    On Thursday, January 20, 2022 at 2:45:37 PM UTC-5, Joe Gwinn wrote:
    On Thu, 20 Jan 2022 05:45:00 -0800 (PST), Bob Davis
    <wrober...@gmail.com> wrote:
    I need to glue pieces of a bandsaw blade into thin slots in mahogany. The teeth of the blade will be exposed to grip an artist's paint canvas. What kind of glue do you think would be best?
    Wood and steel have very different coefficients of expansion in
    response to variations of temperature and of humidity. No rigid glue
    will long hold. You'll need some rivets, like the handles on knives.
    And that's where I'd look - there are lots of suppliers of
    knife-making raw materials.

    Joe Gwinn

    ...or perhaps a somewhat flexible adhesive such as West System G/flex epoxy which specifically mentions "dissimilar materials".

    https://www.westsystem.com/specialty-epoxies/gflex-650-toughened-epoxy/

    "G/flex 650 is a toughened, versatile, liquid epoxy for permanent waterproof bonding of fiberglass, ceramics, metals, plastics, damp and difficult-to-bond woods. With a modulus of elasticity of 150,000 PSI, it is a bit more flexible than standard epoxies and polyester, but much stiffer than adhesive sealants. This gives it the ability to make structural bonds that can absorb the stress of expansion, contraction, shock, and vibration. It is ideal for bonding dissimilar
    materials."

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  • From John Grossbohlin@21:1/5 to All on Thu Jan 20 22:27:47 2022
    "Bob Davis" wrote in message news:76e52cbd-20bc-4e19-ba20-89fcbbf2628cn@googlegroups.com...

    I need to glue pieces of a bandsaw blade into thin slots in mahogany. The >teeth of the blade will be exposed to grip an artist's paint >canvas. What >kind of glue do you think would be best?

    How big is this to be? How much pressure will be on it? How thick is the mahogany? I'm trying to understand the demands on the joint...

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  • From Bob Davis@21:1/5 to John Grossbohlin on Fri Jan 21 11:11:54 2022
    On Thursday, January 20, 2022 at 9:27:58 PM UTC-6, John Grossbohlin wrote:
    "Bob Davis" wrote in message
    news:76e52cbd-20bc-4e19...@googlegroups.com...
    I need to glue pieces of a bandsaw blade into thin slots in mahogany. The >teeth of the blade will be exposed to grip an artist's paint >canvas. What >kind of glue do you think would be best?
    How big is this to be? How much pressure will be on it? How thick is the mahogany? I'm trying to understand the demands on the joint...

    I understand your valid questions. The metal is a 1/2" wide 12 tooth per inch bandsaw blade. Pieces of the blade, approximately 1 1/2 inches long are embedded about 1/4 inch deep cross-grain into 3/4" thick mahogany. There are two pieces of mahogany
    with bandsaw blades embedded about every 10-12 inches. These create a bottom and top parts of a clamp to secure the painting canvas. The clamping force total is only a few PSI, so its not a heavy duty application. the glue is just to keep the bandsaw
    blades from falling out overtime. Here are some photographs of a similar application on another artist's easel. I get the feeling that any glue which will adhere to metal and wood will work just fine.

    https://www.icloud.com/sharedalbum/#B0gGDZLe8GSuWIY

    Bob

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  • From whit3rd@21:1/5 to wrober...@gmail.com on Fri Jan 21 19:47:40 2022
    On Friday, January 21, 2022 at 11:11:56 AM UTC-8, wrober...@gmail.com wrote:
    I need to glue pieces of a bandsaw blade into thin slots in mahogany.

    I understand your valid questions. The metal is a 1/2" wide 12 tooth per inch bandsaw blade. Pieces of the blade, approximately 1 1/2 inches long are embedded about 1/4 inch deep cross-grain...

    For short lengths, wood expansion ought not to be a big problem; I'd poke some polyurethane
    (Gorilla Glue of the classic type) into the slot, wipe glue on the steel blade, then mist with water
    to start the cure, and insert the blade. The foam-up will fill voids, and it doesn't soak
    into the endgrain of the wood like a water-based adhesive might. Even just some
    plaster of paris would probably work.

    The thin kerf that you'd want to insert the blade into, won't allow a thick glue to flow well,
    and most water-based types are suboptimal in contact with water-thirsty endgrain.
    Mahogany is somewhat resinous, test the glue on scraps to be sure; sometimes resin interferes
    with paint or glue chemistry

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  • From Bill@21:1/5 to All on Sat Jan 22 03:28:22 2022
    On 1/21/2022 10:47 PM, whit3rd wrote:
    On Friday, January 21, 2022 at 11:11:56 AM UTC-8, wrober...@gmail.com wrote:
    I need to glue pieces of a bandsaw blade into thin slots in mahogany.

    I understand your valid questions. The metal is a 1/2" wide 12 tooth per inch bandsaw blade. Pieces of the blade, approximately 1 1/2 inches long are embedded about 1/4 inch deep cross-grain...

    For short lengths, wood expansion ought not to be a big problem; I'd poke some polyurethane
    (Gorilla Glue of the classic type) into the slot, wipe glue on the steel blade, then mist with water
    to start the cure, and insert the blade. The foam-up will fill voids, and it doesn't soak
    into the endgrain of the wood like a water-based adhesive might. Even just some
    plaster of paris would probably work.

    The thin kerf that you'd want to insert the blade into, won't allow a thick glue to flow well,
    and most water-based types are suboptimal in contact with water-thirsty endgrain.
    Mahogany is somewhat resinous, test the glue on scraps to be sure; sometimes resin interferes
    with paint or glue chemistry




    It occurred to me that small wedges (splines?) might work well. One
    could even cut the metal to somehow accept the spline. Glue the wood
    splines in place and it should last forever. If there is not enough
    wood present, add more! ; )

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  • From Bill@21:1/5 to Bill on Sat Jan 22 03:38:31 2022
    On 1/22/2022 3:28 AM, Bill wrote:
    On 1/21/2022 10:47 PM, whit3rd wrote:
    On Friday, January 21, 2022 at 11:11:56 AM UTC-8, wrober...@gmail.com
    wrote:
    I need to glue pieces of a bandsaw blade into thin slots in mahogany.

    I understand your valid questions. The metal is a 1/2" wide 12 tooth
    per inch bandsaw blade. Pieces of the blade, approximately 1 1/2
    inches long are embedded about 1/4 inch deep cross-grain...

    For short lengths, wood expansion ought not to be a big problem; I'd
    poke some polyurethane
    (Gorilla Glue of the classic type) into the slot, wipe glue on the
    steel blade, then mist with water
    to start the cure, and insert the blade.   The foam-up will fill
    voids, and it doesn't soak
    into the endgrain of the wood like a water-based adhesive might.
    Even just some
    plaster of paris would probably work.

    The thin kerf that you'd want to insert the blade into, won't allow a
    thick glue to flow well,
    and most water-based types are suboptimal in contact with
    water-thirsty endgrain.
    Mahogany is somewhat resinous, test the glue on scraps to be sure;
    sometimes resin interferes
    with paint or glue chemistry




    It occurred to me that  small wedges (splines?) might work well. One
    could even cut the metal to somehow accept the spline.  Glue the wood splines in place and it should last forever.  If there is not enough
    wood present, add more! ; )

    How about making a narrow "staple" out of a dowel and cutting away some
    of the blade to accept it. Then glue it in place. Due to the shape of a
    dowel, so all you'd mainly only have to drill to fit it. It would never
    come loose. This would give it a professional look (too)!

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  • From Bob Davis@21:1/5 to All on Thu Jan 27 12:31:08 2022
    On Friday, January 21, 2022 at 9:47:43 PM UTC-6, whit3rd wrote:
    On Friday, January 21, 2022 at 11:11:56 AM UTC-8, wrober...@gmail.com wrote:
    I need to glue pieces of a bandsaw blade into thin slots in mahogany.
    I understand your valid questions. The metal is a 1/2" wide 12 tooth per inch bandsaw blade. Pieces of the blade, approximately 1 1/2 inches long are embedded about 1/4 inch deep cross-grain...

    For short lengths, wood expansion ought not to be a big problem; I'd poke some polyurethane
    (Gorilla Glue of the classic type) into the slot, wipe glue on the steel blade, then mist with water
    to start the cure, and insert the blade. The foam-up will fill voids, and it doesn't soak
    into the endgrain of the wood like a water-based adhesive might. Even just some
    plaster of paris would probably work.

    The thin kerf that you'd want to insert the blade into, won't allow a thick glue to flow well,
    and most water-based types are suboptimal in contact with water-thirsty endgrain.
    Mahogany is somewhat resinous, test the glue on scraps to be sure; sometimes resin interferes
    with paint or glue chemistry

    Thanks to all for various suggestions and advice. I completed this aspect of the project. I used West Systems epoxy. The metal blades cannot be loosened, even with a hammer. I used a Japanese cross cut saw to cut the thin grooves. I used double sided
    tape to attach a wooden piece to the saw blade that acted as a depth stop. Before gluing, I used frog tape to mask off both sides of each blade to minimize glue runs on the wood. Here are pictures of the prep and final result.

    https://www.icloud.com/sharedalbum/#B0gGLLXGLGb9zML

    Bob

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  • From DerbyDad03@21:1/5 to wrober...@gmail.com on Thu Jan 27 12:47:20 2022
    On Thursday, January 27, 2022 at 3:31:11 PM UTC-5, wrober...@gmail.com wrote:
    On Friday, January 21, 2022 at 9:47:43 PM UTC-6, whit3rd wrote:
    On Friday, January 21, 2022 at 11:11:56 AM UTC-8, wrober...@gmail.com wrote:
    I need to glue pieces of a bandsaw blade into thin slots in mahogany.
    I understand your valid questions. The metal is a 1/2" wide 12 tooth per inch bandsaw blade. Pieces of the blade, approximately 1 1/2 inches long are embedded about 1/4 inch deep cross-grain...

    For short lengths, wood expansion ought not to be a big problem; I'd poke some polyurethane
    (Gorilla Glue of the classic type) into the slot, wipe glue on the steel blade, then mist with water
    to start the cure, and insert the blade. The foam-up will fill voids, and it doesn't soak
    into the endgrain of the wood like a water-based adhesive might. Even just some
    plaster of paris would probably work.

    The thin kerf that you'd want to insert the blade into, won't allow a thick glue to flow well,
    and most water-based types are suboptimal in contact with water-thirsty endgrain.
    Mahogany is somewhat resinous, test the glue on scraps to be sure; sometimes resin interferes
    with paint or glue chemistry
    Thanks to all for various suggestions and advice. I completed this aspect of the project. I used West Systems epoxy. The metal blades cannot be loosened, even with a hammer. I used a Japanese cross cut saw to cut the thin grooves. I used double sided
    tape to attach a wooden piece to the saw blade that acted as a depth stop. Before gluing, I used frog tape to mask off both sides of each blade to minimize glue runs on the wood. Here are pictures of the prep and final result.

    https://www.icloud.com/sharedalbum/#B0gGLLXGLGb9zML

    Bob

    G/flex or a different West System product?

    In any case, consider getting some filler to have on hand.
    I always have a couple of different types on the shelf.

    https://www.westsystem.com/filler-selection-guide/

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  • From Bob Davis@21:1/5 to All on Fri Jan 28 04:19:33 2022
    On Thursday, January 27, 2022 at 2:47:23 PM UTC-6, DerbyDad03 wrote:
    On Thursday, January 27, 2022 at 3:31:11 PM UTC-5, wrober...@gmail.com wrote:
    On Friday, January 21, 2022 at 9:47:43 PM UTC-6, whit3rd wrote:
    On Friday, January 21, 2022 at 11:11:56 AM UTC-8, wrober...@gmail.com wrote:
    I need to glue pieces of a bandsaw blade into thin slots in mahogany.
    I understand your valid questions. The metal is a 1/2" wide 12 tooth per inch bandsaw blade. Pieces of the blade, approximately 1 1/2 inches long are embedded about 1/4 inch deep cross-grain...

    For short lengths, wood expansion ought not to be a big problem; I'd poke some polyurethane
    (Gorilla Glue of the classic type) into the slot, wipe glue on the steel blade, then mist with water
    to start the cure, and insert the blade. The foam-up will fill voids, and it doesn't soak
    into the endgrain of the wood like a water-based adhesive might. Even just some
    plaster of paris would probably work.

    The thin kerf that you'd want to insert the blade into, won't allow a thick glue to flow well,
    and most water-based types are suboptimal in contact with water-thirsty endgrain.
    Mahogany is somewhat resinous, test the glue on scraps to be sure; sometimes resin interferes
    with paint or glue chemistry
    Thanks to all for various suggestions and advice. I completed this aspect of the project. I used West Systems epoxy. The metal blades cannot be loosened, even with a hammer. I used a Japanese cross cut saw to cut the thin grooves. I used double sided
    tape to attach a wooden piece to the saw blade that acted as a depth stop. Before gluing, I used frog tape to mask off both sides of each blade to minimize glue runs on the wood. Here are pictures of the prep and final result.

    https://www.icloud.com/sharedalbum/#B0gGLLXGLGb9zML

    Bob
    G/flex or a different West System product?

    In any case, consider getting some filler to have on hand.
    I always have a couple of different types on the shelf.

    https://www.westsystem.com/filler-selection-guide/

    I used gflex. Your comments are opening up a whole world to me. I was not aware of all the fillers and applications for west systems. This warrants some exploration.

    Bob

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  • From DerbyDad03@21:1/5 to wrober...@gmail.com on Fri Jan 28 07:08:23 2022
    On Friday, January 28, 2022 at 7:19:35 AM UTC-5, wrober...@gmail.com wrote:
    On Thursday, January 27, 2022 at 2:47:23 PM UTC-6, DerbyDad03 wrote:
    On Thursday, January 27, 2022 at 3:31:11 PM UTC-5, wrober...@gmail.com wrote:
    On Friday, January 21, 2022 at 9:47:43 PM UTC-6, whit3rd wrote:
    On Friday, January 21, 2022 at 11:11:56 AM UTC-8, wrober...@gmail.com wrote:
    I need to glue pieces of a bandsaw blade into thin slots in mahogany.
    I understand your valid questions. The metal is a 1/2" wide 12 tooth per inch bandsaw blade. Pieces of the blade, approximately 1 1/2 inches long are embedded about 1/4 inch deep cross-grain...

    For short lengths, wood expansion ought not to be a big problem; I'd poke some polyurethane
    (Gorilla Glue of the classic type) into the slot, wipe glue on the steel blade, then mist with water
    to start the cure, and insert the blade. The foam-up will fill voids, and it doesn't soak
    into the endgrain of the wood like a water-based adhesive might. Even just some
    plaster of paris would probably work.

    The thin kerf that you'd want to insert the blade into, won't allow a thick glue to flow well,
    and most water-based types are suboptimal in contact with water-thirsty endgrain.
    Mahogany is somewhat resinous, test the glue on scraps to be sure; sometimes resin interferes
    with paint or glue chemistry
    Thanks to all for various suggestions and advice. I completed this aspect of the project. I used West Systems epoxy. The metal blades cannot be loosened, even with a hammer. I used a Japanese cross cut saw to cut the thin grooves. I used double
    sided tape to attach a wooden piece to the saw blade that acted as a depth stop. Before gluing, I used frog tape to mask off both sides of each blade to minimize glue runs on the wood. Here are pictures of the prep and final result.

    https://www.icloud.com/sharedalbum/#B0gGLLXGLGb9zML

    Bob
    G/flex or a different West System product?

    In any case, consider getting some filler to have on hand.
    I always have a couple of different types on the shelf.

    https://www.westsystem.com/filler-selection-guide/
    I used gflex. Your comments are opening up a whole world to me. I was not aware of all the fillers and applications for west systems. This warrants some exploration.

    Bob

    Epoxy is magic! ;-)

    When I was building Soap Box Derby cars we used gallons of it.

    In the image below, the fillets (flairs) where the axles enter the body were made from West System 205/105 epoxy mix and the 407 filler.

    The entire body was built to be 3/8" below the minimum girth allowed and
    then wrapped in 3 layers of fiberglass mat and 205/105 epoxy to bring it back up to the minimum spec. It was then baked in a black trailer in the 90° heat for
    3 days to achieve maximum hardness. No amount of rough track is going to
    twist the body and temperature/humidity changes will have virtually no impact.

    Yes, my son is in the car. ;-)

    https://i.imgur.com/IOQt88q.jpg

    A trick we used to use is to spread some Vaseline on any area where you don't want the epoxy to stick. That way you can build up areas and not have to be exact.
    e.g. if you want to bury a nut into a recess, put Vaseline on the bolt, put it in the
    threads and just pour your epoxy over the nut. Once it cures, just unscrew the
    bolt and you'll have a hole that leads down into the threads.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Bob Davis@21:1/5 to All on Fri Jan 28 10:35:51 2022
    On Friday, January 28, 2022 at 9:08:26 AM UTC-6, DerbyDad03 wrote:
    On Friday, January 28, 2022 at 7:19:35 AM UTC-5, wrober...@gmail.com wrote:
    On Thursday, January 27, 2022 at 2:47:23 PM UTC-6, DerbyDad03 wrote:
    On Thursday, January 27, 2022 at 3:31:11 PM UTC-5, wrober...@gmail.com wrote:
    On Friday, January 21, 2022 at 9:47:43 PM UTC-6, whit3rd wrote:
    On Friday, January 21, 2022 at 11:11:56 AM UTC-8, wrober...@gmail.com wrote:
    I need to glue pieces of a bandsaw blade into thin slots in mahogany.
    I understand your valid questions. The metal is a 1/2" wide 12 tooth per inch bandsaw blade. Pieces of the blade, approximately 1 1/2 inches long are embedded about 1/4 inch deep cross-grain...

    For short lengths, wood expansion ought not to be a big problem; I'd poke some polyurethane
    (Gorilla Glue of the classic type) into the slot, wipe glue on the steel blade, then mist with water
    to start the cure, and insert the blade. The foam-up will fill voids, and it doesn't soak
    into the endgrain of the wood like a water-based adhesive might. Even just some
    plaster of paris would probably work.

    The thin kerf that you'd want to insert the blade into, won't allow a thick glue to flow well,
    and most water-based types are suboptimal in contact with water-thirsty endgrain.
    Mahogany is somewhat resinous, test the glue on scraps to be sure; sometimes resin interferes
    with paint or glue chemistry
    Thanks to all for various suggestions and advice. I completed this aspect of the project. I used West Systems epoxy. The metal blades cannot be loosened, even with a hammer. I used a Japanese cross cut saw to cut the thin grooves. I used double
    sided tape to attach a wooden piece to the saw blade that acted as a depth stop. Before gluing, I used frog tape to mask off both sides of each blade to minimize glue runs on the wood. Here are pictures of the prep and final result.

    https://www.icloud.com/sharedalbum/#B0gGLLXGLGb9zML

    Bob
    G/flex or a different West System product?

    In any case, consider getting some filler to have on hand.
    I always have a couple of different types on the shelf.

    https://www.westsystem.com/filler-selection-guide/
    I used gflex. Your comments are opening up a whole world to me. I was not aware of all the fillers and applications for west systems. This warrants some exploration.

    Bob
    Epoxy is magic! ;-)

    When I was building Soap Box Derby cars we used gallons of it.

    In the image below, the fillets (flairs) where the axles enter the body were made from West System 205/105 epoxy mix and the 407 filler.

    The entire body was built to be 3/8" below the minimum girth allowed and then wrapped in 3 layers of fiberglass mat and 205/105 epoxy to bring it back
    up to the minimum spec. It was then baked in a black trailer in the 90° heat for
    3 days to achieve maximum hardness. No amount of rough track is going to twist the body and temperature/humidity changes will have virtually no impact.

    Yes, my son is in the car. ;-)

    https://i.imgur.com/IOQt88q.jpg

    A trick we used to use is to spread some Vaseline on any area where you don't
    want the epoxy to stick. That way you can build up areas and not have to be exact.
    e.g. if you want to bury a nut into a recess, put Vaseline on the bolt, put it in the
    threads and just pour your epoxy over the nut. Once it cures, just unscrew the
    bolt and you'll have a hole that leads down into the threads.

    I like this magic. I downloaded the west systems user manual to educate myself.

    Bob

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Clare Snyder@21:1/5 to wrobertdavis@gmail.com on Fri Jan 28 16:17:38 2022
    On Fri, 28 Jan 2022 10:35:51 -0800 (PST), Bob Davis
    <wrobertdavis@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Friday, January 28, 2022 at 9:08:26 AM UTC-6, DerbyDad03 wrote:
    On Friday, January 28, 2022 at 7:19:35 AM UTC-5, wrober...@gmail.com wrote: >> > On Thursday, January 27, 2022 at 2:47:23 PM UTC-6, DerbyDad03 wrote:
    On Thursday, January 27, 2022 at 3:31:11 PM UTC-5, wrober...@gmail.com wrote:
    On Friday, January 21, 2022 at 9:47:43 PM UTC-6, whit3rd wrote:
    On Friday, January 21, 2022 at 11:11:56 AM UTC-8, wrober...@gmail.com wrote:
    I need to glue pieces of a bandsaw blade into thin slots in mahogany.
    I understand your valid questions. The metal is a 1/2" wide 12 tooth per inch bandsaw blade. Pieces of the blade, approximately 1 1/2 inches long are embedded about 1/4 inch deep cross-grain...

    For short lengths, wood expansion ought not to be a big problem; I'd poke some polyurethane
    (Gorilla Glue of the classic type) into the slot, wipe glue on the steel blade, then mist with water
    to start the cure, and insert the blade. The foam-up will fill voids, and it doesn't soak
    into the endgrain of the wood like a water-based adhesive might. Even just some
    plaster of paris would probably work.

    The thin kerf that you'd want to insert the blade into, won't allow a thick glue to flow well,
    and most water-based types are suboptimal in contact with water-thirsty endgrain.
    Mahogany is somewhat resinous, test the glue on scraps to be sure; sometimes resin interferes
    with paint or glue chemistry
    Thanks to all for various suggestions and advice. I completed this aspect of the project. I used West Systems epoxy. The metal blades cannot be loosened, even with a hammer. I used a Japanese cross cut saw to cut the thin grooves. I used double
    sided tape to attach a wooden piece to the saw blade that acted as a depth stop. Before gluing, I used frog tape to mask off both sides of each blade to minimize glue runs on the wood. Here are pictures of the prep and final result.

    https://www.icloud.com/sharedalbum/#B0gGLLXGLGb9zML

    Bob
    G/flex or a different West System product?

    In any case, consider getting some filler to have on hand.
    I always have a couple of different types on the shelf.

    https://www.westsystem.com/filler-selection-guide/
    I used gflex. Your comments are opening up a whole world to me. I was not aware of all the fillers and applications for west systems. This warrants some exploration.

    Bob
    Epoxy is magic! ;-)

    When I was building Soap Box Derby cars we used gallons of it.

    In the image below, the fillets (flairs) where the axles enter the body were >> made from West System 205/105 epoxy mix and the 407 filler.

    The entire body was built to be 3/8" below the minimum girth allowed and
    then wrapped in 3 layers of fiberglass mat and 205/105 epoxy to bring it back
    up to the minimum spec. It was then baked in a black trailer in the 90 heat for
    3 days to achieve maximum hardness. No amount of rough track is going to
    twist the body and temperature/humidity changes will have virtually no impact.

    Yes, my son is in the car. ;-)

    https://i.imgur.com/IOQt88q.jpg

    A trick we used to use is to spread some Vaseline on any area where you don't
    want the epoxy to stick. That way you can build up areas and not have to be exact.
    e.g. if you want to bury a nut into a recess, put Vaseline on the bolt, put it in the
    threads and just pour your epoxy over the nut. Once it cures, just unscrew the
    bolt and you'll have a hole that leads down into the threads.

    I like this magic. I downloaded the west systems user manual to educate myself.

    Bob
    Good Caraubu wax works too as a "release ent" and is less likely to
    affect the epoxy.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DerbyDad03@21:1/5 to Clare Snyder on Fri Jan 28 15:07:12 2022
    On Friday, January 28, 2022 at 4:17:43 PM UTC-5, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Fri, 28 Jan 2022 10:35:51 -0800 (PST), Bob Davis
    <wrober...@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Friday, January 28, 2022 at 9:08:26 AM UTC-6, DerbyDad03 wrote:
    On Friday, January 28, 2022 at 7:19:35 AM UTC-5, wrober...@gmail.com wrote:
    On Thursday, January 27, 2022 at 2:47:23 PM UTC-6, DerbyDad03 wrote:
    On Thursday, January 27, 2022 at 3:31:11 PM UTC-5, wrober...@gmail.com wrote:
    On Friday, January 21, 2022 at 9:47:43 PM UTC-6, whit3rd wrote:
    On Friday, January 21, 2022 at 11:11:56 AM UTC-8, wrober...@gmail.com wrote:
    I need to glue pieces of a bandsaw blade into thin slots in mahogany.
    I understand your valid questions. The metal is a 1/2" wide 12 tooth per inch bandsaw blade. Pieces of the blade, approximately 1 1/2 inches long are embedded about 1/4 inch deep cross-grain...

    For short lengths, wood expansion ought not to be a big problem; I'd poke some polyurethane
    (Gorilla Glue of the classic type) into the slot, wipe glue on the steel blade, then mist with water
    to start the cure, and insert the blade. The foam-up will fill voids, and it doesn't soak
    into the endgrain of the wood like a water-based adhesive might. Even just some
    plaster of paris would probably work.

    The thin kerf that you'd want to insert the blade into, won't allow a thick glue to flow well,
    and most water-based types are suboptimal in contact with water-thirsty endgrain.
    Mahogany is somewhat resinous, test the glue on scraps to be sure; sometimes resin interferes
    with paint or glue chemistry
    Thanks to all for various suggestions and advice. I completed this aspect of the project. I used West Systems epoxy. The metal blades cannot be loosened, even with a hammer. I used a Japanese cross cut saw to cut the thin grooves. I used
    double sided tape to attach a wooden piece to the saw blade that acted as a depth stop. Before gluing, I used frog tape to mask off both sides of each blade to minimize glue runs on the wood. Here are pictures of the prep and final result.

    https://www.icloud.com/sharedalbum/#B0gGLLXGLGb9zML

    Bob
    G/flex or a different West System product?

    In any case, consider getting some filler to have on hand.
    I always have a couple of different types on the shelf.

    https://www.westsystem.com/filler-selection-guide/
    I used gflex. Your comments are opening up a whole world to me. I was not aware of all the fillers and applications for west systems. This warrants some exploration.

    Bob
    Epoxy is magic! ;-)

    When I was building Soap Box Derby cars we used gallons of it.

    In the image below, the fillets (flairs) where the axles enter the body were
    made from West System 205/105 epoxy mix and the 407 filler.

    The entire body was built to be 3/8" below the minimum girth allowed and >> then wrapped in 3 layers of fiberglass mat and 205/105 epoxy to bring it back
    up to the minimum spec. It was then baked in a black trailer in the 90° heat for
    3 days to achieve maximum hardness. No amount of rough track is going to >> twist the body and temperature/humidity changes will have virtually no impact.

    Yes, my son is in the car. ;-)

    https://i.imgur.com/IOQt88q.jpg

    A trick we used to use is to spread some Vaseline on any area where you don't
    want the epoxy to stick. That way you can build up areas and not have to be exact.
    e.g. if you want to bury a nut into a recess, put Vaseline on the bolt, put it in the
    threads and just pour your epoxy over the nut. Once it cures, just unscrew the
    bolt and you'll have a hole that leads down into the threads.

    I like this magic. I downloaded the west systems user manual to educate myself.

    Bob
    Good Caraubu wax works too as a "release ent" and is less likely to
    affect the epoxy.

    In what way does Vaseline affect the epoxy, specifically the epoxy that you want to
    stay in place?

    FWIW, West System recommends Vaseline (amongst other substances) as a suitable release agent for all of their epoxy products, from the standard 10x/20x family to the
    G/5 five minute adhesive. If it's good enough for them, it's good enough for me.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to wrobertdavis@gmail.com on Fri Jan 28 20:08:42 2022
    On Fri, 28 Jan 2022 04:19:33 -0800 (PST), Bob Davis
    <wrobertdavis@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Thursday, January 27, 2022 at 2:47:23 PM UTC-6, DerbyDad03 wrote:
    On Thursday, January 27, 2022 at 3:31:11 PM UTC-5, wrober...@gmail.com wrote:
    On Friday, January 21, 2022 at 9:47:43 PM UTC-6, whit3rd wrote:
    On Friday, January 21, 2022 at 11:11:56 AM UTC-8, wrober...@gmail.com wrote:
    I need to glue pieces of a bandsaw blade into thin slots in mahogany.
    I understand your valid questions. The metal is a 1/2" wide 12 tooth per inch bandsaw blade. Pieces of the blade, approximately 1 1/2 inches long are embedded about 1/4 inch deep cross-grain...

    For short lengths, wood expansion ought not to be a big problem; I'd poke some polyurethane
    (Gorilla Glue of the classic type) into the slot, wipe glue on the steel blade, then mist with water
    to start the cure, and insert the blade. The foam-up will fill voids, and it doesn't soak
    into the endgrain of the wood like a water-based adhesive might. Even just some
    plaster of paris would probably work.

    The thin kerf that you'd want to insert the blade into, won't allow a thick glue to flow well,
    and most water-based types are suboptimal in contact with water-thirsty endgrain.
    Mahogany is somewhat resinous, test the glue on scraps to be sure; sometimes resin interferes
    with paint or glue chemistry
    Thanks to all for various suggestions and advice. I completed this aspect of the project. I used West Systems epoxy. The metal blades cannot be loosened, even with a hammer. I used a Japanese cross cut saw to cut the thin grooves. I used double
    sided tape to attach a wooden piece to the saw blade that acted as a depth stop. Before gluing, I used frog tape to mask off both sides of each blade to minimize glue runs on the wood. Here are pictures of the prep and final result.

    https://www.icloud.com/sharedalbum/#B0gGLLXGLGb9zML

    Bob
    G/flex or a different West System product?

    In any case, consider getting some filler to have on hand.
    I always have a couple of different types on the shelf.

    https://www.westsystem.com/filler-selection-guide/

    I used gflex. Your comments are opening up a whole world to me. I was not aware of all the fillers and applications for west systems. This warrants some exploration.

    Ditto. Is it mail order only? Some of that stuff can be a problem
    with shipping.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DerbyDad03@21:1/5 to k...@notreal.com on Fri Jan 28 17:15:54 2022
    On Friday, January 28, 2022 at 8:08:46 PM UTC-5, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Fri, 28 Jan 2022 04:19:33 -0800 (PST), Bob Davis
    <wrober...@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Thursday, January 27, 2022 at 2:47:23 PM UTC-6, DerbyDad03 wrote:
    On Thursday, January 27, 2022 at 3:31:11 PM UTC-5, wrober...@gmail.com wrote:
    On Friday, January 21, 2022 at 9:47:43 PM UTC-6, whit3rd wrote:
    On Friday, January 21, 2022 at 11:11:56 AM UTC-8, wrober...@gmail.com wrote:
    I need to glue pieces of a bandsaw blade into thin slots in mahogany.
    I understand your valid questions. The metal is a 1/2" wide 12 tooth per inch bandsaw blade. Pieces of the blade, approximately 1 1/2 inches long are embedded about 1/4 inch deep cross-grain...

    For short lengths, wood expansion ought not to be a big problem; I'd poke some polyurethane
    (Gorilla Glue of the classic type) into the slot, wipe glue on the steel blade, then mist with water
    to start the cure, and insert the blade. The foam-up will fill voids, and it doesn't soak
    into the endgrain of the wood like a water-based adhesive might. Even just some
    plaster of paris would probably work.

    The thin kerf that you'd want to insert the blade into, won't allow a thick glue to flow well,
    and most water-based types are suboptimal in contact with water-thirsty endgrain.
    Mahogany is somewhat resinous, test the glue on scraps to be sure; sometimes resin interferes
    with paint or glue chemistry
    Thanks to all for various suggestions and advice. I completed this aspect of the project. I used West Systems epoxy. The metal blades cannot be loosened, even with a hammer. I used a Japanese cross cut saw to cut the thin grooves. I used double
    sided tape to attach a wooden piece to the saw blade that acted as a depth stop. Before gluing, I used frog tape to mask off both sides of each blade to minimize glue runs on the wood. Here are pictures of the prep and final result.

    https://www.icloud.com/sharedalbum/#B0gGLLXGLGb9zML

    Bob
    G/flex or a different West System product?

    In any case, consider getting some filler to have on hand.
    I always have a couple of different types on the shelf.

    https://www.westsystem.com/filler-selection-guide/

    I used gflex. Your comments are opening up a whole world to me. I was not aware of all the fillers and applications for west systems. This warrants some exploration.
    Ditto. Is it mail order only? Some of that stuff can be a problem
    with shipping.

    I get the G/flex on Amazon.

    https://www.amazon.com/s?k=g%2Fflex&crid=3BXMWT04R3UV4

    I used to buy the 10x/20x stuff at a local boating supply store but it's
    much more expensive than most mail order houses.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)