• Stanley no 750 socket chisels - too good to be true?

    From Bob Davis@21:1/5 to All on Wed Jan 12 18:04:38 2022
    My son has given me some home depot gift cards, which I have a hard time redeeming. I already have a boatload of dewalt tools and I don't want to waste a gift card on air conditioner filters. I had the idea to see what they have in chisels - not
    expecting much. I found sets of Stanley 750 socket chisels listed as "made in sheffield, England". $90 for a set of four. If these are the real deal, its a decent buy. I ordered a set.

    Bob

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  • From John Grossbohlin@21:1/5 to All on Wed Jan 12 22:12:05 2022
    "Bob Davis" wrote in message news:22522cae-d9bd-4d80-bbb7-07f394821e85n@googlegroups.com...

    My son has given me some home depot gift cards, which I have a hard time >redeeming. I already have a boatload of dewalt tools and I >don't want to >waste a gift card on air conditioner filters. I had the idea to see what >they have in chisels - not expecting much. I found sets >of Stanley 750 >socket chisels listed as "made in sheffield, England". $90 for a set of >four. If these are the real deal, its a decent buy. I >ordered a set.

    Hornbeam handles... cool! Please do report!

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  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to wrobertdavis@gmail.com on Wed Jan 12 23:10:42 2022
    On Wed, 12 Jan 2022 18:04:38 -0800 (PST), Bob Davis
    <wrobertdavis@gmail.com> wrote:

    My son has given me some home depot gift cards, which I have a hard time redeeming. I already have a boatload of dewalt tools and I don't want to waste a gift card on air conditioner filters. I had the idea to see what they have in chisels - not
    expecting much. I found sets of Stanley 750 socket chisels listed as "made in sheffield, England". $90 for a set of four. If these are the real deal, its a decent buy. I ordered a set.

    Looking at the reviews (both HD and elsewhere), some report that
    they're good chisels and easy to sharpen. Others report that while
    they come sharp, they take a lot of work to flatten and sharpen right.
    Report back.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Bob Davis@21:1/5 to k...@notreal.com on Thu Jan 13 05:09:24 2022
    On Wednesday, January 12, 2022 at 10:10:47 PM UTC-6, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Wed, 12 Jan 2022 18:04:38 -0800 (PST), Bob Davis
    <wrober...@gmail.com> wrote:

    My son has given me some home depot gift cards, which I have a hard time redeeming. I already have a boatload of dewalt tools and I don't want to waste a gift card on air conditioner filters. I had the idea to see what they have in chisels - not
    expecting much. I found sets of Stanley 750 socket chisels listed as "made in sheffield, England". $90 for a set of four. If these are the real deal, its a decent buy. I ordered a set.
    Looking at the reviews (both HD and elsewhere), some report that
    they're good chisels and easy to sharpen. Others report that while
    they come sharp, they take a lot of work to flatten and sharpen right. Report back.

    This article in finewoodworking convinced me to at least try them. It is 10 years old but might still apply. It has some interesting history.

    https://www.finewoodworking.com/2011/04/07/sweetheart-chisels-750-series-review

    Bob

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  • From Scott Lurndal@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Thu Jan 13 18:44:46 2022
    krw@notreal.com writes:
    On Thu, 13 Jan 2022 05:09:24 -0800 (PST), Bob Davis
    <wrobertdavis@gmail.com> wrote:

    Not really relevant but why make them in Sheffield England instead of
    the US, as the originals were. I wouldn't have thought that the UK
    would be cheaper. Sheffield does have the reputation but they don't
    seem to be pushing it.

    Most stanley planes have been made by Stanley UK (in sheffield) for at
    least three decades[*], as have stanley chisels and othter stanley
    woodworking tools. That's where the factory is.

    "But Stanley did not start manufacturing tools in England
    until they bought controlling interest in J.A. Chapman in 1936."


    [*] Until they reintroduced the bailey line (made in Mexico) a few
    years ago.

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  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to wrobertdavis@gmail.com on Thu Jan 13 13:30:18 2022
    On Thu, 13 Jan 2022 05:09:24 -0800 (PST), Bob Davis
    <wrobertdavis@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Wednesday, January 12, 2022 at 10:10:47 PM UTC-6, k...@notreal.com wrote: >> On Wed, 12 Jan 2022 18:04:38 -0800 (PST), Bob Davis
    <wrober...@gmail.com> wrote:

    My son has given me some home depot gift cards, which I have a hard time redeeming. I already have a boatload of dewalt tools and I don't want to waste a gift card on air conditioner filters. I had the idea to see what they have in chisels - not
    expecting much. I found sets of Stanley 750 socket chisels listed as "made in sheffield, England". $90 for a set of four. If these are the real deal, its a decent buy. I ordered a set.
    Looking at the reviews (both HD and elsewhere), some report that
    they're good chisels and easy to sharpen. Others report that while
    they come sharp, they take a lot of work to flatten and sharpen right.
    Report back.

    This article in finewoodworking convinced me to at least try them. It is 10 years old but might still apply. It has some interesting history.

    https://www.finewoodworking.com/2011/04/07/sweetheart-chisels-750-series-review

    I wouldn't give a review from eleven years ago full confidence. Many
    things have been cheapened over the years.

    While some of the online product reviews say the backs are so wavy
    that the tools aren't worth the time, more give them a good, four or
    five star, review. Of course, one has to read what's said to see if
    the review is meaningful.

    Not really relevant but why make them in Sheffield England instead of
    the US, as the originals were. I wouldn't have thought that the UK
    would be cheaper. Sheffield does have the reputation but they don't
    seem to be pushing it.

    I agree with you, for the price, they seem to be worth a shot. Let us
    know how they turn out.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Bob Davis@21:1/5 to k...@notreal.com on Sat Jan 22 13:22:23 2022
    On Thursday, January 13, 2022 at 12:30:22 PM UTC-6, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Thu, 13 Jan 2022 05:09:24 -0800 (PST), Bob Davis
    <wrober...@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Wednesday, January 12, 2022 at 10:10:47 PM UTC-6, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Wed, 12 Jan 2022 18:04:38 -0800 (PST), Bob Davis
    <wrober...@gmail.com> wrote:

    My son has given me some home depot gift cards, which I have a hard time redeeming. I already have a boatload of dewalt tools and I don't want to waste a gift card on air conditioner filters. I had the idea to see what they have in chisels - not
    expecting much. I found sets of Stanley 750 socket chisels listed as "made in sheffield, England". $90 for a set of four. If these are the real deal, its a decent buy. I ordered a set.
    Looking at the reviews (both HD and elsewhere), some report that
    they're good chisels and easy to sharpen. Others report that while
    they come sharp, they take a lot of work to flatten and sharpen right.
    Report back.

    This article in finewoodworking convinced me to at least try them. It is 10 years old but might still apply. It has some interesting history.

    https://www.finewoodworking.com/2011/04/07/sweetheart-chisels-750-series-review
    I wouldn't give a review from eleven years ago full confidence. Many
    things have been cheapened over the years.

    While some of the online product reviews say the backs are so wavy
    that the tools aren't worth the time, more give them a good, four or
    five star, review. Of course, one has to read what's said to see if
    the review is meaningful.

    Not really relevant but why make them in Sheffield England instead of
    the US, as the originals were. I wouldn't have thought that the UK
    would be cheaper. Sheffield does have the reputation but they don't
    seem to be pushing it.

    I agree with you, for the price, they seem to be worth a shot. Let us
    know how they turn out.

    The order was ready at my local home depot 4 days after I ordered it. So here's my observations:

    1. The included leather tool wrap is amazing quality. Lie Nielson would be proud to include this with their chisels.
    2. I hoped for a set of chisels that are well made and can be hand honed to top quality. That seems to be exactly what I got. The blades are factory ground on all edges and well finished. The blades are pretty sharp right out of the box. I think 30-60
    minutes of hand work on each chisel would make them outstanding.
    3. At this price, the chisels are excellent value.
    4. The shape is really good, IMO.

    With all these good words, I have decided to return them. Huh? The one detractor is that the side edges of the blades are pretty thick. I do not hand cut dovetails and these are just fine for everyday use. I've been getting along with hand sharpened
    1973 Craftsman chisels since they were new. This set will probably be the last set of chisels I ever buy and I decided to go for top shelf. Lie Nielson and Lee Valley are out of stock on everything. Lie Nielson has stopped production on some chisels.
    So what to do? Infinity tools had some Narex Richter chisel sets in stock and I ordered one.

    Bob

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    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to wrobertdavis@gmail.com on Sat Jan 22 18:59:17 2022
    On Sat, 22 Jan 2022 13:22:23 -0800 (PST), Bob Davis
    <wrobertdavis@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Thursday, January 13, 2022 at 12:30:22 PM UTC-6, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Thu, 13 Jan 2022 05:09:24 -0800 (PST), Bob Davis
    <wrober...@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Wednesday, January 12, 2022 at 10:10:47 PM UTC-6, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Wed, 12 Jan 2022 18:04:38 -0800 (PST), Bob Davis
    <wrober...@gmail.com> wrote:

    My son has given me some home depot gift cards, which I have a hard time redeeming. I already have a boatload of dewalt tools and I don't want to waste a gift card on air conditioner filters. I had the idea to see what they have in chisels - not
    expecting much. I found sets of Stanley 750 socket chisels listed as "made in sheffield, England". $90 for a set of four. If these are the real deal, its a decent buy. I ordered a set.
    Looking at the reviews (both HD and elsewhere), some report that
    they're good chisels and easy to sharpen. Others report that while
    they come sharp, they take a lot of work to flatten and sharpen right.
    Report back.

    This article in finewoodworking convinced me to at least try them. It is 10 years old but might still apply. It has some interesting history.

    https://www.finewoodworking.com/2011/04/07/sweetheart-chisels-750-series-review
    I wouldn't give a review from eleven years ago full confidence. Many
    things have been cheapened over the years.

    While some of the online product reviews say the backs are so wavy
    that the tools aren't worth the time, more give them a good, four or
    five star, review. Of course, one has to read what's said to see if
    the review is meaningful.

    Not really relevant but why make them in Sheffield England instead of
    the US, as the originals were. I wouldn't have thought that the UK
    would be cheaper. Sheffield does have the reputation but they don't
    seem to be pushing it.

    I agree with you, for the price, they seem to be worth a shot. Let us
    know how they turn out.

    The order was ready at my local home depot 4 days after I ordered it. So here's my observations:

    1. The included leather tool wrap is amazing quality. Lie Nielson would be proud to include this with their chisels.
    2. I hoped for a set of chisels that are well made and can be hand honed to top quality. That seems to be exactly what I got. The blades are factory ground on all edges and well finished. The blades are pretty sharp right out of the box. I think 30-60
    minutes of hand work on each chisel would make them outstanding.
    3. At this price, the chisels are excellent value.
    4. The shape is really good, IMO.

    They sound like good chisels and are reasonably well made/finished.
    I'm not too surprised that a few percent of the reviewers weren't
    happy with them. Perhaps they're looking for something for nothing or
    wanted to prove something. There's always someone.

    With all these good words, I have decided to return them. Huh? The one detractor is that the side edges of the blades are pretty thick. I do not hand cut dovetails and these are just fine for everyday use. I've been getting along with hand sharpened
    1973 Craftsman chisels since they were new. This set will probably be the last set of chisels I ever buy and I decided to go for top shelf. Lie Nielson and Lee Valley are out of stock on everything. Lie Nielson has stopped production on some chisels.
    So what to do? Infinity tools had some Narex Richter chisel sets in stock and I ordered one.

    Craftsman from that age made some more than decent tools. I wish I
    still had my wrenches and sockets. I have a stainless screwdriver set
    from the early '70s that are pretty good. I keep them in the garage
    and don't worry about rust. The hammers I have from that time are the
    best I've used (personal opinion). I like the balance and grip.
    Estwings rattle my teeth.

    I don't know what it is with Lie-Nielson. I bought mine in '15 and
    they were hard to come by then. Highland carried them but they
    weren't happy because Lie-Nielson's delivery was so spotty, even then.
    I see they still carry their plane irons but that's about it.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From 10x@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Sun Jan 23 07:01:39 2022
    On Jan 22, 2022, krw@notreal.com wrote
    (in article<vh5puglsujc43grrtkaqn3ne0buvnnfm1c@4ax.com>):

    Craftsman from that age made some more than decent tools. I wish I
    still had my wrenches and sockets. I have a stainless screwdriver set
    from the early '70s that are pretty good.

    I bought my first set of Craftsman® tools when I was in the Navy, and stationed in Pensacola, FL back in1971. They were purchased as a set
    consisting of something like 200 pieces, where every Allen wrench, etc. was counted as a piece along with the included steel tool box.

    I’m proud to say that they are all still in my possession, minus one or two misplaced Allen wrenches over the years, and still serving me well.

    I wonder if the Craftsman® brand carried by Lowes is anywhere near the same quality?

    Joe

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Bob Davis@21:1/5 to k...@notreal.com on Sun Jan 23 07:44:33 2022
    On Sunday, January 23, 2022 at 9:33:17 AM UTC-6, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 23 Jan 2022 07:01:39 -0500, 10x <1...@home.com> wrote:

    On Jan 22, 2022, k...@notreal.com wrote
    (in article<vh5puglsujc43grrt...@4ax.com>):

    Craftsman from that age made some more than decent tools. I wish I
    still had my wrenches and sockets. I have a stainless screwdriver set
    from the early '70s that are pretty good.

    I bought my first set of Craftsman® tools when I was in the Navy, and >stationed in Pensacola, FL back in1971. They were purchased as a set >consisting of something like 200 pieces, where every Allen wrench, etc. was >counted as a piece along with the included steel tool box.
    That sort of thing was common. Still is but it's pretty clear that
    they're playing that game.
    I’m proud to say that they are all still in my possession, minus one or two
    misplaced Allen wrenches over the years, and still serving me well.
    I lost wrenches constantly. I'm sure I left them where I was working. Probably under the hood. I don't much anymore because I buy HF crap.
    It's not worth losing.
    I wonder if the Craftsman® brand carried by Lowes is anywhere near the same
    quality?
    Not a chance. It's the same Chinese junk as HF sells, for 4x the
    price.

    I've had good experiences buying good condition vintage Made in USA tools on ebay, including Craftsman deep sockets and Crescent brand wrenches.

    Bob

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to 10x@home.com on Sun Jan 23 10:33:12 2022
    On Sun, 23 Jan 2022 07:01:39 -0500, 10x <10x@home.com> wrote:

    On Jan 22, 2022, krw@notreal.com wrote
    (in article<vh5puglsujc43grrtkaqn3ne0buvnnfm1c@4ax.com>):

    Craftsman from that age made some more than decent tools. I wish I
    still had my wrenches and sockets. I have a stainless screwdriver set
    from the early '70s that are pretty good.

    I bought my first set of Craftsman tools when I was in the Navy, and >stationed in Pensacola, FL back in1971. They were purchased as a set >consisting of something like 200 pieces, where every Allen wrench, etc. was >counted as a piece along with the included steel tool box.

    That sort of thing was common. Still is but it's pretty clear that
    they're playing that game.

    Im proud to say that they are all still in my possession, minus one or two >misplaced Allen wrenches over the years, and still serving me well.

    I lost wrenches constantly. I'm sure I left them where I was working.
    Probably under the hood. I don't much anymore because I buy HF crap.
    It's not worth losing.

    I wonder if the Craftsman brand carried by Lowes is anywhere near the same >quality?

    Not a chance. It's the same Chinese junk as HF sells, for 4x the
    price.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Scott Lurndal@21:1/5 to Bob Davis on Sun Jan 23 17:53:16 2022
    Bob Davis <wrobertdavis@gmail.com> writes:
    On Thursday, January 13, 2022 at 12:30:22 PM UTC-6, k...@notreal.com wrote:


    With all these good words, I have decided to return them. Huh? The one det= >ractor is that the side edges of the blades are pretty thick. I do not han= >d cut dovetails and these are just fine for everyday use. I've been getting=
    along with hand sharpened 1973 Craftsman chisels since they were new. Thi=
    s set will probably be the last set of chisels I ever buy and I decided to = >go for top shelf. Lie Nielson and Lee Valley are out of stock on everythin= >g. Lie Nielson has stopped production on some chisels. So what to do? Infi= >nity tools had some Narex Richter chisel sets in stock and I ordered one.

    I make a habit of stopping at any antique store I pass, I've found dozens
    of high-quality chisels for a few dollars apiece. Flea markets are also
    a good source, as are some of the more reputable tool dealers like Pat Leach
    or Pete Neiderberger.

    Granted, you're not likely to find a matched set, and the handles will show wear, but function over form, right?

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to All on Sun Jan 23 16:17:51 2022
    On Sun, 23 Jan 2022 17:53:16 GMT, scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal)
    wrote:

    Bob Davis <wrobertdavis@gmail.com> writes:
    On Thursday, January 13, 2022 at 12:30:22 PM UTC-6, k...@notreal.com wrote:


    With all these good words, I have decided to return them. Huh? The one det= >>ractor is that the side edges of the blades are pretty thick. I do not han= >>d cut dovetails and these are just fine for everyday use. I've been getting= >> along with hand sharpened 1973 Craftsman chisels since they were new. Thi= >>s set will probably be the last set of chisels I ever buy and I decided to = >>go for top shelf. Lie Nielson and Lee Valley are out of stock on everythin= >>g. Lie Nielson has stopped production on some chisels. So what to do? Infi= >>nity tools had some Narex Richter chisel sets in stock and I ordered one.

    I make a habit of stopping at any antique store I pass, I've found dozens
    of high-quality chisels for a few dollars apiece. Flea markets are also
    a good source, as are some of the more reputable tool dealers like Pat Leach >or Pete Neiderberger.

    Granted, you're not likely to find a matched set, and the handles will show >wear, but function over form, right?

    That's a nice thing about socket chisels. Just turn a new handle and
    make it as pretty as you like. Of course it's possible with other
    styles but it's almost trivial with socket chisels.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Puckdropper@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Mon Jan 24 03:56:04 2022
    krw@notreal.com wrote in
    news:gtsqugtd01femacv68u51tmh6pao8tbama@4ax.com:


    I lost wrenches constantly. I'm sure I left them where I was working. Probably under the hood. I don't much anymore because I buy HF crap.
    It's not worth losing.


    If you're the guy who lost that Craftsman screwdriver under the hood...
    Thanks! No, you can't have it back.

    :-)

    Puckdropper

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Bob Davis@21:1/5 to Bob Davis on Sun Jan 23 19:51:29 2022
    On Saturday, January 22, 2022 at 3:22:25 PM UTC-6, Bob Davis wrote:
    On Thursday, January 13, 2022 at 12:30:22 PM UTC-6, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Thu, 13 Jan 2022 05:09:24 -0800 (PST), Bob Davis
    <wrober...@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Wednesday, January 12, 2022 at 10:10:47 PM UTC-6, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Wed, 12 Jan 2022 18:04:38 -0800 (PST), Bob Davis
    <wrober...@gmail.com> wrote:

    My son has given me some home depot gift cards, which I have a hard time redeeming. I already have a boatload of dewalt tools and I don't want to waste a gift card on air conditioner filters. I had the idea to see what they have in chisels - not
    expecting much. I found sets of Stanley 750 socket chisels listed as "made in sheffield, England". $90 for a set of four. If these are the real deal, its a decent buy. I ordered a set.
    Looking at the reviews (both HD and elsewhere), some report that
    they're good chisels and easy to sharpen. Others report that while
    they come sharp, they take a lot of work to flatten and sharpen right. >> Report back.

    This article in finewoodworking convinced me to at least try them. It is 10 years old but might still apply. It has some interesting history.

    https://www.finewoodworking.com/2011/04/07/sweetheart-chisels-750-series-review
    I wouldn't give a review from eleven years ago full confidence. Many things have been cheapened over the years.

    While some of the online product reviews say the backs are so wavy
    that the tools aren't worth the time, more give them a good, four or
    five star, review. Of course, one has to read what's said to see if
    the review is meaningful.

    Not really relevant but why make them in Sheffield England instead of
    the US, as the originals were. I wouldn't have thought that the UK
    would be cheaper. Sheffield does have the reputation but they don't
    seem to be pushing it.

    I agree with you, for the price, they seem to be worth a shot. Let us
    know how they turn out.
    The order was ready at my local home depot 4 days after I ordered it. So here's my observations:

    1. The included leather tool wrap is amazing quality. Lie Nielson would be proud to include this with their chisels.
    2. I hoped for a set of chisels that are well made and can be hand honed to top quality. That seems to be exactly what I got. The blades are factory ground on all edges and well finished. The blades are pretty sharp right out of the box. I think 30-60
    minutes of hand work on each chisel would make them outstanding.
    3. At this price, the chisels are excellent value.
    4. The shape is really good, IMO.

    With all these good words, I have decided to return them. Huh? The one detractor is that the side edges of the blades are pretty thick. I do not hand cut dovetails and these are just fine for everyday use. I've been getting along with hand sharpened
    1973 Craftsman chisels since they were new. This set will probably be the last set of chisels I ever buy and I decided to go for top shelf. Lie Nielson and Lee Valley are out of stock on everything. Lie Nielson has stopped production on some chisels. So
    what to do? Infinity tools had some Narex Richter chisel sets in stock and I ordered one.

    Bob

    I have a followup on the Narex Richter chisel set I ordered. They came in a plain brown box, humble packaging. Each chisel is individually boxed in a cheap looking cardboard box. All this description is to paint the picture that I was prepared to be
    disappointed. When I peeled away the tissue paper on the first chisel, I am sure I let out an audible gasp. I do not believe I have ever seen such a fine cutting instrument. It has a fine mirror finish on all sides. I do not see that any hand tuning will
    be necessary. The edges of the blade are really thin for doing very fine detailed work.

    Bob

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to All on Sun Jan 23 23:21:07 2022
    On Mon, 24 Jan 2022 03:56:04 GMT, Puckdropper <puckdropper@yahoo.com>
    wrote:

    krw@notreal.com wrote in
    news:gtsqugtd01femacv68u51tmh6pao8tbama@4ax.com:


    I lost wrenches constantly. I'm sure I left them where I was working.
    Probably under the hood. I don't much anymore because I buy HF crap.
    It's not worth losing.


    If you're the guy who lost that Craftsman screwdriver under the hood... >Thanks! No, you can't have it back.

    :-)

    It's probably mine but I fixed the problem. I haven't worked on my
    own cars for 20 years. I don't think I lifted the hood on my last
    truck more than a dozen times in the eight years I had it. Of course,
    the engine died after eight years (as an asshat ran a stop sign and
    hit it in the front end at 45mph).

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Grossbohlin@21:1/5 to All on Mon Jan 24 15:48:11 2022
    "10x" wrote in message news:0001HW.279D7B230253AB9F700001BF438F@news.giganews.com...

    On Jan 22, 2022, krw@notreal.com wrote
    (in article<vh5puglsujc43grrtkaqn3ne0buvnnfm1c@4ax.com>):

    Craftsman from that age made some more than decent tools. wish I
    still had my wrenches and sockets. I have a stainless screwdriver set
    from the early '70s that are pretty good.

    I bought my first set of Craftsman® tools when I was in the Navy, and >stationed in Pensacola, FL back in1971. They were purchased as a set >consisting of something like 200 pieces, where every Allen wrench, etc. was >counted as a piece along with the included steel tool box.

    I’m proud to say that they are all still in my possession, minus one or two >misplaced Allen wrenches over the years, and still serving me well.

    I wonder if the Craftsman® brand carried by Lowes is anywhere near the same >quality?

    The Craftsman sockets from the 60s were high quality thin walled sockets. My father still has most of a set (the whole set likely still exists and the pieces will be found after he passes away... kind of like when we cleaned
    out my brother's place). By the late 70s the sockets were much thicker...
    The set I bought about 1978 wasn’t nearly as good... much thicker walls
    which means they didn't fit into the spaces that the older sockets fit
    (e.g., some areas of engines where there was little clearance).

    I've gotten screw driver sets over the years from Craftsman (now referred to
    as Craftsman Acetate Screwdrivers) and Stanley... the tips didn't hold up so
    I bought I set of Klein (American made) screw drivers and there is no comparison... The Kleins cost about 4X the price of the Craftsman and 2.5X
    the Stanley. I recently bought a pair of Klein lineman pliers and KNIPEX
    twin grip slip joint pliers (American made) and they are far superior to the Craftsman pliers I have. They grip well and cut clearly. The Lineman pliers cost about 4X what Craftsman cost... It doesn't look like Craftsman has a
    plier comparable to the KNIPEX.

    I guess you have to ask yourself what you expect of your tools. Me... I've mostly got professional quality tools now as I got fed up with using crappy tools. 40-45 years ago I turned a wrench in a bicycle shop for a living...
    we had a lot of Craftsman tools originally but as they wore out (and were replaced for free and worn out again) they were replaced by higher quality tools such as Park.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to nospam.grossboj@nospam.earthlink.ne on Mon Jan 24 20:53:00 2022
    On Mon, 24 Jan 2022 15:48:11 -0500, "John Grossbohlin" <nospam.grossboj@nospam.earthlink.net> wrote:

    "10x" wrote in message >news:0001HW.279D7B230253AB9F700001BF438F@news.giganews.com...

    On Jan 22, 2022, krw@notreal.com wrote
    (in article<vh5puglsujc43grrtkaqn3ne0buvnnfm1c@4ax.com>):

    Craftsman from that age made some more than decent tools. wish I
    still had my wrenches and sockets. I have a stainless screwdriver set
    from the early '70s that are pretty good.

    I bought my first set of Craftsman tools when I was in the Navy, and >>stationed in Pensacola, FL back in1971. They were purchased as a set >>consisting of something like 200 pieces, where every Allen wrench, etc. was >>counted as a piece along with the included steel tool box.

    Im proud to say that they are all still in my possession, minus one or two >>misplaced Allen wrenches over the years, and still serving me well.

    I wonder if the Craftsman brand carried by Lowes is anywhere near the same >>quality?

    The Craftsman sockets from the 60s were high quality thin walled sockets. My >father still has most of a set (the whole set likely still exists and the >pieces will be found after he passes away... kind of like when we cleaned
    out my brother's place). By the late 70s the sockets were much thicker...
    The set I bought about 1978 wasnt nearly as good... much thicker walls
    which means they didn't fit into the spaces that the older sockets fit
    (e.g., some areas of engines where there was little clearance).

    Exactly. A mechanic friend used Craftsman because, he said, they were
    just as good as Snap-On, without the truck. Those days are long gone.

    I've gotten screw driver sets over the years from Craftsman (now referred to >as Craftsman Acetate Screwdrivers) and Stanley... the tips didn't hold up so >I bought I set of Klein (American made) screw drivers and there is no >comparison... The Kleins cost about 4X the price of the Craftsman and 2.5X >the Stanley. I recently bought a pair of Klein lineman pliers and KNIPEX
    twin grip slip joint pliers (American made) and they are far superior to the >Craftsman pliers I have. They grip well and cut clearly. The Lineman pliers >cost about 4X what Craftsman cost... It doesn't look like Craftsman has a >plier comparable to the KNIPEX.

    I looked at briefly Klein screwdrivers the other day (had to buy a
    larger cable cutter). Most of them were insulated, which I really
    don't have a need for. I've been doing some electrical work for the
    last couple of weeks (it goes slow with 1/2 a right hand) but have
    never seen the need. The power is always off and even if it weren't
    my fingers would be in the mess.

    We talked, here, about this recently. I have a drawer full of
    screwdrivers. Some are OK but most aren't worth using. The steel is so
    soft that they just round out. Some suggested Wera but I don't like
    the handles.

    I guess you have to ask yourself what you expect of your tools. Me... I've >mostly got professional quality tools now as I got fed up with using crappy >tools. 40-45 years ago I turned a wrench in a bicycle shop for a living...
    we had a lot of Craftsman tools originally but as they wore out (and were >replaced for free and worn out again) they were replaced by higher quality >tools such as Park.

    I certainly but "the best" WW and household maintenance tools but I
    buy cheap (read: disposable) mechanic's tools. I don't work on
    engines or anything automotive anymore so thin walls aren't important.
    If they drive lag screws, good enough. If I had a use for them, I'd
    buy better but HF is good enough.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From J. Clarke@21:1/5 to nospam.grossboj@nospam.earthlink.ne on Mon Jan 24 22:33:56 2022
    On Mon, 24 Jan 2022 15:48:11 -0500, "John Grossbohlin" <nospam.grossboj@nospam.earthlink.net> wrote:

    "10x" wrote in message >news:0001HW.279D7B230253AB9F700001BF438F@news.giganews.com...

    On Jan 22, 2022, krw@notreal.com wrote
    (in article<vh5puglsujc43grrtkaqn3ne0buvnnfm1c@4ax.com>):

    Craftsman from that age made some more than decent tools. wish I
    still had my wrenches and sockets. I have a stainless screwdriver set
    from the early '70s that are pretty good.

    I bought my first set of Craftsman® tools when I was in the Navy, and >>stationed in Pensacola, FL back in1971. They were purchased as a set >>consisting of something like 200 pieces, where every Allen wrench, etc. was >>counted as a piece along with the included steel tool box.

    I’m proud to say that they are all still in my possession, minus one or two >>misplaced Allen wrenches over the years, and still serving me well.

    I wonder if the Craftsman® brand carried by Lowes is anywhere near the same >>quality?

    The Craftsman sockets from the 60s were high quality thin walled sockets. My >father still has most of a set (the whole set likely still exists and the >pieces will be found after he passes away... kind of like when we cleaned
    out my brother's place). By the late 70s the sockets were much thicker...
    The set I bought about 1978 wasn’t nearly as good... much thicker walls >which means they didn't fit into the spaces that the older sockets fit
    (e.g., some areas of engines where there was little clearance).

    I've gotten screw driver sets over the years from Craftsman (now referred to >as Craftsman Acetate Screwdrivers) and Stanley... the tips didn't hold up so >I bought I set of Klein (American made) screw drivers and there is no >comparison... The Kleins cost about 4X the price of the Craftsman and 2.5X >the Stanley. I recently bought a pair of Klein lineman pliers and KNIPEX
    twin grip slip joint pliers (American made)

    I'd be concerned about that--KNIPEX tools are supposed to be _German_
    made.

    and they are far superior to the
    Craftsman pliers I have. They grip well and cut clearly. The Lineman pliers >cost about 4X what Craftsman cost... It doesn't look like Craftsman has a >plier comparable to the KNIPEX.

    I guess you have to ask yourself what you expect of your tools. Me... I've >mostly got professional quality tools now as I got fed up with using crappy >tools. 40-45 years ago I turned a wrench in a bicycle shop for a living...
    we had a lot of Craftsman tools originally but as they wore out (and were >replaced for free and worn out again) they were replaced by higher quality >tools such as Park.


    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Puckdropper@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Tue Jan 25 04:42:11 2022
    krw@notreal.com wrote in
    news:umkuugl7kc4ov88qnih6dpn6kb0bp6rio4@4ax.com:

    We talked, here, about this recently. I have a drawer full of
    screwdrivers. Some are OK but most aren't worth using. The steel is so
    soft that they just round out. Some suggested Wera but I don't like
    the handles.

    At my FIL's place, he produced a screwdriver that was so soft the tip was
    junk. I had brought a small sharpening stone and after just a few minutes
    on the stone it was back to looking like a screwdriver again.

    Trying to use the screwdriver was impossible, by the time we gave up it
    looked like a "jigsaw puzzle with a couple of pieces gone."

    Softest thing I've ever seen.

    Puckdropper

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Grossbohlin@21:1/5 to nospam.grossboj@nospam.earthlink.ne on Mon Jan 24 23:58:16 2022
    "J. Clarke" wrote in message news:jmruug5mla6ikm5mrc767lj3f9io06csv5@4ax.com...

    On Mon, 24 Jan 2022 15:48:11 -0500, "John Grossbohlin" <nospam.grossboj@nospam.earthlink.net> wrote:


    I've gotten screw driver sets over the years from Craftsman (now referred >>to
    as Craftsman Acetate Screwdrivers) and Stanley... the tips didn't hold up >>so
    I bought I set of Klein (American made) screw drivers and there is no >>comparison... The Kleins cost about 4X the price of the Craftsman and 2.5X >>the Stanley. I recently bought a pair of Klein lineman pliers and KNIPEX >>twin grip slip joint pliers (American made)

    I'd be concerned about that--KNIPEX tools are supposed to be _German_
    made.

    Bad editing on my part! I rephrased the paragraph and hosed it! LOL

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From whit3rd@21:1/5 to Puckdropper on Tue Jan 25 00:09:11 2022
    On Monday, January 24, 2022 at 8:42:15 PM UTC-8, Puckdropper wrote:
    k...@notreal.com wrote in
    news:umkuugl7kc4ov88qn...@4ax.com:
    We talked, here, about this recently. I have a drawer full of
    screwdrivers. Some are OK but most aren't worth using. The steel is so
    soft that they just round out. Some suggested Wera but I don't like
    the handles.
    At my FIL's place, he produced a screwdriver that was so soft the tip was junk. I had brought a small sharpening stone and after just a few minutes
    on the stone it was back to looking like a screwdriver again.

    Trying to use the screwdriver was impossible, by the time we gave up it looked like a "jigsaw puzzle with a couple of pieces gone."

    Yeah; there's a potential cure for that, though. If you can grind off the soft tip, and braze or weld
    a good-quality tip from the 1/4" hex offerings, a useful handle can have a variety of
    things on the end, during its life. My more elaborate plan is to use a lathe to make
    coupler rods with a taper bored in each end, and fit the handle-shank-coupler-tip with
    braze, or solder, or even just good epoxy. The hard metal of the tip will have to
    be accurately ground to a taper, but I've got a lathe and other tooling. Unlike swap-a-tip
    drivers, the taper fit makes a nonloose, perfect feeling hand-to-fastener connection.

    There's one LONG shank screwdriver that I've wanted to put a good new Philips tip on for years.
    And occasionally, I want other tips on long shanks, because it's easy to aim 'em straight if
    you can sight down a long driver

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Scott Lurndal@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Tue Jan 25 14:36:46 2022
    krw@notreal.com writes:
    On Mon, 24 Jan 2022 15:48:11 -0500, "John Grossbohlin" ><nospam.grossboj@nospam.earthlink.net> wrote:

    I looked at briefly Klein screwdrivers the other day (had to buy a
    larger cable cutter). Most of them were insulated, which I really
    don't have a need for. I've been doing some electrical work for the
    last couple of weeks (it goes slow with 1/2 a right hand) but have
    never seen the need. The power is always off and even if it weren't
    my fingers would be in the mess.

    We talked, here, about this recently. I have a drawer full of
    screwdrivers. Some are OK but most aren't worth using. The steel is so
    soft that they just round out. Some suggested Wera but I don't like
    the handles.

    Again, I'd recommend checking flea markets and antique stores.

    I'm quite happy with my 80's vintage Vermont American screwdrivers.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to All on Tue Jan 25 14:04:06 2022
    On Tue, 25 Jan 2022 04:42:11 GMT, Puckdropper <puckdropper@yahoo.com>
    wrote:

    krw@notreal.com wrote in
    news:umkuugl7kc4ov88qnih6dpn6kb0bp6rio4@4ax.com:

    We talked, here, about this recently. I have a drawer full of
    screwdrivers. Some are OK but most aren't worth using. The steel is so
    soft that they just round out. Some suggested Wera but I don't like
    the handles.

    At my FIL's place, he produced a screwdriver that was so soft the tip was >junk. I had brought a small sharpening stone and after just a few minutes
    on the stone it was back to looking like a screwdriver again.

    Trying to use the screwdriver was impossible, by the time we gave up it >looked like a "jigsaw puzzle with a couple of pieces gone."

    Was its name Leroy Brown?

    Softest thing I've ever seen.

    Yep, a drawer full of "Jims" (Leroy's cousins).

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From John Grossbohlin@21:1/5 to nospam.grossboj@nospam.earthlink.ne on Tue Jan 25 18:42:12 2022
    wrote in message news:umkuugl7kc4ov88qnih6dpn6kb0bp6rio4@4ax.com...

    On Mon, 24 Jan 2022 15:48:11 -0500, "John Grossbohlin" <nospam.grossboj@nospam.earthlink.net> wrote:

    I've gotten screw driver sets over the years from Craftsman (now referred >>to
    as Craftsman Acetate Screwdrivers) and Stanley... the tips didn't hold up >>so
    I bought I set of Klein (American made) screw drivers and there is no >>comparison...

    snip

    I looked at briefly Klein screwdrivers the other day (had to buy a
    larger cable cutter). Most of them were insulated, which I really
    don't have a need for. I've been doing some electrical work for the
    last couple of weeks (it goes slow with 1/2 a right hand) but have
    never seen the need. The power is always off and even if it weren't
    my fingers would be in the mess.

    We talked, here, about this recently. I have a drawer full of
    screwdrivers. Some are OK but most aren't worth using. The steel is so
    soft that they just round out. Some suggested Wera but I don't like
    the handles.

    I've come to like the Klein screwdriver handles. They afford a much better
    grip than the Craftsman Acetate and are comparable to the Stanley set I have that has soft feeling molded dull-yellow handles. Mine have the black rubber Cushion Grip only, not the insulated shafts. Klein does make screwdrivers
    with insulated shafts but I don't really have a use for them.

    I recently ordered some more Klein stuff... combo tip for electrical connectors, 1/8" cabinet, #0 Phillips, bit holder, and a set of nut drivers. That should fill out my screwdriver needs!

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)