• Portable Toolkit

    From Puckdropper@21:1/5 to All on Sun Jan 2 15:01:44 2022
    I need something lightweight and portable for basic household projects. So
    far on this trip I've needed a #2 Phillips screwdriver, wrench (of unknown size, adjustable would be great) and pocket knife. I've looked at Swiss
    Army knives and Leathermen and also thought about putting together a small
    kit myself, but am not really sure which way to go.

    A small autoranging multimeter would be helpful, too. I wanted to check a
    fuse and didn't have anything handy to do it with.

    Size and weight are big factors, it's going to go in checked luggage when
    we visit my wife's family.

    Any suggestions on what to look at?

    Puckdropper

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  • From knuttle@21:1/5 to Puckdropper on Sun Jan 2 10:59:15 2022
    On 1/2/2022 10:01 AM, Puckdropper wrote:
    I need something lightweight and portable for basic household projects. So far on this trip I've needed a #2 Phillips screwdriver, wrench (of unknown size, adjustable would be great) and pocket knife. I've looked at Swiss
    Army knives and Leathermen and also thought about putting together a small kit myself, but am not really sure which way to go.

    A small autoranging multimeter would be helpful, too. I wanted to check a fuse and didn't have anything handy to do it with.

    Size and weight are big factors, it's going to go in checked luggage when
    we visit my wife's family.

    Any suggestions on what to look at?

    Puckdropper
    There are several lite weight multi meters at places like Harbor freight.

    I would get a pair of roto grip pliers, I got mine a a Christmas
    present and now they have become essential. Mine are similar to this https://www.amazon.com/Glitter-Sun-V-Notch-Adjusting-Pliers/dp/B07RNJPQDG?ref_=ast_sto_dp&th=1&psc=1

    They may fulfill you need for wrenches of several sizes.

    While they sound useful, the folding tools are a literally a pain. I
    don't know how many time I have pinched the skin on my hands in the
    folding joints.

    I would also consider a multi screw driver with several bits that can be
    stored in the screwdriver itself. There are several types.

    search "interchangeable screwdriver"

    Lastly, do you really want to try to fly during this time with all of
    the cancellations? About 10 years ago we lived in Indianapolis, and my daughters lived in Raleigh. At that time I could drive between the two
    cities as fast as I could fly, including the drive to and from the
    airports, and, the airport waiting and hassle.

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  • From hubops@ccanoemail.ca@21:1/5 to All on Sun Jan 2 11:56:59 2022
    On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 15:01:44 GMT, Puckdropper <email@example.com>
    wrote:

    I need something lightweight and portable for basic household projects. So >far on this trip I've needed a #2 Phillips screwdriver, wrench (of unknown >size, adjustable would be great) and pocket knife. I've looked at Swiss
    Army knives and Leathermen and also thought about putting together a small >kit myself, but am not really sure which way to go.
    A small autoranging multimeter would be helpful, too. I wanted to check a >fuse and didn't have anything handy to do it with.
    Size and weight are big factors, it's going to go in checked luggage when
    we visit my wife's family.
    Any suggestions on what to look at?
    Puckdropper


    Good luck.
    My "car" toolkit - of just a few necessities - has grown into
    a toolbox + , over the years. ... and I still find myself wanting
    something at times .. this is likewise for family visits where
    they either don't own / can't find the tools needed.
    I can't really imagine an airplane friendly kit.
    I was going to suggest the multi screwdriver that Lee Valley
    once sold - no longer apparently - very similar to this Klein
    but not ratcheting :
    https://tinyurl.com/2amtuc8t

    : good bit storage & lots of bits <double-ended good quality bits>
    : long shank < I hate those fat short-shank multis >
    John T.

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  • From J. Clarke@21:1/5 to keith_nuttle@sbcglobal.net on Sun Jan 2 13:25:50 2022
    On Sun, 2 Jan 2022 10:59:15 -0500, knuttle
    <keith_nuttle@sbcglobal.net> wrote:


    On 1/2/2022 10:01 AM, Puckdropper wrote:
    I need something lightweight and portable for basic household projects. So >> far on this trip I've needed a #2 Phillips screwdriver, wrench (of unknown >> size, adjustable would be great) and pocket knife. I've looked at Swiss
    Army knives and Leathermen and also thought about putting together a small >> kit myself, but am not really sure which way to go.

    A small autoranging multimeter would be helpful, too. I wanted to check a >> fuse and didn't have anything handy to do it with.

    Size and weight are big factors, it's going to go in checked luggage when
    we visit my wife's family.

    Any suggestions on what to look at?

    Puckdropper
    There are several lite weight multi meters at places like Harbor freight.

    I would get a pair of roto grip pliers, I got mine a a Christmas
    present and now they have become essential. Mine are similar to this >https://www.amazon.com/Glitter-Sun-V-Notch-Adjusting-Pliers/dp/B07RNJPQDG?ref_=ast_sto_dp&th=1&psc=1

    They may fulfill you need for wrenches of several sizes.

    Alternatively, take a look at these: <https://www.irwin.com/tools/locking-tools/the-original-locking-wrenches> They're intended to be used as flare-nut wrenches and they really
    work, although they can crush a brass nut. I don't recall who turned
    me on to them but they'll take off fittings that a Snap-On flare nut
    wrench of the correct size just rounds off.

    While they sound useful, the folding tools are a literally a pain. I
    don't know how many time I have pinched the skin on my hands in the
    folding joints.

    I would also consider a multi screw driver with several bits that can be >stored in the screwdriver itself. There are several types.

    search "interchangeable screwdriver"

    Lastly, do you really want to try to fly during this time with all of
    the cancellations? About 10 years ago we lived in Indianapolis, and my >daughters lived in Raleigh. At that time I could drive between the two >cities as fast as I could fly, including the drive to and from the
    airports, and, the airport waiting and hassle.

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  • From J. Clarke@21:1/5 to All on Sun Jan 2 13:16:34 2022
    On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 15:01:44 GMT, Puckdropper <email@example.com>
    wrote:

    I need something lightweight and portable for basic household projects. So >far on this trip I've needed a #2 Phillips screwdriver, wrench (of unknown >size, adjustable would be great) and pocket knife. I've looked at Swiss
    Army knives and Leathermen and also thought about putting together a small >kit myself, but am not really sure which way to go.

    Start out by writing down what you want to be able to do, then figure
    out what you need in order to do it. Then look for solutions.

    A small autoranging multimeter would be helpful, too. I wanted to check a >fuse and didn't have anything handy to do it with.

    Size and weight are big factors, it's going to go in checked luggage when
    we visit my wife's family.

    Don't get something fancy enough that the TSA boys are likely to
    pilfer it.

    Any suggestions on what to look at?

    Puckdropper

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  • From hubops@ccanoemail.ca@21:1/5 to jclarke.873638@gmail.com on Sun Jan 2 13:39:37 2022
    On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 13:16:34 -0500, J. Clarke
    <jclarke.873638@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 15:01:44 GMT, Puckdropper <email@example.com>
    wrote:

    I need something lightweight and portable for basic household projects.
    A small autoranging multimeter would be helpful, too. I wanted to check a >>fuse and didn't have anything handy to do it with.
    Size and weight are big factors, it's going to go in checked luggage when >>we visit my wife's family.

    Don't get something fancy enough that the TSA boys are likely to
    pilfer it.



    I wonder if a multimeter would attract attention -
    who travels with a multimeter ! ? :-)
    John T.

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  • From J. Clarke@21:1/5 to hubops@ccanoemail.ca on Sun Jan 2 14:39:40 2022
    On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 13:39:37 -0500, hubops@ccanoemail.ca wrote:

    On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 13:16:34 -0500, J. Clarke
    <jclarke.873638@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 15:01:44 GMT, Puckdropper <email@example.com>
    wrote:

    I need something lightweight and portable for basic household projects.
    A small autoranging multimeter would be helpful, too. I wanted to check a >>>fuse and didn't have anything handy to do it with.
    Size and weight are big factors, it's going to go in checked luggage when >>>we visit my wife's family.

    Don't get something fancy enough that the TSA boys are likely to
    pilfer it.



    I wonder if a multimeter would attract attention -
    who travels with a multimeter ! ? :-)

    I don't think it would attract attention per se, but a nice Fluke is
    more likely to mysteriously disappear than a cheap Harbor Freight.

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  • From DerbyDad03@21:1/5 to Puckdropper on Sun Jan 2 11:37:25 2022
    On Sunday, January 2, 2022 at 10:01:48 AM UTC-5, Puckdropper wrote:
    I need something lightweight and portable for basic household projects. So far on this trip I've needed a #2 Phillips screwdriver, wrench (of unknown size, adjustable would be great) and pocket knife. I've looked at Swiss
    Army knives and Leathermen and also thought about putting together a small kit myself, but am not really sure which way to go.

    A small autoranging multimeter would be helpful, too. I wanted to check a fuse and didn't have anything handy to do it with.

    Size and weight are big factors, it's going to go in checked luggage when
    we visit my wife's family.

    Any suggestions on what to look at?

    Puckdropper

    Does the owner not have any tools? Will you make this trip often?

    Wait until you get there and then buy what you need and leave it there.
    A belated Christmas gift.

    or...

    Once you have your list, order tools online and have it shipped there.

    BTW Milwaukee makes a great 13-in-1 driver tool. I have 3 of them.

    Straight bits, Phillips bits, Robertson bits and nut drivers. This alone
    would make a great gift.

    https://www.homedepot.com/p/Milwaukee-13-in-1-Multi-Tip-Cushion-Grip-Screwdriver-48-22-2880/305456601

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  • From pyotr filipivich@21:1/5 to All on Sun Jan 2 12:04:28 2022
    hubops@ccanoemail.ca on Sun, 02 Jan 2022 11:56:59 -0500 typed in rec.woodworking the following:

    A small autoranging multimeter would be helpful, too. I wanted to check a >>fuse and didn't have anything handy to do it with.
    Size and weight are big factors, it's going to go in checked luggage when >>we visit my wife's family.
    Any suggestions on what to look at?

    Yes, whatever you get, ship it FedEx. 1) No hassles with the TSA Security Theatre.
    2) possibility exists that it might get there before you.
    3) one less thing to lug through airports.

    Yes, you will wind up possibly spending more to ship it, but ...
    --
    pyotr filipivich
    This Week's Panel: Us & Them - Eliminating Them.
    Next Month's Panel: Having eliminated the old Them(tm)
    Selecting who insufficiently Woke(tm) as to serve as the new Them(tm)

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  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to All on Sun Jan 2 16:01:03 2022
    On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 15:01:44 GMT, Puckdropper <email@example.com>
    wrote:

    I need something lightweight and portable for basic household projects. So >far on this trip I've needed a #2 Phillips screwdriver, wrench (of unknown >size, adjustable would be great) and pocket knife. I've looked at Swiss
    Army knives and Leathermen and also thought about putting together a small >kit myself, but am not really sure which way to go.

    Friends would never be without a Leatherman. I haven't found them to
    be very useful. All of the "Swiss Army knife sorts of tools are
    mediocre to bad at all tasks. They're awkward to use and none have
    hardened tools. Together, this is just asking for cam-out and
    stripped driver AND screw.

    A small autoranging multimeter would be helpful, too. I wanted to check a >fuse and didn't have anything handy to do it with.

    A non-contact circuit tester? They're small.

    Size and weight are big factors, it's going to go in checked luggage when
    we visit my wife's family.

    Yeah, don't make them look like they're worth any money. Stuff seems
    to climb out of luggage and run away.

    Any suggestions on what to look at.

    Whatever, I'd include a real #2 Phillips screwdriver and perhaps a
    3/16" or 1/4" flat blade. Short but not stubby.

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  • From Clare Snyder@21:1/5 to All on Sun Jan 2 15:40:04 2022
    On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 15:01:44 GMT, Puckdropper <email@example.com>
    wrote:

    I need something lightweight and portable for basic household projects. So >far on this trip I've needed a #2 Phillips screwdriver, wrench (of unknown >size, adjustable would be great) and pocket knife. I've looked at Swiss
    Army knives and Leathermen and also thought about putting together a small >kit myself, but am not really sure which way to go.

    A small autoranging multimeter would be helpful, too. I wanted to check a >fuse and didn't have anything handy to do it with.

    Size and weight are big factors, it's going to go in checked luggage when
    we visit my wife's family.

    Any suggestions on what to look at?

    Puckdropper


    Has quite the "situation" back in '76 when a friend and his fiance
    wanted to go th the Tulsa Street Rod Nationals in his chocked
    channeled 396 Model A coupe and had no way to carry any luggage. He
    was trying to figure out how to put a trailer hitch on the old "A
    Bone" when I suggested I go along to Tulsa with the '57 Fargo and his
    fiance's friend decided to go along with me in the truck. I had my
    complete mechanic's tool kit under the tanneau cover along with the
    camping equipment and other luggage. The US border agents asked where
    I was going, and what Iwas planning on doing -- and WHY I had a
    quarter ton of tools in the truck!!!! Was I planning on working while
    in the states??? I pointed to the model A in the next lane and said
    "would YOU drive a 48 year old car and a 19 year old truck to oklahoma
    without tools??? and that I'd be just THRILLED if I never had to
    unlock the box. I was able to register them so there would be no
    question of "importation" bringing them back home

    When on a "service call" to the east coast, on a domestic flight, I
    was able to hand my "tool bag" to the pilot before boarding the plane
    and pick it up from him at my destination. Goof thing I had not put
    them in checked luggage because I didn't see THAT for 3 days - - -
    (and 2 further stops)

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  • From J. Clarke@21:1/5 to All on Sun Jan 2 16:39:53 2022
    On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 15:40:04 -0500, Clare Snyder <clare@snyder.on.ca>
    wrote:

    On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 15:01:44 GMT, Puckdropper <email@example.com>
    wrote:

    I need something lightweight and portable for basic household projects. So >>far on this trip I've needed a #2 Phillips screwdriver, wrench (of unknown >>size, adjustable would be great) and pocket knife. I've looked at Swiss >>Army knives and Leathermen and also thought about putting together a small >>kit myself, but am not really sure which way to go.

    A small autoranging multimeter would be helpful, too. I wanted to check a >>fuse and didn't have anything handy to do it with.

    Size and weight are big factors, it's going to go in checked luggage when >>we visit my wife's family.

    Any suggestions on what to look at?

    Puckdropper


    Has quite the "situation" back in '76 when a friend and his fiance
    wanted to go th the Tulsa Street Rod Nationals in his chocked
    channeled 396 Model A coupe and had no way to carry any luggage. He
    was trying to figure out how to put a trailer hitch on the old "A
    Bone" when I suggested I go along to Tulsa with the '57 Fargo and his >fiance's friend decided to go along with me in the truck. I had my
    complete mechanic's tool kit under the tanneau cover along with the
    camping equipment and other luggage. The US border agents asked where
    I was going, and what Iwas planning on doing -- and WHY I had a
    quarter ton of tools in the truck!!!! Was I planning on working while
    in the states??? I pointed to the model A in the next lane and said
    "would YOU drive a 48 year old car and a 19 year old truck to oklahoma >without tools??? and that I'd be just THRILLED if I never had to
    unlock the box. I was able to register them so there would be no
    question of "importation" bringing them back home

    When on a "service call" to the east coast, on a domestic flight, I
    was able to hand my "tool bag" to the pilot before boarding the plane
    and pick it up from him at my destination. Goof thing I had not put
    them in checked luggage because I didn't see THAT for 3 days - - -
    (and 2 further stops)

    That was a different time. Today the only way that would work would
    be if you knew the pilot before hand and could arrange it outside the
    security area.

    I remember buying a propeller blade a first class ticket on Delta and
    riding in the seat next to it. Can't do that anymore either.

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  • From Leon@21:1/5 to Puckdropper on Mon Jan 3 10:14:42 2022
    On 1/2/2022 9:01 AM, Puckdropper wrote:
    I need something lightweight and portable for basic household projects. So far on this trip I've needed a #2 Phillips screwdriver, wrench (of unknown size, adjustable would be great) and pocket knife. I've looked at Swiss
    Army knives and Leathermen and also thought about putting together a small kit myself, but am not really sure which way to go.

    A small autoranging multimeter would be helpful, too. I wanted to check a fuse and didn't have anything handy to do it with.

    Size and weight are big factors, it's going to go in checked luggage when
    we visit my wife's family.

    Any suggestions on what to look at?

    Puckdropper


    I got a Leatherman almost 40 years ago. I do not recall ever using it.
    It was a gift.

    IMHO these tools are more of a novelty, a conversation piece. They
    seldom are small enough or large enough to be of any use. Yes there
    will be easy spots to get to that have nothing in the way but quite
    often you need to reach a spot in a narrow area or need more leverage
    than the tool would afford you.

    I would rather sacrifice room for the right tools that are more likely
    to work in tricky situations.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From hubops@ccanoemail.ca@21:1/5 to All on Mon Jan 3 11:23:46 2022


    I got a Leatherman almost 40 years ago. I do not recall ever using it.
    It was a gift.


    Ditto.
    I kept mine with the camping gear and even then ~ never used it.
    I'd go to my car-tool-box or pocket knife.
    John T.

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  • From Just Wondering@21:1/5 to Leon on Mon Jan 3 10:30:28 2022
    On 1/3/2022 9:14 AM, Leon wrote:
    On 1/2/2022 9:01 AM, Puckdropper wrote:
    I need something lightweight and portable for basic household
    projects.  So
    far on this trip I've needed a #2 Phillips screwdriver, wrench (of
    unknown
    size, adjustable would be great) and pocket knife.  I've looked at Swiss
    Army knives and Leathermen and also thought about putting together a
    small
    kit myself, but am not really sure which way to go.

    A small autoranging multimeter would be helpful, too.  I wanted to
    check a
    fuse and didn't have anything handy to do it with.

    Size and weight are big factors, it's going to go in checked luggage when
    we visit my wife's family.

    Any suggestions on what to look at?

    Puckdropper


    I got a Leatherman almost 40 years ago.  I do not recall ever using it.
     It was a gift.

    I have a multitool in my urban bugout bag, which is for emergency
    use only. (Think having to leave home for a week due to fire,
    earthquake etc.} If things go right, I will never use it.

    IMHO these tools are more of a novelty, a conversation piece.  They
    seldom are small enough or large enough to be of any use.  Yes there
    will be easy spots to get to that have nothing in the way but quite
    often you need to reach a spot in a narrow area or need more leverage
    than the tool would afford you.

    I would rather sacrifice room for the right tools that are more likely
    to work in tricky situations.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Brian Welch@21:1/5 to All on Mon Jan 3 13:07:20 2022

    I have a multitool in my urban bugout bag, which is for emergency
    use only. (Think having to leave home for a week due to fire,
    earthquake etc.} If things go right, I will never use it.


    I keep a Leatherman (no idea of the model, received as gifts around the holidays over the years) in each of our vehicles, just in case...
    So far, been used to cut twine/lashing for roof rack mounted purchases from big box stores and Christmas trees...
    As stated by others, I can only hope that these are the only times that I will truly need them...

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  • From J. Clarke@21:1/5 to Just Wondering on Mon Jan 3 15:59:07 2022
    On Mon, 3 Jan 2022 10:30:28 -0700, Just Wondering <JW@jw.com> wrote:

    On 1/3/2022 9:14 AM, Leon wrote:
    On 1/2/2022 9:01 AM, Puckdropper wrote:
    I need something lightweight and portable for basic household
    projects.  So
    far on this trip I've needed a #2 Phillips screwdriver, wrench (of
    unknown
    size, adjustable would be great) and pocket knife.  I've looked at Swiss >>> Army knives and Leathermen and also thought about putting together a
    small
    kit myself, but am not really sure which way to go.

    A small autoranging multimeter would be helpful, too.  I wanted to
    check a
    fuse and didn't have anything handy to do it with.

    Size and weight are big factors, it's going to go in checked luggage when >>> we visit my wife's family.

    Any suggestions on what to look at?

    Puckdropper


    I got a Leatherman almost 40 years ago.  I do not recall ever using it.
     It was a gift.

    I have a multitool in my urban bugout bag, which is for emergency
    use only. (Think having to leave home for a week due to fire,
    earthquake etc.} If things go right, I will never use it.

    IMHO these tools are more of a novelty, a conversation piece.  They
    seldom are small enough or large enough to be of any use.  Yes there
    will be easy spots to get to that have nothing in the way but quite
    often you need to reach a spot in a narrow area or need more leverage
    than the tool would afford you.

    I would rather sacrifice room for the right tools that are more likely
    to work in tricky situations.

    There are two multitools I have used that work well.

    One is the leatherman Micra, which does a dandy job of trimming
    fingernails, tightening eyeglasses, and opening envelopes. It used to
    live on my key chain until I started working somewhere with an
    absolutely no knives policy (I asked security if it was OK and while
    they were fine with it, HR said NO NO NO in anguished tones and
    started an investigation to find out why anybody would even _think_
    about possessing such a horrible weapon).

    The other is the Swiss Army Cybertool, which I used to carry when I
    was fixing computers for a living--it has every tool I needed day to
    day including the big and little Torx drivers. I kept a Jensen
    toolkit in the car but only brought it in on the rare occasions that I encountered something the Cybertool wouldn't do (usually crimp network
    cables) or when it was necessary to "look professional".

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  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to jclarke.873638@gmail.com on Mon Jan 3 22:28:38 2022
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 15:59:07 -0500, J. Clarke
    <jclarke.873638@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Mon, 3 Jan 2022 10:30:28 -0700, Just Wondering <JW@jw.com> wrote:

    On 1/3/2022 9:14 AM, Leon wrote:
    On 1/2/2022 9:01 AM, Puckdropper wrote:
    I need something lightweight and portable for basic household
    projects. So
    far on this trip I've needed a #2 Phillips screwdriver, wrench (of
    unknown
    size, adjustable would be great) and pocket knife. I've looked at Swiss >>>> Army knives and Leathermen and also thought about putting together a
    small
    kit myself, but am not really sure which way to go.

    A small autoranging multimeter would be helpful, too. I wanted to
    check a
    fuse and didn't have anything handy to do it with.

    Size and weight are big factors, it's going to go in checked luggage when >>>> we visit my wife's family.

    Any suggestions on what to look at?

    Puckdropper


    I got a Leatherman almost 40 years ago. I do not recall ever using it.
    It was a gift.

    I have a multitool in my urban bugout bag, which is for emergency
    use only. (Think having to leave home for a week due to fire,
    earthquake etc.} If things go right, I will never use it.

    IMHO these tools are more of a novelty, a conversation piece. They
    seldom are small enough or large enough to be of any use. Yes there
    will be easy spots to get to that have nothing in the way but quite
    often you need to reach a spot in a narrow area or need more leverage
    than the tool would afford you.

    I would rather sacrifice room for the right tools that are more likely
    to work in tricky situations.

    There are two multitools I have used that work well.

    One is the leatherman Micra, which does a dandy job of trimming
    fingernails, tightening eyeglasses, and opening envelopes. It used to
    live on my key chain until I started working somewhere with an
    absolutely no knives policy (I asked security if it was OK and while
    they were fine with it, HR said NO NO NO in anguished tones and
    started an investigation to find out why anybody would even _think_
    about possessing such a horrible weapon).

    I bet they wouldn't like my key "ring". <https://www.leevalley.com/en-us/shop/home/personal-accessories/carabiners-and-keyrings/110013-keysmart-pro-key-holder?item=45K0771>
    I've worried about what the TSA would say.

    The other is the Swiss Army Cybertool, which I used to carry when I
    was fixing computers for a living--it has every tool I needed day to
    day including the big and little Torx drivers. I kept a Jensen
    toolkit in the car but only brought it in on the rare occasions that I >encountered something the Cybertool wouldn't do (usually crimp network >cables) or when it was necessary to "look professional".

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From pyotr filipivich@21:1/5 to All on Mon Jan 3 22:28:55 2022
    Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> on Mon, 3 Jan 2022 10:14:42 -0600 typed
    in rec.woodworking the following:


    I got a Leatherman almost 40 years ago. I do not recall ever using it.
    It was a gift.

    I've got two. Got the first one working in a hardware store. Flip
    it open one handed (eventually it got used enough) and I had "tool"
    for a quick "action".

    IMHO these tools are more of a novelty, a conversation piece. They
    seldom are small enough or large enough to be of any use. Yes there
    will be easy spots to get to that have nothing in the way but quite
    often you need to reach a spot in a narrow area or need more leverage
    than the tool would afford you.

    If your choice is a pair of pliers / screwdriver, what ever in
    hand, or waiting until you can get it back to the shop where you have
    the Right Tool - it is a personal decision. Having a 3" saw blade
    handy when I got stuck behind something and needed to cut something
    loose, made it worth it.

    I would rather sacrifice room for the right tools that are more likely
    to work in tricky situations.

    As I have said, I would not want to do a lot with one of these. At
    the same time, it is remarkable how much I have done with mine. Mine
    goes with me on the belt, even to church under the suit.


    --
    pyotr filipivich
    This Week's Panel: Us & Them - Eliminating Them.
    Next Month's Panel: Having eliminated the old Them(tm)
    Selecting who insufficiently Woke(tm) as to serve as the new Them(tm)

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DerbyDad03@21:1/5 to k...@notreal.com on Tue Jan 4 05:15:27 2022
    On Monday, January 3, 2022 at 10:28:42 PM UTC-5, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 15:59:07 -0500, J. Clarke
    <jclarke...@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Mon, 3 Jan 2022 10:30:28 -0700, Just Wondering <J...@jw.com> wrote:

    On 1/3/2022 9:14 AM, Leon wrote:
    On 1/2/2022 9:01 AM, Puckdropper wrote:
    I need something lightweight and portable for basic household
    projects. So
    far on this trip I've needed a #2 Phillips screwdriver, wrench (of
    unknown
    size, adjustable would be great) and pocket knife. I've looked at Swiss >>>> Army knives and Leathermen and also thought about putting together a >>>> small
    kit myself, but am not really sure which way to go.

    A small autoranging multimeter would be helpful, too. I wanted to
    check a
    fuse and didn't have anything handy to do it with.

    Size and weight are big factors, it's going to go in checked luggage when
    we visit my wife's family.

    Any suggestions on what to look at?

    Puckdropper


    I got a Leatherman almost 40 years ago. I do not recall ever using it. >>> It was a gift.

    I have a multitool in my urban bugout bag, which is for emergency
    use only. (Think having to leave home for a week due to fire,
    earthquake etc.} If things go right, I will never use it.

    IMHO these tools are more of a novelty, a conversation piece. They
    seldom are small enough or large enough to be of any use. Yes there
    will be easy spots to get to that have nothing in the way but quite
    often you need to reach a spot in a narrow area or need more leverage
    than the tool would afford you.

    I would rather sacrifice room for the right tools that are more likely >>> to work in tricky situations.

    There are two multitools I have used that work well.

    One is the leatherman Micra, which does a dandy job of trimming >fingernails, tightening eyeglasses, and opening envelopes. It used to
    live on my key chain until I started working somewhere with an
    absolutely no knives policy (I asked security if it was OK and while
    they were fine with it, HR said NO NO NO in anguished tones and
    started an investigation to find out why anybody would even _think_
    about possessing such a horrible weapon).
    I bet they wouldn't like my key "ring". <https://www.leevalley.com/en-us/shop/home/personal-accessories/carabiners-and-keyrings/110013-keysmart-pro-key-holder?item=45K0771>
    I've worried about what the TSA would say.


    I forget whether it was Trethewey or Silva, but on one of the ATOH shows they were talking about their favorite tools. Whoever it was said they have given dozens of their Leatherman tools to TSA since they put them their belt by habit.

    Could be BS...

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Bob La Londe@21:1/5 to Puckdropper on Tue Jan 4 10:56:53 2022
    On 1/2/2022 8:01 AM, Puckdropper wrote:
    I need something lightweight and portable for basic household projects. So far on this trip I've needed a #2 Phillips screwdriver, wrench (of unknown size, adjustable would be great) and pocket knife. I've looked at Swiss
    Army knives and Leathermen and also thought about putting together a small kit myself, but am not really sure which way to go.

    A small autoranging multimeter would be helpful, too. I wanted to check a fuse and didn't have anything handy to do it with.

    Size and weight are big factors, it's going to go in checked luggage when
    we visit my wife's family.

    Any suggestions on what to look at?

    Puckdropper


    Bucket Bag. Used them for years contracting. Paired with a small clip
    on tool pouch and parts pouch you have what you need right there for 90%
    of all projects... unless you are one of those people who likes to run
    up the clock walking back to the truck fifty times instead of actually
    thinking through the job before leaving the truck the first time. The
    pouches are for running up a ladder.

    Hint. Do not waste your money on hardware store buckets. They are crap
    that won't last. Old machine oil buckets and coolant buckets last much
    longer. Drywall mud buckets don't last either, but some paint buckets
    are ok.

    Alternatively if its going to be a prolonged project a tool cart is
    useful. You just have to be disciplined enough to empty the tool cart
    when you are done.

    --
    This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
    https://www.avg.com

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From hubops@ccanoemail.ca@21:1/5 to All on Tue Jan 4 13:35:44 2022
    On Tue, 4 Jan 2022 10:56:53 -0700, Bob La Londe <none@none.com99>
    wrote:

    On 1/2/2022 8:01 AM, Puckdropper wrote:
    I need something lightweight and portable for basic household projects. So >> far on this trip I've needed a #2 Phillips screwdriver, wrench (of unknown >> size, adjustable would be great) and pocket knife. I've looked at Swiss
    Army knives and Leathermen and also thought about putting together a small >> kit myself, but am not really sure which way to go.

    A small autoranging multimeter would be helpful, too. I wanted to check a >> fuse and didn't have anything handy to do it with.

    Size and weight are big factors, it's going to go in checked luggage when
    we visit my wife's family.

    Any suggestions on what to look at?

    Puckdropper


    Bucket Bag. Used them for years contracting. Paired with a small clip
    on tool pouch and parts pouch you have what you need right there for 90%
    of all projects... unless you are one of those people who likes to run
    up the clock walking back to the truck fifty times instead of actually >thinking through the job before leaving the truck the first time. The >pouches are for running up a ladder.

    Hint. Do not waste your money on hardware store buckets. They are crap
    that won't last. Old machine oil buckets and coolant buckets last much >longer. Drywall mud buckets don't last either, but some paint buckets
    are ok.

    Alternatively if its going to be a prolonged project a tool cart is
    useful. You just have to be disciplined enough to empty the tool cart
    when you are done.


    Should be interesting - getting that tool cart into
    the airport - let alone checked baggage ... ;-)
    John T.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Brian Welch@21:1/5 to hub...@ccanoemail.ca on Tue Jan 4 11:06:59 2022
    On Tuesday, January 4, 2022 at 1:33:52 PM UTC-5, hub...@ccanoemail.ca wrote:
    On Tue, 4 Jan 2022 10:56:53 -0700, Bob La Londe <no...@none.com99>
    wrote:
    On 1/2/2022 8:01 AM, Puckdropper wrote:
    I need something lightweight and portable for basic household projects. So
    far on this trip I've needed a #2 Phillips screwdriver, wrench (of unknown
    size, adjustable would be great) and pocket knife. I've looked at Swiss >> Army knives and Leathermen and also thought about putting together a small
    kit myself, but am not really sure which way to go.

    A small autoranging multimeter would be helpful, too. I wanted to check a >> fuse and didn't have anything handy to do it with.

    Size and weight are big factors, it's going to go in checked luggage when >> we visit my wife's family.

    Any suggestions on what to look at?

    Puckdropper


    Bucket Bag. Used them for years contracting. Paired with a small clip
    on tool pouch and parts pouch you have what you need right there for 90% >of all projects... unless you are one of those people who likes to run
    up the clock walking back to the truck fifty times instead of actually >thinking through the job before leaving the truck the first time. The >pouches are for running up a ladder.

    Hint. Do not waste your money on hardware store buckets. They are crap >that won't last. Old machine oil buckets and coolant buckets last much >longer. Drywall mud buckets don't last either, but some paint buckets
    are ok.

    Alternatively if its going to be a prolonged project a tool cart is >useful. You just have to be disciplined enough to empty the tool cart
    when you are done.
    Should be interesting - getting that tool cart into
    the airport - let alone checked baggage ... ;-)
    John T.
    A few years ago I was volunteered to build farm tables for our daughter's wedding on the other side of the country. I turned a bunch of legs at home which fit nicely in duffle bags at just under 50# per bag and became my checked luggage. I also stuffed
    some small tools in the duffles as well...Mission accomplished and on our way back I packed everything in carry-on and went thru TSA security...Apparently my 4 Kreg step drill bits were not acceptable and were commissioned to the "circular file"...
    Expensive lesson for me, but at least the jig was permitted to travel...

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From pyotr filipivich@21:1/5 to All on Tue Jan 4 11:30:51 2022
    J. Clarke <jclarke.873638@gmail.com> on Mon, 03 Jan 2022 15:59:07
    -0500 typed in rec.woodworking the following:

    I would rather sacrifice room for the right tools that are more likely
    to work in tricky situations.

    There are two multitools I have used that work well.

    One is the leatherman Micra, which does a dandy job of trimming
    fingernails, tightening eyeglasses, and opening envelopes. It used to
    live on my key chain until I started working somewhere with an
    absolutely no knives policy (I asked security if it was OK and while
    they were fine with it, HR said NO NO NO in anguished tones and
    started an investigation to find out why anybody would even _think_
    about possessing such a horrible weapon).

    I was working a temp job, and at the break the lead came and told
    me that HR said I wasn't allowed to have "a weapon" on me. And my
    little 3 inch mini tanto qualified. I responded along the lines of
    "That's not a weapon, that just a knife." to which he responded "I
    know, this isn't a weapon, I keep that ...", and bent over reaching
    for his ankle. We both laughed.

    I worry about these modern neo-pagan luddites, so fearful of
    weapons, so ignorant of how dangerous other items can be. Car keys,
    ID badges, lanyards, staplers, coffee mugs, etc, etc.
    --
    pyotr filipivich
    This Week's Panel: Us & Them - Eliminating Them.
    Next Month's Panel: Having eliminated the old Them(tm)
    Selecting who insufficiently Woke(tm) as to serve as the new Them(tm)

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From J. Clarke@21:1/5 to phamp@mindspring.com on Tue Jan 4 16:04:29 2022
    On Tue, 04 Jan 2022 11:30:51 -0800, pyotr filipivich
    <phamp@mindspring.com> wrote:

    J. Clarke <jclarke.873638@gmail.com> on Mon, 03 Jan 2022 15:59:07
    -0500 typed in rec.woodworking the following:

    I would rather sacrifice room for the right tools that are more likely >>>> to work in tricky situations.

    There are two multitools I have used that work well.

    One is the leatherman Micra, which does a dandy job of trimming >>fingernails, tightening eyeglasses, and opening envelopes. It used to
    live on my key chain until I started working somewhere with an
    absolutely no knives policy (I asked security if it was OK and while
    they were fine with it, HR said NO NO NO in anguished tones and
    started an investigation to find out why anybody would even _think_
    about possessing such a horrible weapon).

    I was working a temp job, and at the break the lead came and told
    me that HR said I wasn't allowed to have "a weapon" on me. And my
    little 3 inch mini tanto qualified. I responded along the lines of
    "That's not a weapon, that just a knife." to which he responded "I
    know, this isn't a weapon, I keep that ...", and bent over reaching
    for his ankle. We both laughed.

    I worry about these modern neo-pagan luddites, so fearful of
    weapons, so ignorant of how dangerous other items can be. Car keys,
    ID badges, lanyards, staplers, coffee mugs, etc, etc.

    The long screwdriver that you used to need to open a Mac could be
    quite lethal--Carlson's Raiders carried a similar one, sharpened, as
    part of their standard kit.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Puckdropper@21:1/5 to teamarrows@eznet.net on Wed Jan 5 20:52:23 2022
    DerbyDad03 <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote in news:2f849fa6-09a4-438a-8e7b-1d4d224c9672n@googlegroups.com:

    On Sunday, January 2, 2022 at 10:01:48 AM UTC-5, Puckdropper wrote:
    I need something lightweight and portable for basic household
    projects. So far on this trip I've needed a #2 Phillips screwdriver,
    wrench (of unknown size, adjustable would be great) and pocket knife.
    I've looked at Swiss Army knives and Leathermen and also thought
    about putting together a small kit myself, but am not really sure
    which way to go.

    A small autoranging multimeter would be helpful, too. I wanted to
    check a fuse and didn't have anything handy to do it with.

    Size and weight are big factors, it's going to go in checked luggage
    when we visit my wife's family.

    Any suggestions on what to look at?

    Puckdropper

    Does the owner not have any tools? Will you make this trip often?

    Wait until you get there and then buy what you need and leave it
    there. A belated Christmas gift.

    or...

    Once you have your list, order tools online and have it shipped there.

    BTW Milwaukee makes a great 13-in-1 driver tool. I have 3 of them.

    Straight bits, Phillips bits, Robertson bits and nut drivers. This
    alone would make a great gift.

    https://www.homedepot.com/p/Milwaukee-13-in-1-Multi-Tip-Cushion-Grip-Sc rewdriver-48-22-2880/305456601



    Sounds like a good tool. I'll have to look it up somewhere. Home Depot
    won't play in Africa. :-(

    This guy?
    https://www.amazon.com/Milwaukee-Multi-Tip-Cushion-Grip- Screwdriver/dp/B07FKWFXWF

    Puckdropper

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Puckdropper@21:1/5 to knuttle on Wed Jan 5 20:47:57 2022
    knuttle <keith_nuttle@sbcglobal.net> wrote in
    news:sqsi4k$2mr$1@dont-email.me:

    There are several lite weight multi meters at places like Harbor
    freight.

    I would get a pair of roto grip pliers, I got mine a a Christmas
    present and now they have become essential. Mine are similar to this https://www.amazon.com/Glitter-Sun-V-Notch-Adjusting-Pliers/dp/B07RNJPQ DG?ref_=ast_sto_dp&th=1&psc=1

    They may fulfill you need for wrenches of several sizes.

    While they sound useful, the folding tools are a literally a pain. I
    don't know how many time I have pinched the skin on my hands in the
    folding joints.

    I would also consider a multi screw driver with several bits that can
    be stored in the screwdriver itself. There are several types.

    search "interchangeable screwdriver"

    Yes, I've come to realize one of those 6-in-1s would handle most of the screwdriving needs... Now for something to handle nuts and bolts.

    Lastly, do you really want to try to fly during this time with all of
    the cancellations? About 10 years ago we lived in Indianapolis, and
    my daughters lived in Raleigh. At that time I could drive between the
    two cities as fast as I could fly, including the drive to and from the airports, and, the airport waiting and hassle.


    Can't help it. Gotta cross an ocean and that's a little hard to do in a
    Prius or a Piper.

    Puckdropper

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Puckdropper@21:1/5 to Bob La Londe on Wed Jan 5 21:00:44 2022
    Bob La Londe <none@none.com99> wrote in
    news:sr21p6$5n5$1@gioia.aioe.org:

    On 1/2/2022 8:01 AM, Puckdropper wrote:
    I need something lightweight and portable for basic household
    projects. So far on this trip I've needed a #2 Phillips screwdriver,
    wrench (of unknown size, adjustable would be great) and pocket knife.
    I've looked at Swiss Army knives and Leathermen and also thought
    about putting together a small kit myself, but am not really sure
    which way to go.

    A small autoranging multimeter would be helpful, too. I wanted to
    check a fuse and didn't have anything handy to do it with.

    Size and weight are big factors, it's going to go in checked luggage
    when we visit my wife's family.

    Any suggestions on what to look at?

    Puckdropper


    Bucket Bag. Used them for years contracting. Paired with a small
    clip on tool pouch and parts pouch you have what you need right there
    for 90% of all projects... unless you are one of those people who
    likes to run up the clock walking back to the truck fifty times
    instead of actually thinking through the job before leaving the truck
    the first time. The pouches are for running up a ladder.

    Hint. Do not waste your money on hardware store buckets. They are
    crap that won't last. Old machine oil buckets and coolant buckets
    last much longer. Drywall mud buckets don't last either, but some
    paint buckets are ok.

    Alternatively if its going to be a prolonged project a tool cart is
    useful. You just have to be disciplined enough to empty the tool cart
    when you are done.


    Good information. My away from home projects tend to be of the simple
    repairs variety, disassemble a bed, mount new feet to a new TV, etc. I
    have a tool kit for more involved work, but it won't be flying with us.

    Puckdropper

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DerbyDad03@21:1/5 to Puckdropper on Wed Jan 5 15:40:39 2022
    On Wednesday, January 5, 2022 at 3:52:27 PM UTC-5, Puckdropper wrote:
    DerbyDad03 <teama...@eznet.net> wrote in news:2f849fa6-09a4-438a...@googlegroups.com:
    On Sunday, January 2, 2022 at 10:01:48 AM UTC-5, Puckdropper wrote:
    I need something lightweight and portable for basic household
    projects. So far on this trip I've needed a #2 Phillips screwdriver,
    wrench (of unknown size, adjustable would be great) and pocket knife.
    I've looked at Swiss Army knives and Leathermen and also thought
    about putting together a small kit myself, but am not really sure
    which way to go.

    A small autoranging multimeter would be helpful, too. I wanted to
    check a fuse and didn't have anything handy to do it with.

    Size and weight are big factors, it's going to go in checked luggage
    when we visit my wife's family.

    Any suggestions on what to look at?

    Puckdropper

    Does the owner not have any tools? Will you make this trip often?

    Wait until you get there and then buy what you need and leave it
    there. A belated Christmas gift.

    or...

    Once you have your list, order tools online and have it shipped there.

    BTW Milwaukee makes a great 13-in-1 driver tool. I have 3 of them.

    Straight bits, Phillips bits, Robertson bits and nut drivers. This
    alone would make a great gift.

    https://www.homedepot.com/p/Milwaukee-13-in-1-Multi-Tip-Cushion-Grip-Sc rewdriver-48-22-2880/305456601


    Sounds like a good tool. I'll have to look it up somewhere. Home Depot
    won't play in Africa. :-(

    This guy?
    https://www.amazon.com/Milwaukee-Multi-Tip-Cushion-Grip- Screwdriver/dp/B07FKWFXWF

    Puckdropper

    That's similar to mine, looks like they've changed the style
    a bit.

    That one has an extra nut driver - the one where shaft goes in.
    I don't have that, but I do have a wire stripper in the handle.
    Just a piece of metal with a V cut in it. Never tried it. It's in
    that slot up near the smart end of the tool, shown here.

    https://i.imgur.com/gDrHXHH.jpg

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to All on Wed Jan 5 20:02:48 2022
    On Wed, 05 Jan 2022 20:47:57 GMT, Puckdropper <email@example.com>
    wrote:

    knuttle <keith_nuttle@sbcglobal.net> wrote in >news:sqsi4k$2mr$1@dont-email.me:

    There are several lite weight multi meters at places like Harbor
    freight.

    I would get a pair of roto grip pliers, I got mine a a Christmas
    present and now they have become essential. Mine are similar to this
    https://www.amazon.com/Glitter-Sun-V-Notch-Adjusting-Pliers/dp/B07RNJPQ
    DG?ref_=ast_sto_dp&th=1&psc=1

    They may fulfill you need for wrenches of several sizes.

    While they sound useful, the folding tools are a literally a pain. I
    don't know how many time I have pinched the skin on my hands in the
    folding joints.

    I would also consider a multi screw driver with several bits that can
    be stored in the screwdriver itself. There are several types.

    search "interchangeable screwdriver"

    Yes, I've come to realize one of those 6-in-1s would handle most of the >screwdriving needs... Now for something to handle nuts and bolts.

    Lastly, do you really want to try to fly during this time with all of
    the cancellations? About 10 years ago we lived in Indianapolis, and
    my daughters lived in Raleigh. At that time I could drive between the
    two cities as fast as I could fly, including the drive to and from the
    airports, and, the airport waiting and hassle.


    Can't help it. Gotta cross an ocean and that's a little hard to do in a >Prius or a Piper.

    Make sure you take a metric Crescent wrench.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From knuttle@21:1/5 to All on Wed Jan 5 20:40:56 2022
    On Wed, 05 Jan 2022 20:47:57 GMT, Puckdropper <email@example.com>
    wrote:

    knuttle <keith_nuttle@sbcglobal.net> wrote in
    news:sqsi4k$2mr$1@dont-email.me:

    There are several lite weight multi meters at places like Harbor
    freight.

    I would get a pair of roto grip pliers, I got mine a a Christmas
    present and now they have become essential. Mine are similar to this
    https://www.amazon.com/Glitter-Sun-V-Notch-Adjusting-Pliers/dp/B07RNJPQ
    DG?ref_=ast_sto_dp&th=1&psc=1

    They may fulfill you need for wrenches of several sizes.

    While they sound useful, the folding tools are a literally a pain. I
    don't know how many time I have pinched the skin on my hands in the
    folding joints.

    I would also consider a multi screw driver with several bits that can
    be stored in the screwdriver itself. There are several types.

    search "interchangeable screwdriver"

    Yes, I've come to realize one of those 6-in-1s would handle most of the
    screwdriving needs... Now for something to handle nuts and bolts.

    Lastly, do you really want to try to fly during this time with all of
    the cancellations? About 10 years ago we lived in Indianapolis, and
    my daughters lived in Raleigh. At that time I could drive between the
    two cities as fast as I could fly, including the drive to and from the
    airports, and, the airport waiting and hassle.


    Can't help it. Gotta cross an ocean and that's a little hard to do in a
    Prius or a Piper.

    That is what is one other facets about this group that makes it
    interesting. We discuss what tools that you need for a job, and work
    out solutions to common problems. We become so involved in our
    similarities and forget our diverse backgrounds. It is unfortunate
    that, there are people in the world that focuses on there differences
    not their similarities. I think the world would be better off to
    forget the diversities between people.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)