• Air compressor recommendations

    From Bob Davis@21:1/5 to All on Fri Dec 31 06:35:54 2021
    My ever faithful air compressor is finally getting tired. I've had it since the mid-70's. I am thinking about getting the exact same compressor. The design has been around at least 50 years and they still make it. It's an oil lubed cast iron
    workhorse. Maybe technology has marched and there is something better, so I seek opinions.

    Here is my current compressor:

    https://www.grainger.com/product/SPEEDAIRE-Portable-Air-Compressor-Oil-1NNF7

    Bob

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From J. Clarke@21:1/5 to wrobertdavis@gmail.com on Fri Dec 31 12:02:51 2021
    On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 06:35:54 -0800 (PST), Bob Davis
    <wrobertdavis@gmail.com> wrote:

    My ever faithful air compressor is finally getting tired. I've had it since the mid-70's. I am thinking about getting the exact same compressor. The design has been around at least 50 years and they still make it. It's an oil lubed cast iron
    workhorse. Maybe technology has marched and there is something better, so I seek opinions.

    Here is my current compressor:

    https://www.grainger.com/product/SPEEDAIRE-Portable-Air-Compressor-Oil-1NNF7

    Note country of origin. "Speedaire" is Grainger's house brand--they
    don't make it, it might have been made by any of a number of
    companies.

    If you can identify the actual manufacturer and they are still around
    it might be worthwhile contacting them to see if your existing
    compressor can be overhauled.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From hubops@ccanoemail.ca@21:1/5 to jclarke.873638@gmail.com on Fri Dec 31 13:28:45 2021
    On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 12:02:51 -0500, J. Clarke
    <jclarke.873638@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 06:35:54 -0800 (PST), Bob Davis
    <wrobertdavis@gmail.com> wrote:

    My ever faithful air compressor is finally getting tired. I've had it since the mid-70's.
    I am thinking about getting the exact same compressor.
    The design has been around at least 50 years and they still make it.
    It's an oil lubed cast iron workhorse.
    Maybe technology has marched and there is something better, so I seek opinions.
    Here is my current compressor:
    https://www.grainger.com/product/SPEEDAIRE-Portable-Air-Compressor-Oil-1NNF7


    Note country of origin. "Speedaire" is Grainger's house brand--they
    don't make it, it might have been made by any of a number of
    companies.
    If you can identify the actual manufacturer and they are still around
    it might be worthwhile contacting them to see if your existing
    compressor can be overhauled.


    Sorry - I can't recommend a make/model but I strongly suspect
    that ~ _all_ your new choices will be made in China.
    Your link carefully avoids the Made In category .. hint hint .
    ps: it will not last 40 years ..
    John T.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Leon@21:1/5 to Bob Davis on Fri Dec 31 12:22:39 2021
    On 12/31/2021 8:35 AM, Bob Davis wrote:
    My ever faithful air compressor is finally getting tired. I've had it since the mid-70's. I am thinking about getting the exact same compressor. The design has been around at least 50 years and they still make it. It's an oil lubed cast iron
    workhorse. Maybe technology has marched and there is something better, so I seek opinions.

    Here is my current compressor:

    https://www.grainger.com/product/SPEEDAIRE-Portable-Air-Compressor-Oil-1NNF7

    Bob


    WOW So I think that there are only a few compressor manufacturers, so
    to speak. I have had a SpeedAire since about 1995. I have had to
    replace the pressure switch and regulator but no big deal. OH and I had
    to replace the head casket as it began chirping like a bird when it ran.

    All of the model numbers translated to Campbell Hausfeld for the pump.
    AND I got repair parts from Jack's Small Engine repair.

    That said, I believer the pumps are manufactured by Campbell Hausfeld.


    Northern Tool has name brand products too. They have a Ingersol Rand
    for $650. IR has been a leader in automotive air tools for decades.
    Whether they build their portable compressors or not is the question.
    Likely Campbell Hausfeld too.

    https://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200906530_200906530

    Or Campbell Hausfeld,

    https://www.homedepot.com/p/Campbell-Hausfeld-20-Gal-Electric-Air-Compressor-VT6290/203002182?ITC=AUC-123128-23-12070

    I think cast iron pumps, belt drive, and oil lubricated is still the way
    to go for longevity. Check you capacity or other features to decide.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From J. Clarke@21:1/5 to hubops@ccanoemail.ca on Fri Dec 31 15:54:20 2021
    On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 13:28:45 -0500, hubops@ccanoemail.ca wrote:

    On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 12:02:51 -0500, J. Clarke
    <jclarke.873638@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 06:35:54 -0800 (PST), Bob Davis >><wrobertdavis@gmail.com> wrote:

    My ever faithful air compressor is finally getting tired. I've had it since the mid-70's.
    I am thinking about getting the exact same compressor.
    The design has been around at least 50 years and they still make it.
    It's an oil lubed cast iron workhorse.
    Maybe technology has marched and there is something better, so I seek opinions.
    Here is my current compressor:
    https://www.grainger.com/product/SPEEDAIRE-Portable-Air-Compressor-Oil-1NNF7 >>

    Note country of origin. "Speedaire" is Grainger's house brand--they
    don't make it, it might have been made by any of a number of
    companies.
    If you can identify the actual manufacturer and they are still around
    it might be worthwhile contacting them to see if your existing
    compressor can be overhauled.


    Sorry - I can't recommend a make/model but I strongly suspect
    that ~ _all_ your new choices will be made in China.
    Your link carefully avoids the Made In category .. hint hint .
    ps: it will not last 40 years ..
    John T.

    You can get made in USA compressors but they aren't cheap and probably
    not in your size range.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Clare Snyder@21:1/5 to wrobertdavis@gmail.com on Fri Dec 31 16:20:47 2021
    On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 06:35:54 -0800 (PST), Bob Davis
    <wrobertdavis@gmail.com> wrote:

    My ever faithful air compressor is finally getting tired. I've had it since the mid-70's. I am thinking about getting the exact same compressor. The design has been around at least 50 years and they still make it. It's an oil lubed cast iron
    workhorse. Maybe technology has marched and there is something better, so I seek opinions.

    Here is my current compressor:

    https://www.grainger.com/product/SPEEDAIRE-Portable-Air-Compressor-Oil-1NNF7

    Bob
    If the tank motor and controls are all in good shape just pick up a
    a replacement compressor head. Here in Canada Princess Auto usually
    has a good assortment at reasonable prices. In the USA I imagine
    Northern Machine or one of the farm and home supply chains would have
    good availability.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to hubops@ccanoemail.ca on Fri Dec 31 16:59:56 2021
    On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 13:28:45 -0500, hubops@ccanoemail.ca wrote:

    On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 12:02:51 -0500, J. Clarke
    <jclarke.873638@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 06:35:54 -0800 (PST), Bob Davis >><wrobertdavis@gmail.com> wrote:

    My ever faithful air compressor is finally getting tired. I've had it since the mid-70's.
    I am thinking about getting the exact same compressor.
    The design has been around at least 50 years and they still make it.
    It's an oil lubed cast iron workhorse.
    Maybe technology has marched and there is something better, so I seek opinions.
    Here is my current compressor:
    https://www.grainger.com/product/SPEEDAIRE-Portable-Air-Compressor-Oil-1NNF7 >>

    Note country of origin. "Speedaire" is Grainger's house brand--they
    don't make it, it might have been made by any of a number of
    companies.
    If you can identify the actual manufacturer and they are still around
    it might be worthwhile contacting them to see if your existing
    compressor can be overhauled.


    Sorry - I can't recommend a make/model but I strongly suspect
    that ~ _all_ your new choices will be made in China.
    Your link carefully avoids the Made In category .. hint hint .
    ps: it will not last 40 years ..
    John T.

    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or anything for that
    matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DerbyDad03@21:1/5 to k...@notreal.com on Fri Dec 31 16:35:30 2021
    On Friday, December 31, 2021 at 5:00:00 PM UTC-5, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 13:28:45 -0500, hub...@ccanoemail.ca wrote:

    On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 12:02:51 -0500, J. Clarke
    <jclarke...@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 06:35:54 -0800 (PST), Bob Davis
    <wrober...@gmail.com> wrote:

    My ever faithful air compressor is finally getting tired. I've had it since the mid-70's.
    I am thinking about getting the exact same compressor.
    The design has been around at least 50 years and they still make it.
    It's an oil lubed cast iron workhorse.
    Maybe technology has marched and there is something better, so I seek opinions.
    Here is my current compressor:
    https://www.grainger.com/product/SPEEDAIRE-Portable-Air-Compressor-Oil-1NNF7


    Note country of origin. "Speedaire" is Grainger's house brand--they
    don't make it, it might have been made by any of a number of
    companies.
    If you can identify the actual manufacturer and they are still around
    it might be worthwhile contacting them to see if your existing
    compressor can be overhauled.


    Sorry - I can't recommend a make/model but I strongly suspect
    that ~ _all_ your new choices will be made in China.
    Your link carefully avoids the Made In category .. hint hint .
    ps: it will not last 40 years ..
    John T.
    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or anything for that
    matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)

    My marriage is approaching that. I was concerned at one point, but not anymore.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Clare Snyder@21:1/5 to teamarrows@eznet.net on Fri Dec 31 20:30:03 2021
    On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 16:35:30 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Friday, December 31, 2021 at 5:00:00 PM UTC-5, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 13:28:45 -0500, hub...@ccanoemail.ca wrote:

    On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 12:02:51 -0500, J. Clarke
    <jclarke...@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 06:35:54 -0800 (PST), Bob Davis
    <wrober...@gmail.com> wrote:

    My ever faithful air compressor is finally getting tired. I've had it since the mid-70's.
    I am thinking about getting the exact same compressor.
    The design has been around at least 50 years and they still make it.
    It's an oil lubed cast iron workhorse.
    Maybe technology has marched and there is something better, so I seek opinions.
    Here is my current compressor:

    https://www.grainger.com/product/SPEEDAIRE-Portable-Air-Compressor-Oil-1NNF7


    Note country of origin. "Speedaire" is Grainger's house brand--they
    don't make it, it might have been made by any of a number of
    companies.
    If you can identify the actual manufacturer and they are still around
    it might be worthwhile contacting them to see if your existing
    compressor can be overhauled.


    Sorry - I can't recommend a make/model but I strongly suspect
    that ~ _all_ your new choices will be made in China.
    Your link carefully avoids the Made In category .. hint hint .
    ps: it will not last 40 years ..
    John T.
    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or anything for that
    matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)

    My marriage is approaching that. I was concerned at one point, but not anymore.
    41 coming up for me and my gal.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to teamarrows@eznet.net on Fri Dec 31 20:57:19 2021
    On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 16:35:30 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Friday, December 31, 2021 at 5:00:00 PM UTC-5, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 13:28:45 -0500, hub...@ccanoemail.ca wrote:

    On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 12:02:51 -0500, J. Clarke
    <jclarke...@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 06:35:54 -0800 (PST), Bob Davis
    <wrober...@gmail.com> wrote:

    My ever faithful air compressor is finally getting tired. I've had it since the mid-70's.
    I am thinking about getting the exact same compressor.
    The design has been around at least 50 years and they still make it.
    It's an oil lubed cast iron workhorse.
    Maybe technology has marched and there is something better, so I seek opinions.
    Here is my current compressor:

    https://www.grainger.com/product/SPEEDAIRE-Portable-Air-Compressor-Oil-1NNF7


    Note country of origin. "Speedaire" is Grainger's house brand--they
    don't make it, it might have been made by any of a number of
    companies.
    If you can identify the actual manufacturer and they are still around
    it might be worthwhile contacting them to see if your existing
    compressor can be overhauled.


    Sorry - I can't recommend a make/model but I strongly suspect
    that ~ _all_ your new choices will be made in China.
    Your link carefully avoids the Made In category .. hint hint .
    ps: it will not last 40 years ..
    John T.
    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or anything for that
    matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)

    My marriage is approaching that. I was concerned at one point, but not anymore.

    We're over the 50yr mark (June) but she'll probably dump me before
    another fifty.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Michael Trew@21:1/5 to Bob Davis on Fri Dec 31 22:31:36 2021
    On 12/31/2021 9:35, Bob Davis wrote:
    My ever faithful air compressor is finally getting tired. I've had it since the mid-70's. I am thinking about getting the exact same compressor. The design has been around at least 50 years and they still make it. It's an oil lubed cast iron
    workhorse. Maybe technology has marched and there is something better, so I seek opinions.

    Here is my current compressor:

    https://www.grainger.com/product/SPEEDAIRE-Portable-Air-Compressor-Oil-1NNF7

    Bob

    If it's hung on that long, I personally would try to rebuild it before considering a replacement. Perhaps it just needs new seals?

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Michael Trew@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Fri Dec 31 22:29:38 2021
    On 12/31/2021 16:59, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 13:28:45 -0500, hubops@ccanoemail.ca wrote:

    On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 12:02:51 -0500, J. Clarke
    <jclarke.873638@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 06:35:54 -0800 (PST), Bob Davis
    <wrobertdavis@gmail.com> wrote:

    My ever faithful air compressor is finally getting tired. I've had it since the mid-70's.
    I am thinking about getting the exact same compressor.
    The design has been around at least 50 years and they still make it.
    It's an oil lubed cast iron workhorse.
    Maybe technology has marched and there is something better, so I seek opinions.
    Here is my current compressor:

    https://www.grainger.com/product/SPEEDAIRE-Portable-Air-Compressor-Oil-1NNF7


    Note country of origin. "Speedaire" is Grainger's house brand--they
    don't make it, it might have been made by any of a number of
    companies.
    If you can identify the actual manufacturer and they are still around
    it might be worthwhile contacting them to see if your existing
    compressor can be overhauled.


    Sorry - I can't recommend a make/model but I strongly suspect
    that ~ _all_ your new choices will be made in China.
    Your link carefully avoids the Made In category .. hint hint .
    ps: it will not last 40 years ..
    John T.

    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or anything for that
    matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)

    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Clare Snyder@21:1/5 to michael.trew@att.net on Sat Jan 1 02:29:54 2022
    On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 22:31:36 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    On 12/31/2021 9:35, Bob Davis wrote:
    My ever faithful air compressor is finally getting tired. I've had it since the mid-70's. I am thinking about getting the exact same compressor. The design has been around at least 50 years and they still make it. It's an oil lubed cast iron
    workhorse. Maybe technology has marched and there is something better, so I seek opinions.

    Here is my current compressor:

    https://www.grainger.com/product/SPEEDAIRE-Portable-Air-Compressor-Oil-1NNF7 >>
    Bob

    If it's hung on that long, I personally would try to rebuild it before >considering a replacement. Perhaps it just needs new seals?
    Definitely an option IF the parts are available

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Leon@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Sat Jan 1 11:56:54 2022
    On 12/31/2021 3:59 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 13:28:45 -0500, hubops@ccanoemail.ca wrote:

    On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 12:02:51 -0500, J. Clarke
    <jclarke.873638@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 06:35:54 -0800 (PST), Bob Davis
    <wrobertdavis@gmail.com> wrote:

    My ever faithful air compressor is finally getting tired. I've had it since the mid-70's.
    I am thinking about getting the exact same compressor.
    The design has been around at least 50 years and they still make it.
    It's an oil lubed cast iron workhorse.
    Maybe technology has marched and there is something better, so I seek opinions.
    Here is my current compressor:

    https://www.grainger.com/product/SPEEDAIRE-Portable-Air-Compressor-Oil-1NNF7


    Note country of origin. "Speedaire" is Grainger's house brand--they
    don't make it, it might have been made by any of a number of
    companies.
    If you can identify the actual manufacturer and they are still around
    it might be worthwhile contacting them to see if your existing
    compressor can be overhauled.


    Sorry - I can't recommend a make/model but I strongly suspect
    that ~ _all_ your new choices will be made in China.
    Your link carefully avoids the Made In category .. hint hint .
    ps: it will not last 40 years ..
    John T.

    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or anything for that
    matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)



    Well if you don't buy some thing that will last that long you might not
    get 5 years out of it.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to Leon on Sat Jan 1 13:49:48 2022
    On Sat, 1 Jan 2022 11:56:54 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 12/31/2021 3:59 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 13:28:45 -0500, hubops@ccanoemail.ca wrote:

    On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 12:02:51 -0500, J. Clarke
    <jclarke.873638@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 06:35:54 -0800 (PST), Bob Davis
    <wrobertdavis@gmail.com> wrote:

    My ever faithful air compressor is finally getting tired. I've had it since the mid-70's.
    I am thinking about getting the exact same compressor.
    The design has been around at least 50 years and they still make it. >>>>> It's an oil lubed cast iron workhorse.
    Maybe technology has marched and there is something better, so I seek opinions.
    Here is my current compressor:

    https://www.grainger.com/product/SPEEDAIRE-Portable-Air-Compressor-Oil-1NNF7


    Note country of origin. "Speedaire" is Grainger's house brand--they
    don't make it, it might have been made by any of a number of
    companies.
    If you can identify the actual manufacturer and they are still around
    it might be worthwhile contacting them to see if your existing
    compressor can be overhauled.


    Sorry - I can't recommend a make/model but I strongly suspect
    that ~ _all_ your new choices will be made in China.
    Your link carefully avoids the Made In category .. hint hint .
    ps: it will not last 40 years ..
    John T.

    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or anything for that
    matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)



    Well if you don't buy some thing that will last that long you might not
    get 5 years out of it.

    Are you that hard on your toys?

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DerbyDad03@21:1/5 to k...@notreal.com on Sat Jan 1 15:20:30 2022
    On Saturday, January 1, 2022 at 1:49:51 PM UTC-5, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sat, 1 Jan 2022 11:56:54 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 12/31/2021 3:59 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 13:28:45 -0500, hub...@ccanoemail.ca wrote:

    On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 12:02:51 -0500, J. Clarke
    <jclarke...@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 06:35:54 -0800 (PST), Bob Davis
    <wrober...@gmail.com> wrote:

    My ever faithful air compressor is finally getting tired. I've had it since the mid-70's.
    I am thinking about getting the exact same compressor.
    The design has been around at least 50 years and they still make it. >>>>> It's an oil lubed cast iron workhorse.
    Maybe technology has marched and there is something better, so I seek opinions.
    Here is my current compressor:

    https://www.grainger.com/product/SPEEDAIRE-Portable-Air-Compressor-Oil-1NNF7


    Note country of origin. "Speedaire" is Grainger's house brand--they
    don't make it, it might have been made by any of a number of
    companies.
    If you can identify the actual manufacturer and they are still around >>>> it might be worthwhile contacting them to see if your existing
    compressor can be overhauled.


    Sorry - I can't recommend a make/model but I strongly suspect
    that ~ _all_ your new choices will be made in China.
    Your link carefully avoids the Made In category .. hint hint .
    ps: it will not last 40 years ..
    John T.

    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or anything for that
    matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)



    Well if you don't buy some thing that will last that long you might not
    get 5 years out of it.
    Are you that hard on your toys?

    I just looked back at the last 4 or so responses. Hard to tell if they refer to the air compressor or some of our marriages. :-O

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Puckdropper@21:1/5 to Michael Trew on Sun Jan 2 14:48:13 2022
    Michael Trew <michael.trew@att.net> wrote in
    news:sqohqs$f27$7@dont-email.me:

    On 12/31/2021 16:59, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or anything for that
    matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)

    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol

    A good compressor that's easy to move (so not one of those 200 gallon
    monsters but also not a 1 1/2 gallon noise maker) would be a nice thing to
    pass down. Shoot, even if they just use it to inflate tires and beach
    balls, it would make their life that much easier.

    Puckdropper

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From J. Clarke@21:1/5 to All on Sun Jan 2 13:06:02 2022
    On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 14:48:13 GMT, Puckdropper <email@example.com>
    wrote:

    Michael Trew <michael.trew@att.net> wrote in
    news:sqohqs$f27$7@dont-email.me:

    On 12/31/2021 16:59, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or anything for that
    matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)

    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol

    A good compressor that's easy to move (so not one of those 200 gallon >monsters but also not a 1 1/2 gallon noise maker) would be a nice thing to >pass down. Shoot, even if they just use it to inflate tires and beach
    balls, it would make their life that much easier.

    Mine (a Sears cheapie) died the death a while back and I'm debating
    whether to replace it with another Chinese cheapie or go for something
    good.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Bob Davis@21:1/5 to Clare Snyder on Sun Jan 2 10:53:29 2022
    On Friday, December 31, 2021 at 3:20:51 PM UTC-6, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 06:35:54 -0800 (PST), Bob Davis
    <wrober...@gmail.com> wrote:
    My ever faithful air compressor is finally getting tired. I've had it since the mid-70's. I am thinking about getting the exact same compressor. The design has been around at least 50 years and they still make it. It's an oil lubed cast iron workhorse.
    Maybe technology has marched and there is something better, so I seek opinions.

    Here is my current compressor:

    https://www.grainger.com/product/SPEEDAIRE-Portable-Air-Compressor-Oil-1NNF7

    Bob
    If the tank motor and controls are all in good shape just pick up a
    a replacement compressor head. Here in Canada Princess Auto usually
    has a good assortment at reasonable prices. In the USA I imagine
    Northern Machine or one of the farm and home supply chains would have
    good availability.

    I found a dealer that only sells complete compressor bodies. I suspect the rings are worn in mine and will require something like that, as I am not into doing a ring job. The complete body is about $350 with shipping and I have to do all the work.
    This is not looking like a winner to me.

    Bob

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Bob Davis@21:1/5 to Puckdropper on Sun Jan 2 10:54:52 2022
    On Sunday, January 2, 2022 at 8:48:17 AM UTC-6, Puckdropper wrote:
    Michael Trew <michae...@att.net> wrote in
    news:sqohqs$f27$7...@dont-email.me:
    On 12/31/2021 16:59, k...@notreal.com wrote:

    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or anything for that
    matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)

    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol
    A good compressor that's easy to move (so not one of those 200 gallon monsters but also not a 1 1/2 gallon noise maker) would be a nice thing to pass down. Shoot, even if they just use it to inflate tires and beach
    balls, it would make their life that much easier.

    Puckdropper

    Mine is 220vac only. I do not have any family that would deal with that.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to All on Sun Jan 2 15:33:42 2022
    On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 14:48:13 GMT, Puckdropper <email@example.com>
    wrote:

    Michael Trew <michael.trew@att.net> wrote in
    news:sqohqs$f27$7@dont-email.me:

    On 12/31/2021 16:59, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or anything for that
    matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)

    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol

    A good compressor that's easy to move (so not one of those 200 gallon >monsters but also not a 1 1/2 gallon noise maker) would be a nice thing to >pass down. Shoot, even if they just use it to inflate tires and beach
    balls, it would make their life that much easier.

    For tires I have one of these:

    <https://www.homedepot.com/p/RYOBI-ONE-18V-Lithium-Ion-Cordless-Power-Inflator-Kit-with-1-5-Ah-Battery-and-18V-Charger-P737DKN/311788879>

    SWMBO appreciates it very much.

    I looked at her "spare" a while back. Since it is small car
    (Mustang), I knew it had to have a bicycle tire. Nope. Not even
    that. Under the trunk liner is a 12V compressor and a can of
    compressed tire gunk. Nice. A bicycle tire is an extra $250.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DerbyDad03@21:1/5 to k...@notreal.com on Sun Jan 2 14:49:08 2022
    On Sunday, January 2, 2022 at 3:33:44 PM UTC-5, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 14:48:13 GMT, Puckdropper <em...@example.com>
    wrote:
    Michael Trew <michae...@att.net> wrote in >news:sqohqs$f27$7...@dont-email.me:

    On 12/31/2021 16:59, k...@notreal.com wrote:

    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or anything for that
    matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)

    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol

    A good compressor that's easy to move (so not one of those 200 gallon >monsters but also not a 1 1/2 gallon noise maker) would be a nice thing to >pass down. Shoot, even if they just use it to inflate tires and beach >balls, it would make their life that much easier.
    For tires I have one of these:

    <https://www.homedepot.com/p/RYOBI-ONE-18V-Lithium-Ion-Cordless-Power-Inflator-Kit-with-1-5-Ah-Battery-and-18V-Charger-P737DKN/311788879>

    SWMBO appreciates it very much.

    I looked at her "spare" a while back. Since it is small car
    (Mustang), I knew it had to have a bicycle tire. Nope. Not even
    that. Under the trunk liner is a 12V compressor and a can of
    compressed tire gunk. Nice. A bicycle tire is an extra $250.

    Ever notice how all (?) spares are stored with the valve down or inward, forcing you to remove the spare it to check/fill it? The spare in my Odyssey is buried valve down under the carpet between the front and middle row seats. What a PITA to get it out.

    I have one configuration or another of these in all of my vehicles.

    https://www.amazon.com/Hotop-Stainless-Extension-Braided-Extender/dp/B09BMWQQ3R

    All of the spares in my vehicles look something like this so I can check/top them off without removing them.

    https://i.imgur.com/6IHvl8M.jpg

    https://i.imgur.com/nxJAKFf.jpg

    I wouldn't be surprised if half the folks in this group (that have spares) have spares that are sitting at 45-50 PSI.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Michael Trew@21:1/5 to Puckdropper on Sun Jan 2 20:30:19 2022
    On 1/2/2022 9:48, Puckdropper wrote:
    Michael Trew<michael.trew@att.net> wrote in
    news:sqohqs$f27$7@dont-email.me:

    On 12/31/2021 16:59, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or anything for that
    matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)

    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol

    A good compressor that's easy to move (so not one of those 200 gallon monsters but also not a 1 1/2 gallon noise maker) would be a nice thing to pass down. Shoot, even if they just use it to inflate tires and beach
    balls, it would make their life that much easier.

    Puckdropper

    Well, I'm probably a fair deal younger than most here (in my 20's). If
    I had a garage, I'd love to have one of those "monsters".

    I have an old sears compressor, no tank, that was used for some kind of
    power spray tool. It will inflate a tire to almost exactly 40 PSI, so I
    use that for car tires until you can hear the machine spitting out the
    excess PSI at its limit.

    I have a couple of cheap, small, crappy pan-cake style "noise makers".
    A decent air compressor is in my future, at some point. One that isn't
    too heavy to haul up and down the cellar steps, due to my no garage
    situation.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to teamarrows@eznet.net on Sun Jan 2 20:25:14 2022
    On Sun, 2 Jan 2022 14:49:08 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Sunday, January 2, 2022 at 3:33:44 PM UTC-5, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 14:48:13 GMT, Puckdropper <em...@example.com>
    wrote:
    Michael Trew <michae...@att.net> wrote in
    news:sqohqs$f27$7...@dont-email.me:

    On 12/31/2021 16:59, k...@notreal.com wrote:

    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or anything for that
    matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)

    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol

    A good compressor that's easy to move (so not one of those 200 gallon
    monsters but also not a 1 1/2 gallon noise maker) would be a nice thing to >> >pass down. Shoot, even if they just use it to inflate tires and beach
    balls, it would make their life that much easier.
    For tires I have one of these:

    <https://www.homedepot.com/p/RYOBI-ONE-18V-Lithium-Ion-Cordless-Power-Inflator-Kit-with-1-5-Ah-Battery-and-18V-Charger-P737DKN/311788879>

    SWMBO appreciates it very much.

    I looked at her "spare" a while back. Since it is small car
    (Mustang), I knew it had to have a bicycle tire. Nope. Not even
    that. Under the trunk liner is a 12V compressor and a can of
    compressed tire gunk. Nice. A bicycle tire is an extra $250.

    Ever notice how all (?) spares are stored with the valve down or inward, >forcing you to remove the spare it to check/fill it? The spare in my Odyssey >is buried valve down under the carpet between the front and middle row seats. >What a PITA to get it out.

    I have one configuration or another of these in all of my vehicles.

    https://www.amazon.com/Hotop-Stainless-Extension-Braided-Extender/dp/B09BMWQQ3R

    All of the spares in my vehicles look something like this so I can check/top >them off without removing them.

    https://i.imgur.com/6IHvl8M.jpg

    https://i.imgur.com/nxJAKFf.jpg

    I wouldn't be surprised if half the folks in this group (that have spares) have
    spares that are sitting at 45-50 PSI.

    I always get good ideas here. Now, if I had the tire. I do have a real
    spare on my truck so one of these would be useful so I didn't have to
    crawl around under the truck. A 12V pump would work too.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Clare Snyder@21:1/5 to teamarrows@eznet.net on Sun Jan 2 21:24:01 2022
    On Sun, 2 Jan 2022 14:49:08 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Sunday, January 2, 2022 at 3:33:44 PM UTC-5, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 14:48:13 GMT, Puckdropper <em...@example.com>
    wrote:
    Michael Trew <michae...@att.net> wrote in
    news:sqohqs$f27$7...@dont-email.me:

    On 12/31/2021 16:59, k...@notreal.com wrote:

    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or anything for that
    matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)

    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol

    A good compressor that's easy to move (so not one of those 200 gallon
    monsters but also not a 1 1/2 gallon noise maker) would be a nice thing to >> >pass down. Shoot, even if they just use it to inflate tires and beach
    balls, it would make their life that much easier.
    For tires I have one of these:

    <https://www.homedepot.com/p/RYOBI-ONE-18V-Lithium-Ion-Cordless-Power-Inflator-Kit-with-1-5-Ah-Battery-and-18V-Charger-P737DKN/311788879>

    SWMBO appreciates it very much.

    I looked at her "spare" a while back. Since it is small car
    (Mustang), I knew it had to have a bicycle tire. Nope. Not even
    that. Under the trunk liner is a 12V compressor and a can of
    compressed tire gunk. Nice. A bicycle tire is an extra $250.

    Ever notice how all (?) spares are stored with the valve down or inward, >forcing you to remove the spare it to check/fill it? The spare in my Odyssey >is buried valve down under the carpet between the front and middle row seats. >What a PITA to get it out.

    I have one configuration or another of these in all of my vehicles.

    https://www.amazon.com/Hotop-Stainless-Extension-Braided-Extender/dp/B09BMWQQ3R

    All of the spares in my vehicles look something like this so I can check/top >them off without removing them.

    https://i.imgur.com/6IHvl8M.jpg

    https://i.imgur.com/nxJAKFf.jpg

    I wouldn't be surprised if half the folks in this group (that have spares) have
    spares that are sitting at 45-50 PSI.
    The last time I actually USED my spare was on my '63 Valiant back
    about 1970. I ALMOST had to use it 3 times on one trip with the PT
    Cruiser on my trip to PEI when 3 valve stems failed and christmas 1972
    in Montana or Idaho or Wyoming or wherever when I got a cinder
    puncture - managed to find a tire repair guy before it got all the way
    flat.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to michael.trew@att.net on Sun Jan 2 21:46:47 2022
    On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 20:30:19 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/2/2022 9:48, Puckdropper wrote:
    Michael Trew<michael.trew@att.net> wrote in
    news:sqohqs$f27$7@dont-email.me:

    On 12/31/2021 16:59, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or anything for that
    matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)

    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol

    A good compressor that's easy to move (so not one of those 200 gallon
    monsters but also not a 1 1/2 gallon noise maker) would be a nice thing to >> pass down. Shoot, even if they just use it to inflate tires and beach
    balls, it would make their life that much easier.

    Puckdropper

    Well, I'm probably a fair deal younger than most here (in my 20's). If
    I had a garage, I'd love to have one of those "monsters".

    I have an old sears compressor, no tank, that was used for some kind of
    power spray tool. It will inflate a tire to almost exactly 40 PSI, so I
    use that for car tires until you can hear the machine spitting out the
    excess PSI at its limit.

    I have a couple of cheap, small, crappy pan-cake style "noise makers".
    A decent air compressor is in my future, at some point. One that isn't
    too heavy to haul up and down the cellar steps, due to my no garage >situation.

    There's nothing really wrong with pancake compressors. They're not
    good for painting but they'll run any air tools that you're likely to
    use. I've had one for 15-20 years. I have another in my garage that is
    just a pancake compressor with elephantiasis. I think it's a 225psi
    15gal so it has plenty of air storage but its recovery time is
    abysmal. I intend to plumb it into the basement so the noise stays in
    the garage. You could do the opposite but you may run into a freezing
    problem. With a little thought that shouldn't be too hard to avoid.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DerbyDad03@21:1/5 to k...@notreal.com on Sun Jan 2 20:37:19 2022
    On Sunday, January 2, 2022 at 9:46:51 PM UTC-5, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 20:30:19 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michae...@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/2/2022 9:48, Puckdropper wrote:
    Michael Trew<michae...@att.net> wrote in
    news:sqohqs$f27$7...@dont-email.me:

    On 12/31/2021 16:59, k...@notreal.com wrote:

    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or anything for that >>>> matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)

    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol

    A good compressor that's easy to move (so not one of those 200 gallon
    monsters but also not a 1 1/2 gallon noise maker) would be a nice thing to >> pass down. Shoot, even if they just use it to inflate tires and beach
    balls, it would make their life that much easier.

    Puckdropper

    Well, I'm probably a fair deal younger than most here (in my 20's). If
    I had a garage, I'd love to have one of those "monsters".

    I have an old sears compressor, no tank, that was used for some kind of >power spray tool. It will inflate a tire to almost exactly 40 PSI, so I
    use that for car tires until you can hear the machine spitting out the >excess PSI at its limit.

    I have a couple of cheap, small, crappy pan-cake style "noise makers".
    A decent air compressor is in my future, at some point. One that isn't
    too heavy to haul up and down the cellar steps, due to my no garage >situation.
    There's nothing really wrong with pancake compressors. They're not
    good for painting but they'll run any air tools that you're likely to
    use. I've had one for 15-20 years. I have another in my garage that is
    just a pancake compressor with elephantiasis. I think it's a 225psi
    15gal so it has plenty of air storage but its recovery time is
    abysmal. I intend to plumb it into the basement so the noise stays in
    the garage. You could do the opposite but you may run into a freezing problem. With a little thought that shouldn't be too hard to avoid.

    That's exactly what I did. My son bought me one of those retractable air hose reels a few years ago. Based on where I keep the compressor and where I
    wanted to hang the reel, I had to run some pex across the garage. I figured that
    as long as I was doing that, I might as well run pex into the basement and over to the shop. Love it.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Leon@21:1/5 to Puckdropper on Mon Jan 3 10:32:00 2022
    On 1/2/2022 8:48 AM, Puckdropper wrote:
    Michael Trew <michael.trew@att.net> wrote in
    news:sqohqs$f27$7@dont-email.me:

    On 12/31/2021 16:59, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or anything for that
    matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)

    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol

    A good compressor that's easy to move (so not one of those 200 gallon monsters but also not a 1 1/2 gallon noise maker) would be a nice thing to pass down. Shoot, even if they just use it to inflate tires and beach
    balls, it would make their life that much easier.

    Puckdropper


    200 gallon monster. LOL. I used to have an 80 gallon compressor and
    that was a monster considering it had no wheels.

    And that reminded me of the way bigger than 200 gallon compressor that
    was at an Oldsmobile dealership that I worked at. The compressor was
    upstairs in the parts department. Good thing there was a hydraulic
    elevator. This thing was about 8' long and the tank was about 48" in
    diameter. it was started by a throw switch located next to the
    compressor. No one dared touch that switch or stand near the compressor
    when it came on. Shockingly loud in that confined concert floor and
    walled room. There was a hole in the floor directly under the throw
    switch and a rope going through that hole. We pulled the rope that went through the floor and through a pulley over the switch to start the
    compressor each morning. Turning the compressor off was not so much an
    issue as you gradually approached the noise. But if you were stand
    close to the compressor when it started up you always jumped, even when
    you were expecting the start up. We sent new guys up there to throw the
    switch in the mornings. ;~)

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Leon@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Mon Jan 3 10:20:23 2022
    On 1/1/2022 12:49 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sat, 1 Jan 2022 11:56:54 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 12/31/2021 3:59 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 13:28:45 -0500, hubops@ccanoemail.ca wrote:

    On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 12:02:51 -0500, J. Clarke
    <jclarke.873638@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 06:35:54 -0800 (PST), Bob Davis
    <wrobertdavis@gmail.com> wrote:

    My ever faithful air compressor is finally getting tired. I've had it since the mid-70's.
    I am thinking about getting the exact same compressor.
    The design has been around at least 50 years and they still make it. >>>>>> It's an oil lubed cast iron workhorse.
    Maybe technology has marched and there is something better, so I seek opinions.
    Here is my current compressor:

    https://www.grainger.com/product/SPEEDAIRE-Portable-Air-Compressor-Oil-1NNF7


    Note country of origin. "Speedaire" is Grainger's house brand--they >>>>> don't make it, it might have been made by any of a number of
    companies.
    If you can identify the actual manufacturer and they are still around >>>>> it might be worthwhile contacting them to see if your existing
    compressor can be overhauled.


    Sorry - I can't recommend a make/model but I strongly suspect
    that ~ _all_ your new choices will be made in China.
    Your link carefully avoids the Made In category .. hint hint .
    ps: it will not last 40 years ..
    John T.

    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or anything for that
    matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)



    Well if you don't buy some thing that will last that long you might not
    get 5 years out of it.

    Are you that hard on your toys?

    Kinda. But my Speedaire compressor has lasted for 25+ years, much like
    Bob's. And I confess that I have changed the oil one time, 20+ years ago.
    I do not baby my tools as a rule, I find it more productive to use the
    tool than to repair and polish the tool. My shop is not anything like a museum. ;~)

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Leon@21:1/5 to All on Mon Jan 3 10:35:50 2022
    On 1/2/2022 4:49 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
    On Sunday, January 2, 2022 at 3:33:44 PM UTC-5, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 14:48:13 GMT, Puckdropper <em...@example.com>
    wrote:
    Michael Trew <michae...@att.net> wrote in
    news:sqohqs$f27$7...@dont-email.me:

    On 12/31/2021 16:59, k...@notreal.com wrote:

    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or anything for that >>>>> matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)

    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol

    A good compressor that's easy to move (so not one of those 200 gallon
    monsters but also not a 1 1/2 gallon noise maker) would be a nice thing to >>> pass down. Shoot, even if they just use it to inflate tires and beach
    balls, it would make their life that much easier.
    For tires I have one of these:

    <https://www.homedepot.com/p/RYOBI-ONE-18V-Lithium-Ion-Cordless-Power-Inflator-Kit-with-1-5-Ah-Battery-and-18V-Charger-P737DKN/311788879>

    SWMBO appreciates it very much.

    I looked at her "spare" a while back. Since it is small car
    (Mustang), I knew it had to have a bicycle tire. Nope. Not even
    that. Under the trunk liner is a 12V compressor and a can of
    compressed tire gunk. Nice. A bicycle tire is an extra $250.

    Ever notice how all (?) spares are stored with the valve down or inward, forcing you to remove the spare it to check/fill it? The spare in my Odyssey
    is buried valve down under the carpet between the front and middle row seats. What a PITA to get it out.

    I have one configuration or another of these in all of my vehicles.

    https://www.amazon.com/Hotop-Stainless-Extension-Braided-Extender/dp/B09BMWQQ3R

    All of the spares in my vehicles look something like this so I can check/top them off without removing them.

    https://i.imgur.com/6IHvl8M.jpg

    https://i.imgur.com/nxJAKFf.jpg

    I wouldn't be surprised if half the folks in this group (that have spares) have
    spares that are sitting at 45-50 PSI.


    Funny you should mention that. My wife's spare requires 60 lb. Oddly
    the spare tire has a pressure sensor that does not show up on the info
    screen like the tires on the ground do. But if it is low the low air
    light comes on. We thought we would never figure that one out.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to Leon on Mon Jan 3 11:46:46 2022
    On Mon, 3 Jan 2022 10:35:50 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 1/2/2022 4:49 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
    On Sunday, January 2, 2022 at 3:33:44 PM UTC-5, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 14:48:13 GMT, Puckdropper <em...@example.com>
    wrote:
    Michael Trew <michae...@att.net> wrote in
    news:sqohqs$f27$7...@dont-email.me:

    On 12/31/2021 16:59, k...@notreal.com wrote:

    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or anything for that >>>>>> matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)

    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol

    A good compressor that's easy to move (so not one of those 200 gallon
    monsters but also not a 1 1/2 gallon noise maker) would be a nice thing to >>>> pass down. Shoot, even if they just use it to inflate tires and beach
    balls, it would make their life that much easier.
    For tires I have one of these:

    <https://www.homedepot.com/p/RYOBI-ONE-18V-Lithium-Ion-Cordless-Power-Inflator-Kit-with-1-5-Ah-Battery-and-18V-Charger-P737DKN/311788879>

    SWMBO appreciates it very much.

    I looked at her "spare" a while back. Since it is small car
    (Mustang), I knew it had to have a bicycle tire. Nope. Not even
    that. Under the trunk liner is a 12V compressor and a can of
    compressed tire gunk. Nice. A bicycle tire is an extra $250.

    Ever notice how all (?) spares are stored with the valve down or inward,
    forcing you to remove the spare it to check/fill it? The spare in my Odyssey
    is buried valve down under the carpet between the front and middle row seats.
    What a PITA to get it out.

    I have one configuration or another of these in all of my vehicles.

    https://www.amazon.com/Hotop-Stainless-Extension-Braided-Extender/dp/B09BMWQQ3R

    All of the spares in my vehicles look something like this so I can check/top >> them off without removing them.

    https://i.imgur.com/6IHvl8M.jpg

    https://i.imgur.com/nxJAKFf.jpg

    I wouldn't be surprised if half the folks in this group (that have spares) have
    spares that are sitting at 45-50 PSI.


    Funny you should mention that. My wife's spare requires 60 lb. Oddly
    the spare tire has a pressure sensor that does not show up on the info
    screen like the tires on the ground do. But if it is low the low air
    light comes on. We thought we would never figure that one out.

    They probably want you to pay to replace all four sensors looking for
    the culprit. ;-0

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Michael Trew@21:1/5 to Clare Snyder on Mon Jan 3 11:50:51 2022
    On 1/2/2022 21:24, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Sun, 2 Jan 2022 14:49:08 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Sunday, January 2, 2022 at 3:33:44 PM UTC-5, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 14:48:13 GMT, Puckdropper<em...@example.com>
    wrote:
    Michael Trew<michae...@att.net> wrote in
    news:sqohqs$f27$7...@dont-email.me:

    On 12/31/2021 16:59, k...@notreal.com wrote:

    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or anything for that >>>>>> matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)

    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol

    A good compressor that's easy to move (so not one of those 200 gallon
    monsters but also not a 1 1/2 gallon noise maker) would be a nice thing to >>>> pass down. Shoot, even if they just use it to inflate tires and beach
    balls, it would make their life that much easier.
    For tires I have one of these:

    <https://www.homedepot.com/p/RYOBI-ONE-18V-Lithium-Ion-Cordless-Power-Inflator-Kit-with-1-5-Ah-Battery-and-18V-Charger-P737DKN/311788879>

    SWMBO appreciates it very much.

    I looked at her "spare" a while back. Since it is small car
    (Mustang), I knew it had to have a bicycle tire. Nope. Not even
    that. Under the trunk liner is a 12V compressor and a can of
    compressed tire gunk. Nice. A bicycle tire is an extra $250.

    Ever notice how all (?) spares are stored with the valve down or inward,
    forcing you to remove the spare it to check/fill it? The spare in my Odyssey
    is buried valve down under the carpet between the front and middle row seats.
    What a PITA to get it out.

    I have one configuration or another of these in all of my vehicles.

    https://www.amazon.com/Hotop-Stainless-Extension-Braided-Extender/dp/B09BMWQQ3R

    All of the spares in my vehicles look something like this so I can check/top >> them off without removing them.

    https://i.imgur.com/6IHvl8M.jpg

    https://i.imgur.com/nxJAKFf.jpg

    I wouldn't be surprised if half the folks in this group (that have spares) have
    spares that are sitting at 45-50 PSI.

    It's amazing how those tires hold up. Especially the old bias-ply
    tires, to build on the post quoted below. I have a '68 Ford Galaxie,
    and it has the full size spare installed on the front tire now, a 1968
    bias-ply tire. I cannot believe that the thing still holds air
    pressure. It's pretty well bald, however.

    The last time I actually USED my spare was on my '63 Valiant back
    about 1970. I ALMOST had to use it 3 times on one trip with the PT
    Cruiser on my trip to PEI when 3 valve stems failed and christmas 1972
    in Montana or Idaho or Wyoming or wherever when I got a cinder
    puncture - managed to find a tire repair guy before it got all the way
    flat.

    I always keep a full sized spare when traveling. I can recall too many
    times that I needed it on a 1,000+ mile road trip, in recent history.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Michael Trew@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Mon Jan 3 11:53:25 2022
    On 1/2/2022 21:46, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 20:30:19 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/2/2022 9:48, Puckdropper wrote:
    Michael Trew<michael.trew@att.net> wrote in
    news:sqohqs$f27$7@dont-email.me:

    On 12/31/2021 16:59, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or anything for that >>>>> matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)

    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol

    A good compressor that's easy to move (so not one of those 200 gallon
    monsters but also not a 1 1/2 gallon noise maker) would be a nice thing to >>> pass down. Shoot, even if they just use it to inflate tires and beach
    balls, it would make their life that much easier.

    Puckdropper

    Well, I'm probably a fair deal younger than most here (in my 20's). If
    I had a garage, I'd love to have one of those "monsters".

    I have an old sears compressor, no tank, that was used for some kind of
    power spray tool. It will inflate a tire to almost exactly 40 PSI, so I
    use that for car tires until you can hear the machine spitting out the
    excess PSI at its limit.

    I have a couple of cheap, small, crappy pan-cake style "noise makers".
    A decent air compressor is in my future, at some point. One that isn't
    too heavy to haul up and down the cellar steps, due to my no garage
    situation.

    There's nothing really wrong with pancake compressors. They're not
    good for painting but they'll run any air tools that you're likely to
    use. I've had one for 15-20 years. I have another in my garage that is
    just a pancake compressor with elephantiasis. I think it's a 225psi
    15gal so it has plenty of air storage but its recovery time is
    abysmal. I intend to plumb it into the basement so the noise stays in
    the garage. You could do the opposite but you may run into a freezing problem. With a little thought that shouldn't be too hard to avoid.

    True, nothing wrong with pancake compressors. The two that I have are
    far smaller than 15 gallons, one is a Walmart brand. Those ones are
    garbage, in specific. That was a regretted purchase from a few years ago.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to michael.trew@att.net on Mon Jan 3 12:00:19 2022
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 11:50:51 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/2/2022 21:24, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Sun, 2 Jan 2022 14:49:08 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Sunday, January 2, 2022 at 3:33:44 PM UTC-5, k...@notreal.com wrote: >>>> On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 14:48:13 GMT, Puckdropper<em...@example.com>
    wrote:
    Michael Trew<michae...@att.net> wrote in
    news:sqohqs$f27$7...@dont-email.me:

    On 12/31/2021 16:59, k...@notreal.com wrote:

    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or anything for that >>>>>>> matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)

    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol

    A good compressor that's easy to move (so not one of those 200 gallon >>>>> monsters but also not a 1 1/2 gallon noise maker) would be a nice thing to
    pass down. Shoot, even if they just use it to inflate tires and beach >>>>> balls, it would make their life that much easier.
    For tires I have one of these:

    <https://www.homedepot.com/p/RYOBI-ONE-18V-Lithium-Ion-Cordless-Power-Inflator-Kit-with-1-5-Ah-Battery-and-18V-Charger-P737DKN/311788879>

    SWMBO appreciates it very much.

    I looked at her "spare" a while back. Since it is small car
    (Mustang), I knew it had to have a bicycle tire. Nope. Not even
    that. Under the trunk liner is a 12V compressor and a can of
    compressed tire gunk. Nice. A bicycle tire is an extra $250.

    Ever notice how all (?) spares are stored with the valve down or inward, >>> forcing you to remove the spare it to check/fill it? The spare in my Odyssey
    is buried valve down under the carpet between the front and middle row seats.
    What a PITA to get it out.

    I have one configuration or another of these in all of my vehicles.

    https://www.amazon.com/Hotop-Stainless-Extension-Braided-Extender/dp/B09BMWQQ3R

    All of the spares in my vehicles look something like this so I can check/top
    them off without removing them.

    https://i.imgur.com/6IHvl8M.jpg

    https://i.imgur.com/nxJAKFf.jpg

    I wouldn't be surprised if half the folks in this group (that have spares) have
    spares that are sitting at 45-50 PSI.

    It's amazing how those tires hold up. Especially the old bias-ply
    tires, to build on the post quoted below. I have a '68 Ford Galaxie,
    and it has the full size spare installed on the front tire now, a 1968 >bias-ply tire. I cannot believe that the thing still holds air
    pressure. It's pretty well bald, however.

    Bicycle tires are designed to never be used.

    The last time I actually USED my spare was on my '63 Valiant back
    about 1970. I ALMOST had to use it 3 times on one trip with the PT
    Cruiser on my trip to PEI when 3 valve stems failed and christmas 1972
    in Montana or Idaho or Wyoming or wherever when I got a cinder
    puncture - managed to find a tire repair guy before it got all the way
    flat.

    I always keep a full sized spare when traveling. I can recall too many
    times that I needed it on a 1,000+ mile road trip, in recent history.

    A full-size tire would take up the entire trunk, making travel a
    little difficult. Full-size truck spares work because there is waste
    space under the bed. There is no wasted space in cars these days. I
    wonder that the (useless) electric trucks will do. AFAIK, the
    batteries take up that space.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to michael.trew@att.net on Mon Jan 3 12:06:27 2022
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 11:53:25 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/2/2022 21:46, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 20:30:19 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/2/2022 9:48, Puckdropper wrote:
    Michael Trew<michael.trew@att.net> wrote in
    news:sqohqs$f27$7@dont-email.me:

    On 12/31/2021 16:59, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or anything for that >>>>>> matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)

    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol

    A good compressor that's easy to move (so not one of those 200 gallon
    monsters but also not a 1 1/2 gallon noise maker) would be a nice thing to >>>> pass down. Shoot, even if they just use it to inflate tires and beach >>>> balls, it would make their life that much easier.

    Puckdropper

    Well, I'm probably a fair deal younger than most here (in my 20's). If
    I had a garage, I'd love to have one of those "monsters".

    I have an old sears compressor, no tank, that was used for some kind of
    power spray tool. It will inflate a tire to almost exactly 40 PSI, so I >>> use that for car tires until you can hear the machine spitting out the
    excess PSI at its limit.

    I have a couple of cheap, small, crappy pan-cake style "noise makers".
    A decent air compressor is in my future, at some point. One that isn't
    too heavy to haul up and down the cellar steps, due to my no garage
    situation.

    There's nothing really wrong with pancake compressors. They're not
    good for painting but they'll run any air tools that you're likely to
    use. I've had one for 15-20 years. I have another in my garage that is
    just a pancake compressor with elephantiasis. I think it's a 225psi
    15gal so it has plenty of air storage but its recovery time is
    abysmal. I intend to plumb it into the basement so the noise stays in
    the garage. You could do the opposite but you may run into a freezing
    problem. With a little thought that shouldn't be too hard to avoid.

    True, nothing wrong with pancake compressors. The two that I have are
    far smaller than 15 gallons, one is a Walmart brand. Those ones are
    garbage, in specific. That was a regretted purchase from a few years ago.

    Aren't they all made in the same factory, deep in China? I think mine
    is a Porter-Cable that came with three nail guns (brad, 16ga(?), and
    narrow crown stapler) for $200. It can't be much better than a Wally
    World.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Leon@21:1/5 to Michael Trew on Mon Jan 3 11:08:56 2022
    On 1/3/2022 10:50 AM, Michael Trew wrote:
    On 1/2/2022 21:24, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Sun, 2 Jan 2022 14:49:08 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net>  wrote:

    On Sunday, January 2, 2022 at 3:33:44 PM UTC-5, k...@notreal.com wrote: >>>> On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 14:48:13 GMT, Puckdropper<em...@example.com>
    wrote:
    Michael Trew<michae...@att.net>  wrote in
    news:sqohqs$f27$7...@dont-email.me:

    On 12/31/2021 16:59, k...@notreal.com wrote:

    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or anything for that >>>>>>> matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)

    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol

    A good compressor that's easy to move (so not one of those 200 gallon >>>>> monsters but also not a 1 1/2 gallon noise maker) would be a nice
    thing to
    pass down. Shoot, even if they just use it to inflate tires and beach >>>>> balls, it would make their life that much easier.
    For tires I have one of these:

    <https://www.homedepot.com/p/RYOBI-ONE-18V-Lithium-Ion-Cordless-Power-Inflator-Kit-with-1-5-Ah-Battery-and-18V-Charger-P737DKN/311788879>


    SWMBO appreciates it very much.

    I looked at her "spare" a while back. Since it is small car
    (Mustang), I knew it had to have a bicycle tire. Nope. Not even
    that. Under the trunk liner is a 12V compressor and a can of
    compressed tire gunk. Nice. A bicycle tire is an extra $250.

    Ever notice how all (?) spares are stored with the valve down or inward, >>> forcing you to  remove the spare it to check/fill it?  The spare in
    my Odyssey
    is buried valve down under the carpet between the front and middle
    row seats.
    What a PITA to get it out.

    I have one configuration or another of these in all of my vehicles.

    https://www.amazon.com/Hotop-Stainless-Extension-Braided-Extender/dp/B09BMWQQ3R


    All of the spares in my vehicles look something like this so I can
    check/top
    them off without removing them.

    https://i.imgur.com/6IHvl8M.jpg

    https://i.imgur.com/nxJAKFf.jpg

    I wouldn't be surprised if half the folks in this group (that have
    spares) have
    spares that are sitting at 45-50 PSI.

    It's amazing how those tires hold up.  Especially the old bias-ply
    tires, to build on the post quoted below.  I have a '68 Ford Galaxie,
    and it has the full size spare installed on the front tire now, a 1968 bias-ply tire.  I cannot believe that the thing still holds air
    pressure.  It's pretty well bald, however.

    Amazing that it has not concerted over to Maypop status. Maypop any time.




       The last time I actually USED my spare was on my '63 Valiant back
    about 1970. I ALMOST had to use it 3 times on one trip with the PT
    Cruiser on my trip to PEI when 3 valve stems failed and christmas 1972
    in Montana or Idaho or Wyoming or wherever when I got a cinder
    puncture - managed to find a tire repair guy before it got all the way
    flat.

    I always keep a full sized spare when traveling.  I can recall too many times that I needed it on a 1,000+ mile road trip, in recent history.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Leon@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Mon Jan 3 11:11:16 2022
    On 1/3/2022 11:00 AM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 11:50:51 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/2/2022 21:24, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Sun, 2 Jan 2022 14:49:08 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Sunday, January 2, 2022 at 3:33:44 PM UTC-5, k...@notreal.com wrote: >>>>> On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 14:48:13 GMT, Puckdropper<em...@example.com>
    wrote:
    Michael Trew<michae...@att.net> wrote in
    news:sqohqs$f27$7...@dont-email.me:

    On 12/31/2021 16:59, k...@notreal.com wrote:

    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or anything for that >>>>>>>> matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)

    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol

    A good compressor that's easy to move (so not one of those 200 gallon >>>>>> monsters but also not a 1 1/2 gallon noise maker) would be a nice thing to
    pass down. Shoot, even if they just use it to inflate tires and beach >>>>>> balls, it would make their life that much easier.
    For tires I have one of these:

    <https://www.homedepot.com/p/RYOBI-ONE-18V-Lithium-Ion-Cordless-Power-Inflator-Kit-with-1-5-Ah-Battery-and-18V-Charger-P737DKN/311788879>

    SWMBO appreciates it very much.

    I looked at her "spare" a while back. Since it is small car
    (Mustang), I knew it had to have a bicycle tire. Nope. Not even
    that. Under the trunk liner is a 12V compressor and a can of
    compressed tire gunk. Nice. A bicycle tire is an extra $250.

    Ever notice how all (?) spares are stored with the valve down or inward, >>>> forcing you to remove the spare it to check/fill it? The spare in my Odyssey
    is buried valve down under the carpet between the front and middle row seats.
    What a PITA to get it out.

    I have one configuration or another of these in all of my vehicles.

    https://www.amazon.com/Hotop-Stainless-Extension-Braided-Extender/dp/B09BMWQQ3R

    All of the spares in my vehicles look something like this so I can check/top
    them off without removing them.

    https://i.imgur.com/6IHvl8M.jpg

    https://i.imgur.com/nxJAKFf.jpg

    I wouldn't be surprised if half the folks in this group (that have spares) have
    spares that are sitting at 45-50 PSI.

    It's amazing how those tires hold up. Especially the old bias-ply
    tires, to build on the post quoted below. I have a '68 Ford Galaxie,
    and it has the full size spare installed on the front tire now, a 1968
    bias-ply tire. I cannot believe that the thing still holds air
    pressure. It's pretty well bald, however.

    Bicycle tires are designed to never be used.

    The last time I actually USED my spare was on my '63 Valiant back
    about 1970. I ALMOST had to use it 3 times on one trip with the PT
    Cruiser on my trip to PEI when 3 valve stems failed and christmas 1972
    in Montana or Idaho or Wyoming or wherever when I got a cinder
    puncture - managed to find a tire repair guy before it got all the way
    flat.

    I always keep a full sized spare when traveling. I can recall too many
    times that I needed it on a 1,000+ mile road trip, in recent history.

    A full-size tire would take up the entire trunk, making travel a
    little difficult. Full-size truck spares work because there is waste
    space under the bed. There is no wasted space in cars these days. I
    wonder that the (useless) electric trucks will do. AFAIK, the
    batteries take up that space.


    Those limited range electric trucks may never be further than walking
    distance from a tire store. ;~)

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to Leon on Mon Jan 3 12:51:33 2022
    On Mon, 3 Jan 2022 11:11:16 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 1/3/2022 11:00 AM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 11:50:51 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/2/2022 21:24, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Sun, 2 Jan 2022 14:49:08 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Sunday, January 2, 2022 at 3:33:44 PM UTC-5, k...@notreal.com wrote: >>>>>> On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 14:48:13 GMT, Puckdropper<em...@example.com>
    wrote:
    Michael Trew<michae...@att.net> wrote in
    news:sqohqs$f27$7...@dont-email.me:

    On 12/31/2021 16:59, k...@notreal.com wrote:

    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or anything for that >>>>>>>>> matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)

    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol

    A good compressor that's easy to move (so not one of those 200 gallon >>>>>>> monsters but also not a 1 1/2 gallon noise maker) would be a nice thing to
    pass down. Shoot, even if they just use it to inflate tires and beach >>>>>>> balls, it would make their life that much easier.
    For tires I have one of these:

    <https://www.homedepot.com/p/RYOBI-ONE-18V-Lithium-Ion-Cordless-Power-Inflator-Kit-with-1-5-Ah-Battery-and-18V-Charger-P737DKN/311788879>

    SWMBO appreciates it very much.

    I looked at her "spare" a while back. Since it is small car
    (Mustang), I knew it had to have a bicycle tire. Nope. Not even
    that. Under the trunk liner is a 12V compressor and a can of
    compressed tire gunk. Nice. A bicycle tire is an extra $250.

    Ever notice how all (?) spares are stored with the valve down or inward, >>>>> forcing you to remove the spare it to check/fill it? The spare in my Odyssey
    is buried valve down under the carpet between the front and middle row seats.
    What a PITA to get it out.

    I have one configuration or another of these in all of my vehicles.

    https://www.amazon.com/Hotop-Stainless-Extension-Braided-Extender/dp/B09BMWQQ3R

    All of the spares in my vehicles look something like this so I can check/top
    them off without removing them.

    https://i.imgur.com/6IHvl8M.jpg

    https://i.imgur.com/nxJAKFf.jpg

    I wouldn't be surprised if half the folks in this group (that have spares) have
    spares that are sitting at 45-50 PSI.

    It's amazing how those tires hold up. Especially the old bias-ply
    tires, to build on the post quoted below. I have a '68 Ford Galaxie,
    and it has the full size spare installed on the front tire now, a 1968
    bias-ply tire. I cannot believe that the thing still holds air
    pressure. It's pretty well bald, however.

    Bicycle tires are designed to never be used.

    The last time I actually USED my spare was on my '63 Valiant back
    about 1970. I ALMOST had to use it 3 times on one trip with the PT
    Cruiser on my trip to PEI when 3 valve stems failed and christmas 1972 >>>> in Montana or Idaho or Wyoming or wherever when I got a cinder
    puncture - managed to find a tire repair guy before it got all the way >>>> flat.

    I always keep a full sized spare when traveling. I can recall too many
    times that I needed it on a 1,000+ mile road trip, in recent history.

    A full-size tire would take up the entire trunk, making travel a
    little difficult. Full-size truck spares work because there is waste
    space under the bed. There is no wasted space in cars these days. I
    wonder that the (useless) electric trucks will do. AFAIK, the
    batteries take up that space.


    Those limited range electric trucks may never be further than walking >distance from a tire store. ;~)

    LOL! Maybe dualies front and back?

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Scott Lurndal@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Mon Jan 3 18:11:21 2022
    krw@notreal.com writes:
    On Mon, 3 Jan 2022 11:11:16 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:




    Those limited range electric trucks may never be further than walking >>distance from a tire store. ;~)

    LOL! Maybe dualies front and back?

    The Rivian R1S (saw one drive past a couple of weeks ago) have a range
    of 300+ miles. How often do you drive more than 300 miles in a working
    day?

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to All on Mon Jan 3 13:31:17 2022
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 18:11:21 GMT, scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal)
    wrote:

    krw@notreal.com writes:
    On Mon, 3 Jan 2022 11:11:16 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:




    Those limited range electric trucks may never be further than walking >>>distance from a tire store. ;~)

    LOL! Maybe dualies front and back?

    The Rivian R1S (saw one drive past a couple of weeks ago) have a range
    of 300+ miles. How often do you drive more than 300 miles in a working
    day?

    Working? The kid lives 1200 mi from here. The beach is 350mi. Disney
    world is 450mi. A few places.

    How about these scenarios: Your employee forgets to plug the truck in
    when he's done for the day. He keeps it overnight and because and
    doesn't have a charging station.... You're driving all day
    supervising jobs across the city? Nope, _DUMB_ idea. Only a virtue-signaling-eco-freak could love such a dumb idea.

    Ford might be able to buy fewer EPA mileage credits from Elon, though.
    ...if they can find enough suckers.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Clare Snyder@21:1/5 to Leon on Mon Jan 3 13:40:22 2022
    On Mon, 3 Jan 2022 11:08:56 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 1/3/2022 10:50 AM, Michael Trew wrote:
    On 1/2/2022 21:24, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Sun, 2 Jan 2022 14:49:08 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Sunday, January 2, 2022 at 3:33:44 PM UTC-5, k...@notreal.com wrote: >>>>> On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 14:48:13 GMT, Puckdropper<em...@example.com>
    wrote:
    Michael Trew<michae...@att.net> wrote in
    news:sqohqs$f27$7...@dont-email.me:

    On 12/31/2021 16:59, k...@notreal.com wrote:

    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or anything for that >>>>>>>> matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)

    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol

    A good compressor that's easy to move (so not one of those 200 gallon >>>>>> monsters but also not a 1 1/2 gallon noise maker) would be a nice
    thing to
    pass down. Shoot, even if they just use it to inflate tires and beach >>>>>> balls, it would make their life that much easier.
    For tires I have one of these:

    <https://www.homedepot.com/p/RYOBI-ONE-18V-Lithium-Ion-Cordless-Power-Inflator-Kit-with-1-5-Ah-Battery-and-18V-Charger-P737DKN/311788879>


    SWMBO appreciates it very much.

    I looked at her "spare" a while back. Since it is small car
    (Mustang), I knew it had to have a bicycle tire. Nope. Not even
    that. Under the trunk liner is a 12V compressor and a can of
    compressed tire gunk. Nice. A bicycle tire is an extra $250.

    Ever notice how all (?) spares are stored with the valve down or inward, >>>> forcing you to remove the spare it to check/fill it? The spare in
    my Odyssey
    is buried valve down under the carpet between the front and middle
    row seats.
    What a PITA to get it out.

    I have one configuration or another of these in all of my vehicles.

    https://www.amazon.com/Hotop-Stainless-Extension-Braided-Extender/dp/B09BMWQQ3R


    All of the spares in my vehicles look something like this so I can
    check/top
    them off without removing them.

    https://i.imgur.com/6IHvl8M.jpg

    https://i.imgur.com/nxJAKFf.jpg

    I wouldn't be surprised if half the folks in this group (that have
    spares) have
    spares that are sitting at 45-50 PSI.

    It's amazing how those tires hold up. Especially the old bias-ply
    tires, to build on the post quoted below. I have a '68 Ford Galaxie,
    and it has the full size spare installed on the front tire now, a 1968
    bias-ply tire. I cannot believe that the thing still holds air
    pressure. It's pretty well bald, however.

    Amazing that it has not concerted over to Maypop status. Maypop any time.




    The last time I actually USED my spare was on my '63 Valiant back
    about 1970. I ALMOST had to use it 3 times on one trip with the PT
    Cruiser on my trip to PEI when 3 valve stems failed and christmas 1972
    in Montana or Idaho or Wyoming or wherever when I got a cinder
    puncture - managed to find a tire repair guy before it got all the way
    flat.

    I always keep a full sized spare when traveling. I can recall too many
    times that I needed it on a 1,000+ mile road trip, in recent history.
    Funny how many people have tire troubles on he road. How old are
    their tires? Are the tires the right tires for the application and of
    good quality???.What are they hitting? Are they not watching where
    they are driving? Or do thy just not care???

    And I forgot the one time I needed the spare on my '69 dart - 2 days
    after buying new tires I picked up a cross-traffic vehicle counter
    hose that had come un-nailed from the road - putting 3 nail holes
    within a square inch and wrapping about 20 feet of hose around the
    tire. When I went tio the city traffic department to make a claim for
    the damage the guy asked "what makes you think it was our traffic
    counter that flattened the tire?" I opened the door and rolled in the
    wheel still fastened to the 20 foot hose and told him to check
    thecounter at the location and then explain to me how it was NOT his
    counter that caused the problem. They bought a new tire.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Bob Davis@21:1/5 to Scott Lurndal on Mon Jan 3 10:18:35 2022
    On Monday, January 3, 2022 at 12:11:26 PM UTC-6, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    k...@notreal.com writes:
    On Mon, 3 Jan 2022 11:11:16 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:




    Those limited range electric trucks may never be further than walking >>distance from a tire store. ;~)

    LOL! Maybe dualies front and back?
    The Rivian R1S (saw one drive past a couple of weeks ago) have a range
    of 300+ miles. How often do you drive more than 300 miles in a working
    day?

    I think that is the range without heating or air conditioning. Put it Minnesota in winter and the heater will suck the batteries down much quicker. I think would also be true for Houston in August with air conditioning.

    Bob

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Leon@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Mon Jan 3 12:49:39 2022
    On 1/3/2022 12:31 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 18:11:21 GMT, scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal)
    wrote:

    krw@notreal.com writes:
    On Mon, 3 Jan 2022 11:11:16 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:




    Those limited range electric trucks may never be further than walking
    distance from a tire store. ;~)

    LOL! Maybe dualies front and back?

    The Rivian R1S (saw one drive past a couple of weeks ago) have a range
    of 300+ miles. How often do you drive more than 300 miles in a working
    day?

    Working? The kid lives 1200 mi from here. The beach is 350mi. Disney
    world is 450mi. A few places.

    How about these scenarios: Your employee forgets to plug the truck in
    when he's done for the day. He keeps it overnight and because and
    doesn't have a charging station.... You're driving all day
    supervising jobs across the city? Nope, _DUMB_ idea. Only a virtue-signaling-eco-freak could love such a dumb idea.

    Ford might be able to buy fewer EPA mileage credits from Elon, though.
    ...if they can find enough suckers.


    And that is part of the problem with electrics.
    Along with this is the mileage estimate when new. What about in 3~5
    years and or 40K miles?
    Until an electric is capable of going 500~600 miles on a charge, and
    charging takes less than 15 minutes I'll stick with gasoline.
    Maybe an electric for my wife for around town driving, if it is less
    expensive than gasoline to buy.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Leon@21:1/5 to Scott Lurndal on Mon Jan 3 13:02:03 2022
    On 1/3/2022 12:11 PM, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    krw@notreal.com writes:
    On Mon, 3 Jan 2022 11:11:16 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:




    Those limited range electric trucks may never be further than walking
    distance from a tire store. ;~)

    LOL! Maybe dualies front and back?

    The Rivian R1S (saw one drive past a couple of weeks ago) have a range
    of 300+ miles. How often do you drive more than 300 miles in a working
    day?

    Not often but with that range you don't take it on a long trip. And you
    may consider a truck not being a good vacation vehicle but a truck that
    costs that much should be more comfortable on long trips. My wife and I
    would much rather take our upper end F150 on vacation than her upper end
    Camry.

    I think that the electrics might be better to use when range doubles,
    can be recharged in about the time it takes to fill a tank of gasoline,
    and or if only using it as a city commuter.

    And considering that if you have to go from one city to another for work related travel, especially in Texas, you will have to recharge to get
    back home.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to Leon on Mon Jan 3 14:22:06 2022
    On Mon, 3 Jan 2022 13:02:03 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 1/3/2022 12:11 PM, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    krw@notreal.com writes:
    On Mon, 3 Jan 2022 11:11:16 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:




    Those limited range electric trucks may never be further than walking
    distance from a tire store. ;~)

    LOL! Maybe dualies front and back?

    The Rivian R1S (saw one drive past a couple of weeks ago) have a range
    of 300+ miles. How often do you drive more than 300 miles in a working
    day?

    Not often but with that range you don't take it on a long trip. And you
    may consider a truck not being a good vacation vehicle but a truck that
    costs that much should be more comfortable on long trips. My wife and I >would much rather take our upper end F150 on vacation than her upper end >Camry.

    A puckup is the perfect vehicle for the beach or the kid's. Beach
    chairs, umbrellas, and coolers for the beach and a bed-load of tools
    for the kid's.

    I think that the electrics might be better to use when range doubles,
    can be recharged in about the time it takes to fill a tank of gasoline,
    and or if only using it as a city commuter.

    With or without Brandon paying a chunk of it?

    And considering that if you have to go from one city to another for work >related travel, especially in Texas, you will have to recharge to get
    back home.

    Where are you going to recharge? At the customer's? Do they have a
    charging station? You're not going to do it with a lamp cord.

    And if you have a rain-out? Oh, forgot, it is Texas. ;-)

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to All on Mon Jan 3 14:29:11 2022
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 13:40:22 -0500, Clare Snyder <clare@snyder.on.ca>
    wrote:

    On Mon, 3 Jan 2022 11:08:56 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 1/3/2022 10:50 AM, Michael Trew wrote:
    On 1/2/2022 21:24, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Sun, 2 Jan 2022 14:49:08 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Sunday, January 2, 2022 at 3:33:44 PM UTC-5, k...@notreal.com wrote: >>>>>> On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 14:48:13 GMT, Puckdropper<em...@example.com>
    wrote:
    Michael Trew<michae...@att.net> wrote in
    news:sqohqs$f27$7...@dont-email.me:

    On 12/31/2021 16:59, k...@notreal.com wrote:

    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or anything for that >>>>>>>>> matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)

    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol

    A good compressor that's easy to move (so not one of those 200 gallon >>>>>>> monsters but also not a 1 1/2 gallon noise maker) would be a nice >>>>>>> thing to
    pass down. Shoot, even if they just use it to inflate tires and beach >>>>>>> balls, it would make their life that much easier.
    For tires I have one of these:

    <https://www.homedepot.com/p/RYOBI-ONE-18V-Lithium-Ion-Cordless-Power-Inflator-Kit-with-1-5-Ah-Battery-and-18V-Charger-P737DKN/311788879>


    SWMBO appreciates it very much.

    I looked at her "spare" a while back. Since it is small car
    (Mustang), I knew it had to have a bicycle tire. Nope. Not even
    that. Under the trunk liner is a 12V compressor and a can of
    compressed tire gunk. Nice. A bicycle tire is an extra $250.

    Ever notice how all (?) spares are stored with the valve down or inward, >>>>> forcing you to remove the spare it to check/fill it? The spare in
    my Odyssey
    is buried valve down under the carpet between the front and middle
    row seats.
    What a PITA to get it out.

    I have one configuration or another of these in all of my vehicles.

    https://www.amazon.com/Hotop-Stainless-Extension-Braided-Extender/dp/B09BMWQQ3R


    All of the spares in my vehicles look something like this so I can
    check/top
    them off without removing them.

    https://i.imgur.com/6IHvl8M.jpg

    https://i.imgur.com/nxJAKFf.jpg

    I wouldn't be surprised if half the folks in this group (that have
    spares) have
    spares that are sitting at 45-50 PSI.

    It's amazing how those tires hold up. Especially the old bias-ply
    tires, to build on the post quoted below. I have a '68 Ford Galaxie,
    and it has the full size spare installed on the front tire now, a 1968
    bias-ply tire. I cannot believe that the thing still holds air
    pressure. It's pretty well bald, however.

    Amazing that it has not concerted over to Maypop status. Maypop any time.




    The last time I actually USED my spare was on my '63 Valiant back
    about 1970. I ALMOST had to use it 3 times on one trip with the PT
    Cruiser on my trip to PEI when 3 valve stems failed and christmas 1972 >>>> in Montana or Idaho or Wyoming or wherever when I got a cinder
    puncture - managed to find a tire repair guy before it got all the way >>>> flat.

    I always keep a full sized spare when traveling. I can recall too many
    times that I needed it on a 1,000+ mile road trip, in recent history.
    Funny how many people have tire troubles on he road. How old are
    their tires? Are the tires the right tires for the application and of
    good quality???.What are they hitting? Are they not watching where
    they are driving? Or do thy just not care???

    I hit some metal on an Interstate a few years ago. It did a real
    number on the tires and wheels. We were driving back from WallyWorld
    last summer when some f'n moron flew by on our right, cut in from
    behind a truck into too short of the space, two cars in front of us.
    All I saw was an explosion of car. Fortunately, it was all plastic.

    And I forgot the one time I needed the spare on my '69 dart - 2 days
    after buying new tires I picked up a cross-traffic vehicle counter
    hose that had come un-nailed from the road - putting 3 nail holes
    within a square inch and wrapping about 20 feet of hose around the
    tire. When I went tio the city traffic department to make a claim for
    the damage the guy asked "what makes you think it was our traffic
    counter that flattened the tire?" I opened the door and rolled in the
    wheel still fastened to the 20 foot hose and told him to check
    thecounter at the location and then explain to me how it was NOT his
    counter that caused the problem. They bought a new tire.

    I've picked up nails and have had slices in the side-wall. They're not
    always obvious until it's too late.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Scott Lurndal@21:1/5 to Bob Davis on Mon Jan 3 20:26:28 2022
    Bob Davis <wrobertdavis@gmail.com> writes:
    On Monday, January 3, 2022 at 12:11:26 PM UTC-6, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    k...@notreal.com writes:
    On Mon, 3 Jan 2022 11:11:16 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:




    Those limited range electric trucks may never be further than walking
    distance from a tire store. ;~)

    LOL! Maybe dualies front and back?
    The Rivian R1S (saw one drive past a couple of weeks ago) have a range
    of 300+ miles. How often do you drive more than 300 miles in a working
    day?

    I think that is the range without heating or air conditioning. Put it Minnesota in winter and the heater will suck the batteries down much quicker. I think would also be true for Houston in August with air conditioning.

    Current numbers indicate a 10-40% drop in range in the winter - as much because the batteries need to be warmed up than the use of the heater. Although keeping
    the interior in the low 60's and wearing a coat and using the seat-heaters helps.

    Also depends on the technology - heat pump vs. resistance heat.

    The batteries need to be warmed up before use, so preconditioning (via your smartphone
    app or scheduled via the manufacturer) while still connected to the charger helps
    preserve range in the winter.

    I drive my pick-em-up truck, on average, about 350 miles a month.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Scott Lurndal@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Mon Jan 3 20:30:07 2022
    krw@notreal.com writes:
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 18:11:21 GMT, scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal)
    wrote:

    krw@notreal.com writes:
    On Mon, 3 Jan 2022 11:11:16 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:




    Those limited range electric trucks may never be further than walking >>>>distance from a tire store. ;~)

    LOL! Maybe dualies front and back?

    The Rivian R1S (saw one drive past a couple of weeks ago) have a range
    of 300+ miles. How often do you drive more than 300 miles in a working >>day?

    Working? The kid lives 1200 mi from here. The beach is 350mi. Disney
    world is 450mi. A few places.

    Well, your needs don't match the capabilities. Buy something that does
    and stop your political posturing.

    The average light truck in the United States is driven less a 1000
    miles a month, which means they'll have sufficient range for most
    users who aren't you.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Clare Snyder@21:1/5 to All on Mon Jan 3 16:41:38 2022
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 20:26:28 GMT, scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal)
    wrote:

    Bob Davis <wrobertdavis@gmail.com> writes:
    On Monday, January 3, 2022 at 12:11:26 PM UTC-6, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    k...@notreal.com writes:
    On Mon, 3 Jan 2022 11:11:16 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:




    Those limited range electric trucks may never be further than walking
    distance from a tire store. ;~)

    LOL! Maybe dualies front and back?
    The Rivian R1S (saw one drive past a couple of weeks ago) have a range
    of 300+ miles. How often do you drive more than 300 miles in a working
    day?

    I think that is the range without heating or air conditioning. Put it Minnesota in winter and the heater will suck the batteries down much quicker. I think would also be true for Houston in August with air conditioning.

    Current numbers indicate a 10-40% drop in range in the winter - as much because
    the batteries need to be warmed up than the use of the heater. Although keeping
    the interior in the low 60's and wearing a coat and using the seat-heaters helps.

    Also depends on the technology - heat pump vs. resistance heat.

    The batteries need to be warmed up before use, so preconditioning (via your smartphone
    app or scheduled via the manufacturer) while still connected to the charger helps
    preserve range in the winter.

    I drive my pick-em-up truck, on average, about 350 miles a month.
    The last few years I've put about 6000km a year on the old ranger -
    likely less than 5000 this last year. Not that long ago I was putting
    on 25000+

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Markem618@21:1/5 to All on Mon Jan 3 15:48:24 2022
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 16:41:38 -0500, Clare Snyder <clare@snyder.on.ca>
    wrote:

    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 20:26:28 GMT, scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal)
    wrote:

    Bob Davis <wrobertdavis@gmail.com> writes:
    On Monday, January 3, 2022 at 12:11:26 PM UTC-6, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    k...@notreal.com writes:
    On Mon, 3 Jan 2022 11:11:16 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote: >>>> >



    Those limited range electric trucks may never be further than walking >>>> >>distance from a tire store. ;~)

    LOL! Maybe dualies front and back?
    The Rivian R1S (saw one drive past a couple of weeks ago) have a range >>>> of 300+ miles. How often do you drive more than 300 miles in a working >>>> day?

    I think that is the range without heating or air conditioning. Put it Minnesota in winter and the heater will suck the batteries down much quicker. I think would also be true for Houston in August with air conditioning.

    Current numbers indicate a 10-40% drop in range in the winter - as much because
    the batteries need to be warmed up than the use of the heater. Although keeping
    the interior in the low 60's and wearing a coat and using the seat-heaters helps.

    Also depends on the technology - heat pump vs. resistance heat.

    The batteries need to be warmed up before use, so preconditioning (via your smartphone
    app or scheduled via the manufacturer) while still connected to the charger helps
    preserve range in the winter.

    I drive my pick-em-up truck, on average, about 350 miles a month.
    The last few years I've put about 6000km a year on the old ranger -
    likely less than 5000 this last year. Not that long ago I was putting
    on 25000+

    I have put less than 1600 miles on a new truck I bought in October
    last year.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to All on Mon Jan 3 21:56:11 2022
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 15:48:24 -0600, Markem618 <markrm618@hotmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 16:41:38 -0500, Clare Snyder <clare@snyder.on.ca>
    wrote:

    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 20:26:28 GMT, scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) >>wrote:

    Bob Davis <wrobertdavis@gmail.com> writes:
    On Monday, January 3, 2022 at 12:11:26 PM UTC-6, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    k...@notreal.com writes:
    On Mon, 3 Jan 2022 11:11:16 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote: >>>>> >



    Those limited range electric trucks may never be further than walking >>>>> >>distance from a tire store. ;~)

    LOL! Maybe dualies front and back?
    The Rivian R1S (saw one drive past a couple of weeks ago) have a range >>>>> of 300+ miles. How often do you drive more than 300 miles in a working >>>>> day?

    I think that is the range without heating or air conditioning. Put it Minnesota in winter and the heater will suck the batteries down much quicker. I think would also be true for Houston in August with air conditioning.

    Current numbers indicate a 10-40% drop in range in the winter - as much because
    the batteries need to be warmed up than the use of the heater. Although keeping
    the interior in the low 60's and wearing a coat and using the seat-heaters helps.

    Also depends on the technology - heat pump vs. resistance heat.

    The batteries need to be warmed up before use, so preconditioning (via your smartphone
    app or scheduled via the manufacturer) while still connected to the charger helps
    preserve range in the winter.

    I drive my pick-em-up truck, on average, about 350 miles a month.
    The last few years I've put about 6000km a year on the old ranger -
    likely less than 5000 this last year. Not that long ago I was putting
    on 25000+

    I have put less than 1600 miles on a new truck I bought in October
    last year.

    I've put 1800+ on a truck I bought in mid-November.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to All on Mon Jan 3 21:54:55 2022
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 20:26:28 GMT, scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal)
    wrote:

    Bob Davis <wrobertdavis@gmail.com> writes:
    On Monday, January 3, 2022 at 12:11:26 PM UTC-6, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    k...@notreal.com writes:
    On Mon, 3 Jan 2022 11:11:16 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:




    Those limited range electric trucks may never be further than walking
    distance from a tire store. ;~)

    LOL! Maybe dualies front and back?
    The Rivian R1S (saw one drive past a couple of weeks ago) have a range
    of 300+ miles. How often do you drive more than 300 miles in a working
    day?

    I think that is the range without heating or air conditioning. Put it Minnesota in winter and the heater will suck the batteries down much quicker. I think would also be true for Houston in August with air conditioning.

    Current numbers indicate a 10-40% drop in range in the winter - as much because
    the batteries need to be warmed up than the use of the heater. Although keeping
    the interior in the low 60's and wearing a coat and using the seat-heaters helps.

    Also depends on the technology - heat pump vs. resistance heat.

    Red herring. Heat pumps aren't going to work in a Minnesota winter. I
    heat with a heat pump. It switches to resistive heat at about 40F.

    The batteries need to be warmed up before use, so preconditioning (via your smartphone
    app or scheduled via the manufacturer) while still connected to the charger helps
    preserve range in the winter.

    I drive my pick-em-up truck, on average, about 350 miles a month.

    Point?

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to All on Mon Jan 3 22:00:30 2022
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 20:30:07 GMT, scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal)
    wrote:

    krw@notreal.com writes:
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 18:11:21 GMT, scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) >>wrote:

    krw@notreal.com writes:
    On Mon, 3 Jan 2022 11:11:16 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:




    Those limited range electric trucks may never be further than walking >>>>>distance from a tire store. ;~)

    LOL! Maybe dualies front and back?

    The Rivian R1S (saw one drive past a couple of weeks ago) have a range
    of 300+ miles. How often do you drive more than 300 miles in a working >>>day?

    Working? The kid lives 1200 mi from here. The beach is 350mi. Disney
    world is 450mi. A few places.

    Well, your needs don't match the capabilities. Buy something that does
    and stop your political posturing.

    Bullshit. Your furher (more accurately his puppet masters) is trying
    to bankrupt the oil industry and force everyone to electric, which has
    *NO* chance of working but will bankrupt the country (the whole
    point).

    The average light truck in the United States is driven less a 1000
    miles a month, which means they'll have sufficient range for most
    users who aren't you.

    Nonsense.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ed Pawlowski@21:1/5 to Bob Davis on Mon Jan 3 23:17:31 2022
    On 1/3/2022 1:18 PM, Bob Davis wrote:
    On Monday, January 3, 2022 at 12:11:26 PM UTC-6, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    k...@notreal.com writes:
    On Mon, 3 Jan 2022 11:11:16 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:




    Those limited range electric trucks may never be further than walking
    distance from a tire store. ;~)

    LOL! Maybe dualies front and back?
    The Rivian R1S (saw one drive past a couple of weeks ago) have a range
    of 300+ miles. How often do you drive more than 300 miles in a working
    day?

    I think that is the range without heating or air conditioning. Put it Minnesota in winter and the heater will suck the batteries down much quicker. I think would also be true for Houston in August with air conditioning.

    Bob

    Many tradesmen never go more than 40 miles from their home base. one
    test of the F-150 lightning got 472 miles. IIRC, Ford is saying 300
    miles.

    I don't know about heat but I drove an EV on a 90+ degree day and the AC
    was fantastic.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DerbyDad03@21:1/5 to k...@notreal.com on Mon Jan 3 20:21:42 2022
    On Monday, January 3, 2022 at 10:00:35 PM UTC-5, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 20:30:07 GMT, sc...@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal)
    wrote:

    k...@notreal.com writes:
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 18:11:21 GMT, sc...@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) >>wrote:

    k...@notreal.com writes:
    On Mon, 3 Jan 2022 11:11:16 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote: >>>>



    Those limited range electric trucks may never be further than walking >>>>>distance from a tire store. ;~)

    LOL! Maybe dualies front and back?

    The Rivian R1S (saw one drive past a couple of weeks ago) have a range >>>of 300+ miles. How often do you drive more than 300 miles in a working >>>day?

    Working? The kid lives 1200 mi from here. The beach is 350mi. Disney >>world is 450mi. A few places.

    Well, your needs don't match the capabilities. Buy something that does
    and stop your political posturing.
    Bullshit. Your furher (more accurately his puppet masters) is trying
    to bankrupt the oil industry and force everyone to electric, which has
    *NO* chance of working but will bankrupt the country (the whole
    point).

    The average light truck in the United States is driven less a 1000
    miles a month, which means they'll have sufficient range for most
    users who aren't you.
    Nonsense.

    I'm not jumping in the middle of this discussion, but I was curious about
    that stat. According to this .gov page, the average annual miles driven by
    the "light truck/van" category is 11,543.

    https://afdc.energy.gov/data/10309

    "Vehicles with short wheelbases (<121") are generalized as cars and vehicles with long wheelbases are generalized as light trucks."

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ed Pawlowski@21:1/5 to Leon on Mon Jan 3 23:28:37 2022
    On 1/3/2022 1:49 PM, Leon wrote:

    Working? The kid lives 1200 mi from here. The beach is 350mi. Disney
    world is 450mi.  A few places.

    How about these scenarios: Your employee forgets to plug the truck in
    when he's done for the day.  He keeps it overnight and because and
    doesn't have a charging station....  You're driving all day
    supervising jobs across the city? Nope, _DUMB_ idea. Only a
    virtue-signaling-eco-freak could love such a dumb idea.

    Ford might be able to buy fewer EPA mileage credits from Elon, though.
    ...if they can find enough suckers.


    And that is part of the problem with electrics.
    Along with this is the mileage estimate when new.  What about in 3~5
    years and or 40K miles?
    Until an electric is capable of going 500~600 miles on a charge, and
    charging takes less than 15 minutes I'll stick with gasoline.
    Maybe an electric for my wife for around town driving, if it is less expensive than gasoline to buy.


    That day will be here fairly soon. New battery technology is in the
    works and charging times on half what you want.

    EVs are not yet the answer for everyone yet but many of the complaints
    are unfounded. There was a time people thought the automobile was just
    a toy too. Just look at the evolution of every transportation system in existence. We went from the Wright Flyer to the Boeing 747 and the
    Mayflower to luxury cruise ships. Some people are very short sighted.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ed Pawlowski@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Mon Jan 3 23:35:28 2022
    On 1/3/2022 10:00 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    Bullshit. Your furher (more accurately his puppet masters) is trying
    to bankrupt the oil industry and force everyone to electric, which has
    *NO* chance of working but will bankrupt the country (the whole
    point).

    Oil companies are adapting

    https://www.shell.com/energy-and-innovation/new-energies/electric-vehicle-charging.html

    As one of the world’s largest energy suppliers, Shell has played a part
    in the essential journeys people make every day for well over a century.
    Our aim now is to become one of the largest electric charging solutions providers globally, meeting customer demand at home, at work or on the go.

    Growing network of electric charging points
    Shell has set a target to operate over 500,000 charge points by 2025. Currently, we operate over 80,000 charge points for electric cars at
    homes, business, Shell retail sites and destinations. In addition, we
    currently offer access to over 300,000 additional charge points through
    our roaming networks

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ed Pawlowski@21:1/5 to Clare Snyder on Tue Jan 4 00:24:50 2022
    On 1/4/2022 12:17 AM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Mon, 3 Jan 2022 23:35:28 -0500, Ed Pawlowski <esp@snet.xxx> wrote:

    On 1/3/2022 10:00 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    Bullshit. Your furher (more accurately his puppet masters) is trying
    to bankrupt the oil industry and force everyone to electric, which has
    *NO* chance of working but will bankrupt the country (the whole
    point).

    Oil companies are adapting

    https://www.shell.com/energy-and-innovation/new-energies/electric-vehicle-charging.html

    As one of the world’s largest energy suppliers, Shell has played a part
    in the essential journeys people make every day for well over a century.
    Our aim now is to become one of the largest electric charging solutions
    providers globally, meeting customer demand at home, at work or on the go. >>
    Growing network of electric charging points
    Shell has set a target to operate over 500,000 charge points by 2025.
    Currently, we operate over 80,000 charge points for electric cars at
    homes, business, Shell retail sites and destinations. In addition, we
    currently offer access to over 300,000 additional charge points through
    our roaming networks
    They are also one of the biggest players in wind and solar power
    worldwide

    Smart business. Estimates vary but some day oil will begin to dry up
    and be very expensive. They are planning ahead. I've heard numbers
    from 40 to 100 years but it is finite.

    Solar has to be figured out for better use and I expect it will be.
    Probably not nest week but it is in the works.

    A total of 173,000 terawatts (trillions of watts) of solar energy
    strikes the Earth continuously. That's more than 10,000 times the
    world's total energy use. And that energy is completely renewable — at
    least, for the lifetime of the sun.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Clare Snyder@21:1/5 to Ed Pawlowski on Tue Jan 4 00:17:36 2022
    On Mon, 3 Jan 2022 23:35:28 -0500, Ed Pawlowski <esp@snet.xxx> wrote:

    On 1/3/2022 10:00 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    Bullshit. Your furher (more accurately his puppet masters) is trying
    to bankrupt the oil industry and force everyone to electric, which has
    *NO* chance of working but will bankrupt the country (the whole
    point).

    Oil companies are adapting

    https://www.shell.com/energy-and-innovation/new-energies/electric-vehicle-charging.html

    As one of the worlds largest energy suppliers, Shell has played a part
    in the essential journeys people make every day for well over a century.
    Our aim now is to become one of the largest electric charging solutions >providers globally, meeting customer demand at home, at work or on the go.

    Growing network of electric charging points
    Shell has set a target to operate over 500,000 charge points by 2025. >Currently, we operate over 80,000 charge points for electric cars at
    homes, business, Shell retail sites and destinations. In addition, we >currently offer access to over 300,000 additional charge points through
    our roaming networks
    They are also one of the biggest players in wind and solar power
    worldwide

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ed Pawlowski@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Tue Jan 4 00:30:17 2022
    On 1/3/2022 2:22 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    And considering that if you have to go from one city to another for work
    related travel, especially in Texas, you will have to recharge to get
    back home.

    Where are you going to recharge? At the customer's? Do they have a
    charging station? You're not going to do it with a lamp cord.


    At one of the 500,000 stations Shell is putting in. Or the 7-11 as they
    are putting them in.
    There are 15 stations at 4 locations within 8 miles of me.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From J. Clarke@21:1/5 to Ed Pawlowski on Tue Jan 4 05:34:38 2022
    On Tue, 4 Jan 2022 00:30:17 -0500, Ed Pawlowski <esp@snet.xxx> wrote:

    On 1/3/2022 2:22 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    And considering that if you have to go from one city to another for work >>> related travel, especially in Texas, you will have to recharge to get
    back home.

    Where are you going to recharge? At the customer's? Do they have a
    charging station? You're not going to do it with a lamp cord.


    At one of the 500,000 stations Shell is putting in. Or the 7-11 as they
    are putting them in.
    There are 15 stations at 4 locations within 8 miles of me.

    You don't recharge with a lamp cord but you do recharge with an
    extension cord and a dryer or stove outlet.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DerbyDad03@21:1/5 to k...@notreal.com on Tue Jan 4 05:04:56 2022
    On Monday, January 3, 2022 at 2:22:12 PM UTC-5, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 3 Jan 2022 13:02:03 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 1/3/2022 12:11 PM, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    k...@notreal.com writes:
    On Mon, 3 Jan 2022 11:11:16 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote: >>>



    Those limited range electric trucks may never be further than walking >>>> distance from a tire store. ;~)

    LOL! Maybe dualies front and back?

    The Rivian R1S (saw one drive past a couple of weeks ago) have a range
    of 300+ miles. How often do you drive more than 300 miles in a working
    day?

    Not often but with that range you don't take it on a long trip. And you
    may consider a truck not being a good vacation vehicle but a truck that >costs that much should be more comfortable on long trips. My wife and I >would much rather take our upper end F150 on vacation than her upper end >Camry.
    A puckup is the perfect vehicle for the beach or the kid's. Beach
    chairs, umbrellas, and coolers for the beach and a bed-load of tools
    for the kid's.

    I think that the electrics might be better to use when range doubles,
    can be recharged in about the time it takes to fill a tank of gasoline,
    and or if only using it as a city commuter.
    With or without Brandon paying a chunk of it?
    And considering that if you have to go from one city to another for work >related travel, especially in Texas, you will have to recharge to get
    back home.
    Where are you going to recharge? At the customer's? Do they have a
    charging station? You're not going to do it with a lamp cord.


    I pretty sure that all EV's are capable of Level 1 charging, i.e. 120V.

    I think that that is is the basic charger that comes with all EV.

    I think.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Markem618@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Tue Jan 4 09:24:35 2022
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 21:56:11 -0500, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 15:48:24 -0600, Markem618 <markrm618@hotmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 16:41:38 -0500, Clare Snyder <clare@snyder.on.ca> >>wrote:

    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 20:26:28 GMT, scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) >>>wrote:

    Bob Davis <wrobertdavis@gmail.com> writes:
    On Monday, January 3, 2022 at 12:11:26 PM UTC-6, Scott Lurndal wrote: >>>>>> k...@notreal.com writes:
    On Mon, 3 Jan 2022 11:11:16 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote: >>>>>> >



    Those limited range electric trucks may never be further than walking >>>>>> >>distance from a tire store. ;~)

    LOL! Maybe dualies front and back?
    The Rivian R1S (saw one drive past a couple of weeks ago) have a range >>>>>> of 300+ miles. How often do you drive more than 300 miles in a working >>>>>> day?

    I think that is the range without heating or air conditioning. Put it Minnesota in winter and the heater will suck the batteries down much quicker. I think would also be true for Houston in August with air conditioning.

    Current numbers indicate a 10-40% drop in range in the winter - as much because
    the batteries need to be warmed up than the use of the heater. Although keeping
    the interior in the low 60's and wearing a coat and using the seat-heaters helps.

    Also depends on the technology - heat pump vs. resistance heat.

    The batteries need to be warmed up before use, so preconditioning (via your smartphone
    app or scheduled via the manufacturer) while still connected to the charger helps
    preserve range in the winter.

    I drive my pick-em-up truck, on average, about 350 miles a month.
    The last few years I've put about 6000km a year on the old ranger - >>>likely less than 5000 this last year. Not that long ago I was putting
    on 25000+

    I have put less than 1600 miles on a new truck I bought in October
    last year.

    I've put 1800+ on a truck I bought in mid-November.

    So I bought in October 2020, and have driven nowhere or about 100 per
    month.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Scott Lurndal@21:1/5 to Ed Pawlowski on Tue Jan 4 15:16:31 2022
    Ed Pawlowski <esp@snet.xxx> writes:
    On 1/4/2022 12:17 AM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Mon, 3 Jan 2022 23:35:28 -0500, Ed Pawlowski <esp@snet.xxx> wrote:

    On 1/3/2022 10:00 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    Bullshit. Your furher (more accurately his puppet masters) is trying

    Your rhetoric is obnoxious, incorrect and insultingly stupid.

    to bankrupt the oil industry and force everyone to electric, which has >>>> *NO* chance of working but will bankrupt the country (the whole
    point).

    Oil companies are adapting

    https://www.shell.com/energy-and-innovation/new-energies/electric-vehicle-charging.html

    As one of the world’s largest energy suppliers, Shell has played a part >>> in the essential journeys people make every day for well over a century. >>> Our aim now is to become one of the largest electric charging solutions
    providers globally, meeting customer demand at home, at work or on the go. >>>
    Growing network of electric charging points
    Shell has set a target to operate over 500,000 charge points by 2025.
    Currently, we operate over 80,000 charge points for electric cars at
    homes, business, Shell retail sites and destinations. In addition, we
    currently offer access to over 300,000 additional charge points through
    our roaming networks
    They are also one of the biggest players in wind and solar power
    worldwide

    Smart business. Estimates vary but some day oil will begin to dry up
    and be very expensive. They are planning ahead. I've heard numbers
    from 40 to 100 years but it is finite.

    Indeed. Here's the reason why we need to start weening off
    fossil fuels now:

    https://dothemath.ucsd.edu/2011/10/the-energy-trap/

    Extremists like KRW (and that nutcase Blake) are simple fools.

    Ultimately, a growth based enconomy must change to
    steady state or collapse.

    'It is well known that individual oil fields universally
    see a production peak - often early in their production
    lifetime - followed by persistent decline. The geological
    upshot is that oil is not a lake into which we thrust a straw,
    slurping as fast as we wish. Rather, oil is a viscous fluid in
    porous, permeable rock that resists rapid recovery. It's not
    a spigot or valve that we can turn at will. Nature has a say
    in how fast we can claim the oil. When economists speak of
    reserves-to-production (R/P) ratios to set a time scale on
    oil depletion (usually a few decades), this "lake" is the
    implied model. The R/P ratio is a useful number, but its
    use obscures geological limitations to the rate of recovery.
    In truth, oil will last longer than the R/P indicates, but
    at a reduced rate of flow. The decline, meanwhile, is closer
    at hand than the R/P number alone conveys.'

    https://dothemath.ucsd.edu/2011/11/peak-oil-perspective/

    A decade later, those facts remain, just delayed a couple of
    years by the fracking boom.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ed Pawlowski@21:1/5 to All on Tue Jan 4 10:41:15 2022
    On 1/4/2022 8:04 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
    On Monday, January 3, 2022 at 2:22:12 PM UTC-5, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 3 Jan 2022 13:02:03 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 1/3/2022 12:11 PM, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    k...@notreal.com writes:
    On Mon, 3 Jan 2022 11:11:16 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote: >>>>>



    Those limited range electric trucks may never be further than walking >>>>>> distance from a tire store. ;~)

    LOL! Maybe dualies front and back?

    The Rivian R1S (saw one drive past a couple of weeks ago) have a range >>>> of 300+ miles. How often do you drive more than 300 miles in a working >>>> day?

    Not often but with that range you don't take it on a long trip. And you
    may consider a truck not being a good vacation vehicle but a truck that
    costs that much should be more comfortable on long trips. My wife and I
    would much rather take our upper end F150 on vacation than her upper end >>> Camry.
    A puckup is the perfect vehicle for the beach or the kid's. Beach
    chairs, umbrellas, and coolers for the beach and a bed-load of tools
    for the kid's.

    I think that the electrics might be better to use when range doubles,
    can be recharged in about the time it takes to fill a tank of gasoline,
    and or if only using it as a city commuter.
    With or without Brandon paying a chunk of it?
    And considering that if you have to go from one city to another for work >>> related travel, especially in Texas, you will have to recharge to get
    back home.
    Where are you going to recharge? At the customer's? Do they have a
    charging station? You're not going to do it with a lamp cord.


    I pretty sure that all EV's are capable of Level 1 charging, i.e. 120V.

    I think that that is is the basic charger that comes with all EV.

    I think.
    My daughter was given a Chevy Bolt as a loaner when her car was in the
    dealer for a few days. Yes, a 120V extension will charge it but it
    takes longer. She charged it once in the four or five days she had it.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Clare Snyder@21:1/5 to jclarke.873638@gmail.com on Tue Jan 4 11:29:05 2022
    On Tue, 04 Jan 2022 05:34:38 -0500, J. Clarke
    <jclarke.873638@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Tue, 4 Jan 2022 00:30:17 -0500, Ed Pawlowski <esp@snet.xxx> wrote:

    On 1/3/2022 2:22 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    And considering that if you have to go from one city to another for work >>>> related travel, especially in Texas, you will have to recharge to get
    back home.

    Where are you going to recharge? At the customer's? Do they have a
    charging station? You're not going to do it with a lamp cord.


    At one of the 500,000 stations Shell is putting in. Or the 7-11 as they >>are putting them in.
    There are 15 stations at 4 locations within 8 miles of me.

    You don't recharge with a lamp cord but you do recharge with an
    extension cord and a dryer or stove outlet.
    Not a drier or stove outlet - a stadard Nema 5-15 plug.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Clare Snyder@21:1/5 to teamarrows@eznet.net on Tue Jan 4 11:26:37 2022
    On Tue, 4 Jan 2022 05:04:56 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Monday, January 3, 2022 at 2:22:12 PM UTC-5, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 3 Jan 2022 13:02:03 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 1/3/2022 12:11 PM, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    k...@notreal.com writes:
    On Mon, 3 Jan 2022 11:11:16 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote: >> >>>



    Those limited range electric trucks may never be further than walking >> >>>> distance from a tire store. ;~)

    LOL! Maybe dualies front and back?

    The Rivian R1S (saw one drive past a couple of weeks ago) have a range
    of 300+ miles. How often do you drive more than 300 miles in a working
    day?

    Not often but with that range you don't take it on a long trip. And you
    may consider a truck not being a good vacation vehicle but a truck that
    costs that much should be more comfortable on long trips. My wife and I
    would much rather take our upper end F150 on vacation than her upper end
    Camry.
    A puckup is the perfect vehicle for the beach or the kid's. Beach
    chairs, umbrellas, and coolers for the beach and a bed-load of tools
    for the kid's.

    I think that the electrics might be better to use when range doubles,
    can be recharged in about the time it takes to fill a tank of gasoline,
    and or if only using it as a city commuter.
    With or without Brandon paying a chunk of it?
    And considering that if you have to go from one city to another for work
    related travel, especially in Texas, you will have to recharge to get
    back home.
    Where are you going to recharge? At the customer's? Do they have a
    charging station? You're not going to do it with a lamp cord.


    I pretty sure that all EV's are capable of Level 1 charging, i.e. 120V.

    I think that that is is the basic charger that comes with all EV.

    I think.
    The professor next door charges his Prius phev with the 15 amp 120
    volt convenience outlet on his front porch.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Bob La Londe@21:1/5 to Bob Davis on Tue Jan 4 10:14:10 2022
    On 12/31/2021 7:35 AM, Bob Davis wrote:
    My ever faithful air compressor is finally getting tired. I've had it since the mid-70's. I am thinking about getting the exact same compressor. The design has been around at least 50 years and they still make it. It's an oil lubed cast iron
    workhorse. Maybe technology has marched and there is something better, so I seek opinions.

    Here is my current compressor:

    https://www.grainger.com/product/SPEEDAIRE-Portable-Air-Compressor-Oil-1NNF7

    Bob

    Personally I despise Grainger, but I won't let that get in the way of
    good advice. As long as the compressor you had meets your needs and
    duty cycle, it has lasted fifty years, and the new one really is the
    same... BUY THE SAME COMPRESSOR.

    --
    This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
    https://www.avg.com

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Tue Jan 4 13:46:13 2022
    On Tue, 04 Jan 2022 13:42:19 -0500, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    On Tue, 04 Jan 2022 09:24:35 -0600, Markem618 <markrm618@hotmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 21:56:11 -0500, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 15:48:24 -0600, Markem618 <markrm618@hotmail.com> >>>wrote:

    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 16:41:38 -0500, Clare Snyder <clare@snyder.on.ca> >>>>wrote:

    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 20:26:28 GMT, scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) >>>>>wrote:

    Bob Davis <wrobertdavis@gmail.com> writes:
    On Monday, January 3, 2022 at 12:11:26 PM UTC-6, Scott Lurndal wrote: >>>>>>>> k...@notreal.com writes:
    On Mon, 3 Jan 2022 11:11:16 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:




    Those limited range electric trucks may never be further than walking
    distance from a tire store. ;~)

    LOL! Maybe dualies front and back?
    The Rivian R1S (saw one drive past a couple of weeks ago) have a range >>>>>>>> of 300+ miles. How often do you drive more than 300 miles in a working >>>>>>>> day?

    I think that is the range without heating or air conditioning. Put it Minnesota in winter and the heater will suck the batteries down much quicker. I think would also be true for Houston in August with air conditioning.

    Current numbers indicate a 10-40% drop in range in the winter - as much because
    the batteries need to be warmed up than the use of the heater. Although keeping
    the interior in the low 60's and wearing a coat and using the seat-heaters helps.

    Also depends on the technology - heat pump vs. resistance heat.

    The batteries need to be warmed up before use, so preconditioning (via your smartphone
    app or scheduled via the manufacturer) while still connected to the charger helps
    preserve range in the winter.

    I drive my pick-em-up truck, on average, about 350 miles a month.
    The last few years I've put about 6000km a year on the old ranger - >>>>>likely less than 5000 this last year. Not that long ago I was putting >>>>>on 25000+

    I have put less than 1600 miles on a new truck I bought in October
    last year.

    I've put 1800+ on a truck I bought in mid-November.

    So I bought in October 2020, and have driven nowhere or about 100 per >>month.

    Yeah, we generally put about 30K miles between the two vehicles every
    year.

    BTW, that 15K per person is very close to the average for the country.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to All on Tue Jan 4 13:42:19 2022
    On Tue, 04 Jan 2022 09:24:35 -0600, Markem618 <markrm618@hotmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 21:56:11 -0500, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 15:48:24 -0600, Markem618 <markrm618@hotmail.com> >>wrote:

    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 16:41:38 -0500, Clare Snyder <clare@snyder.on.ca> >>>wrote:

    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 20:26:28 GMT, scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) >>>>wrote:

    Bob Davis <wrobertdavis@gmail.com> writes:
    On Monday, January 3, 2022 at 12:11:26 PM UTC-6, Scott Lurndal wrote: >>>>>>> k...@notreal.com writes:
    On Mon, 3 Jan 2022 11:11:16 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote: >>>>>>> >



    Those limited range electric trucks may never be further than walking >>>>>>> >>distance from a tire store. ;~)

    LOL! Maybe dualies front and back?
    The Rivian R1S (saw one drive past a couple of weeks ago) have a range >>>>>>> of 300+ miles. How often do you drive more than 300 miles in a working >>>>>>> day?

    I think that is the range without heating or air conditioning. Put it Minnesota in winter and the heater will suck the batteries down much quicker. I think would also be true for Houston in August with air conditioning.

    Current numbers indicate a 10-40% drop in range in the winter - as much because
    the batteries need to be warmed up than the use of the heater. Although keeping
    the interior in the low 60's and wearing a coat and using the seat-heaters helps.

    Also depends on the technology - heat pump vs. resistance heat.

    The batteries need to be warmed up before use, so preconditioning (via your smartphone
    app or scheduled via the manufacturer) while still connected to the charger helps
    preserve range in the winter.

    I drive my pick-em-up truck, on average, about 350 miles a month.
    The last few years I've put about 6000km a year on the old ranger - >>>>likely less than 5000 this last year. Not that long ago I was putting >>>>on 25000+

    I have put less than 1600 miles on a new truck I bought in October
    last year.

    I've put 1800+ on a truck I bought in mid-November.

    So I bought in October 2020, and have driven nowhere or about 100 per
    month.

    Yeah, we generally put about 30K miles between the two vehicles every
    year.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to jclarke.873638@gmail.com on Tue Jan 4 13:48:11 2022
    On Tue, 04 Jan 2022 05:34:38 -0500, J. Clarke
    <jclarke.873638@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Tue, 4 Jan 2022 00:30:17 -0500, Ed Pawlowski <esp@snet.xxx> wrote:

    On 1/3/2022 2:22 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    And considering that if you have to go from one city to another for work >>>> related travel, especially in Texas, you will have to recharge to get
    back home.

    Where are you going to recharge? At the customer's? Do they have a
    charging station? You're not going to do it with a lamp cord.


    At one of the 500,000 stations Shell is putting in. Or the 7-11 as they >>are putting them in.
    There are 15 stations at 4 locations within 8 miles of me.

    You don't recharge with a lamp cord but you do recharge with an
    extension cord and a dryer or stove outlet.

    Not in time to get home in the above scenario. You could do it with a
    hamster wheel, too, if you had enough time.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Markem618@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Tue Jan 4 13:25:03 2022
    On Tue, 04 Jan 2022 13:46:13 -0500, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    On Tue, 04 Jan 2022 13:42:19 -0500, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    On Tue, 04 Jan 2022 09:24:35 -0600, Markem618 <markrm618@hotmail.com> >>wrote:

    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 21:56:11 -0500, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 15:48:24 -0600, Markem618 <markrm618@hotmail.com> >>>>wrote:

    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 16:41:38 -0500, Clare Snyder <clare@snyder.on.ca> >>>>>wrote:

    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 20:26:28 GMT, scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) >>>>>>wrote:

    Bob Davis <wrobertdavis@gmail.com> writes:
    On Monday, January 3, 2022 at 12:11:26 PM UTC-6, Scott Lurndal wrote: >>>>>>>>> k...@notreal.com writes:
    On Mon, 3 Jan 2022 11:11:16 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:




    Those limited range electric trucks may never be further than walking
    distance from a tire store. ;~)

    LOL! Maybe dualies front and back?
    The Rivian R1S (saw one drive past a couple of weeks ago) have a range
    of 300+ miles. How often do you drive more than 300 miles in a working
    day?

    I think that is the range without heating or air conditioning. Put it Minnesota in winter and the heater will suck the batteries down much quicker. I think would also be true for Houston in August with air conditioning.

    Current numbers indicate a 10-40% drop in range in the winter - as much because
    the batteries need to be warmed up than the use of the heater. Although keeping
    the interior in the low 60's and wearing a coat and using the seat-heaters helps.

    Also depends on the technology - heat pump vs. resistance heat.

    The batteries need to be warmed up before use, so preconditioning (via your smartphone
    app or scheduled via the manufacturer) while still connected to the charger helps
    preserve range in the winter.

    I drive my pick-em-up truck, on average, about 350 miles a month.
    The last few years I've put about 6000km a year on the old ranger - >>>>>>likely less than 5000 this last year. Not that long ago I was putting >>>>>>on 25000+

    I have put less than 1600 miles on a new truck I bought in October >>>>>last year.

    I've put 1800+ on a truck I bought in mid-November.

    So I bought in October 2020, and have driven nowhere or about 100 per >>>month.

    Yeah, we generally put about 30K miles between the two vehicles every
    year.

    BTW, that 15K per person is very close to the average for the country.

    Puts us well below that average, my wife 2012 Fusion has 41k.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Markem618@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Tue Jan 4 13:26:23 2022
    On Tue, 04 Jan 2022 13:48:11 -0500, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    On Tue, 04 Jan 2022 05:34:38 -0500, J. Clarke
    <jclarke.873638@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Tue, 4 Jan 2022 00:30:17 -0500, Ed Pawlowski <esp@snet.xxx> wrote:

    On 1/3/2022 2:22 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    And considering that if you have to go from one city to another for work >>>>> related travel, especially in Texas, you will have to recharge to get >>>>> back home.

    Where are you going to recharge? At the customer's? Do they have a
    charging station? You're not going to do it with a lamp cord.


    At one of the 500,000 stations Shell is putting in. Or the 7-11 as they >>>are putting them in.
    There are 15 stations at 4 locations within 8 miles of me.

    You don't recharge with a lamp cord but you do recharge with an
    extension cord and a dryer or stove outlet.

    Not in time to get home in the above scenario. You could do it with a >hamster wheel, too, if you had enough time.


    Pack a generator make your own hybrid.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to teamarrows@eznet.net on Tue Jan 4 14:20:25 2022
    On Mon, 3 Jan 2022 20:21:42 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Monday, January 3, 2022 at 10:00:35 PM UTC-5, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 20:30:07 GMT, sc...@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal)
    wrote:

    k...@notreal.com writes:
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 18:11:21 GMT, sc...@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal)
    wrote:

    k...@notreal.com writes:
    On Mon, 3 Jan 2022 11:11:16 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote: >> >>>>



    Those limited range electric trucks may never be further than walking >> >>>>>distance from a tire store. ;~)

    LOL! Maybe dualies front and back?

    The Rivian R1S (saw one drive past a couple of weeks ago) have a range
    of 300+ miles. How often do you drive more than 300 miles in a working
    day?

    Working? The kid lives 1200 mi from here. The beach is 350mi. Disney
    world is 450mi. A few places.

    Well, your needs don't match the capabilities. Buy something that does
    and stop your political posturing.
    Bullshit. Your furher (more accurately his puppet masters) is trying
    to bankrupt the oil industry and force everyone to electric, which has
    *NO* chance of working but will bankrupt the country (the whole
    point).

    The average light truck in the United States is driven less a 1000
    miles a month, which means they'll have sufficient range for most
    users who aren't you.
    Nonsense.

    I'm not jumping in the middle of this discussion, but I was curious about >that stat. According to this .gov page, the average annual miles driven by >the "light truck/van" category is 11,543.

    https://afdc.energy.gov/data/10309

    "Vehicles with short wheelbases (<121") are generalized as cars and vehicles >with long wheelbases are generalized as light trucks."

    I read the post wrong. 11,500 is reasonable but I don't think it's
    all that usual to drive 31.5 miles each day. How many drive more than
    500mi once a year? That's the point.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to All on Tue Jan 4 15:02:31 2022
    On Tue, 04 Jan 2022 13:26:23 -0600, Markem618 <markrm618@hotmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Tue, 04 Jan 2022 13:48:11 -0500, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    On Tue, 04 Jan 2022 05:34:38 -0500, J. Clarke
    <jclarke.873638@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Tue, 4 Jan 2022 00:30:17 -0500, Ed Pawlowski <esp@snet.xxx> wrote:

    On 1/3/2022 2:22 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    And considering that if you have to go from one city to another for work >>>>>> related travel, especially in Texas, you will have to recharge to get >>>>>> back home.

    Where are you going to recharge? At the customer's? Do they have a >>>>> charging station? You're not going to do it with a lamp cord.


    At one of the 500,000 stations Shell is putting in. Or the 7-11 as they >>>>are putting them in.
    There are 15 stations at 4 locations within 8 miles of me.

    You don't recharge with a lamp cord but you do recharge with an
    extension cord and a dryer or stove outlet.

    Not in time to get home in the above scenario. You could do it with a >>hamster wheel, too, if you had enough time.


    Pack a generator make your own hybrid.

    A hybrid makes some sense.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Scott Lurndal@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Tue Jan 4 20:31:06 2022
    krw@notreal.com writes:
    On Mon, 3 Jan 2022 20:21:42 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:


    The average light truck in the United States is driven less a 1000
    miles a month, which means they'll have sufficient range for most
    users who aren't you.
    Nonsense.

    I'm not jumping in the middle of this discussion, but I was curious about >>that stat. According to this .gov page, the average annual miles driven by >>the "light truck/van" category is 11,543.

    https://afdc.energy.gov/data/10309

    "Vehicles with short wheelbases (<121") are generalized as cars and vehicles >>with long wheelbases are generalized as light trucks."

    I read the post wrong. 11,500 is reasonable but I don't think it's
    all that usual to drive 31.5 miles each day. How many drive more than
    500mi once a year? That's the point.

    Is it really? A point, that is? How many people _do_ drive more than
    350 or 400 miles in a single leg? (Mercedes just announced an e-car with
    700 mile range, by the way).

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From J. Clarke@21:1/5 to All on Tue Jan 4 15:59:01 2022
    On Tue, 04 Jan 2022 11:29:05 -0500, Clare Snyder <clare@snyder.on.ca>
    wrote:

    On Tue, 04 Jan 2022 05:34:38 -0500, J. Clarke
    <jclarke.873638@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Tue, 4 Jan 2022 00:30:17 -0500, Ed Pawlowski <esp@snet.xxx> wrote:

    On 1/3/2022 2:22 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    And considering that if you have to go from one city to another for work >>>>> related travel, especially in Texas, you will have to recharge to get >>>>> back home.

    Where are you going to recharge? At the customer's? Do they have a
    charging station? You're not going to do it with a lamp cord.


    At one of the 500,000 stations Shell is putting in. Or the 7-11 as they >>>are putting them in.
    There are 15 stations at 4 locations within 8 miles of me.

    You don't recharge with a lamp cord but you do recharge with an
    extension cord and a dryer or stove outlet.
    Not a drier or stove outlet - a stadard Nema 5-15 plug.

    Good luck charging a Tesla on 110V. It can be done, but you're going
    to be waiting a very long time.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ed Pawlowski@21:1/5 to Scott Lurndal on Tue Jan 4 16:22:07 2022
    On 1/4/2022 3:31 PM, Scott Lurndal wrote:


    I'm not jumping in the middle of this discussion, but I was curious about >>> that stat. According to this .gov page, the average annual miles driven by >>> the "light truck/van" category is 11,543.

    https://afdc.energy.gov/data/10309

    "Vehicles with short wheelbases (<121") are generalized as cars and vehicles
    with long wheelbases are generalized as light trucks."

    I read the post wrong. 11,500 is reasonable but I don't think it's
    all that usual to drive 31.5 miles each day. How many drive more than
    500mi once a year? That's the point.

    Is it really? A point, that is? How many people _do_ drive more than
    350 or 400 miles in a single leg? (Mercedes just announced an e-car with 700 mile range, by the way).

    Four trips a year. Day one 800 miles, day two 350 miles. Same on return.

    Right now that would be a PITA for an EV but give it a few years. The technology for a 5 minute charge exists, they just have to make it
    practical.

    All my other travel is under 30 miles. Today I drove 8 miles.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Scott Lurndal@21:1/5 to J. Clarke on Tue Jan 4 21:43:44 2022
    J. Clarke <jclarke.873638@gmail.com> writes:
    On Tue, 04 Jan 2022 11:29:05 -0500, Clare Snyder <clare@snyder.on.ca>

    You don't recharge with a lamp cord but you do recharge with an
    extension cord and a dryer or stove outlet.
    Not a drier or stove outlet - a stadard Nema 5-15 plug.

    Good luck charging a Tesla on 110V. It can be done, but you're going
    to be waiting a very long time.

    Between 88 and 103 hours, depending on the Model 3 (std vs. ER)
    to full charge. Significantly less for a partial charge
    (charging slows as the battery is charged).

    On a 20A 120V circuit, it's about 4 miles per hour of charge,
    so a 24 hour charge provides just under 100 miles of range.

    https://www.quora.com/How-fast-can-a-Tesla-Model-3-fully-charge-using-a-regular-110v-outlet

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DerbyDad03@21:1/5 to Clare Snyder on Tue Jan 4 17:12:53 2022
    On Tuesday, January 4, 2022 at 11:29:09 AM UTC-5, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Tue, 04 Jan 2022 05:34:38 -0500, J. Clarke
    <jclarke...@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Tue, 4 Jan 2022 00:30:17 -0500, Ed Pawlowski <e...@snet.xxx> wrote:

    On 1/3/2022 2:22 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:

    And considering that if you have to go from one city to another for work >>>> related travel, especially in Texas, you will have to recharge to get >>>> back home.

    Where are you going to recharge? At the customer's? Do they have a
    charging station? You're not going to do it with a lamp cord.


    At one of the 500,000 stations Shell is putting in. Or the 7-11 as they >>are putting them in.
    There are 15 stations at 4 locations within 8 miles of me.

    You don't recharge with a lamp cord but you do recharge with an
    extension cord and a dryer or stove outlet.
    Not a drier or stove outlet - a stadard Nema 5-15 plug.

    I know a guy that owns an Airbnb in Vegas. He was thinking of putting
    a 50 amp receptacle in his garage so he could add "EV friendly" to his
    listing. He just needed to get around to doing it.

    One day some guy from CA contacts him and says "I like your place. Can
    I charge my Tesla there?"

    Airbnb guy: "You know, I've been thinking about setting that up, just
    haven't done it yet."

    CA guy: "If you can promise you'll have it in by (some date) I'll book
    your place for a month."

    Airbnb guy: "What color would you like the receptacle to be?"

    CA guy laughed and booked his place - for a month. Cha-Ching!

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DerbyDad03@21:1/5 to Ed Pawlowski on Tue Jan 4 16:51:44 2022
    On Tuesday, January 4, 2022 at 10:41:19 AM UTC-5, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
    On 1/4/2022 8:04 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
    On Monday, January 3, 2022 at 2:22:12 PM UTC-5, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 3 Jan 2022 13:02:03 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 1/3/2022 12:11 PM, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    k...@notreal.com writes:
    On Mon, 3 Jan 2022 11:11:16 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote: >>>>>



    Those limited range electric trucks may never be further than walking >>>>>> distance from a tire store. ;~)

    LOL! Maybe dualies front and back?

    The Rivian R1S (saw one drive past a couple of weeks ago) have a range >>>> of 300+ miles. How often do you drive more than 300 miles in a working >>>> day?

    Not often but with that range you don't take it on a long trip. And you >>> may consider a truck not being a good vacation vehicle but a truck that >>> costs that much should be more comfortable on long trips. My wife and I >>> would much rather take our upper end F150 on vacation than her upper end >>> Camry.
    A puckup is the perfect vehicle for the beach or the kid's. Beach
    chairs, umbrellas, and coolers for the beach and a bed-load of tools
    for the kid's.

    I think that the electrics might be better to use when range doubles,
    can be recharged in about the time it takes to fill a tank of gasoline, >>> and or if only using it as a city commuter.
    With or without Brandon paying a chunk of it?
    And considering that if you have to go from one city to another for work >>> related travel, especially in Texas, you will have to recharge to get
    back home.
    Where are you going to recharge? At the customer's? Do they have a
    charging station? You're not going to do it with a lamp cord.


    I pretty sure that all EV's are capable of Level 1 charging, i.e. 120V.

    I think that that is is the basic charger that comes with all EV.

    I think.
    My daughter was given a Chevy Bolt as a loaner when her car was in the
    dealer for a few days. Yes, a 120V extension will charge it but it
    takes longer. She charged it once in the four or five days she had it.

    Yes, I know it takes longer. I was responding to krw 3 questions and
    statement. Basically, yes, you can charge it with a lamp cord.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to teamarrows@eznet.net on Tue Jan 4 21:18:54 2022
    On Tue, 4 Jan 2022 16:51:44 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Tuesday, January 4, 2022 at 10:41:19 AM UTC-5, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
    On 1/4/2022 8:04 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
    On Monday, January 3, 2022 at 2:22:12 PM UTC-5, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 3 Jan 2022 13:02:03 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 1/3/2022 12:11 PM, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    k...@notreal.com writes:
    On Mon, 3 Jan 2022 11:11:16 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote: >> >>>>>



    Those limited range electric trucks may never be further than walking >> >>>>>> distance from a tire store. ;~)

    LOL! Maybe dualies front and back?

    The Rivian R1S (saw one drive past a couple of weeks ago) have a range >> >>>> of 300+ miles. How often do you drive more than 300 miles in a working >> >>>> day?

    Not often but with that range you don't take it on a long trip. And you >> >>> may consider a truck not being a good vacation vehicle but a truck that >> >>> costs that much should be more comfortable on long trips. My wife and I >> >>> would much rather take our upper end F150 on vacation than her upper end >> >>> Camry.
    A puckup is the perfect vehicle for the beach or the kid's. Beach
    chairs, umbrellas, and coolers for the beach and a bed-load of tools
    for the kid's.

    I think that the electrics might be better to use when range doubles,
    can be recharged in about the time it takes to fill a tank of gasoline, >> >>> and or if only using it as a city commuter.
    With or without Brandon paying a chunk of it?
    And considering that if you have to go from one city to another for work >> >>> related travel, especially in Texas, you will have to recharge to get
    back home.
    Where are you going to recharge? At the customer's? Do they have a
    charging station? You're not going to do it with a lamp cord.


    I pretty sure that all EV's are capable of Level 1 charging, i.e. 120V.

    I think that that is is the basic charger that comes with all EV.

    I think.
    My daughter was given a Chevy Bolt as a loaner when her car was in the
    dealer for a few days. Yes, a 120V extension will charge it but it
    takes longer. She charged it once in the four or five days she had it.

    Yes, I know it takes longer. I was responding to krw 3 questions and >statement. Basically, yes, you can charge it with a lamp cord.

    Not with Leon's scenario somewhere up there.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Michael Trew@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Tue Jan 4 23:53:45 2022
    On 1/3/2022 12:00, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 11:50:51 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/2/2022 21:24, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Sun, 2 Jan 2022 14:49:08 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Sunday, January 2, 2022 at 3:33:44 PM UTC-5, k...@notreal.com wrote: >>>>> On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 14:48:13 GMT, Puckdropper<em...@example.com>
    wrote:
    Michael Trew<michae...@att.net> wrote in
    news:sqohqs$f27$7...@dont-email.me:

    On 12/31/2021 16:59, k...@notreal.com wrote:

    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or anything for that >>>>>>>> matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)

    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol

    A good compressor that's easy to move (so not one of those 200 gallon >>>>>> monsters but also not a 1 1/2 gallon noise maker) would be a nice thing to
    pass down. Shoot, even if they just use it to inflate tires and beach >>>>>> balls, it would make their life that much easier.
    For tires I have one of these:

    <https://www.homedepot.com/p/RYOBI-ONE-18V-Lithium-Ion-Cordless-Power-Inflator-Kit-with-1-5-Ah-Battery-and-18V-Charger-P737DKN/311788879>

    SWMBO appreciates it very much.

    I looked at her "spare" a while back. Since it is small car
    (Mustang), I knew it had to have a bicycle tire. Nope. Not even
    that. Under the trunk liner is a 12V compressor and a can of
    compressed tire gunk. Nice. A bicycle tire is an extra $250.

    Ever notice how all (?) spares are stored with the valve down or inward, >>>> forcing you to remove the spare it to check/fill it? The spare in my Odyssey
    is buried valve down under the carpet between the front and middle row seats.
    What a PITA to get it out.

    I have one configuration or another of these in all of my vehicles.

    https://www.amazon.com/Hotop-Stainless-Extension-Braided-Extender/dp/B09BMWQQ3R

    All of the spares in my vehicles look something like this so I can check/top
    them off without removing them.

    https://i.imgur.com/6IHvl8M.jpg

    https://i.imgur.com/nxJAKFf.jpg

    I wouldn't be surprised if half the folks in this group (that have spares) have
    spares that are sitting at 45-50 PSI.

    It's amazing how those tires hold up. Especially the old bias-ply
    tires, to build on the post quoted below. I have a '68 Ford Galaxie,
    and it has the full size spare installed on the front tire now, a 1968
    bias-ply tire. I cannot believe that the thing still holds air
    pressure. It's pretty well bald, however.

    Bicycle tires are designed to never be used.

    What about bicycle tires?

    The last time I actually USED my spare was on my '63 Valiant back
    about 1970. I ALMOST had to use it 3 times on one trip with the PT
    Cruiser on my trip to PEI when 3 valve stems failed and christmas 1972
    in Montana or Idaho or Wyoming or wherever when I got a cinder
    puncture - managed to find a tire repair guy before it got all the way
    flat.

    I always keep a full sized spare when traveling. I can recall too many
    times that I needed it on a 1,000+ mile road trip, in recent history.

    A full-size tire would take up the entire trunk, making travel a
    little difficult. Full-size truck spares work because there is waste
    space under the bed. There is no wasted space in cars these days. I
    wonder that the (useless) electric trucks will do. AFAIK, the
    batteries take up that space.

    I keep the full-size tire on rim behind the driver's seat. On very long
    road trips, the back seat it otherwise full of luggage, cooler, blankets/pillows/air mattress/etc.

    I've heard that some new cars don't even have a donut spare.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Michael Trew@21:1/5 to Clare Snyder on Wed Jan 5 00:05:14 2022
    On 1/3/2022 13:40, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Mon, 3 Jan 2022 11:08:56 -0600, Leon<lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 1/3/2022 10:50 AM, Michael Trew wrote:

    It's amazing how those tires hold up. Especially the old bias-ply
    tires, to build on the post quoted below. I have a '68 Ford Galaxie,
    and it has the full size spare installed on the front tire now, a 1968
    bias-ply tire. I cannot believe that the thing still holds air
    pressure. It's pretty well bald, however.

    Amazing that it has not concerted over to Maypop status. Maypop any time.

    Taking a good look at it, it's pretty firmly at that point. The car is
    a basket case, and the frame is rotted to almost nothing. It can't go
    over 40 MPH without significant drive-ability issues anyway. I'm not
    putting any money into it. It's fun to cruise around town, slowly...
    that's about it.

    I always keep a full sized spare when traveling. I can recall too many
    times that I needed it on a 1,000+ mile road trip, in recent history.
    Funny how many people have tire troubles on he road. How old are
    their tires? Are the tires the right tires for the application and of
    good quality???.What are they hitting? Are they not watching where
    they are driving? Or do thy just not care???

    I rarely, if ever, hit things. I'm guilty of driving 10+ year old tires
    that I find cheap/free. I've had more broken belts and other issues
    than I can recall. I typically try to make sure the tires are solid
    before such a long trip, but you never know. I lost two belts on my
    last trip to Minnesota. Full-size spare came in handy on the WI border.
    Once the other belt went, I have a very bumpy last hour drive from the
    MN border in, until I got to my destination and found another full-size
    spare tire (car meet).

    What can I say, I'm young, cheap, and I sure suck whatever life I can
    get out of tires. I once had a stock of 20 year old 12" Geo Metro tires
    that I would mount (not even balance) to the rear wheels of a '92 Metro.
    One would pop every other month or so, I kept a full spare with me,
    and a jack/tire iron. I used those tires up ;)

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Michael Trew@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Wed Jan 5 00:06:01 2022
    On 1/3/2022 12:06, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 11:53:25 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/2/2022 21:46, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 20:30:19 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/2/2022 9:48, Puckdropper wrote:
    Michael Trew<michael.trew@att.net> wrote in
    news:sqohqs$f27$7@dont-email.me:

    On 12/31/2021 16:59, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or anything for that >>>>>>> matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)

    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol

    A good compressor that's easy to move (so not one of those 200 gallon >>>>> monsters but also not a 1 1/2 gallon noise maker) would be a nice thing to
    pass down. Shoot, even if they just use it to inflate tires and beach >>>>> balls, it would make their life that much easier.

    Puckdropper

    Well, I'm probably a fair deal younger than most here (in my 20's). If >>>> I had a garage, I'd love to have one of those "monsters".

    I have an old sears compressor, no tank, that was used for some kind of >>>> power spray tool. It will inflate a tire to almost exactly 40 PSI, so I >>>> use that for car tires until you can hear the machine spitting out the >>>> excess PSI at its limit.

    I have a couple of cheap, small, crappy pan-cake style "noise makers". >>>> A decent air compressor is in my future, at some point. One that isn't >>>> too heavy to haul up and down the cellar steps, due to my no garage
    situation.

    There's nothing really wrong with pancake compressors. They're not
    good for painting but they'll run any air tools that you're likely to
    use. I've had one for 15-20 years. I have another in my garage that is
    just a pancake compressor with elephantiasis. I think it's a 225psi
    15gal so it has plenty of air storage but its recovery time is
    abysmal. I intend to plumb it into the basement so the noise stays in
    the garage. You could do the opposite but you may run into a freezing
    problem. With a little thought that shouldn't be too hard to avoid.

    True, nothing wrong with pancake compressors. The two that I have are
    far smaller than 15 gallons, one is a Walmart brand. Those ones are
    garbage, in specific. That was a regretted purchase from a few years ago.

    Aren't they all made in the same factory, deep in China? I think mine
    is a Porter-Cable that came with three nail guns (brad, 16ga(?), and
    narrow crown stapler) for $200. It can't be much better than a Wally
    World.

    Probably. It might work better if it didn't kick on all of the time
    with air tools, due to the small tank size. Next one will be powerful
    enough for a roofing nailer, at least.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Leon@21:1/5 to Michael Trew on Wed Jan 5 09:05:26 2022
    On 1/4/2022 11:06 PM, Michael Trew wrote:
    On 1/3/2022 12:06, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 11:53:25 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net>  wrote:

    On 1/2/2022 21:46, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 20:30:19 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net>   wrote:

    On 1/2/2022 9:48, Puckdropper wrote:
    Michael Trew<michael.trew@att.net>    wrote in
    news:sqohqs$f27$7@dont-email.me:

    On 12/31/2021 16:59, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or anything for >>>>>>>> that
    matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)

    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol

    A good compressor that's easy to move (so not one of those 200 gallon >>>>>> monsters but also not a 1 1/2 gallon noise maker) would be a nice
    thing to
    pass down.  Shoot, even if they just use it to inflate tires and
    beach
    balls, it would make their life that much easier.

    Puckdropper

    Well, I'm probably a fair deal younger than most here (in my
    20's).  If
    I had a garage, I'd love to have one of those "monsters".

    I have an old sears compressor, no tank, that was used for some
    kind of
    power spray tool.  It will inflate a tire to almost exactly 40 PSI, >>>>> so I
    use that for car tires until you can hear the machine spitting out the >>>>> excess PSI at its limit.

    I have a couple of cheap, small, crappy pan-cake style "noise makers". >>>>> A decent air compressor is in my future, at some point.  One that
    isn't
    too heavy to haul up and down the cellar steps, due to my no garage
    situation.

    There's nothing really wrong with pancake compressors. They're not
    good for painting but they'll run any air tools that you're likely to
    use. I've had one for 15-20 years. I have another in my garage that is >>>> just a pancake compressor with elephantiasis.  I think it's a 225psi
    15gal so it has plenty of air storage but its recovery time is
    abysmal. I intend to plumb it into the basement so the noise stays in
    the garage.  You could do the opposite but you may run into a freezing >>>> problem. With a little thought that shouldn't be too hard to avoid.

    True, nothing wrong with pancake compressors.  The two that I have are
    far smaller than 15 gallons, one is a Walmart brand.  Those ones are
    garbage, in specific.  That was a regretted purchase from a few years
    ago.

    Aren't they all made in the same factory, deep in China? I think mine
    is a Porter-Cable that came with three nail guns (brad, 16ga(?), and
    narrow crown stapler) for $200. It can't be much better than a Wally
    World.

    Probably.  It might work better if it didn't kick on all of the time
    with air tools, due to the small tank size.  Next one will be powerful enough for a roofing nailer, at least.

    Soo roofing nailers do not use much air. If you buy one that is only
    big enough for a nail gun it will likely run all of the time for other
    tools.

    Look for something that will handle impact drivers or a paint gun.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Leon@21:1/5 to All on Wed Jan 5 10:12:49 2022
    On 1/4/2022 7:12 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
    On Tuesday, January 4, 2022 at 11:29:09 AM UTC-5, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Tue, 04 Jan 2022 05:34:38 -0500, J. Clarke
    <jclarke...@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Tue, 4 Jan 2022 00:30:17 -0500, Ed Pawlowski <e...@snet.xxx> wrote:

    On 1/3/2022 2:22 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:

    And considering that if you have to go from one city to another for work >>>>>> related travel, especially in Texas, you will have to recharge to get >>>>>> back home.

    Where are you going to recharge? At the customer's? Do they have a
    charging station? You're not going to do it with a lamp cord.


    At one of the 500,000 stations Shell is putting in. Or the 7-11 as they >>>> are putting them in.
    There are 15 stations at 4 locations within 8 miles of me.

    You don't recharge with a lamp cord but you do recharge with an
    extension cord and a dryer or stove outlet.
    Not a drier or stove outlet - a stadard Nema 5-15 plug.

    I know a guy that owns an Airbnb in Vegas. He was thinking of putting
    a 50 amp receptacle in his garage so he could add "EV friendly" to his listing. He just needed to get around to doing it.

    One day some guy from CA contacts him and says "I like your place. Can
    I charge my Tesla there?"

    Airbnb guy: "You know, I've been thinking about setting that up, just
    haven't done it yet."

    CA guy: "If you can promise you'll have it in by (some date) I'll book
    your place for a month."

    Airbnb guy: "What color would you like the receptacle to be?"

    CA guy laughed and booked his place - for a month. Cha-Ching!


    Cha-Ching except for the cost of the set up and some type of way to
    charge for the electricity.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to michael.trew@att.net on Wed Jan 5 11:34:40 2022
    On Wed, 05 Jan 2022 00:06:01 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/3/2022 12:06, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 11:53:25 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/2/2022 21:46, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 20:30:19 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/2/2022 9:48, Puckdropper wrote:
    Michael Trew<michael.trew@att.net> wrote in
    news:sqohqs$f27$7@dont-email.me:

    On 12/31/2021 16:59, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or anything for that >>>>>>>> matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)

    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol

    A good compressor that's easy to move (so not one of those 200 gallon >>>>>> monsters but also not a 1 1/2 gallon noise maker) would be a nice thing to
    pass down. Shoot, even if they just use it to inflate tires and beach >>>>>> balls, it would make their life that much easier.

    Puckdropper

    Well, I'm probably a fair deal younger than most here (in my 20's). If >>>>> I had a garage, I'd love to have one of those "monsters".

    I have an old sears compressor, no tank, that was used for some kind of >>>>> power spray tool. It will inflate a tire to almost exactly 40 PSI, so I >>>>> use that for car tires until you can hear the machine spitting out the >>>>> excess PSI at its limit.

    I have a couple of cheap, small, crappy pan-cake style "noise makers". >>>>> A decent air compressor is in my future, at some point. One that isn't >>>>> too heavy to haul up and down the cellar steps, due to my no garage
    situation.

    There's nothing really wrong with pancake compressors. They're not
    good for painting but they'll run any air tools that you're likely to
    use. I've had one for 15-20 years. I have another in my garage that is >>>> just a pancake compressor with elephantiasis. I think it's a 225psi
    15gal so it has plenty of air storage but its recovery time is
    abysmal. I intend to plumb it into the basement so the noise stays in
    the garage. You could do the opposite but you may run into a freezing >>>> problem. With a little thought that shouldn't be too hard to avoid.

    True, nothing wrong with pancake compressors. The two that I have are
    far smaller than 15 gallons, one is a Walmart brand. Those ones are
    garbage, in specific. That was a regretted purchase from a few years ago. >>
    Aren't they all made in the same factory, deep in China? I think mine
    is a Porter-Cable that came with three nail guns (brad, 16ga(?), and
    narrow crown stapler) for $200. It can't be much better than a Wally
    World.

    Probably. It might work better if it didn't kick on all of the time
    with air tools, due to the small tank size. Next one will be powerful
    enough for a roofing nailer, at least.

    My pancake will easily power a roofing nailer. I resided my house in
    VT with it and I use it for 3-1/2" framing nails here. I've never run
    out of air. Unless you're a pro and have someone laying shingles out
    for you, it's not going to run out of air.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Michael Trew@21:1/5 to Leon on Wed Jan 5 14:09:24 2022
    On 1/5/2022 10:05, Leon wrote:
    On 1/4/2022 11:06 PM, Michael Trew wrote:
    On 1/3/2022 12:06, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 11:53:25 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/2/2022 21:46, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 20:30:19 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/2/2022 9:48, Puckdropper wrote:
    Michael Trew<michael.trew@att.net> wrote in
    news:sqohqs$f27$7@dont-email.me:

    On 12/31/2021 16:59, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or anything for >>>>>>>>> that
    matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)

    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol

    A good compressor that's easy to move (so not one of those 200
    gallon
    monsters but also not a 1 1/2 gallon noise maker) would be a nice >>>>>>> thing to
    pass down. Shoot, even if they just use it to inflate tires and >>>>>>> beach
    balls, it would make their life that much easier.

    Puckdropper

    Well, I'm probably a fair deal younger than most here (in my
    20's). If
    I had a garage, I'd love to have one of those "monsters".

    I have an old sears compressor, no tank, that was used for some
    kind of
    power spray tool. It will inflate a tire to almost exactly 40
    PSI, so I
    use that for car tires until you can hear the machine spitting out >>>>>> the
    excess PSI at its limit.

    I have a couple of cheap, small, crappy pan-cake style "noise
    makers".
    A decent air compressor is in my future, at some point. One that
    isn't
    too heavy to haul up and down the cellar steps, due to my no garage >>>>>> situation.

    There's nothing really wrong with pancake compressors. They're not
    good for painting but they'll run any air tools that you're likely to >>>>> use. I've had one for 15-20 years. I have another in my garage that is >>>>> just a pancake compressor with elephantiasis. I think it's a 225psi >>>>> 15gal so it has plenty of air storage but its recovery time is
    abysmal. I intend to plumb it into the basement so the noise stays in >>>>> the garage. You could do the opposite but you may run into a freezing >>>>> problem. With a little thought that shouldn't be too hard to avoid.

    True, nothing wrong with pancake compressors. The two that I have are >>>> far smaller than 15 gallons, one is a Walmart brand. Those ones are
    garbage, in specific. That was a regretted purchase from a few
    years ago.

    Aren't they all made in the same factory, deep in China? I think mine
    is a Porter-Cable that came with three nail guns (brad, 16ga(?), and
    narrow crown stapler) for $200. It can't be much better than a Wally
    World.

    Probably. It might work better if it didn't kick on all of the time
    with air tools, due to the small tank size. Next one will be powerful
    enough for a roofing nailer, at least.

    Soo roofing nailers do not use much air. If you buy one that is only big enough for a nail gun it will likely run all of the time for other tools.

    Look for something that will handle impact drivers or a paint gun.

    Good point; I've never owned an impact gun. That would be nice for car repairs.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Puckdropper@21:1/5 to Ed Pawlowski on Wed Jan 5 20:02:46 2022
    Ed Pawlowski <esp@snet.xxx> wrote in
    news:3U2BJ.257184$aF1.256178@fx98.iad:



    Four trips a year. Day one 800 miles, day two 350 miles. Same on
    return.

    Right now that would be a PITA for an EV but give it a few years. The technology for a 5 minute charge exists, they just have to make it
    practical.

    All my other travel is under 30 miles. Today I drove 8 miles.


    I had heard about technology that would drop a battery pack from a car
    then put a new one in. Kinda like Propane exchange. The advantage to
    the owner, at least, is that the battery packs get renewed somewhat
    regularly. The disadvantage is that it's someone else's battery (have
    you ever seen a dying battery report 100% and be dead in 10 minutes of
    use?) and you might get a bad one.

    With the right platform, the swap could be accomplished easily within the amount of time it takes to fuel a car.

    Puckdropper

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Puckdropper@21:1/5 to Michael Trew on Wed Jan 5 20:15:20 2022
    Michael Trew <michael.trew@att.net> wrote in
    news:sr38vm$5iv$2@dont-email.me:


    Probably. It might work better if it didn't kick on all of the time
    with air tools, due to the small tank size. Next one will be powerful
    enough for a roofing nailer, at least.


    Used to be 10 gallon or so air tanks were about 20 dollars. I know it's
    more now, but I've used mine a few times with a T to add extra capacity
    before the compressor kicked on. (I bought it to run a hobby air brush,
    but sometimes the extra capacity came in handy.)

    Fill it to capacity and maybe add a regulator and you've got a way to
    fill a tire that's quite a ways from the compressor. Don't lawn mowers
    always seem to fail far from the garage? :-)

    Puckdropper

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DerbyDad03@21:1/5 to Leon on Wed Jan 5 12:15:53 2022
    On Wednesday, January 5, 2022 at 11:12:57 AM UTC-5, Leon wrote:
    On 1/4/2022 7:12 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
    On Tuesday, January 4, 2022 at 11:29:09 AM UTC-5, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Tue, 04 Jan 2022 05:34:38 -0500, J. Clarke
    <jclarke...@gmail.com> wrote:

    On Tue, 4 Jan 2022 00:30:17 -0500, Ed Pawlowski <e...@snet.xxx> wrote: >>>
    On 1/3/2022 2:22 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:

    And considering that if you have to go from one city to another for work
    related travel, especially in Texas, you will have to recharge to get >>>>>> back home.

    Where are you going to recharge? At the customer's? Do they have a >>>>> charging station? You're not going to do it with a lamp cord.


    At one of the 500,000 stations Shell is putting in. Or the 7-11 as they >>>> are putting them in.
    There are 15 stations at 4 locations within 8 miles of me.

    You don't recharge with a lamp cord but you do recharge with an
    extension cord and a dryer or stove outlet.
    Not a drier or stove outlet - a stadard Nema 5-15 plug.

    I know a guy that owns an Airbnb in Vegas. He was thinking of putting
    a 50 amp receptacle in his garage so he could add "EV friendly" to his listing. He just needed to get around to doing it.

    One day some guy from CA contacts him and says "I like your place. Can
    I charge my Tesla there?"

    Airbnb guy: "You know, I've been thinking about setting that up, just haven't done it yet."

    CA guy: "If you can promise you'll have it in by (some date) I'll book
    your place for a month."

    Airbnb guy: "What color would you like the receptacle to be?"

    CA guy laughed and booked his place - for a month. Cha-Ching!
    Cha-Ching except for the cost of the set up and some type of way to
    charge for the electricity.

    He did his own work, so the set-up cost was only parts. There was
    already extra breaker space in the garage panel, so it was pretty easy
    job.

    At $200 - $220/night, depending on booking dates, the cost of electricity
    is more than covered. By the end of this week his mortgage payment will
    be covered and he's currently booked at >50% for the rest of January.
    He gets a lot of last minute bookings, so that will probably go up.

    He has RV parking, so he gets a lot of "I don't want to drive anymore
    tonight, let's just find a place to sleep." He doesn't charge (NPI) extra
    for guests to plug in their RV's.

    Now that he can list EV charging, he'll end up in more search results
    since "EV charger" is a filter option.

    A month long booking is definitely a Cha-Ching, even if the guy
    is charging his Tesla every day.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From J. Clarke@21:1/5 to All on Wed Jan 5 16:33:58 2022
    On Wed, 05 Jan 2022 20:02:46 GMT, Puckdropper <email@example.com>
    wrote:

    Ed Pawlowski <esp@snet.xxx> wrote in
    news:3U2BJ.257184$aF1.256178@fx98.iad:



    Four trips a year. Day one 800 miles, day two 350 miles. Same on
    return.

    Right now that would be a PITA for an EV but give it a few years. The
    technology for a 5 minute charge exists, they just have to make it
    practical.

    All my other travel is under 30 miles. Today I drove 8 miles.


    I had heard about technology that would drop a battery pack from a car
    then put a new one in. Kinda like Propane exchange. The advantage to
    the owner, at least, is that the battery packs get renewed somewhat >regularly. The disadvantage is that it's someone else's battery (have
    you ever seen a dying battery report 100% and be dead in 10 minutes of
    use?) and you might get a bad one.

    With the right platform, the swap could be accomplished easily within the >amount of time it takes to fuel a car.

    That could be done with early releases of the Tesla Model S. Tesla
    set up a swap station and found that nobody was using it, so they
    decided that the idea was a non-starter and gave up on it.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Leon@21:1/5 to Michael Trew on Wed Jan 5 16:51:00 2022
    On 1/5/2022 1:09 PM, Michael Trew wrote:
    On 1/5/2022 10:05, Leon wrote:
    On 1/4/2022 11:06 PM, Michael Trew wrote:
    On 1/3/2022 12:06, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 11:53:25 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net>  wrote:

    On 1/2/2022 21:46, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 20:30:19 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net>   wrote:

    On 1/2/2022 9:48, Puckdropper wrote:
    Michael Trew<michael.trew@att.net>    wrote in
    news:sqohqs$f27$7@dont-email.me:

    On 12/31/2021 16:59, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or anything for >>>>>>>>>> that
    matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)

    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol

    A good compressor that's easy to move (so not one of those 200 >>>>>>>> gallon
    monsters but also not a 1 1/2 gallon noise maker) would be a nice >>>>>>>> thing to
    pass down.  Shoot, even if they just use it to inflate tires and >>>>>>>> beach
    balls, it would make their life that much easier.

    Puckdropper

    Well, I'm probably a fair deal younger than most here (in my
    20's).  If
    I had a garage, I'd love to have one of those "monsters".

    I have an old sears compressor, no tank, that was used for some
    kind of
    power spray tool.  It will inflate a tire to almost exactly 40
    PSI, so I
    use that for car tires until you can hear the machine spitting out >>>>>>> the
    excess PSI at its limit.

    I have a couple of cheap, small, crappy pan-cake style "noise
    makers".
    A decent air compressor is in my future, at some point.  One that >>>>>>> isn't
    too heavy to haul up and down the cellar steps, due to my no garage >>>>>>> situation.

    There's nothing really wrong with pancake compressors. They're not >>>>>> good for painting but they'll run any air tools that you're likely to >>>>>> use. I've had one for 15-20 years. I have another in my garage
    that is
    just a pancake compressor with elephantiasis.  I think it's a 225psi >>>>>> 15gal so it has plenty of air storage but its recovery time is
    abysmal. I intend to plumb it into the basement so the noise stays in >>>>>> the garage.  You could do the opposite but you may run into a
    freezing
    problem. With a little thought that shouldn't be too hard to avoid. >>>>>
    True, nothing wrong with pancake compressors.  The two that I have are >>>>> far smaller than 15 gallons, one is a Walmart brand.  Those ones are >>>>> garbage, in specific.  That was a regretted purchase from a few
    years ago.

    Aren't they all made in the same factory, deep in China? I think mine
    is a Porter-Cable that came with three nail guns (brad, 16ga(?), and
    narrow crown stapler) for $200. It can't be much better than a Wally
    World.

    Probably.  It might work better if it didn't kick on all of the time
    with air tools, due to the small tank size.  Next one will be powerful
    enough for a roofing nailer, at least.

    Soo roofing nailers do not use much air. If you buy one that is only big
    enough for a nail gun it will likely run all of the time for other tools.

    Look for something that will handle impact drivers or a paint gun.

    Good point; I've never owned an impact gun.  That would be nice for car repairs.

    As a point of reference, most any tool that is constentely using air and
    or running all of the time, the trigger is pulled, will require a larger
    tank and or output.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to All on Wed Jan 5 19:38:09 2022
    On Wed, 05 Jan 2022 20:02:46 GMT, Puckdropper <email@example.com>
    wrote:

    Ed Pawlowski <esp@snet.xxx> wrote in
    news:3U2BJ.257184$aF1.256178@fx98.iad:



    Four trips a year. Day one 800 miles, day two 350 miles. Same on
    return.

    Right now that would be a PITA for an EV but give it a few years. The
    technology for a 5 minute charge exists, they just have to make it
    practical.

    All my other travel is under 30 miles. Today I drove 8 miles.


    I had heard about technology that would drop a battery pack from a car
    then put a new one in. Kinda like Propane exchange. The advantage to
    the owner, at least, is that the battery packs get renewed somewhat >regularly. The disadvantage is that it's someone else's battery (have
    you ever seen a dying battery report 100% and be dead in 10 minutes of
    use?) and you might get a bad one.

    With the right platform, the swap could be accomplished easily within the >amount of time it takes to fuel a car.

    The battery pack is an integral part of the car. Removing it weakens
    the structure. It's not for the average grease monkey. It's a matter
    of weight.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ed Pawlowski@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Wed Jan 5 22:49:43 2022
    On 1/5/2022 7:38 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Wed, 05 Jan 2022 20:02:46 GMT, Puckdropper <email@example.com>
    wrote:

    Ed Pawlowski <esp@snet.xxx> wrote in
    news:3U2BJ.257184$aF1.256178@fx98.iad:



    Four trips a year. Day one 800 miles, day two 350 miles. Same on
    return.

    Right now that would be a PITA for an EV but give it a few years. The
    technology for a 5 minute charge exists, they just have to make it
    practical.

    All my other travel is under 30 miles. Today I drove 8 miles.


    I had heard about technology that would drop a battery pack from a car
    then put a new one in. Kinda like Propane exchange. The advantage to
    the owner, at least, is that the battery packs get renewed somewhat
    regularly. The disadvantage is that it's someone else's battery (have
    you ever seen a dying battery report 100% and be dead in 10 minutes of
    use?) and you might get a bad one.

    With the right platform, the swap could be accomplished easily within the
    amount of time it takes to fuel a car.

    The battery pack is an integral part of the car. Removing it weakens
    the structure. It's not for the average grease monkey. It's a matter
    of weight.

    Depends on the design of the car. They can be swapped in 10 minutes It
    is done a lot in China but is coming here.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zl5UJQzP7NE&ab_channel=CNBC

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From ritzannaseaton@gmail.com@21:1/5 to k...@notreal.com on Wed Jan 5 22:20:28 2022
    On Monday, January 3, 2022 at 9:00:35 PM UTC-6, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 20:30:07 GMT, sc...@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal)

    The average light truck in the United States is driven less a 1000
    miles a month, which means they'll have sufficient range for most
    users who aren't you.
    Nonsense.

    No, true. 1000 miles per month is 12,000 annual miles. Assuming 50 working weeks and Mon-Fri work week, that is 250 working days a year. 12,000 miles divided by 250 days equals 48 miles per day of driving each work day. I'd guess most, majority,
    working people live 24 miles or less from their work place. Round trip.

    And the vast majority of the pick up trucks sold in the USA are personal vehicles. Driving to work and to the stores and restaurants. Not work trucks used by employees while working. So the vast majority of pick up trucks in the USA are not work
    trucks. They are personal use vehicles only. Commuting to work each day. Going to the grocery store and back home. Going to the restaurant and back home. Personal driving. Not work driving.

    How many people drive over 48 miles every single Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday of the year? A few do, yes. But the vast majority of people live somewhat close to where they work. Less than 24 miles away. Leon lives in Houston.
    Pretty dog gone big city in the USA. Looking on Google Maps it looks like Houston and ALL of its suburbs is about 50 miles by 50 miles. So if you lived on the very outermost suburb and commuted to downtown center of Houston, it would only be about 48-
    50 total round trip commute. I lived in Kansas City once. Big city and suburbs like Houston. I lived 1 mile and 3 miles from work at different times. I lived in Des Moines. Much smaller than Houston. But still biggish. I lived 2 miles and 8 miles
    from work. 48 mile commute is much longer commute than most people make.

    Yes, people make trips on weekends. But how many people make that big of trips on the weekend? I have a friend whose daughter was in soccer. She took the daughter to weekend tournaments and games a few times a year. 1-2-3 weekends. 100-150 miles
    away. 200-300 total miles on the weekend. But it was not every single weekend. Most of the soccer games were in town a few miles away. Only rarely did the daughter play in big games far away from home. Who spends their relaxing non working weekends
    driving hundreds of miles every weekend? Driving 6-8-10 hours every weekend is not very relaxing. I suspect people who do that once or twice quickly realize spending half the weekend driving is not fun and stop very quickly. Find something to do
    closer to home with much less driving involved. My friend did not drive a pickup truck. But for those who have a personal pickup for personal use, its still not used for multi hundred mile trips every weekend. Or too many weekends even.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Leon@21:1/5 to All on Thu Jan 6 08:28:34 2022
    T24gMS82LzIwMjIgMTI6MjAgQU0sIHJ1c3NlbGxzZWF0b24xQHlhaG9vLmNvbSB3cm90ZToN Cj4gT24gTW9uZGF5LCBKYW51YXJ5IDMsIDIwMjIgYXQgOTowMDozNSBQTSBVVEMtNiwgay4u LkBub3RyZWFsLmNvbSB3cm90ZToNCj4+IE9uIE1vbiwgMDMgSmFuIDIwMjIgMjA6MzA6MDcg R01ULCBzYy4uLkBzbHA1My5zbC5ob21lIChTY290dCBMdXJuZGFsKQ0KPj4+DQo+Pj4gVGhl IGF2ZXJhZ2UgbGlnaHQgdHJ1Y2sgaW4gdGhlIFVuaXRlZCBTdGF0ZXMgaXMgZHJpdmVuIGxl c3MgYSAxMDAwDQo+Pj4gbWlsZXMgYSBtb250aCwgd2hpY2ggbWVhbnMgdGhleSdsbCBoYXZl IHN1ZmZpY2llbnQgcmFuZ2UgZm9yIG1vc3QNCj4+PiB1c2VycyB3aG8gYXJlbid0IHlvdS4N Cj4+IE5vbnNlbnNlLg0KPiANCj4gTm8sIHRydWUuICAxMDAwIG1pbGVzIHBlciBtb250aCBp cyAxMiwwMDAgYW5udWFsIG1pbGVzLiAgQXNzdW1pbmcgNTAgd29ya2luZyB3ZWVrcyBhbmQg TW9uLUZyaSB3b3JrIHdlZWssIHRoYXQgaXMgMjUwIHdvcmtpbmcgZGF5cyBhIHllYXIuICAx MiwwMDAgbWlsZXMgZGl2aWRlZCBieSAyNTAgZGF5cyBlcXVhbHMgNDggbWlsZXMgcGVyIGRh eSBvZiBkcml2aW5nIGVhY2ggd29yayBkYXkuICBJJ2QgZ3Vlc3MgbW9zdCwgbWFqb3JpdHks IHdvcmtpbmcgcGVvcGxlIGxpdmUgMjQgbWlsZXMgb3IgbGVzcyBmcm9tIHRoZWlyIHdvcmsg 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    DQo=

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Scott Lurndal@21:1/5 to russellseaton1@yahoo.com on Thu Jan 6 16:10:19 2022
    "russellseaton1@yahoo.com" <ritzannaseaton@gmail.com> writes:
    On Monday, January 3, 2022 at 9:00:35 PM UTC-6, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 20:30:07 GMT, sc...@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal)
    =20
    The average light truck in the United States is driven less a 1000=20
    miles a month, which means they'll have sufficient range for most=20
    users who aren't you.
    Nonsense.

    No, true. 1000 miles per month is 12,000 annual miles. Assuming 50 workin= >g weeks and Mon-Fri work week, that is 250 working days a year. 12,000 mil= >es divided by 250 days equals 48 miles per day of driving each work day. I= >'d guess most, majority, working people live 24 miles or less from their wo= >rk place. Round trip.

    Ford has telemetry from their commercial F-150 fleet.

    They found that 95% of current, commercial F-150 customers go less than 175 miles per day.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Scott Lurndal@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Thu Jan 6 16:06:00 2022
    krw@notreal.com writes:
    On Wed, 05 Jan 2022 20:02:46 GMT, Puckdropper <email@example.com>
    wrote:

    Ed Pawlowski <esp@snet.xxx> wrote in
    news:3U2BJ.257184$aF1.256178@fx98.iad:



    Four trips a year. Day one 800 miles, day two 350 miles. Same on
    return.

    Right now that would be a PITA for an EV but give it a few years. The
    technology for a 5 minute charge exists, they just have to make it
    practical.

    All my other travel is under 30 miles. Today I drove 8 miles.


    I had heard about technology that would drop a battery pack from a car
    then put a new one in. Kinda like Propane exchange. The advantage to
    the owner, at least, is that the battery packs get renewed somewhat >>regularly. The disadvantage is that it's someone else's battery (have
    you ever seen a dying battery report 100% and be dead in 10 minutes of >>use?) and you might get a bad one.

    With the right platform, the swap could be accomplished easily within the >>amount of time it takes to fuel a car.

    The battery pack is an integral part of the car. Removing it weakens
    the structure. It's not for the average grease monkey. It's a matter
    of weight.

    It's an integral part of the chassis - which is shaped much like
    a motorized skateboard.

    I could see a future platform where you just lift the body off
    one platform and attach it to another - not necessarily to
    replace the battery pack, but rather to to change the body,
    like putting on a new shirt.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DerbyDad03@21:1/5 to Scott Lurndal on Thu Jan 6 08:33:11 2022
    On Thursday, January 6, 2022 at 11:06:06 AM UTC-5, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    k...@notreal.com writes:
    On Wed, 05 Jan 2022 20:02:46 GMT, Puckdropper <em...@example.com>
    wrote:

    Ed Pawlowski <e...@snet.xxx> wrote in >>news:3U2BJ.257184$aF1.2...@fx98.iad:



    Four trips a year. Day one 800 miles, day two 350 miles. Same on
    return.

    Right now that would be a PITA for an EV but give it a few years. The
    technology for a 5 minute charge exists, they just have to make it
    practical.

    All my other travel is under 30 miles. Today I drove 8 miles.


    I had heard about technology that would drop a battery pack from a car >>then put a new one in. Kinda like Propane exchange. The advantage to
    the owner, at least, is that the battery packs get renewed somewhat >>regularly. The disadvantage is that it's someone else's battery (have
    you ever seen a dying battery report 100% and be dead in 10 minutes of >>use?) and you might get a bad one.

    With the right platform, the swap could be accomplished easily within the >>amount of time it takes to fuel a car.

    The battery pack is an integral part of the car. Removing it weakens
    the structure. It's not for the average grease monkey. It's a matter
    of weight.
    It's an integral part of the chassis - which is shaped much like
    a motorized skateboard.

    I could see a future platform where you just lift the body off
    one platform and attach it to another - not necessarily to
    replace the battery pack, but rather to to change the body,
    like putting on a new shirt.

    I'm just trying to understand your comment...

    What would be the purpose of that? You said "not necessarily to
    replace the battery pack" (which is what the discussion was
    about) "but rather to to change the body".

    Are you changing the subject from replacing batteries to upgrading
    the body for aesthetic reasons?

    It's OK if you are, I'm just a bit confused by your comment.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to All on Thu Jan 6 13:01:53 2022
    On Thu, 06 Jan 2022 16:06:00 GMT, scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal)
    wrote:

    krw@notreal.com writes:
    On Wed, 05 Jan 2022 20:02:46 GMT, Puckdropper <email@example.com>
    wrote:

    Ed Pawlowski <esp@snet.xxx> wrote in >>>news:3U2BJ.257184$aF1.256178@fx98.iad:



    Four trips a year. Day one 800 miles, day two 350 miles. Same on
    return.

    Right now that would be a PITA for an EV but give it a few years. The >>>> technology for a 5 minute charge exists, they just have to make it
    practical.

    All my other travel is under 30 miles. Today I drove 8 miles.


    I had heard about technology that would drop a battery pack from a car >>>then put a new one in. Kinda like Propane exchange. The advantage to >>>the owner, at least, is that the battery packs get renewed somewhat >>>regularly. The disadvantage is that it's someone else's battery (have >>>you ever seen a dying battery report 100% and be dead in 10 minutes of >>>use?) and you might get a bad one.

    With the right platform, the swap could be accomplished easily within the >>>amount of time it takes to fuel a car.

    The battery pack is an integral part of the car. Removing it weakens
    the structure. It's not for the average grease monkey. It's a matter
    of weight.

    It's an integral part of the chassis - which is shaped much like
    a motorized skateboard.

    I could see a future platform where you just lift the body off
    one platform and attach it to another - not necessarily to
    replace the battery pack, but rather to to change the body,
    like putting on a new shirt.

    Shirts collapse when taken off.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to teamarrows@eznet.net on Thu Jan 6 13:03:56 2022
    On Thu, 6 Jan 2022 08:33:11 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Thursday, January 6, 2022 at 11:06:06 AM UTC-5, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    k...@notreal.com writes:
    On Wed, 05 Jan 2022 20:02:46 GMT, Puckdropper <em...@example.com>
    wrote:

    Ed Pawlowski <e...@snet.xxx> wrote in
    news:3U2BJ.257184$aF1.2...@fx98.iad:



    Four trips a year. Day one 800 miles, day two 350 miles. Same on
    return.

    Right now that would be a PITA for an EV but give it a few years. The
    technology for a 5 minute charge exists, they just have to make it
    practical.

    All my other travel is under 30 miles. Today I drove 8 miles.


    I had heard about technology that would drop a battery pack from a car
    then put a new one in. Kinda like Propane exchange. The advantage to
    the owner, at least, is that the battery packs get renewed somewhat
    regularly. The disadvantage is that it's someone else's battery (have
    you ever seen a dying battery report 100% and be dead in 10 minutes of
    use?) and you might get a bad one.

    With the right platform, the swap could be accomplished easily within the >> >>amount of time it takes to fuel a car.

    The battery pack is an integral part of the car. Removing it weakens
    the structure. It's not for the average grease monkey. It's a matter
    of weight.
    It's an integral part of the chassis - which is shaped much like
    a motorized skateboard.

    I could see a future platform where you just lift the body off
    one platform and attach it to another - not necessarily to
    replace the battery pack, but rather to to change the body,
    like putting on a new shirt.

    I'm just trying to understand your comment...

    What would be the purpose of that? You said "not necessarily to
    replace the battery pack" (which is what the discussion was
    about) "but rather to to change the body".

    If they replace your head, is it a brain transplant or a body
    transplant. A distingtion with a difference.

    Are you changing the subject from replacing batteries to upgrading
    the body for aesthetic reasons?

    It's OK if you are, I'm just a bit confused by your comment.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to All on Thu Jan 6 13:08:23 2022
    On Thu, 06 Jan 2022 16:10:19 GMT, scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal)
    wrote:

    "russellseaton1@yahoo.com" <ritzannaseaton@gmail.com> writes:
    On Monday, January 3, 2022 at 9:00:35 PM UTC-6, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 20:30:07 GMT, sc...@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal)
    =20
    The average light truck in the United States is driven less a 1000=20
    miles a month, which means they'll have sufficient range for most=20
    users who aren't you.
    Nonsense.

    No, true. 1000 miles per month is 12,000 annual miles. Assuming 50 workin= >>g weeks and Mon-Fri work week, that is 250 working days a year. 12,000 mil= >>es divided by 250 days equals 48 miles per day of driving each work day. I= >>'d guess most, majority, working people live 24 miles or less from their wo= >>rk place. Round trip.

    Ford has telemetry from their commercial F-150 fleet.

    They found that 95% of current, commercial F-150 customers go less than 175 miles per day.

    That's average. What about two/three sigma day of those who drive
    that average of 175mi per day. You can't buy a vehicle that can only
    drive an "average" day.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to Leon on Thu Jan 6 13:41:06 2022
    On Thu, 6 Jan 2022 08:28:34 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 1/6/2022 12:20 AM, russellseaton1@yahoo.com wrote:
    On Monday, January 3, 2022 at 9:00:35 PM UTC-6, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 20:30:07 GMT, sc...@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal)

    The average light truck in the United States is driven less a 1000
    miles a month, which means they'll have sufficient range for most
    users who aren't you.
    Nonsense.

    No, true. 1000 miles per month is 12,000 annual miles. Assuming 50 working weeks and Mon-Fri work week, that is 250 working days a year. 12,000 miles divided by 250 days equals 48 miles per day of driving each work day. I'd guess most, majority,
    working people live 24 miles or less from their work place. Round trip.

    And the vast majority of the pick up trucks sold in the USA are personal vehicles. Driving to work and to the stores and restaurants. Not work trucks used by employees while working. So the vast majority of pick up trucks in the USA are not work
    trucks. They are personal use vehicles only. Commuting to work each day. Going to the grocery store and back home. Going to the restaurant and back home. Personal driving. Not work driving.

    How many people drive over 48 miles every single Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday of the year? A few do, yes. But the vast majority of people live somewhat close to where they work. Less than 24 miles away. Leon lives in Houston.
    Pretty dog gone big city in the USA. Looking on Google Maps it looks like Houston and ALL of its suburbs is about 50 miles by 50 miles. So if you lived on the very outermost suburb and commuted to downtown center of Houston, it would only be about 48-
    50 total round trip commute. I lived in Kansas City once. Big city and suburbs like Houston. I lived 1 mile and 3 miles from work at different times. I lived in Des Moines. Much smaller than Houston. But still biggish. I lived 2 miles and 8 miles
    from work. 48 mile commute is much longer commute than most people make.

    The Houston area probably has more trucks than cars and if I drove to
    the other side of downtown that would be 30 miles. There are 8 homes
    across the street from where I live. There are actually 10 pickups in
    those driveways and 4 SUV's, no actual cars. I don't drive to work
    and have driven almost 30K in 28 months... I wonder how many miles my >neighbors, that do drive to work drive each day, have on their vehicles.
    FWIW I live in an unincorporated area of the Houston area, there are
    many of those. In my particular case over 250,000 live in our area
    alone. We represent 5~10% of the area around Houston. There are more
    people living outside the city limits of Houston than in Houston.
    This is pretty much the norm for most any large city in Texas.

    That's true of all large cities in the US. It's a suburban society,
    much to the chagrin of leftists.

    So basically the 50+ mile per day is probably a conservative for the
    majority of pick up truck drivers in this area of Texas.

    Same here but averages don't matter. What's the maximum over a year
    or ten.


    Yes, people make trips on weekends. But how many people make that big of trips on the weekend? I have a friend whose daughter was in soccer. She took the daughter to weekend tournaments and games a few times a year. 1-2-3 weekends. 100-150 miles
    away. 200-300 total miles on the weekend. But it was not every single weekend. Most of the soccer games were in town a few miles away. Only rarely did the daughter play in big games far away from home. Who spends their relaxing non working weekends
    driving hundreds of miles every weekend? Driving 6-8-10 hours every weekend is not very relaxing. I suspect people who do that once or twice quickly realize spending half the weekend driving is not fun and stop very quickly. Find something to do
    closer to home with much less driving involved. My friend did not drive a pickup truck. But for those who have a personal pickup for personal use, its still not used for multi hundred mile trips every weekend. Or too many weekends even.

    Again, every and average mean nothing here. Once counts.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Puckdropper@21:1/5 to Michael Trew on Thu Jan 6 18:52:18 2022
    Michael Trew <michael.trew@att.net> wrote in
    news:sr4qd0$jih$1@dont-email.me:


    Good point; I've never owned an impact gun. That would be nice for
    car repairs.

    It might be worth checking out the electric ones. It seems like they've
    gotten more powerful the last decade or so, so air powered isn't
    necessarily the best way to go.

    Smaller ones are great for driving screws. I helped do a whole deck with a screw impact driver and 25 lbs of Torx head screws and I think we stripped maybe 6 heads.

    Puckdropper

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DerbyDad03@21:1/5 to Puckdropper on Thu Jan 6 11:36:57 2022
    On Thursday, January 6, 2022 at 1:52:22 PM UTC-5, Puckdropper wrote:
    Michael Trew <michae...@att.net> wrote in
    news:sr4qd0$jih$1...@dont-email.me:


    Good point; I've never owned an impact gun. That would be nice for
    car repairs.

    It might be worth checking out the electric ones. It seems like they've gotten more powerful the last decade or so, so air powered isn't
    necessarily the best way to go.

    Smaller ones are great for driving screws. I helped do a whole deck with a screw impact driver and 25 lbs of Torx head screws and I think we stripped maybe 6 heads.

    Puckdropper

    Do you recall what brand you used?

    I've dealt with deck screws that either don't want to start or excess ceramic coating in the hole prevents the bit from seating completely.

    When they don't want to start with an impact driver, you could burn yourself trying to hold on while they spin at full speed. :-O

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Scott Lurndal@21:1/5 to All on Thu Jan 6 20:19:16 2022
    On Thu, 6 Jan 2022 08:33:11 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Thursday, January 6, 2022 at 11:06:06 AM UTC-5, Scott Lurndal wrote:

    I could see a future platform where you just lift the body off
    one platform and attach it to another - not necessarily to
    replace the battery pack, but rather to to change the body,
    like putting on a new shirt.

    I'm just trying to understand your comment...

    What would be the purpose of that? You said "not necessarily to
    replace the battery pack" (which is what the discussion was
    about) "but rather to to change the body".

    Want a different body style? Don't buy a whole new car, just
    change the body. Sporty? SUV? old-fashioned station wagon?

    "Not necessarily" doesn't imply anything about the additional
    usefulness of (relatively) straightfordward battery swaps with
    such a configuration.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Scott Lurndal@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Thu Jan 6 20:16:33 2022
    krw@notreal.com writes:
    On Thu, 06 Jan 2022 16:10:19 GMT, scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal)
    wrote:

    "russellseaton1@yahoo.com" <ritzannaseaton@gmail.com> writes:
    On Monday, January 3, 2022 at 9:00:35 PM UTC-6, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 20:30:07 GMT, sc...@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal)
    =20
    The average light truck in the United States is driven less a 1000=20 >>>> >miles a month, which means they'll have sufficient range for most=20
    users who aren't you.
    Nonsense.

    No, true. 1000 miles per month is 12,000 annual miles. Assuming 50 workin= >>>g weeks and Mon-Fri work week, that is 250 working days a year. 12,000 mil= >>>es divided by 250 days equals 48 miles per day of driving each work day. I= >>>'d guess most, majority, working people live 24 miles or less from their wo= >>>rk place. Round trip.

    Ford has telemetry from their commercial F-150 fleet.

    They found that 95% of current, commercial F-150 customers go less than 175 miles per day.

    That's average.

    No, the quote from Ford said 95% never go over 175 miles per day,
    can't you read? The did not say _average_ anything.

    That's why they chose 230-300mi range for the new F-150 Lightning.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Scott Lurndal@21:1/5 to teamarrows@eznet.net on Thu Jan 6 21:30:19 2022
    DerbyDad03 <teamarrows@eznet.net> writes:
    On Thursday, January 6, 2022 at 3:19:20 PM UTC-5, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    On Thu, 6 Jan 2022 08:33:11 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
    <teama...@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Thursday, January 6, 2022 at 11:06:06 AM UTC-5, Scott Lurndal wrote:

    I could see a future platform where you just lift the body off
    one platform and attach it to another - not necessarily to
    replace the battery pack, but rather to to change the body,
    like putting on a new shirt.

    I'm just trying to understand your comment...

    What would be the purpose of that? You said "not necessarily to
    replace the battery pack" (which is what the discussion was
    about) "but rather to to change the body".
    Want a different body style? Don't buy a whole new car, just
    change the body. Sporty? SUV? old-fashioned station wagon?

    OK. That's what I thought. Not quite sure how many radically
    different body styles can be bolted onto a single chassis style,
    but I get your point.


    "Not necessarily" doesn't imply anything about the additional
    usefulness of (relatively) straightfordward battery swaps with
    such a configuration.

    That's where I see an issue. When I put on new shirt, I get to keep
    wearing the same shoes.

    If "body swapping as a means to replace the battery" becomes a
    thing, what about the tires, brakes and suspension that I used to
    have? Do I get to keep the set-up I'm used to, maybe even modified
    from OEM? Assuming there are different packages (OEM or aftermarket) >available for EV's, will that same package be available when I need to
    change batteries?

    https://www.motortrend.com/news/zero-labs-launches-modular-electric-platform-classic-cars/

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DerbyDad03@21:1/5 to Scott Lurndal on Thu Jan 6 13:22:12 2022
    On Thursday, January 6, 2022 at 3:19:20 PM UTC-5, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    On Thu, 6 Jan 2022 08:33:11 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
    <teama...@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Thursday, January 6, 2022 at 11:06:06 AM UTC-5, Scott Lurndal wrote:

    I could see a future platform where you just lift the body off
    one platform and attach it to another - not necessarily to
    replace the battery pack, but rather to to change the body,
    like putting on a new shirt.

    I'm just trying to understand your comment...

    What would be the purpose of that? You said "not necessarily to
    replace the battery pack" (which is what the discussion was
    about) "but rather to to change the body".
    Want a different body style? Don't buy a whole new car, just
    change the body. Sporty? SUV? old-fashioned station wagon?

    OK. That's what I thought. Not quite sure how many radically
    different body styles can be bolted onto a single chassis style,
    but I get your point.


    "Not necessarily" doesn't imply anything about the additional
    usefulness of (relatively) straightfordward battery swaps with
    such a configuration.

    That's where I see an issue. When I put on new shirt, I get to keep
    wearing the same shoes.

    If "body swapping as a means to replace the battery" becomes a
    thing, what about the tires, brakes and suspension that I used to
    have? Do I get to keep the set-up I'm used to, maybe even modified
    from OEM? Assuming there are different packages (OEM or aftermarket)
    available for EV's, will that same package be available when I need to
    change batteries?

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Leon@21:1/5 to Scott Lurndal on Thu Jan 6 15:43:53 2022
    On 1/3/2022 2:30 PM, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    krw@notreal.com writes:
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 18:11:21 GMT, scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal)
    wrote:

    krw@notreal.com writes:
    On Mon, 3 Jan 2022 11:11:16 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote: >>>>



    Those limited range electric trucks may never be further than walking >>>>> distance from a tire store. ;~)

    LOL! Maybe dualies front and back?

    The Rivian R1S (saw one drive past a couple of weeks ago) have a range
    of 300+ miles. How often do you drive more than 300 miles in a working >>> day?

    Working? The kid lives 1200 mi from here. The beach is 350mi. Disney
    world is 450mi. A few places.

    Well, your needs don't match the capabilities. Buy something that does
    and stop your political posturing.

    The average light truck in the United States is driven less a 1000
    miles a month, which means they'll have sufficient range for most
    users who aren't you.


    So I am not going to look those figures up but lets use the average
    usage as being only 1000 miles per month.

    Assuming to work and back 5 days a week that is approximately 50 miles
    per day.

    Now that is average so there will be much less and much more. In
    smaller communities most likely less. I do not live in any city but do
    live near and west of Houston. I do not drive to work at all. I am
    averaging about 1000 per month in our truck.

    So given that info you can probably deduct that I go on trips in-excess
    of the average miles mentioned above.

    So today,,,,

    IMHO EV's are good for city commuters but if you need to travel over 100
    miles to another city all bets are off. Seldom do you simply drive to
    that city and not drive more miles.
    EV's are not a good option for vacation travel.

    Some hotels offer EV chargers but more do not that I have noticed.

    When on vacation my wife and I normally drive 600 miles per day before
    it gets dark. I am not certain that would be possible in an EV today.
    I suspect getting to our destination with a new EV would take twice as
    many days and nights in a hotel.

    Tomorrow?

    Hopefully the range will increase. I believe as range increases and
    people actually take limited time vacations hotels will be more likely
    to offer charging stations.

    And then,,,

    And as time goes on the length of travel will decrease as the batteries age.

    I am hopeful that the "new" battery range will triple to be and stay competitive with the ranges offered by gasoline or diesel. My truck
    gets about 21 mpg on the highway. That is a legit 21 mpg vs. the gas
    mileage shown by the Ford mpg computer. Gas mileage is typically
    overstated by a minimum of 10%.
    With 21 MPG and a 36 gallon tank we can almost go from Houston to El
    Paso Texas on a tank. Or Brownsville Texas to Amarillo Texas.

    On another note Chevrolet has introduced their Silverado/Avalance style
    EV pick up.
    Range 400 miles. WT entry level pricing is supposed to be $39K. The
    top of the line version $105K. Will have to wait till late next year,
    2023, to see it at dealerships.

    And I thought going from the XL trim to King Ranch trim level was bad at
    about $30K difference. There is less difference but ours had $15K more
    options on top of the King Ranch trim. So stripped to our truck there
    was a $40K difference before the deal was made.

    But Chevrolet is asking for 2.5 times more going from basic to top. At
    this point the range is the same for both extremes.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Leon@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Thu Jan 6 15:46:10 2022
    On 1/6/2022 12:03 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    Snip



    If they replace your head, is it a brain transplant or a body
    transplant. A distingtion with a difference.

    LOL. I dreamed up that question 40 + years ago.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Leon@21:1/5 to Scott Lurndal on Thu Jan 6 15:50:50 2022
    On 1/6/2022 2:19 PM, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    On Thu, 6 Jan 2022 08:33:11 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Thursday, January 6, 2022 at 11:06:06 AM UTC-5, Scott Lurndal wrote:

    I could see a future platform where you just lift the body off
    one platform and attach it to another - not necessarily to
    replace the battery pack, but rather to to change the body,
    like putting on a new shirt.

    I'm just trying to understand your comment...

    What would be the purpose of that? You said "not necessarily to
    replace the battery pack" (which is what the discussion was
    about) "but rather to to change the body".

    Want a different body style? Don't buy a whole new car, just
    change the body. Sporty? SUV? old-fashioned station wagon?

    Novel Idea! But the creature comforts are pretty costly. The drive
    train typically craps out first and with EV's the expensive part, the batteries. I think that would be a popular option for those that do not
    drive much but want to have variety over the years.

    BUT in 10 years will the battery fit the drill, um er the new chassis. LOL.





    "Not necessarily" doesn't imply anything about the additional
    usefulness of (relatively) straightfordward battery swaps with
    such a configuration.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Leon@21:1/5 to Scott Lurndal on Thu Jan 6 16:03:00 2022
    On 1/6/2022 2:16 PM, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    krw@notreal.com writes:
    On Thu, 06 Jan 2022 16:10:19 GMT, scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal)
    wrote:

    "russellseaton1@yahoo.com" <ritzannaseaton@gmail.com> writes:
    On Monday, January 3, 2022 at 9:00:35 PM UTC-6, k...@notreal.com wrote: >>>>> On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 20:30:07 GMT, sc...@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) >>>>>> =20
    The average light truck in the United States is driven less a 1000=20 >>>>>> miles a month, which means they'll have sufficient range for most=20 >>>>>> users who aren't you.
    Nonsense.

    No, true. 1000 miles per month is 12,000 annual miles. Assuming 50 workin=
    g weeks and Mon-Fri work week, that is 250 working days a year. 12,000 mil=
    es divided by 250 days equals 48 miles per day of driving each work day. I=
    'd guess most, majority, working people live 24 miles or less from their wo=
    rk place. Round trip.

    Ford has telemetry from their commercial F-150 fleet.

    They found that 95% of current, commercial F-150 customers go less than 175 miles per day.

    That's average.

    No, the quote from Ford said 95% never go over 175 miles per day,
    can't you read? The did not say _average_ anything.

    That's why they chose 230-300mi range for the new F-150 Lightning.


    I have to think that never over 175 miles per day may mean over 170
    miles per day. AND IMHO that would be a lot of driving for an average.

    I think the focus will be on fleet vehicles that are normally at the
    bottom of the trim levels. And the profit is marginal on those vehicles compared to higher trim levels purchased by individuals.

    My thinking is that Ford will need to improve range to be able to sell
    higher trim levels.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Scott Lurndal@21:1/5 to Leon on Thu Jan 6 22:46:42 2022
    Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> writes:
    On 1/6/2022 2:19 PM, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    On Thu, 6 Jan 2022 08:33:11 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Thursday, January 6, 2022 at 11:06:06 AM UTC-5, Scott Lurndal wrote:

    I could see a future platform where you just lift the body off
    one platform and attach it to another - not necessarily to
    replace the battery pack, but rather to to change the body,
    like putting on a new shirt.

    I'm just trying to understand your comment...

    What would be the purpose of that? You said "not necessarily to
    replace the battery pack" (which is what the discussion was
    about) "but rather to to change the body".

    Want a different body style? Don't buy a whole new car, just
    change the body. Sporty? SUV? old-fashioned station wagon?

    Novel Idea!

    Not my idea, it's been around for a decade or more.

    But the creature comforts are pretty costly.

    On the other hand, here's a company actually doing it - albeit
    for the classics:

    https://www.zerolabs.com/

    I like the Bronco they converted (in 24hrs).

    I'm gonna ping my brother-in-law - he has a
    66 'stang in a barn in the midwest.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Scott Lurndal@21:1/5 to Leon on Thu Jan 6 22:50:35 2022
    Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> writes:
    On 1/6/2022 2:16 PM, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    krw@notreal.com writes:
    On Thu, 06 Jan 2022 16:10:19 GMT, scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal)
    wrote:

    "russellseaton1@yahoo.com" <ritzannaseaton@gmail.com> writes:
    On Monday, January 3, 2022 at 9:00:35 PM UTC-6, k...@notreal.com wrote: >>>>>> On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 20:30:07 GMT, sc...@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) >>>>>>> =20
    The average light truck in the United States is driven less a 1000=20 >>>>>>> miles a month, which means they'll have sufficient range for most=20 >>>>>>> users who aren't you.
    Nonsense.

    No, true. 1000 miles per month is 12,000 annual miles. Assuming 50 workin=
    g weeks and Mon-Fri work week, that is 250 working days a year. 12,000 mil=
    es divided by 250 days equals 48 miles per day of driving each work day. I=
    'd guess most, majority, working people live 24 miles or less from their wo=
    rk place. Round trip.

    Ford has telemetry from their commercial F-150 fleet.

    They found that 95% of current, commercial F-150 customers go less than 175 miles per day.

    That's average.

    No, the quote from Ford said 95% never go over 175 miles per day,
    can't you read? The did not say _average_ anything.

    That's why they chose 230-300mi range for the new F-150 Lightning.


    I have to think that never over 175 miles per day may mean over 170
    miles per day. AND IMHO that would be a lot of driving for an average.

    I suspect they picked 175 to get the 95th percentile.

    My guess is that the fleet median is much closer to 80 to 100 miles/day.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to All on Thu Jan 6 18:26:14 2022
    On Thu, 06 Jan 2022 21:30:19 GMT, scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal)
    wrote:

    DerbyDad03 <teamarrows@eznet.net> writes:
    On Thursday, January 6, 2022 at 3:19:20 PM UTC-5, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    On Thu, 6 Jan 2022 08:33:11 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
    <teama...@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Thursday, January 6, 2022 at 11:06:06 AM UTC-5, Scott Lurndal wrote: >>>
    I could see a future platform where you just lift the body off
    one platform and attach it to another - not necessarily to
    replace the battery pack, but rather to to change the body,
    like putting on a new shirt.

    I'm just trying to understand your comment...

    What would be the purpose of that? You said "not necessarily to
    replace the battery pack" (which is what the discussion was
    about) "but rather to to change the body".
    Want a different body style? Don't buy a whole new car, just
    change the body. Sporty? SUV? old-fashioned station wagon?

    OK. That's what I thought. Not quite sure how many radically
    different body styles can be bolted onto a single chassis style,
    but I get your point.


    "Not necessarily" doesn't imply anything about the additional
    usefulness of (relatively) straightfordward battery swaps with
    such a configuration.

    That's where I see an issue. When I put on new shirt, I get to keep
    wearing the same shoes.

    If "body swapping as a means to replace the battery" becomes a
    thing, what about the tires, brakes and suspension that I used to
    have? Do I get to keep the set-up I'm used to, maybe even modified
    from OEM? Assuming there are different packages (OEM or aftermarket) >>available for EV's, will that same package be available when I need to >>change batteries?

    https://www.motortrend.com/news/zero-labs-launches-modular-electric-platform-classic-cars/

    As I said, only an idiot would come up with that. Likely someone
    looking for a patent to show the boss.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to All on Thu Jan 6 18:27:49 2022
    On Thu, 06 Jan 2022 20:16:33 GMT, scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal)
    wrote:

    krw@notreal.com writes:
    On Thu, 06 Jan 2022 16:10:19 GMT, scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) >>wrote:

    "russellseaton1@yahoo.com" <ritzannaseaton@gmail.com> writes:
    On Monday, January 3, 2022 at 9:00:35 PM UTC-6, k...@notreal.com wrote: >>>>> On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 20:30:07 GMT, sc...@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) >>>>> >=20
    The average light truck in the United States is driven less a 1000=20 >>>>> >miles a month, which means they'll have sufficient range for most=20 >>>>> >users who aren't you.
    Nonsense.

    No, true. 1000 miles per month is 12,000 annual miles. Assuming 50 workin=
    g weeks and Mon-Fri work week, that is 250 working days a year. 12,000 mil=
    es divided by 250 days equals 48 miles per day of driving each work day. I=
    'd guess most, majority, working people live 24 miles or less from their wo=
    rk place. Round trip.

    Ford has telemetry from their commercial F-150 fleet.

    They found that 95% of current, commercial F-150 customers go less than 175 miles per day.

    That's average.

    No, the quote from Ford said 95% never go over 175 miles per day,
    can't you read? The did not say _average_ anything.

    Yes, moron. How may cars, TOTAL, _never_ drive more than 400mi?

    That's why they chose 230-300mi range for the new F-150 Lightning.

    Fail.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to Leon on Thu Jan 6 18:29:51 2022
    On Thu, 6 Jan 2022 16:03:00 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 1/6/2022 2:16 PM, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    krw@notreal.com writes:
    On Thu, 06 Jan 2022 16:10:19 GMT, scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal)
    wrote:

    "russellseaton1@yahoo.com" <ritzannaseaton@gmail.com> writes:
    On Monday, January 3, 2022 at 9:00:35 PM UTC-6, k...@notreal.com wrote: >>>>>> On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 20:30:07 GMT, sc...@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) >>>>>>> =20
    The average light truck in the United States is driven less a 1000=20 >>>>>>> miles a month, which means they'll have sufficient range for most=20 >>>>>>> users who aren't you.
    Nonsense.

    No, true. 1000 miles per month is 12,000 annual miles. Assuming 50 workin=
    g weeks and Mon-Fri work week, that is 250 working days a year. 12,000 mil=
    es divided by 250 days equals 48 miles per day of driving each work day. I=
    'd guess most, majority, working people live 24 miles or less from their wo=
    rk place. Round trip.

    Ford has telemetry from their commercial F-150 fleet.

    They found that 95% of current, commercial F-150 customers go less than 175 miles per day.

    That's average.

    No, the quote from Ford said 95% never go over 175 miles per day,
    can't you read? The did not say _average_ anything.

    That's why they chose 230-300mi range for the new F-150 Lightning.


    I have to think that never over 175 miles per day may mean over 170
    miles per day. AND IMHO that would be a lot of driving for an average.

    I think the focus will be on fleet vehicles that are normally at the
    bottom of the trim levels. And the profit is marginal on those vehicles >compared to higher trim levels purchased by individuals.

    My thinking is that Ford will need to improve range to be able to sell
    higher trim levels.

    And just where does the price point for electrics fall?

    Batteries will never have the energy density of gas.


    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to All on Thu Jan 6 18:24:00 2022
    On Thu, 06 Jan 2022 20:19:16 GMT, scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal)
    wrote:


    On Thu, 6 Jan 2022 08:33:11 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Thursday, January 6, 2022 at 11:06:06 AM UTC-5, Scott Lurndal wrote:

    I could see a future platform where you just lift the body off
    one platform and attach it to another - not necessarily to
    replace the battery pack, but rather to to change the body,
    like putting on a new shirt.

    I'm just trying to understand your comment...

    What would be the purpose of that? You said "not necessarily to
    replace the battery pack" (which is what the discussion was
    about) "but rather to to change the body".

    Want a different body style? Don't buy a whole new car, just
    change the body. Sporty? SUV? old-fashioned station wagon?

    Idiotic.

    "Not necessarily" doesn't imply anything about the additional
    usefulness of (relatively) straightfordward battery swaps with
    such a configuration.

    Ah, typical communist. It doesn't matter if it's useful or not. Just
    spend the money.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to Leon on Thu Jan 6 18:36:16 2022
    On Thu, 6 Jan 2022 15:43:53 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 1/3/2022 2:30 PM, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    krw@notreal.com writes:
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 18:11:21 GMT, scott@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal)
    wrote:

    krw@notreal.com writes:
    On Mon, 3 Jan 2022 11:11:16 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote: >>>>>



    Those limited range electric trucks may never be further than walking >>>>>> distance from a tire store. ;~)

    LOL! Maybe dualies front and back?

    The Rivian R1S (saw one drive past a couple of weeks ago) have a range >>>> of 300+ miles. How often do you drive more than 300 miles in a working >>>> day?

    Working? The kid lives 1200 mi from here. The beach is 350mi. Disney
    world is 450mi. A few places.

    Well, your needs don't match the capabilities. Buy something that does
    and stop your political posturing.

    The average light truck in the United States is driven less a 1000
    miles a month, which means they'll have sufficient range for most
    users who aren't you.


    So I am not going to look those figures up but lets use the average
    usage as being only 1000 miles per month.

    Assuming to work and back 5 days a week that is approximately 50 miles
    per day.

    Now that is average so there will be much less and much more. In
    smaller communities most likely less. I do not live in any city but do
    live near and west of Houston. I do not drive to work at all. I am >averaging about 1000 per month in our truck.

    So given that info you can probably deduct that I go on trips in-excess
    of the average miles mentioned above.

    So today,,,,

    IMHO EV's are good for city commuters but if you need to travel over 100 >miles to another city all bets are off. Seldom do you simply drive to
    that city and not drive more miles.
    EV's are not a good option for vacation travel.

    Some hotels offer EV chargers but more do not that I have noticed.

    When on vacation my wife and I normally drive 600 miles per day before
    it gets dark. I am not certain that would be possible in an EV today.
    I suspect getting to our destination with a new EV would take twice as
    many days and nights in a hotel.

    Tomorrow?

    Hopefully the range will increase. I believe as range increases and
    people actually take limited time vacations hotels will be more likely
    to offer charging stations.

    And then,,,

    And as time goes on the length of travel will decrease as the batteries age.

    I am hopeful that the "new" battery range will triple to be and stay >competitive with the ranges offered by gasoline or diesel. My truck
    gets about 21 mpg on the highway. That is a legit 21 mpg vs. the gas
    mileage shown by the Ford mpg computer. Gas mileage is typically
    overstated by a minimum of 10%.
    With 21 MPG and a 36 gallon tank we can almost go from Houston to El
    Paso Texas on a tank. Or Brownsville Texas to Amarillo Texas.

    On another note Chevrolet has introduced their Silverado/Avalance style
    EV pick up.
    Range 400 miles. WT entry level pricing is supposed to be $39K. The
    top of the line version $105K. Will have to wait till late next year,
    2023, to see it at dealerships.

    And I thought going from the XL trim to King Ranch trim level was bad at >about $30K difference. There is less difference but ours had $15K more >options on top of the King Ranch trim. So stripped to our truck there
    was a $40K difference before the deal was made.

    My XLT with pretty much everything possible on a 2x4, including the
    trailer assist package, was well under 40K, out the door (taxes
    included).

    But Chevrolet is asking for 2.5 times more going from basic to top. At
    this point the range is the same for both extremes.




    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Clare Snyder@21:1/5 to michael.trew@att.net on Thu Jan 6 21:56:56 2022
    On Tue, 04 Jan 2022 23:53:45 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/3/2022 12:00, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 11:50:51 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/2/2022 21:24, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Sun, 2 Jan 2022 14:49:08 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Sunday, January 2, 2022 at 3:33:44 PM UTC-5, k...@notreal.com wrote: >>>>>> On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 14:48:13 GMT, Puckdropper<em...@example.com>
    wrote:
    Michael Trew<michae...@att.net> wrote in
    news:sqohqs$f27$7...@dont-email.me:

    On 12/31/2021 16:59, k...@notreal.com wrote:

    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or anything for that >>>>>>>>> matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)

    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol

    A good compressor that's easy to move (so not one of those 200 gallon >>>>>>> monsters but also not a 1 1/2 gallon noise maker) would be a nice thing to
    pass down. Shoot, even if they just use it to inflate tires and beach >>>>>>> balls, it would make their life that much easier.
    For tires I have one of these:

    <https://www.homedepot.com/p/RYOBI-ONE-18V-Lithium-Ion-Cordless-Power-Inflator-Kit-with-1-5-Ah-Battery-and-18V-Charger-P737DKN/311788879>

    SWMBO appreciates it very much.

    I looked at her "spare" a while back. Since it is small car
    (Mustang), I knew it had to have a bicycle tire. Nope. Not even
    that. Under the trunk liner is a 12V compressor and a can of
    compressed tire gunk. Nice. A bicycle tire is an extra $250.

    Ever notice how all (?) spares are stored with the valve down or inward, >>>>> forcing you to remove the spare it to check/fill it? The spare in my Odyssey
    is buried valve down under the carpet between the front and middle row seats.
    What a PITA to get it out.

    I have one configuration or another of these in all of my vehicles.

    https://www.amazon.com/Hotop-Stainless-Extension-Braided-Extender/dp/B09BMWQQ3R

    All of the spares in my vehicles look something like this so I can check/top
    them off without removing them.

    https://i.imgur.com/6IHvl8M.jpg

    https://i.imgur.com/nxJAKFf.jpg

    I wouldn't be surprised if half the folks in this group (that have spares) have
    spares that are sitting at 45-50 PSI.

    It's amazing how those tires hold up. Especially the old bias-ply
    tires, to build on the post quoted below. I have a '68 Ford Galaxie,
    and it has the full size spare installed on the front tire now, a 1968
    bias-ply tire. I cannot believe that the thing still holds air
    pressure. It's pretty well bald, however.

    Bicycle tires are designed to never be used.

    What about bicycle tires?

    The last time I actually USED my spare was on my '63 Valiant back
    about 1970. I ALMOST had to use it 3 times on one trip with the PT
    Cruiser on my trip to PEI when 3 valve stems failed and christmas 1972 >>>> in Montana or Idaho or Wyoming or wherever when I got a cinder
    puncture - managed to find a tire repair guy before it got all the way >>>> flat.

    I always keep a full sized spare when traveling. I can recall too many
    times that I needed it on a 1,000+ mile road trip, in recent history.

    A full-size tire would take up the entire trunk, making travel a
    little difficult. Full-size truck spares work because there is waste
    space under the bed. There is no wasted space in cars these days. I
    wonder that the (useless) electric trucks will do. AFAIK, the
    batteries take up that space.

    I keep the full-size tire on rim behind the driver's seat. On very long
    road trips, the back seat it otherwise full of luggage, cooler, >blankets/pillows/air mattress/etc.

    I've heard that some new cars don't even have a donut spare.
    With 4 little chunks of rubber being the only thing between you and
    your last breath, Tires are not where I am going to cut corners.

    I just "decomissioned" a set of 7 year old michelins with 80% tread
    from the Ranger, as well as a 5 or 6 year old set of Michelind with
    about 40% tread from the Sorento.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to All on Thu Jan 6 22:12:21 2022
    On Thu, 06 Jan 2022 21:56:56 -0500, Clare Snyder <clare@snyder.on.ca>
    wrote:

    On Tue, 04 Jan 2022 23:53:45 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/3/2022 12:00, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 11:50:51 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/2/2022 21:24, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Sun, 2 Jan 2022 14:49:08 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Sunday, January 2, 2022 at 3:33:44 PM UTC-5, k...@notreal.com wrote: >>>>>>> On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 14:48:13 GMT, Puckdropper<em...@example.com> >>>>>>> wrote:
    Michael Trew<michae...@att.net> wrote in
    news:sqohqs$f27$7...@dont-email.me:

    On 12/31/2021 16:59, k...@notreal.com wrote:

    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or anything for that >>>>>>>>>> matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)

    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol

    A good compressor that's easy to move (so not one of those 200 gallon >>>>>>>> monsters but also not a 1 1/2 gallon noise maker) would be a nice thing to
    pass down. Shoot, even if they just use it to inflate tires and beach >>>>>>>> balls, it would make their life that much easier.
    For tires I have one of these:

    <https://www.homedepot.com/p/RYOBI-ONE-18V-Lithium-Ion-Cordless-Power-Inflator-Kit-with-1-5-Ah-Battery-and-18V-Charger-P737DKN/311788879>

    SWMBO appreciates it very much.

    I looked at her "spare" a while back. Since it is small car
    (Mustang), I knew it had to have a bicycle tire. Nope. Not even
    that. Under the trunk liner is a 12V compressor and a can of
    compressed tire gunk. Nice. A bicycle tire is an extra $250.

    Ever notice how all (?) spares are stored with the valve down or inward, >>>>>> forcing you to remove the spare it to check/fill it? The spare in my Odyssey
    is buried valve down under the carpet between the front and middle row seats.
    What a PITA to get it out.

    I have one configuration or another of these in all of my vehicles. >>>>>>
    https://www.amazon.com/Hotop-Stainless-Extension-Braided-Extender/dp/B09BMWQQ3R

    All of the spares in my vehicles look something like this so I can check/top
    them off without removing them.

    https://i.imgur.com/6IHvl8M.jpg

    https://i.imgur.com/nxJAKFf.jpg

    I wouldn't be surprised if half the folks in this group (that have spares) have
    spares that are sitting at 45-50 PSI.

    It's amazing how those tires hold up. Especially the old bias-ply
    tires, to build on the post quoted below. I have a '68 Ford Galaxie,
    and it has the full size spare installed on the front tire now, a 1968 >>>> bias-ply tire. I cannot believe that the thing still holds air
    pressure. It's pretty well bald, however.

    Bicycle tires are designed to never be used.

    What about bicycle tires?

    The last time I actually USED my spare was on my '63 Valiant back >>>>> about 1970. I ALMOST had to use it 3 times on one trip with the PT
    Cruiser on my trip to PEI when 3 valve stems failed and christmas 1972 >>>>> in Montana or Idaho or Wyoming or wherever when I got a cinder
    puncture - managed to find a tire repair guy before it got all the way >>>>> flat.

    I always keep a full sized spare when traveling. I can recall too many >>>> times that I needed it on a 1,000+ mile road trip, in recent history.

    A full-size tire would take up the entire trunk, making travel a
    little difficult. Full-size truck spares work because there is waste
    space under the bed. There is no wasted space in cars these days. I
    wonder that the (useless) electric trucks will do. AFAIK, the
    batteries take up that space.

    I keep the full-size tire on rim behind the driver's seat. On very long >>road trips, the back seat it otherwise full of luggage, cooler, >>blankets/pillows/air mattress/etc.

    I've heard that some new cars don't even have a donut spare.

    As I said earlier, my wife's Mustang came with a 12V tire pump and a
    can of fix-a-flat. No spare of any kind.

    With 4 little chunks of rubber being the only thing between you and
    your last breath, Tires are not where I am going to cut corners.

    I just "decomissioned" a set of 7 year old michelins with 80% tread
    from the Ranger, as well as a 5 or 6 year old set of Michelind with
    about 40% tread from the Sorento.

    What did you do with them? It seems that every car needs a different
    size. Maybe I misunderstood. Do you still have the cars just that the
    tires are too old to trust? Why 80%?

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Puckdropper@21:1/5 to Leon on Fri Jan 7 07:59:28 2022
    Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote in news:rbGdnbTV5eMH_0r8nZ2dnUU7-IvNnZ2d@giganews.com:


    When on vacation my wife and I normally drive 600 miles per day before
    it gets dark. I am not certain that would be possible in an EV today.
    I suspect getting to our destination with a new EV would take twice as
    many days and nights in a hotel.


    Just do what they do with airplanes... Add auxilary fuel tanks or another battery. ;-)

    Who cares about the extra weight and room the thing needs, right?

    Long trips are just something electric cars will probably never be good
    at. Even if you did have a swappable battery, the battery has to stay
    there for the hours it takes to charge.

    Electric cars can be ideal city cars and even short-medium distance type
    cars. There's a saying when buying an airplane, "Buy one that fits the
    mission most of the time, rent one for the times it doesn't."

    Puckdropper

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Puckdropper@21:1/5 to teamarrows@eznet.net on Fri Jan 7 07:45:08 2022
    DerbyDad03 <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote in news:e5fd7209-c95e-4035-a984-f5b344899215n@googlegroups.com:

    On Thursday, January 6, 2022 at 1:52:22 PM UTC-5, Puckdropper wrote:
    Michael Trew <michae...@att.net> wrote in
    news:sr4qd0$jih$1...@dont-email.me:


    Good point; I've never owned an impact gun. That would be nice for
    car repairs.

    It might be worth checking out the electric ones. It seems like
    they've gotten more powerful the last decade or so, so air powered
    isn't necessarily the best way to go.

    Smaller ones are great for driving screws. I helped do a whole deck
    with a screw impact driver and 25 lbs of Torx head screws and I think
    we stripped maybe 6 heads.

    Puckdropper

    Do you recall what brand you used?

    I've dealt with deck screws that either don't want to start or excess
    ceramic coating in the hole prevents the bit from seating completely.

    When they don't want to start with an impact driver, you could burn
    yourself trying to hold on while they spin at full speed. :-O





    I used a 2 3/4" version of these. Got them at Menards:

    https://www.menards.com/main/hardware/fasteners-connectors/screws/deck- screws/grip-fast-reg-9-x-2-1-2-star-drive-cedartone-premium-exterior- flat-head-deck-screw-5-lb-box/m6ld212-ct-5lb/p-1460081076360-c-8929.htm? tid=-5546346967485170273&ipos=14

    Sometimes I poke the wood with a nail to get a balky screw to start.
    Just a quick tap with a hammer and pull it out. (Usually I select a
    better screw, but you know those projects where they say "here's the
    stuff, go build"....)

    Puckdropper

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Puckdropper@21:1/5 to Clare Snyder on Fri Jan 7 08:10:07 2022
    Clare Snyder <clare@snyder.on.ca> wrote in news:bpaftgljaiksfigmqh1hhuh47qts37e13f@4ax.com:

    With 4 little chunks of rubber being the only thing between you and
    your last breath, Tires are not where I am going to cut corners.

    I just "decomissioned" a set of 7 year old michelins with 80% tread
    from the Ranger, as well as a 5 or 6 year old set of Michelind with
    about 40% tread from the Sorento.

    By the time the tires are the only thing between you and your last breath,
    the battle was lost long ago. You want your approach and technique to
    never push those tires to the point where they'll let go.

    Although it is fun to go around a curve and feel some G's.

    Puckdropper

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Leon@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Fri Jan 7 09:02:18 2022
    On 1/6/2022 9:12 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Thu, 06 Jan 2022 21:56:56 -0500, Clare Snyder <clare@snyder.on.ca>
    wrote:

    On Tue, 04 Jan 2022 23:53:45 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/3/2022 12:00, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 11:50:51 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/2/2022 21:24, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Sun, 2 Jan 2022 14:49:08 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Sunday, January 2, 2022 at 3:33:44 PM UTC-5, k...@notreal.com wrote: >>>>>>>> On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 14:48:13 GMT, Puckdropper<em...@example.com> >>>>>>>> wrote:
    Michael Trew<michae...@att.net> wrote in
    news:sqohqs$f27$7...@dont-email.me:

    On 12/31/2021 16:59, k...@notreal.com wrote:

    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or anything for that
    matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)

    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol

    A good compressor that's easy to move (so not one of those 200 gallon >>>>>>>>> monsters but also not a 1 1/2 gallon noise maker) would be a nice thing to
    pass down. Shoot, even if they just use it to inflate tires and beach >>>>>>>>> balls, it would make their life that much easier.
    For tires I have one of these:

    <https://www.homedepot.com/p/RYOBI-ONE-18V-Lithium-Ion-Cordless-Power-Inflator-Kit-with-1-5-Ah-Battery-and-18V-Charger-P737DKN/311788879>

    SWMBO appreciates it very much.

    I looked at her "spare" a while back. Since it is small car
    (Mustang), I knew it had to have a bicycle tire. Nope. Not even >>>>>>>> that. Under the trunk liner is a 12V compressor and a can of
    compressed tire gunk. Nice. A bicycle tire is an extra $250.

    Ever notice how all (?) spares are stored with the valve down or inward,
    forcing you to remove the spare it to check/fill it? The spare in my Odyssey
    is buried valve down under the carpet between the front and middle row seats.
    What a PITA to get it out.

    I have one configuration or another of these in all of my vehicles. >>>>>>>
    https://www.amazon.com/Hotop-Stainless-Extension-Braided-Extender/dp/B09BMWQQ3R

    All of the spares in my vehicles look something like this so I can check/top
    them off without removing them.

    https://i.imgur.com/6IHvl8M.jpg

    https://i.imgur.com/nxJAKFf.jpg

    I wouldn't be surprised if half the folks in this group (that have spares) have
    spares that are sitting at 45-50 PSI.

    It's amazing how those tires hold up. Especially the old bias-ply
    tires, to build on the post quoted below. I have a '68 Ford Galaxie, >>>>> and it has the full size spare installed on the front tire now, a 1968 >>>>> bias-ply tire. I cannot believe that the thing still holds air
    pressure. It's pretty well bald, however.

    Bicycle tires are designed to never be used.

    What about bicycle tires?

    The last time I actually USED my spare was on my '63 Valiant back >>>>>> about 1970. I ALMOST had to use it 3 times on one trip with the PT >>>>>> Cruiser on my trip to PEI when 3 valve stems failed and christmas 1972 >>>>>> in Montana or Idaho or Wyoming or wherever when I got a cinder
    puncture - managed to find a tire repair guy before it got all the way >>>>>> flat.

    I always keep a full sized spare when traveling. I can recall too many >>>>> times that I needed it on a 1,000+ mile road trip, in recent history. >>>>
    A full-size tire would take up the entire trunk, making travel a
    little difficult. Full-size truck spares work because there is waste
    space under the bed. There is no wasted space in cars these days. I
    wonder that the (useless) electric trucks will do. AFAIK, the
    batteries take up that space.

    I keep the full-size tire on rim behind the driver's seat. On very long >>> road trips, the back seat it otherwise full of luggage, cooler,
    blankets/pillows/air mattress/etc.

    I've heard that some new cars don't even have a donut spare.

    As I said earlier, my wife's Mustang came with a 12V tire pump and a
    can of fix-a-flat. No spare of any kind.

    With 4 little chunks of rubber being the only thing between you and
    your last breath, Tires are not where I am going to cut corners.

    I just "decomissioned" a set of 7 year old michelins with 80% tread
    from the Ranger, as well as a 5 or 6 year old set of Michelind with
    about 40% tread from the Sorento.

    What did you do with them? It seems that every car needs a different
    size. Maybe I misunderstood. Do you still have the cars just that the
    tires are too old to trust? Why 80%?

    Possibly 2 reasons for thread being in good shape when retired. The
    vehicle is not driven much. My wife's car falls in that catagory. Over
    6 years old and plenty of tread.
    Or the winter summer swap out and the tires were only used half the year.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Leon@21:1/5 to Scott Lurndal on Fri Jan 7 09:17:55 2022
    On 1/6/2022 4:46 PM, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> writes:
    On 1/6/2022 2:19 PM, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    On Thu, 6 Jan 2022 08:33:11 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Thursday, January 6, 2022 at 11:06:06 AM UTC-5, Scott Lurndal wrote: >>>
    I could see a future platform where you just lift the body off
    one platform and attach it to another - not necessarily to
    replace the battery pack, but rather to to change the body,
    like putting on a new shirt.

    I'm just trying to understand your comment...

    What would be the purpose of that? You said "not necessarily to
    replace the battery pack" (which is what the discussion was
    about) "but rather to to change the body".

    Want a different body style? Don't buy a whole new car, just
    change the body. Sporty? SUV? old-fashioned station wagon?

    Novel Idea!

    Not my idea, it's been around for a decade or more.

    I know, I have heard of that idea in the past. Something similar that a
    new leasing company was toying with a few years ago at a new car auto
    show, the ability to have a vehicle lease and the ability to change
    vehicles multiple times during the lease. Like renting but apparently
    with the advantage of having a fixed and lower cost agreement.




    But the creature comforts are pretty costly.

    On the other hand, here's a company actually doing it - albeit
    for the classics:

    https://www.zerolabs.com/

    Yes I have seen this before too, converting some models over to
    electric. I don't think you could really go from say a converted Bronco
    and then change your mind to then use that drive train go up under a
    pick up or Corvette. ;~) BUT this is a cool Idea.





    I like the Bronco they converted (in 24hrs).

    I'm gonna ping my brother-in-law - he has a
    66 'stang in a barn in the midwest.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Leon@21:1/5 to Clare Snyder on Fri Jan 7 08:59:12 2022
    On 1/6/2022 8:56 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Tue, 04 Jan 2022 23:53:45 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/3/2022 12:00, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 11:50:51 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/2/2022 21:24, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Sun, 2 Jan 2022 14:49:08 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Sunday, January 2, 2022 at 3:33:44 PM UTC-5, k...@notreal.com wrote: >>>>>>> On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 14:48:13 GMT, Puckdropper<em...@example.com> >>>>>>> wrote:
    Michael Trew<michae...@att.net> wrote in
    news:sqohqs$f27$7...@dont-email.me:

    On 12/31/2021 16:59, k...@notreal.com wrote:

    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or anything for that >>>>>>>>>> matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)

    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol

    A good compressor that's easy to move (so not one of those 200 gallon >>>>>>>> monsters but also not a 1 1/2 gallon noise maker) would be a nice thing to
    pass down. Shoot, even if they just use it to inflate tires and beach >>>>>>>> balls, it would make their life that much easier.
    For tires I have one of these:

    <https://www.homedepot.com/p/RYOBI-ONE-18V-Lithium-Ion-Cordless-Power-Inflator-Kit-with-1-5-Ah-Battery-and-18V-Charger-P737DKN/311788879>

    SWMBO appreciates it very much.

    I looked at her "spare" a while back. Since it is small car
    (Mustang), I knew it had to have a bicycle tire. Nope. Not even
    that. Under the trunk liner is a 12V compressor and a can of
    compressed tire gunk. Nice. A bicycle tire is an extra $250.

    Ever notice how all (?) spares are stored with the valve down or inward, >>>>>> forcing you to remove the spare it to check/fill it? The spare in my Odyssey
    is buried valve down under the carpet between the front and middle row seats.
    What a PITA to get it out.

    I have one configuration or another of these in all of my vehicles. >>>>>>
    https://www.amazon.com/Hotop-Stainless-Extension-Braided-Extender/dp/B09BMWQQ3R

    All of the spares in my vehicles look something like this so I can check/top
    them off without removing them.

    https://i.imgur.com/6IHvl8M.jpg

    https://i.imgur.com/nxJAKFf.jpg

    I wouldn't be surprised if half the folks in this group (that have spares) have
    spares that are sitting at 45-50 PSI.

    It's amazing how those tires hold up. Especially the old bias-ply
    tires, to build on the post quoted below. I have a '68 Ford Galaxie,
    and it has the full size spare installed on the front tire now, a 1968 >>>> bias-ply tire. I cannot believe that the thing still holds air
    pressure. It's pretty well bald, however.

    Bicycle tires are designed to never be used.

    What about bicycle tires?

    The last time I actually USED my spare was on my '63 Valiant back >>>>> about 1970. I ALMOST had to use it 3 times on one trip with the PT
    Cruiser on my trip to PEI when 3 valve stems failed and christmas 1972 >>>>> in Montana or Idaho or Wyoming or wherever when I got a cinder
    puncture - managed to find a tire repair guy before it got all the way >>>>> flat.

    I always keep a full sized spare when traveling. I can recall too many >>>> times that I needed it on a 1,000+ mile road trip, in recent history.

    A full-size tire would take up the entire trunk, making travel a
    little difficult. Full-size truck spares work because there is waste
    space under the bed. There is no wasted space in cars these days. I
    wonder that the (useless) electric trucks will do. AFAIK, the
    batteries take up that space.

    I keep the full-size tire on rim behind the driver's seat. On very long
    road trips, the back seat it otherwise full of luggage, cooler,
    blankets/pillows/air mattress/etc.

    I've heard that some new cars don't even have a donut spare.
    With 4 little chunks of rubber being the only thing between you and
    your last breath, Tires are not where I am going to cut corners.

    That was certainly true 5+ years ago. We looked at a Cadillac XT5 in
    2016 and the cure for a flat tire was an air pump and a patch kit. It
    seems like there were other models that had a similar set up. BUT I did
    notice in later years models the spares began showing up again. Sooo
    today, who knows. It was one of the first things that I asked the salesman.




    I just "decomissioned" a set of 7 year old michelins with 80% tread
    from the Ranger, as well as a 5 or 6 year old set of Michelind with
    about 40% tread from the Sorento.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DerbyDad03@21:1/5 to Leon on Fri Jan 7 08:08:34 2022
    On Friday, January 7, 2022 at 10:02:25 AM UTC-5, Leon wrote:
    On 1/6/2022 9:12 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Thu, 06 Jan 2022 21:56:56 -0500, Clare Snyder <cl...@snyder.on.ca> wrote:

    On Tue, 04 Jan 2022 23:53:45 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michae...@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/3/2022 12:00, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 11:50:51 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michae...@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/2/2022 21:24, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Sun, 2 Jan 2022 14:49:08 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
    <teama...@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Sunday, January 2, 2022 at 3:33:44 PM UTC-5, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 14:48:13 GMT, Puckdropper<em...@example.com> >>>>>>>> wrote:
    Michael Trew<michae...@att.net> wrote in
    news:sqohqs$f27$7...@dont-email.me:

    On 12/31/2021 16:59, k...@notreal.com wrote:

    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or anything for that
    matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)

    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol

    A good compressor that's easy to move (so not one of those 200 gallon
    monsters but also not a 1 1/2 gallon noise maker) would be a nice thing to
    pass down. Shoot, even if they just use it to inflate tires and beach
    balls, it would make their life that much easier.
    For tires I have one of these:

    <https://www.homedepot.com/p/RYOBI-ONE-18V-Lithium-Ion-Cordless-Power-Inflator-Kit-with-1-5-Ah-Battery-and-18V-Charger-P737DKN/311788879>

    SWMBO appreciates it very much.

    I looked at her "spare" a while back. Since it is small car
    (Mustang), I knew it had to have a bicycle tire. Nope. Not even >>>>>>>> that. Under the trunk liner is a 12V compressor and a can of >>>>>>>> compressed tire gunk. Nice. A bicycle tire is an extra $250.

    Ever notice how all (?) spares are stored with the valve down or inward,
    forcing you to remove the spare it to check/fill it? The spare in my Odyssey
    is buried valve down under the carpet between the front and middle row seats.
    What a PITA to get it out.

    I have one configuration or another of these in all of my vehicles. >>>>>>>
    https://www.amazon.com/Hotop-Stainless-Extension-Braided-Extender/dp/B09BMWQQ3R

    All of the spares in my vehicles look something like this so I can check/top
    them off without removing them.

    https://i.imgur.com/6IHvl8M.jpg

    https://i.imgur.com/nxJAKFf.jpg

    I wouldn't be surprised if half the folks in this group (that have spares) have
    spares that are sitting at 45-50 PSI.

    It's amazing how those tires hold up. Especially the old bias-ply
    tires, to build on the post quoted below. I have a '68 Ford Galaxie, >>>>> and it has the full size spare installed on the front tire now, a 1968 >>>>> bias-ply tire. I cannot believe that the thing still holds air
    pressure. It's pretty well bald, however.

    Bicycle tires are designed to never be used.

    What about bicycle tires?

    The last time I actually USED my spare was on my '63 Valiant back >>>>>> about 1970. I ALMOST had to use it 3 times on one trip with the PT >>>>>> Cruiser on my trip to PEI when 3 valve stems failed and christmas 1972 >>>>>> in Montana or Idaho or Wyoming or wherever when I got a cinder
    puncture - managed to find a tire repair guy before it got all the way >>>>>> flat.

    I always keep a full sized spare when traveling. I can recall too many >>>>> times that I needed it on a 1,000+ mile road trip, in recent history. >>>>
    A full-size tire would take up the entire trunk, making travel a
    little difficult. Full-size truck spares work because there is waste >>>> space under the bed. There is no wasted space in cars these days. I
    wonder that the (useless) electric trucks will do. AFAIK, the
    batteries take up that space.

    I keep the full-size tire on rim behind the driver's seat. On very long >>> road trips, the back seat it otherwise full of luggage, cooler,
    blankets/pillows/air mattress/etc.

    I've heard that some new cars don't even have a donut spare.

    As I said earlier, my wife's Mustang came with a 12V tire pump and a
    can of fix-a-flat. No spare of any kind.

    With 4 little chunks of rubber being the only thing between you and
    your last breath, Tires are not where I am going to cut corners.

    I just "decomissioned" a set of 7 year old michelins with 80% tread
    from the Ranger, as well as a 5 or 6 year old set of Michelind with
    about 40% tread from the Sorento.

    What did you do with them? It seems that every car needs a different
    size. Maybe I misunderstood. Do you still have the cars just that the
    tires are too old to trust? Why 80%?
    Possibly 2 reasons for thread being in good shape when retired. The
    vehicle is not driven much. My wife's car falls in that catagory. Over
    6 years old and plenty of tread.
    Or the winter summer swap out and the tires were only used half the year.

    I just did the swap on our 2 vehicles yesterday. I have tire & wheel sets, so swapping is done in the driveway. When I take the wheels off, I always mark
    the inside of the wheels with the location that they came from, so the
    seasonal swap is also a rotation.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Leon@21:1/5 to Puckdropper on Fri Jan 7 10:12:18 2022
    On 1/7/2022 1:59 AM, Puckdropper wrote:
    Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote in news:rbGdnbTV5eMH_0r8nZ2dnUU7-IvNnZ2d@giganews.com:


    When on vacation my wife and I normally drive 600 miles per day before
    it gets dark. I am not certain that would be possible in an EV today.
    I suspect getting to our destination with a new EV would take twice as
    many days and nights in a hotel.


    Just do what they do with airplanes... Add auxilary fuel tanks or another battery. ;-)


    Who cares about the extra weight and room the thing needs, right?

    Yeah! Maybe you will even be able to drive the vehicle considering the
    weight capacity of the vehicle. LOL



    Long trips are just something electric cars will probably never be good
    at. Even if you did have a swappable battery, the battery has to stay
    there for the hours it takes to charge.

    I would not say never, they have made improvements that even I am
    surprised about.


    Electric cars can be ideal city cars and even short-medium distance type cars. There's a saying when buying an airplane, "Buy one that fits the mission most of the time, rent one for the times it doesn't."

    Absolutely but you will need to get into the habbit of hooding up to the charger at least every few days. AND that might be something you forget
    to do a time or two given that "filling up" at home is something that is
    not commonly done. You see a gas station now, with decent pricing, and
    you look at your gas gauge. You ignore gas stations when you drive an EV.




    Puckdropper

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Clare Snyder@21:1/5 to All on Fri Jan 7 14:45:48 2022
    On Fri, 07 Jan 2022 08:10:07 GMT, Puckdropper <email@example.com>
    wrote:

    Clare Snyder <clare@snyder.on.ca> wrote in >news:bpaftgljaiksfigmqh1hhuh47qts37e13f@4ax.com:

    With 4 little chunks of rubber being the only thing between you and
    your last breath, Tires are not where I am going to cut corners.

    I just "decomissioned" a set of 7 year old michelins with 80% tread
    from the Ranger, as well as a 5 or 6 year old set of Michelind with
    about 40% tread from the Sorento.

    By the time the tires are the only thing between you and your last breath, >the battle was lost long ago. You want your approach and technique to
    never push those tires to the point where they'll let go.

    Although it is fun to go around a curve and feel some G's.

    Puckdropper
    You don't need to be "pulling Gs" for tires to be critical.I don't
    want to be in the mddle of 14 lanes of traffic doing 140Kph and have a
    tire fail. Not my idea of fun - and certainly not guaranteed to be
    surviveable. If the time ever comes that I have to even BEGIN to
    question my tires, it'e time to get them off and get them replaced.

    This fall when I put the snows on I looked at the old summer tires and
    said "That's it -they are NOT going back on" and to make sure I didn't
    back down come spring the rims went to the tire shop and had new
    rubber installed, right away.

    The driving I have done over the last 50 plus years has convinced me
    - between transcontinental road trips (summer and winter), 3 years of competetive rallying, driving across Africa, andl ocal highway driving
    on "the busyest highway in North America" - that tires are one thing
    where I do NOT scrimp.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Clare Snyder@21:1/5 to Leon on Fri Jan 7 14:54:46 2022
    On Fri, 7 Jan 2022 09:02:18 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 1/6/2022 9:12 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Thu, 06 Jan 2022 21:56:56 -0500, Clare Snyder <clare@snyder.on.ca>
    wrote:

    On Tue, 04 Jan 2022 23:53:45 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/3/2022 12:00, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 11:50:51 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/2/2022 21:24, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Sun, 2 Jan 2022 14:49:08 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Sunday, January 2, 2022 at 3:33:44 PM UTC-5, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 14:48:13 GMT, Puckdropper<em...@example.com> >>>>>>>>> wrote:
    Michael Trew<michae...@att.net> wrote in
    news:sqohqs$f27$7...@dont-email.me:

    On 12/31/2021 16:59, k...@notreal.com wrote:

    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or anything for that
    matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)

    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol

    A good compressor that's easy to move (so not one of those 200 gallon
    monsters but also not a 1 1/2 gallon noise maker) would be a nice thing to
    pass down. Shoot, even if they just use it to inflate tires and beach
    balls, it would make their life that much easier.
    For tires I have one of these:

    <https://www.homedepot.com/p/RYOBI-ONE-18V-Lithium-Ion-Cordless-Power-Inflator-Kit-with-1-5-Ah-Battery-and-18V-Charger-P737DKN/311788879>

    SWMBO appreciates it very much.

    I looked at her "spare" a while back. Since it is small car
    (Mustang), I knew it had to have a bicycle tire. Nope. Not even >>>>>>>>> that. Under the trunk liner is a 12V compressor and a can of >>>>>>>>> compressed tire gunk. Nice. A bicycle tire is an extra $250.

    Ever notice how all (?) spares are stored with the valve down or inward,
    forcing you to remove the spare it to check/fill it? The spare in my Odyssey
    is buried valve down under the carpet between the front and middle row seats.
    What a PITA to get it out.

    I have one configuration or another of these in all of my vehicles. >>>>>>>>
    https://www.amazon.com/Hotop-Stainless-Extension-Braided-Extender/dp/B09BMWQQ3R

    All of the spares in my vehicles look something like this so I can check/top
    them off without removing them.

    https://i.imgur.com/6IHvl8M.jpg

    https://i.imgur.com/nxJAKFf.jpg

    I wouldn't be surprised if half the folks in this group (that have spares) have
    spares that are sitting at 45-50 PSI.

    It's amazing how those tires hold up. Especially the old bias-ply >>>>>> tires, to build on the post quoted below. I have a '68 Ford Galaxie, >>>>>> and it has the full size spare installed on the front tire now, a 1968 >>>>>> bias-ply tire. I cannot believe that the thing still holds air
    pressure. It's pretty well bald, however.

    Bicycle tires are designed to never be used.

    What about bicycle tires?

    The last time I actually USED my spare was on my '63 Valiant back >>>>>>> about 1970. I ALMOST had to use it 3 times on one trip with the PT >>>>>>> Cruiser on my trip to PEI when 3 valve stems failed and christmas 1972 >>>>>>> in Montana or Idaho or Wyoming or wherever when I got a cinder
    puncture - managed to find a tire repair guy before it got all the way >>>>>>> flat.

    I always keep a full sized spare when traveling. I can recall too many >>>>>> times that I needed it on a 1,000+ mile road trip, in recent history. >>>>>
    A full-size tire would take up the entire trunk, making travel a
    little difficult. Full-size truck spares work because there is waste >>>>> space under the bed. There is no wasted space in cars these days. I >>>>> wonder that the (useless) electric trucks will do. AFAIK, the
    batteries take up that space.

    I keep the full-size tire on rim behind the driver's seat. On very long >>>> road trips, the back seat it otherwise full of luggage, cooler,
    blankets/pillows/air mattress/etc.

    I've heard that some new cars don't even have a donut spare.

    As I said earlier, my wife's Mustang came with a 12V tire pump and a
    can of fix-a-flat. No spare of any kind.

    With 4 little chunks of rubber being the only thing between you and
    your last breath, Tires are not where I am going to cut corners.

    I just "decomissioned" a set of 7 year old michelins with 80% tread
    from the Ranger, as well as a 5 or 6 year old set of Michelind with
    about 40% tread from the Sorento.

    What did you do with them? It seems that every car needs a different
    size. Maybe I misunderstood. Do you still have the cars just that the
    tires are too old to trust? Why 80%?

    Possibly 2 reasons for thread being in good shape when retired. The
    vehicle is not driven much. My wife's car falls in that catagory. Over
    6 years old and plenty of tread.
    Or the winter summer swap out and the tires were only used half the year.
    The tires were SCRAPPED. Still have both vehicles. The truck is 26
    years old come april, with 376000Km on it and still going strong. The
    tires were wearing VERY well - so still had 80+% tread left but the
    sidewalls were cracking. Combination of low miles/only used haf the
    year amd plain old age.

    On the Kia I'm not sure how many miles were on the tires as they were
    on the 5 year old vehicle when we bought it and they were NOT
    original. If they were the second set and the miles were put on in a
    uniform manner over the previous life of the car there were likely
    about 80000km on them. The tread was getting thin and, being
    Michelins, the sidewalls were also starting to crack.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to Leon on Fri Jan 7 16:07:13 2022
    On Fri, 7 Jan 2022 09:17:55 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 1/6/2022 4:46 PM, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> writes:
    On 1/6/2022 2:19 PM, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    On Thu, 6 Jan 2022 08:33:11 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Thursday, January 6, 2022 at 11:06:06 AM UTC-5, Scott Lurndal wrote: >>>>
    I could see a future platform where you just lift the body off
    one platform and attach it to another - not necessarily to
    replace the battery pack, but rather to to change the body,
    like putting on a new shirt.

    I'm just trying to understand your comment...

    What would be the purpose of that? You said "not necessarily to
    replace the battery pack" (which is what the discussion was
    about) "but rather to to change the body".

    Want a different body style? Don't buy a whole new car, just
    change the body. Sporty? SUV? old-fashioned station wagon?

    Novel Idea!

    Not my idea, it's been around for a decade or more.

    I know, I have heard of that idea in the past. Something similar that a
    new leasing company was toying with a few years ago at a new car auto
    show, the ability to have a vehicle lease and the ability to change
    vehicles multiple times during the lease. Like renting but apparently
    with the advantage of having a fixed and lower cost agreement.




    But the creature comforts are pretty costly.

    On the other hand, here's a company actually doing it - albeit
    for the classics:

    https://www.zerolabs.com/

    Yes I have seen this before too, converting some models over to
    electric. I don't think you could really go from say a converted Bronco
    and then change your mind to then use that drive train go up under a
    pick up or Corvette. ;~) BUT this is a cool Idea.

    I'm not sure but I think a 'vette suspension is a little different
    than a Bronco.



    I like the Bronco they converted (in 24hrs).

    I'm gonna ping my brother-in-law - he has a
    66 'stang in a barn in the midwest.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Leon@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Fri Jan 7 15:10:02 2022
    On 1/7/2022 3:07 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Fri, 7 Jan 2022 09:17:55 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 1/6/2022 4:46 PM, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> writes:
    On 1/6/2022 2:19 PM, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    On Thu, 6 Jan 2022 08:33:11 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Thursday, January 6, 2022 at 11:06:06 AM UTC-5, Scott Lurndal wrote: >>>>>
    I could see a future platform where you just lift the body off >>>>>>>> one platform and attach it to another - not necessarily to
    replace the battery pack, but rather to to change the body,
    like putting on a new shirt.

    I'm just trying to understand your comment...

    What would be the purpose of that? You said "not necessarily to
    replace the battery pack" (which is what the discussion was
    about) "but rather to to change the body".

    Want a different body style? Don't buy a whole new car, just
    change the body. Sporty? SUV? old-fashioned station wagon?

    Novel Idea!

    Not my idea, it's been around for a decade or more.

    I know, I have heard of that idea in the past. Something similar that a
    new leasing company was toying with a few years ago at a new car auto
    show, the ability to have a vehicle lease and the ability to change
    vehicles multiple times during the lease. Like renting but apparently
    with the advantage of having a fixed and lower cost agreement.




    But the creature comforts are pretty costly.

    On the other hand, here's a company actually doing it - albeit
    for the classics:

    https://www.zerolabs.com/

    Yes I have seen this before too, converting some models over to
    electric. I don't think you could really go from say a converted Bronco
    and then change your mind to then use that drive train go up under a
    pick up or Corvette. ;~) BUT this is a cool Idea.

    I'm not sure but I think a 'vette suspension is a little different
    than a Bronco.

    Absolutely and that goes for most any vehicle but I was addressing the
    issue of keeping the battery/suspension and adding a new body/chassis
    on top.






    I like the Bronco they converted (in 24hrs).

    I'm gonna ping my brother-in-law - he has a
    66 'stang in a barn in the midwest.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to Leon on Fri Jan 7 16:33:19 2022
    On Fri, 7 Jan 2022 10:12:18 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 1/7/2022 1:59 AM, Puckdropper wrote:
    Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote in
    news:rbGdnbTV5eMH_0r8nZ2dnUU7-IvNnZ2d@giganews.com:


    When on vacation my wife and I normally drive 600 miles per day before
    it gets dark. I am not certain that would be possible in an EV today.
    I suspect getting to our destination with a new EV would take twice as
    many days and nights in a hotel.


    Just do what they do with airplanes... Add auxilary fuel tanks or another
    battery. ;-)


    Who cares about the extra weight and room the thing needs, right?

    Yeah! Maybe you will even be able to drive the vehicle considering the >weight capacity of the vehicle. LOL

    Not to mention what the cops say when you drop them in the middle of
    the road.


    Long trips are just something electric cars will probably never be good
    at. Even if you did have a swappable battery, the battery has to stay
    there for the hours it takes to charge.

    I would not say never, they have made improvements that even I am
    surprised about.

    Never, without massive batteries. It's impossible for a battery to
    have a higher energy density than gasoline, by mass or size.

    Electric cars can be ideal city cars and even short-medium distance type
    cars. There's a saying when buying an airplane, "Buy one that fits the
    mission most of the time, rent one for the times it doesn't."

    Absolutely but you will need to get into the habbit of hooding up to the >charger at least every few days. AND that might be something you forget
    to do a time or two given that "filling up" at home is something that is
    not commonly done. You see a gas station now, with decent pricing, and
    you look at your gas gauge. You ignore gas stations when you drive an EV.

    That could be done today with small cars, but isn't.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to Leon on Fri Jan 7 16:36:21 2022
    On Fri, 7 Jan 2022 09:02:18 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 1/6/2022 9:12 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Thu, 06 Jan 2022 21:56:56 -0500, Clare Snyder <clare@snyder.on.ca>
    wrote:

    On Tue, 04 Jan 2022 23:53:45 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/3/2022 12:00, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 11:50:51 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/2/2022 21:24, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Sun, 2 Jan 2022 14:49:08 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Sunday, January 2, 2022 at 3:33:44 PM UTC-5, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 14:48:13 GMT, Puckdropper<em...@example.com> >>>>>>>>> wrote:
    Michael Trew<michae...@att.net> wrote in
    news:sqohqs$f27$7...@dont-email.me:

    On 12/31/2021 16:59, k...@notreal.com wrote:

    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or anything for that
    matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)

    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol

    A good compressor that's easy to move (so not one of those 200 gallon
    monsters but also not a 1 1/2 gallon noise maker) would be a nice thing to
    pass down. Shoot, even if they just use it to inflate tires and beach
    balls, it would make their life that much easier.
    For tires I have one of these:

    <https://www.homedepot.com/p/RYOBI-ONE-18V-Lithium-Ion-Cordless-Power-Inflator-Kit-with-1-5-Ah-Battery-and-18V-Charger-P737DKN/311788879>

    SWMBO appreciates it very much.

    I looked at her "spare" a while back. Since it is small car
    (Mustang), I knew it had to have a bicycle tire. Nope. Not even >>>>>>>>> that. Under the trunk liner is a 12V compressor and a can of >>>>>>>>> compressed tire gunk. Nice. A bicycle tire is an extra $250.

    Ever notice how all (?) spares are stored with the valve down or inward,
    forcing you to remove the spare it to check/fill it? The spare in my Odyssey
    is buried valve down under the carpet between the front and middle row seats.
    What a PITA to get it out.

    I have one configuration or another of these in all of my vehicles. >>>>>>>>
    https://www.amazon.com/Hotop-Stainless-Extension-Braided-Extender/dp/B09BMWQQ3R

    All of the spares in my vehicles look something like this so I can check/top
    them off without removing them.

    https://i.imgur.com/6IHvl8M.jpg

    https://i.imgur.com/nxJAKFf.jpg

    I wouldn't be surprised if half the folks in this group (that have spares) have
    spares that are sitting at 45-50 PSI.

    It's amazing how those tires hold up. Especially the old bias-ply >>>>>> tires, to build on the post quoted below. I have a '68 Ford Galaxie, >>>>>> and it has the full size spare installed on the front tire now, a 1968 >>>>>> bias-ply tire. I cannot believe that the thing still holds air
    pressure. It's pretty well bald, however.

    Bicycle tires are designed to never be used.

    What about bicycle tires?

    The last time I actually USED my spare was on my '63 Valiant back >>>>>>> about 1970. I ALMOST had to use it 3 times on one trip with the PT >>>>>>> Cruiser on my trip to PEI when 3 valve stems failed and christmas 1972 >>>>>>> in Montana or Idaho or Wyoming or wherever when I got a cinder
    puncture - managed to find a tire repair guy before it got all the way >>>>>>> flat.

    I always keep a full sized spare when traveling. I can recall too many >>>>>> times that I needed it on a 1,000+ mile road trip, in recent history. >>>>>
    A full-size tire would take up the entire trunk, making travel a
    little difficult. Full-size truck spares work because there is waste >>>>> space under the bed. There is no wasted space in cars these days. I >>>>> wonder that the (useless) electric trucks will do. AFAIK, the
    batteries take up that space.

    I keep the full-size tire on rim behind the driver's seat. On very long >>>> road trips, the back seat it otherwise full of luggage, cooler,
    blankets/pillows/air mattress/etc.

    I've heard that some new cars don't even have a donut spare.

    As I said earlier, my wife's Mustang came with a 12V tire pump and a
    can of fix-a-flat. No spare of any kind.

    With 4 little chunks of rubber being the only thing between you and
    your last breath, Tires are not where I am going to cut corners.

    I just "decomissioned" a set of 7 year old michelins with 80% tread
    from the Ranger, as well as a 5 or 6 year old set of Michelind with
    about 40% tread from the Sorento.

    What did you do with them? It seems that every car needs a different
    size. Maybe I misunderstood. Do you still have the cars just that the
    tires are too old to trust? Why 80%?

    Possibly 2 reasons for thread being in good shape when retired. The
    vehicle is not driven much.

    "Decommissioned"? "Seven tires"? Confusing wording.

    My wife's car falls in that catagory. Over
    6 years old and plenty of tread.
    Or the winter summer swap out and the tires were only used half the year.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to Leon on Fri Jan 7 19:43:33 2022
    On Fri, 7 Jan 2022 15:10:02 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 1/7/2022 3:07 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Fri, 7 Jan 2022 09:17:55 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 1/6/2022 4:46 PM, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> writes:
    On 1/6/2022 2:19 PM, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    On Thu, 6 Jan 2022 08:33:11 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Thursday, January 6, 2022 at 11:06:06 AM UTC-5, Scott Lurndal wrote:

    I could see a future platform where you just lift the body off >>>>>>>>> one platform and attach it to another - not necessarily to
    replace the battery pack, but rather to to change the body,
    like putting on a new shirt.

    I'm just trying to understand your comment...

    What would be the purpose of that? You said "not necessarily to >>>>>>>> replace the battery pack" (which is what the discussion was
    about) "but rather to to change the body".

    Want a different body style? Don't buy a whole new car, just
    change the body. Sporty? SUV? old-fashioned station wagon?

    Novel Idea!

    Not my idea, it's been around for a decade or more.

    I know, I have heard of that idea in the past. Something similar that a >>> new leasing company was toying with a few years ago at a new car auto
    show, the ability to have a vehicle lease and the ability to change
    vehicles multiple times during the lease. Like renting but apparently
    with the advantage of having a fixed and lower cost agreement.




    But the creature comforts are pretty costly.

    On the other hand, here's a company actually doing it - albeit
    for the classics:

    https://www.zerolabs.com/

    Yes I have seen this before too, converting some models over to
    electric. I don't think you could really go from say a converted Bronco >>> and then change your mind to then use that drive train go up under a
    pick up or Corvette. ;~) BUT this is a cool Idea.

    I'm not sure but I think a 'vette suspension is a little different
    than a Bronco.

    Absolutely and that goes for most any vehicle but I was addressing the
    issue of keeping the battery/suspension and adding a new body/chassis
    on top.

    Hmmm. I think a Silverado club cab and a 'vette have a different
    wheelbase too. The body is a little different, I think, so the
    batteries probably wouldn't fit in the same space. I think there is a
    little more engineering that needs to be done on this "idea".

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Markem618@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Fri Jan 7 21:22:28 2022
    On Fri, 07 Jan 2022 19:43:33 -0500, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    On Fri, 7 Jan 2022 15:10:02 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 1/7/2022 3:07 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Fri, 7 Jan 2022 09:17:55 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 1/6/2022 4:46 PM, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> writes:
    On 1/6/2022 2:19 PM, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    On Thu, 6 Jan 2022 08:33:11 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Thursday, January 6, 2022 at 11:06:06 AM UTC-5, Scott Lurndal wrote:

    I could see a future platform where you just lift the body off >>>>>>>>>> one platform and attach it to another - not necessarily to >>>>>>>>>> replace the battery pack, but rather to to change the body, >>>>>>>>>> like putting on a new shirt.

    I'm just trying to understand your comment...

    What would be the purpose of that? You said "not necessarily to >>>>>>>>> replace the battery pack" (which is what the discussion was
    about) "but rather to to change the body".

    Want a different body style? Don't buy a whole new car, just
    change the body. Sporty? SUV? old-fashioned station wagon?

    Novel Idea!

    Not my idea, it's been around for a decade or more.

    I know, I have heard of that idea in the past. Something similar that a >>>> new leasing company was toying with a few years ago at a new car auto
    show, the ability to have a vehicle lease and the ability to change
    vehicles multiple times during the lease. Like renting but apparently >>>> with the advantage of having a fixed and lower cost agreement.




    But the creature comforts are pretty costly.

    On the other hand, here's a company actually doing it - albeit
    for the classics:

    https://www.zerolabs.com/

    Yes I have seen this before too, converting some models over to
    electric. I don't think you could really go from say a converted Bronco >>>> and then change your mind to then use that drive train go up under a
    pick up or Corvette. ;~) BUT this is a cool Idea.

    I'm not sure but I think a 'vette suspension is a little different
    than a Bronco.

    Absolutely and that goes for most any vehicle but I was addressing the >>issue of keeping the battery/suspension and adding a new body/chassis
    on top.

    Hmmm. I think a Silverado club cab and a 'vette have a different
    wheelbase too. The body is a little different, I think, so the
    batteries probably wouldn't fit in the same space. I think there is a
    little more engineering that needs to be done on this "idea".

    GM has plans and is doing the engineering.

    But then again many plans fail.

    https://www.repairerdrivennews.com/2021/12/21/gm-rolls-out-new-evs-with-ultium-platform-touts-it-as-foundation-for-all-electric-future/

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ed Pawlowski@21:1/5 to All on Fri Jan 7 23:43:11 2022
    On 1/7/2022 10:22 PM, Markem618 wrote:
    On Fri, 07 Jan 2022 19:43:33 -0500, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    On Fri, 7 Jan 2022 15:10:02 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 1/7/2022 3:07 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Fri, 7 Jan 2022 09:17:55 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote: >>>>
    On 1/6/2022 4:46 PM, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> writes:
    On 1/6/2022 2:19 PM, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    On Thu, 6 Jan 2022 08:33:11 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Thursday, January 6, 2022 at 11:06:06 AM UTC-5, Scott Lurndal wrote:

    I could see a future platform where you just lift the body off >>>>>>>>>>> one platform and attach it to another - not necessarily to >>>>>>>>>>> replace the battery pack, but rather to to change the body, >>>>>>>>>>> like putting on a new shirt.

    I'm just trying to understand your comment...

    What would be the purpose of that? You said "not necessarily to >>>>>>>>>> replace the battery pack" (which is what the discussion was >>>>>>>>>> about) "but rather to to change the body".

    Want a different body style? Don't buy a whole new car, just
    change the body. Sporty? SUV? old-fashioned station wagon?

    Novel Idea!

    Not my idea, it's been around for a decade or more.

    I know, I have heard of that idea in the past. Something similar that a >>>>> new leasing company was toying with a few years ago at a new car auto >>>>> show, the ability to have a vehicle lease and the ability to change
    vehicles multiple times during the lease. Like renting but apparently >>>>> with the advantage of having a fixed and lower cost agreement.




    But the creature comforts are pretty costly.

    On the other hand, here's a company actually doing it - albeit
    for the classics:

    https://www.zerolabs.com/

    Yes I have seen this before too, converting some models over to
    electric. I don't think you could really go from say a converted Bronco >>>>> and then change your mind to then use that drive train go up under a >>>>> pick up or Corvette. ;~) BUT this is a cool Idea.

    I'm not sure but I think a 'vette suspension is a little different
    than a Bronco.

    Absolutely and that goes for most any vehicle but I was addressing the
    issue of keeping the battery/suspension and adding a new body/chassis
    on top.

    Hmmm. I think a Silverado club cab and a 'vette have a different
    wheelbase too. The body is a little different, I think, so the
    batteries probably wouldn't fit in the same space. I think there is a
    little more engineering that needs to be done on this "idea".

    GM has plans and is doing the engineering.

    But then again many plans fail.

    https://www.repairerdrivennews.com/2021/12/21/gm-rolls-out-new-evs-with-ultium-platform-touts-it-as-foundation-for-all-electric-future/

    Depends how far they want to carry it. Make a Small, Medium, Large and
    fit different bodies on it. Back in 1959 GM standardized a lot of parts between Buick, Olds, Pontiac. An EV chassis just takes a different set
    on top.

    The auto industry will go through quite a change in the next decade.
    This is just a step up from the bolt on bodies that went on VW running
    gear some years ago.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to All on Fri Jan 7 23:33:54 2022
    On Fri, 07 Jan 2022 21:22:28 -0600, Markem618 <markrm618@hotmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Fri, 07 Jan 2022 19:43:33 -0500, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    On Fri, 7 Jan 2022 15:10:02 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 1/7/2022 3:07 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Fri, 7 Jan 2022 09:17:55 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote: >>>>
    On 1/6/2022 4:46 PM, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> writes:
    On 1/6/2022 2:19 PM, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    On Thu, 6 Jan 2022 08:33:11 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Thursday, January 6, 2022 at 11:06:06 AM UTC-5, Scott Lurndal wrote:

    I could see a future platform where you just lift the body off >>>>>>>>>>> one platform and attach it to another - not necessarily to >>>>>>>>>>> replace the battery pack, but rather to to change the body, >>>>>>>>>>> like putting on a new shirt.

    I'm just trying to understand your comment...

    What would be the purpose of that? You said "not necessarily to >>>>>>>>>> replace the battery pack" (which is what the discussion was >>>>>>>>>> about) "but rather to to change the body".

    Want a different body style? Don't buy a whole new car, just
    change the body. Sporty? SUV? old-fashioned station wagon?

    Novel Idea!

    Not my idea, it's been around for a decade or more.

    I know, I have heard of that idea in the past. Something similar that a >>>>> new leasing company was toying with a few years ago at a new car auto >>>>> show, the ability to have a vehicle lease and the ability to change
    vehicles multiple times during the lease. Like renting but apparently >>>>> with the advantage of having a fixed and lower cost agreement.




    But the creature comforts are pretty costly.

    On the other hand, here's a company actually doing it - albeit
    for the classics:

    https://www.zerolabs.com/

    Yes I have seen this before too, converting some models over to
    electric. I don't think you could really go from say a converted Bronco >>>>> and then change your mind to then use that drive train go up under a >>>>> pick up or Corvette. ;~) BUT this is a cool Idea.

    I'm not sure but I think a 'vette suspension is a little different
    than a Bronco.

    Absolutely and that goes for most any vehicle but I was addressing the >>>issue of keeping the battery/suspension and adding a new body/chassis
    on top.

    Hmmm. I think a Silverado club cab and a 'vette have a different
    wheelbase too. The body is a little different, I think, so the
    batteries probably wouldn't fit in the same space. I think there is a >>little more engineering that needs to be done on this "idea".

    GM has plans and is doing the engineering.

    But then again many plans fail.

    https://www.repairerdrivennews.com/2021/12/21/gm-rolls-out-new-evs-with-ultium-platform-touts-it-as-foundation-for-all-electric-future/


    That's a __way_ different thing. All they're doing is making a
    standardized battery pack, much like a 9V battery. They'll use these
    pack to build a battery for each vehicle. The vehicles won't be
    identical nor will they body/chassis be interchangeable. Nor
    batteries, for that matter.

    "With its single-cell design, the Ultium battery has a rectangular,
    flat pouch design that ensures cells can be efficiently packed into
    modules, Goforth said. Cells are vertical in trucks and SUVs and
    horizonal (sic) in low-profile performance vehicles."


    "Ultium also helps GM innovate in core areas like the interdependent
    body frame and battery structure of its all-new EVs. "

    A FedEx truck is doing to have a bit different structural elements
    than a 'vette. We'll see how much "innovation" makes it into reality.

    You're proving my point.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Bill@21:1/5 to Clare Snyder on Sat Jan 8 01:49:46 2022
    On 1/7/2022 2:45 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Fri, 07 Jan 2022 08:10:07 GMT, Puckdropper <email@example.com>
    wrote:

    Clare Snyder <clare@snyder.on.ca> wrote in
    news:bpaftgljaiksfigmqh1hhuh47qts37e13f@4ax.com:

    With 4 little chunks of rubber being the only thing between you and
    your last breath, Tires are not where I am going to cut corners.

    I just "decomissioned" a set of 7 year old michelins with 80% tread
    from the Ranger, as well as a 5 or 6 year old set of Michelind with
    about 40% tread from the Sorento.

    By the time the tires are the only thing between you and your last breath, >> the battle was lost long ago. You want your approach and technique to
    never push those tires to the point where they'll let go.

    Although it is fun to go around a curve and feel some G's.

    Puckdropper
    You don't need to be "pulling Gs" for tires to be critical.I don't
    want to be in the mddle of 14 lanes of traffic doing 140Kph and have a
    tire fail. Not my idea of fun - and certainly not guaranteed to be surviveable. If the time ever comes that I have to even BEGIN to
    question my tires, it'e time to get them off and get them replaced.

    This fall when I put the snows on I looked at the old summer tires and
    said "That's it -they are NOT going back on" and to make sure I didn't
    back down come spring the rims went to the tire shop and had new
    rubber installed, right away.

    The driving I have done over the last 50 plus years has convinced me
    - between transcontinental road trips (summer and winter), 3 years of competetive rallying, driving across Africa, andl ocal highway driving
    on "the busyest highway in North America" - that tires are one thing
    where I do NOT scrimp.


    I bought some tires from TiresPlus in 2014 with the typical
    rotation/balance maintenance agreement. I visited them recently as one
    tire was not holding appropriate pressure, and one of the managers said
    that our policy is "not to touch them after 6 years" (despite the fact
    that all 4 are very low mileage--they measured them all as "9" (32nds).
    To make a long story short, after applying a little pressure, they
    took care of the tire and performed the balance/rotation--which they
    initially were unwilling to do. I live in central Indiana where temperature/humidity extremes are not so much. The tires are top tier,
    65K-mile tires and they look great (to my admittedly untrained eye). The question put in mind mind by the previous post is "how long" should I
    expect the tires to reasonably last? I won't ever wear them out due to
    mileage. I guess my answer is that if I saw any of the rubber splitting,
    that would be a sign, but no such wear is evident. TiresPlus said that
    the fit to the rim deteriorates over time. If so, how much time? : )

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Michael Trew@21:1/5 to Clare Snyder on Sat Jan 8 18:25:19 2022
    On 1/6/2022 21:56, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Tue, 04 Jan 2022 23:53:45 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    I keep the full-size tire on rim behind the driver's seat. On very long
    road trips, the back seat it otherwise full of luggage, cooler,
    blankets/pillows/air mattress/etc.

    I've heard that some new cars don't even have a donut spare.
    With 4 little chunks of rubber being the only thing between you and
    your last breath, Tires are not where I am going to cut corners.

    I just "decomissioned" a set of 7 year old michelins with 80% tread
    from the Ranger, as well as a 5 or 6 year old set of Michelind with
    about 40% tread from the Sorento.

    Depends on driving style. In most cases, I drive them until the tread
    is getting thin. The 35 year old radials on a car, I very recently
    learned, are NOT kosher for winter driving. Old rubber gets very hard.
    I drove to work with no snow, and surprise... first accumulation of
    the year was on the ground at 6 PM.

    That old car was a literal sled on the way home, slid everywhere, scary
    stuff. I made it home though. The tire industry usually recommends
    replacing after 8 years. I usually get good tire life several years
    after that, depending on tread depth.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Michael Trew@21:1/5 to Clare Snyder on Sat Jan 8 18:28:03 2022
    On 1/7/2022 14:54, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Fri, 7 Jan 2022 09:02:18 -0600, Leon<lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 1/6/2022 9:12 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Thu, 06 Jan 2022 21:56:56 -0500, Clare Snyder<clare@snyder.on.ca>
    wrote:

    On Tue, 04 Jan 2022 23:53:45 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/3/2022 12:00, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 11:50:51 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/2/2022 21:24, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Sun, 2 Jan 2022 14:49:08 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Sunday, January 2, 2022 at 3:33:44 PM UTC-5, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 14:48:13 GMT, Puckdropper<em...@example.com> >>>>>>>>>> wrote:
    Michael Trew<michae...@att.net> wrote in
    news:sqohqs$f27$7...@dont-email.me:

    On 12/31/2021 16:59, k...@notreal.com wrote:

    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or anything for that
    matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)

    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol

    A good compressor that's easy to move (so not one of those 200 gallon
    monsters but also not a 1 1/2 gallon noise maker) would be a nice thing to
    pass down. Shoot, even if they just use it to inflate tires and beach
    balls, it would make their life that much easier.
    For tires I have one of these:

    <https://www.homedepot.com/p/RYOBI-ONE-18V-Lithium-Ion-Cordless-Power-Inflator-Kit-with-1-5-Ah-Battery-and-18V-Charger-P737DKN/311788879>

    SWMBO appreciates it very much.

    I looked at her "spare" a while back. Since it is small car >>>>>>>>>> (Mustang), I knew it had to have a bicycle tire. Nope. Not even >>>>>>>>>> that. Under the trunk liner is a 12V compressor and a can of >>>>>>>>>> compressed tire gunk. Nice. A bicycle tire is an extra $250. >>>>>>>>>
    Ever notice how all (?) spares are stored with the valve down or inward,
    forcing you to remove the spare it to check/fill it? The spare in my Odyssey
    is buried valve down under the carpet between the front and middle row seats.
    What a PITA to get it out.

    I have one configuration or another of these in all of my vehicles. >>>>>>>>>
    https://www.amazon.com/Hotop-Stainless-Extension-Braided-Extender/dp/B09BMWQQ3R

    All of the spares in my vehicles look something like this so I can check/top
    them off without removing them.

    https://i.imgur.com/6IHvl8M.jpg

    https://i.imgur.com/nxJAKFf.jpg

    I wouldn't be surprised if half the folks in this group (that have spares) have
    spares that are sitting at 45-50 PSI.

    It's amazing how those tires hold up. Especially the old bias-ply >>>>>>> tires, to build on the post quoted below. I have a '68 Ford Galaxie, >>>>>>> and it has the full size spare installed on the front tire now, a 1968 >>>>>>> bias-ply tire. I cannot believe that the thing still holds air
    pressure. It's pretty well bald, however.

    Bicycle tires are designed to never be used.

    What about bicycle tires?

    The last time I actually USED my spare was on my '63 Valiant back
    about 1970. I ALMOST had to use it 3 times on one trip with the PT >>>>>>>> Cruiser on my trip to PEI when 3 valve stems failed and christmas 1972 >>>>>>>> in Montana or Idaho or Wyoming or wherever when I got a cinder >>>>>>>> puncture - managed to find a tire repair guy before it got all the way >>>>>>>> flat.

    I always keep a full sized spare when traveling. I can recall too many >>>>>>> times that I needed it on a 1,000+ mile road trip, in recent history. >>>>>>
    A full-size tire would take up the entire trunk, making travel a
    little difficult. Full-size truck spares work because there is waste >>>>>> space under the bed. There is no wasted space in cars these days. I >>>>>> wonder that the (useless) electric trucks will do. AFAIK, the
    batteries take up that space.

    I keep the full-size tire on rim behind the driver's seat. On very long >>>>> road trips, the back seat it otherwise full of luggage, cooler,
    blankets/pillows/air mattress/etc.

    I've heard that some new cars don't even have a donut spare.

    As I said earlier, my wife's Mustang came with a 12V tire pump and a
    can of fix-a-flat. No spare of any kind.

    With 4 little chunks of rubber being the only thing between you and >>>> your last breath, Tires are not where I am going to cut corners.

    I just "decomissioned" a set of 7 year old michelins with 80% tread
    from the Ranger, as well as a 5 or 6 year old set of Michelind with
    about 40% tread from the Sorento.

    What did you do with them? It seems that every car needs a different
    size. Maybe I misunderstood. Do you still have the cars just that the
    tires are too old to trust? Why 80%?

    Possibly 2 reasons for thread being in good shape when retired. The
    vehicle is not driven much. My wife's car falls in that catagory. Over
    6 years old and plenty of tread.
    Or the winter summer swap out and the tires were only used half the year.
    The tires were SCRAPPED. Still have both vehicles. The truck is 26
    years old come april, with 376000Km on it and still going strong. The
    tires were wearing VERY well - so still had 80+% tread left but the
    sidewalls were cracking. Combination of low miles/only used haf the
    year amd plain old age.

    On the Kia I'm not sure how many miles were on the tires as they were
    on the 5 year old vehicle when we bought it and they were NOT
    original. If they were the second set and the miles were put on in a
    uniform manner over the previous life of the car there were likely
    about 80000km on them. The tread was getting thin and, being
    Michelins, the sidewalls were also starting to crack.

    I've never seen such new tires with cracking side walls. I would not
    buy that brand again if I were you. Only 7 years old, and 80% tread, if
    the sidewall cracks weren't severe, I certainly would have kept going
    with them personally for occasional use... unless you get into bad snow
    storms.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Clare Snyder@21:1/5 to michael.trew@att.net on Sun Jan 9 00:19:54 2022
    On Sat, 08 Jan 2022 18:28:03 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/7/2022 14:54, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Fri, 7 Jan 2022 09:02:18 -0600, Leon<lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 1/6/2022 9:12 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Thu, 06 Jan 2022 21:56:56 -0500, Clare Snyder<clare@snyder.on.ca>
    wrote:

    On Tue, 04 Jan 2022 23:53:45 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/3/2022 12:00, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 11:50:51 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/2/2022 21:24, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Sun, 2 Jan 2022 14:49:08 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Sunday, January 2, 2022 at 3:33:44 PM UTC-5, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 14:48:13 GMT, Puckdropper<em...@example.com> >>>>>>>>>>> wrote:
    Michael Trew<michae...@att.net> wrote in
    news:sqohqs$f27$7...@dont-email.me:

    On 12/31/2021 16:59, k...@notreal.com wrote:

    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or anything for that
    matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)

    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol

    A good compressor that's easy to move (so not one of those 200 gallon
    monsters but also not a 1 1/2 gallon noise maker) would be a nice thing to
    pass down. Shoot, even if they just use it to inflate tires and beach
    balls, it would make their life that much easier.
    For tires I have one of these:

    <https://www.homedepot.com/p/RYOBI-ONE-18V-Lithium-Ion-Cordless-Power-Inflator-Kit-with-1-5-Ah-Battery-and-18V-Charger-P737DKN/311788879>

    SWMBO appreciates it very much.

    I looked at her "spare" a while back. Since it is small car >>>>>>>>>>> (Mustang), I knew it had to have a bicycle tire. Nope. Not even >>>>>>>>>>> that. Under the trunk liner is a 12V compressor and a can of >>>>>>>>>>> compressed tire gunk. Nice. A bicycle tire is an extra $250. >>>>>>>>>>
    Ever notice how all (?) spares are stored with the valve down or inward,
    forcing you to remove the spare it to check/fill it? The spare in my Odyssey
    is buried valve down under the carpet between the front and middle row seats.
    What a PITA to get it out.

    I have one configuration or another of these in all of my vehicles. >>>>>>>>>>
    https://www.amazon.com/Hotop-Stainless-Extension-Braided-Extender/dp/B09BMWQQ3R

    All of the spares in my vehicles look something like this so I can check/top
    them off without removing them.

    https://i.imgur.com/6IHvl8M.jpg

    https://i.imgur.com/nxJAKFf.jpg

    I wouldn't be surprised if half the folks in this group (that have spares) have
    spares that are sitting at 45-50 PSI.

    It's amazing how those tires hold up. Especially the old bias-ply >>>>>>>> tires, to build on the post quoted below. I have a '68 Ford Galaxie, >>>>>>>> and it has the full size spare installed on the front tire now, a 1968 >>>>>>>> bias-ply tire. I cannot believe that the thing still holds air >>>>>>>> pressure. It's pretty well bald, however.

    Bicycle tires are designed to never be used.

    What about bicycle tires?

    The last time I actually USED my spare was on my '63 Valiant back
    about 1970. I ALMOST had to use it 3 times on one trip with the PT >>>>>>>>> Cruiser on my trip to PEI when 3 valve stems failed and christmas 1972
    in Montana or Idaho or Wyoming or wherever when I got a cinder >>>>>>>>> puncture - managed to find a tire repair guy before it got all the way
    flat.

    I always keep a full sized spare when traveling. I can recall too many
    times that I needed it on a 1,000+ mile road trip, in recent history. >>>>>>>
    A full-size tire would take up the entire trunk, making travel a >>>>>>> little difficult. Full-size truck spares work because there is waste >>>>>>> space under the bed. There is no wasted space in cars these days. I >>>>>>> wonder that the (useless) electric trucks will do. AFAIK, the
    batteries take up that space.

    I keep the full-size tire on rim behind the driver's seat. On very long >>>>>> road trips, the back seat it otherwise full of luggage, cooler,
    blankets/pillows/air mattress/etc.

    I've heard that some new cars don't even have a donut spare.

    As I said earlier, my wife's Mustang came with a 12V tire pump and a
    can of fix-a-flat. No spare of any kind.

    With 4 little chunks of rubber being the only thing between you and >>>>> your last breath, Tires are not where I am going to cut corners.

    I just "decomissioned" a set of 7 year old michelins with 80% tread
    from the Ranger, as well as a 5 or 6 year old set of Michelind with
    about 40% tread from the Sorento.

    What did you do with them? It seems that every car needs a different
    size. Maybe I misunderstood. Do you still have the cars just that the >>>> tires are too old to trust? Why 80%?

    Possibly 2 reasons for thread being in good shape when retired. The
    vehicle is not driven much. My wife's car falls in that catagory. Over >>> 6 years old and plenty of tread.
    Or the winter summer swap out and the tires were only used half the year. >> The tires were SCRAPPED. Still have both vehicles. The truck is 26
    years old come april, with 376000Km on it and still going strong. The
    tires were wearing VERY well - so still had 80+% tread left but the
    sidewalls were cracking. Combination of low miles/only used haf the
    year amd plain old age.

    On the Kia I'm not sure how many miles were on the tires as they were
    on the 5 year old vehicle when we bought it and they were NOT
    original. If they were the second set and the miles were put on in a
    uniform manner over the previous life of the car there were likely
    about 80000km on them. The tread was getting thin and, being
    Michelins, the sidewalls were also starting to crack.

    I've never seen such new tires with cracking side walls. I would not
    buy that brand again if I were you. Only 7 years old, and 80% tread, if
    the sidewall cracks weren't severe, I certainly would have kept going
    with them personally for occasional use... unless you get into bad snow >storms.
    Snow storms have nothing to do with it as I use SNOW TIRES in the
    winter. Cracking USUALLY is related to rubber compound deterioration
    - getting hard - or less flexible. Hard tires are no good in rain
    either - and when I'm doing over 75MPH down the busiest highway in
    Noth America in the rain I am NOT taking chances on tires. If I lose
    traction, or loose air, in the middle of 7 lanes going in one
    direction at 70MPH I'm not coming out of it unscathed. I can ALMOST
    guarantee that!!!!!
    Each set of tires and rims for my truck costs more than I paid for
    the truck (235/70 16 Nokian Hakkepellitta snows and Nokian One summers (replacing michelin Advantage) The tires on the Kia are a smaller
    fraction of the vehicle cost cue to the car being newer - (but are
    more expensive being 235-60-19 and 235-65 -18 tires)

    Like I said - the crackers were Michelins - I've had too many
    Michelin and BFG tires crack so am now runnining Nokians

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to michael.trew@att.net on Sun Jan 9 10:14:35 2022
    On Sat, 08 Jan 2022 18:25:19 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/6/2022 21:56, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Tue, 04 Jan 2022 23:53:45 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    I keep the full-size tire on rim behind the driver's seat. On very long >>> road trips, the back seat it otherwise full of luggage, cooler,
    blankets/pillows/air mattress/etc.

    I've heard that some new cars don't even have a donut spare.
    With 4 little chunks of rubber being the only thing between you and
    your last breath, Tires are not where I am going to cut corners.

    I just "decomissioned" a set of 7 year old michelins with 80% tread
    from the Ranger, as well as a 5 or 6 year old set of Michelind with
    about 40% tread from the Sorento.

    Depends on driving style. In most cases, I drive them until the tread
    is getting thin. The 35 year old radials on a car, I very recently
    learned, are NOT kosher for winter driving. Old rubber gets very hard.
    I drove to work with no snow, and surprise... first accumulation of
    the year was on the ground at 6 PM.

    That old car was a literal sled on the way home, slid everywhere, scary >stuff. I made it home though. The tire industry usually recommends >replacing after 8 years. I usually get good tire life several years
    after that, depending on tread depth.

    That suicide is painless
    It brings on many changes

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Scott Lurndal@21:1/5 to Michael Trew on Sun Jan 9 16:41:51 2022
    Michael Trew <michael.trew@att.net> writes:
    On 1/7/2022 14:54, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Fri, 7 Jan 2022 09:02:18 -0600, Leon<lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On the Kia I'm not sure how many miles were on the tires as they were
    on the 5 year old vehicle when we bought it and they were NOT
    original. If they were the second set and the miles were put on in a
    uniform manner over the previous life of the car there were likely
    about 80000km on them. The tread was getting thin and, being
    Michelins, the sidewalls were also starting to crack.

    I've never seen such new tires with cracking side walls.

    I have. You'd be amazed at what air pollution (e.g. ozone) can do
    to rubber over 6 or 7 years.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Leon@21:1/5 to Michael Trew on Sun Jan 9 15:21:06 2022
    On 1/8/2022 5:28 PM, Michael Trew wrote:
    On 1/7/2022 14:54, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Fri, 7 Jan 2022 09:02:18 -0600, Leon<lcb11211@swbelldotnet>  wrote:

    On 1/6/2022 9:12 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Thu, 06 Jan 2022 21:56:56 -0500, Clare Snyder<clare@snyder.on.ca>
    wrote:

    On Tue, 04 Jan 2022 23:53:45 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net>  wrote:

    On 1/3/2022 12:00, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 11:50:51 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net>   wrote:

    On 1/2/2022 21:24, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Sun, 2 Jan 2022 14:49:08 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net>    wrote:

    On Sunday, January 2, 2022 at 3:33:44 PM UTC-5,
    k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 14:48:13 GMT, Puckdropper<em...@example.com> >>>>>>>>>>> wrote:
    Michael Trew<michae...@att.net>    wrote in
    news:sqohqs$f27$7...@dont-email.me:

    On 12/31/2021 16:59, k...@notreal.com wrote:

    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or >>>>>>>>>>>>>> anything for that
    matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)

    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol

    A good compressor that's easy to move (so not one of those >>>>>>>>>>>> 200 gallon
    monsters but also not a 1 1/2 gallon noise maker) would be a >>>>>>>>>>>> nice thing to
    pass down. Shoot, even if they just use it to inflate tires >>>>>>>>>>>> and beach
    balls, it would make their life that much easier.
    For tires I have one of these:

    <https://www.homedepot.com/p/RYOBI-ONE-18V-Lithium-Ion-Cordless-Power-Inflator-Kit-with-1-5-Ah-Battery-and-18V-Charger-P737DKN/311788879>


    SWMBO appreciates it very much.

    I looked at her "spare" a while back. Since it is small car >>>>>>>>>>> (Mustang), I knew it had to have a bicycle tire. Nope. Not even >>>>>>>>>>> that. Under the trunk liner is a 12V compressor and a can of >>>>>>>>>>> compressed tire gunk. Nice. A bicycle tire is an extra $250. >>>>>>>>>>
    Ever notice how all (?) spares are stored with the valve down >>>>>>>>>> or inward,
    forcing you to  remove the spare it to check/fill it?  The >>>>>>>>>> spare in my Odyssey
    is buried valve down under the carpet between the front and >>>>>>>>>> middle row seats.
    What a PITA to get it out.

    I have one configuration or another of these in all of my
    vehicles.

    https://www.amazon.com/Hotop-Stainless-Extension-Braided-Extender/dp/B09BMWQQ3R


    All of the spares in my vehicles look something like this so I >>>>>>>>>> can check/top
    them off without removing them.

    https://i.imgur.com/6IHvl8M.jpg

    https://i.imgur.com/nxJAKFf.jpg

    I wouldn't be surprised if half the folks in this group (that >>>>>>>>>> have spares) have
    spares that are sitting at 45-50 PSI.

    It's amazing how those tires hold up.  Especially the old bias-ply >>>>>>>> tires, to build on the post quoted below.  I have a '68 Ford
    Galaxie,
    and it has the full size spare installed on the front tire now, >>>>>>>> a 1968
    bias-ply tire.  I cannot believe that the thing still holds air >>>>>>>> pressure.  It's pretty well bald, however.

    Bicycle tires are designed to never be used.

    What about bicycle tires?

          The last time I actually USED my spare was on my '63 >>>>>>>>> Valiant back
    about 1970. I ALMOST had to use it 3 times on one trip with the PT >>>>>>>>> Cruiser on my trip to PEI when 3 valve stems failed and
    christmas 1972
    in Montana or Idaho or Wyoming or wherever when I got a cinder >>>>>>>>> puncture - managed to find a tire repair guy before it got all >>>>>>>>> the way
    flat.

    I always keep a full sized spare when traveling.  I can recall >>>>>>>> too many
    times that I needed it on a 1,000+ mile road trip, in recent
    history.

    A full-size tire would take up the entire trunk, making travel a >>>>>>> little difficult. Full-size truck spares work because there is waste >>>>>>> space under the bed. There is no wasted space in cars these days.  I >>>>>>> wonder that the (useless) electric trucks will do. AFAIK, the
    batteries take up that space.

    I keep the full-size tire on rim behind the driver's seat.  On
    very long
    road trips, the back seat it otherwise full of luggage, cooler,
    blankets/pillows/air mattress/etc.

    I've heard that some new cars don't even have a donut spare.

    As I said earlier, my wife's Mustang came with a 12V tire pump and a
    can of fix-a-flat.  No spare of any kind.

        With 4 little chunks of rubber being the only thing between you >>>>> and
    your last breath, Tires are not where I am going to cut corners.

    I just "decomissioned" a set of 7 year old michelins with 80% tread
    from the Ranger, as well as a 5 or 6 year old set of Michelind with
    about 40% tread from the Sorento.

    What did you do with them? It seems that every car needs a different
    size. Maybe I misunderstood.  Do you still have the cars just that the >>>> tires are too old to trust? Why 80%?

    Possibly 2 reasons for thread being in good shape when retired.  The
    vehicle is not driven much.  My wife's car falls in that catagory.  Over >>> 6 years old and plenty of tread.
    Or the winter summer swap out and the tires were only used half the
    year.
       The tires were SCRAPPED. Still have both vehicles. The truck is 26
    years old come april, with 376000Km  on it and still going strong. The
    tires were wearing VERY well - so still had 80+% tread left but the
    sidewalls were cracking. Combination of low miles/only used haf the
    year amd plain old age.

    On the Kia I'm not  sure how many miles were on the tires as they were
    on the 5 year old vehicle when we bought it and they were NOT
    original. If they were the second set and the miles were put on in a
    uniform manner over the previous life of the car there were likely
    about 80000km on them. The tread was getting thin and, being
    Michelins, the sidewalls were also starting to crack.

    I've never seen such new tires with cracking side walls.  I would not
    buy that brand again if I were you.

    Brand has nothing to do with cracking on the sidewall. That is a defect
    and every manufacturer puts out some duds. This happened to me with
    Michelin LTX M/S.
    Michelin authorized replacement at about 24K. The next set of Michelin,
    same tire, wore out in less than 25K. They adjusted the set again.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to Leon on Sun Jan 9 17:07:31 2022
    On Sun, 9 Jan 2022 15:21:06 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 1/8/2022 5:28 PM, Michael Trew wrote:
    On 1/7/2022 14:54, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Fri, 7 Jan 2022 09:02:18 -0600, Leon<lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 1/6/2022 9:12 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Thu, 06 Jan 2022 21:56:56 -0500, Clare Snyder<clare@snyder.on.ca> >>>>> wrote:

    On Tue, 04 Jan 2022 23:53:45 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/3/2022 12:00, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 11:50:51 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/2/2022 21:24, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Sun, 2 Jan 2022 14:49:08 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Sunday, January 2, 2022 at 3:33:44 PM UTC-5,
    k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 14:48:13 GMT, Puckdropper<em...@example.com> >>>>>>>>>>>> wrote:
    Michael Trew<michae...@att.net> wrote in
    news:sqohqs$f27$7...@dont-email.me:

    On 12/31/2021 16:59, k...@notreal.com wrote:

    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> anything for that
    matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)

    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol

    A good compressor that's easy to move (so not one of those >>>>>>>>>>>>> 200 gallon
    monsters but also not a 1 1/2 gallon noise maker) would be a >>>>>>>>>>>>> nice thing to
    pass down. Shoot, even if they just use it to inflate tires >>>>>>>>>>>>> and beach
    balls, it would make their life that much easier.
    For tires I have one of these:

    <https://www.homedepot.com/p/RYOBI-ONE-18V-Lithium-Ion-Cordless-Power-Inflator-Kit-with-1-5-Ah-Battery-and-18V-Charger-P737DKN/311788879>


    SWMBO appreciates it very much.

    I looked at her "spare" a while back. Since it is small car >>>>>>>>>>>> (Mustang), I knew it had to have a bicycle tire. Nope. Not even >>>>>>>>>>>> that. Under the trunk liner is a 12V compressor and a can of >>>>>>>>>>>> compressed tire gunk. Nice. A bicycle tire is an extra $250. >>>>>>>>>>>
    Ever notice how all (?) spares are stored with the valve down >>>>>>>>>>> or inward,
    forcing you to remove the spare it to check/fill it? The >>>>>>>>>>> spare in my Odyssey
    is buried valve down under the carpet between the front and >>>>>>>>>>> middle row seats.
    What a PITA to get it out.

    I have one configuration or another of these in all of my >>>>>>>>>>> vehicles.

    https://www.amazon.com/Hotop-Stainless-Extension-Braided-Extender/dp/B09BMWQQ3R


    All of the spares in my vehicles look something like this so I >>>>>>>>>>> can check/top
    them off without removing them.

    https://i.imgur.com/6IHvl8M.jpg

    https://i.imgur.com/nxJAKFf.jpg

    I wouldn't be surprised if half the folks in this group (that >>>>>>>>>>> have spares) have
    spares that are sitting at 45-50 PSI.

    It's amazing how those tires hold up. Especially the old bias-ply >>>>>>>>> tires, to build on the post quoted below. I have a '68 Ford >>>>>>>>> Galaxie,
    and it has the full size spare installed on the front tire now, >>>>>>>>> a 1968
    bias-ply tire. I cannot believe that the thing still holds air >>>>>>>>> pressure. It's pretty well bald, however.

    Bicycle tires are designed to never be used.

    What about bicycle tires?

    The last time I actually USED my spare was on my '63 >>>>>>>>>> Valiant back
    about 1970. I ALMOST had to use it 3 times on one trip with the PT >>>>>>>>>> Cruiser on my trip to PEI when 3 valve stems failed and
    christmas 1972
    in Montana or Idaho or Wyoming or wherever when I got a cinder >>>>>>>>>> puncture - managed to find a tire repair guy before it got all >>>>>>>>>> the way
    flat.

    I always keep a full sized spare when traveling. I can recall >>>>>>>>> too many
    times that I needed it on a 1,000+ mile road trip, in recent >>>>>>>>> history.

    A full-size tire would take up the entire trunk, making travel a >>>>>>>> little difficult. Full-size truck spares work because there is waste >>>>>>>> space under the bed. There is no wasted space in cars these days. I >>>>>>>> wonder that the (useless) electric trucks will do. AFAIK, the
    batteries take up that space.

    I keep the full-size tire on rim behind the driver's seat. On
    very long
    road trips, the back seat it otherwise full of luggage, cooler,
    blankets/pillows/air mattress/etc.

    I've heard that some new cars don't even have a donut spare.

    As I said earlier, my wife's Mustang came with a 12V tire pump and a >>>>> can of fix-a-flat. No spare of any kind.

    With 4 little chunks of rubber being the only thing between you >>>>>> and
    your last breath, Tires are not where I am going to cut corners.

    I just "decomissioned" a set of 7 year old michelins with 80% tread >>>>> >from the Ranger, as well as a 5 or 6 year old set of Michelind with >>>>>> about 40% tread from the Sorento.

    What did you do with them? It seems that every car needs a different >>>>> size. Maybe I misunderstood. Do you still have the cars just that the >>>>> tires are too old to trust? Why 80%?

    Possibly 2 reasons for thread being in good shape when retired. The
    vehicle is not driven much. My wife's car falls in that catagory. Over >>>> 6 years old and plenty of tread.
    Or the winter summer swap out and the tires were only used half the
    year.
    The tires were SCRAPPED. Still have both vehicles. The truck is 26
    years old come april, with 376000Km on it and still going strong. The
    tires were wearing VERY well - so still had 80+% tread left but the
    sidewalls were cracking. Combination of low miles/only used haf the
    year amd plain old age.

    On the Kia I'm not sure how many miles were on the tires as they were
    on the 5 year old vehicle when we bought it and they were NOT
    original. If they were the second set and the miles were put on in a
    uniform manner over the previous life of the car there were likely
    about 80000km on them. The tread was getting thin and, being
    Michelins, the sidewalls were also starting to crack.

    I've never seen such new tires with cracking side walls. I would not
    buy that brand again if I were you.

    Brand has nothing to do with cracking on the sidewall. That is a defect
    and every manufacturer puts out some duds. This happened to me with
    Michelin LTX M/S.
    Michelin authorized replacement at about 24K. The next set of Michelin,
    same tire, wore out in less than 25K. They adjusted the set again.

    At best they've pro-rated them, then charged full retail. Sale price,
    often at the same time, was a better deal.

    At worst, they blamed it on me and refused to refund anything. I
    ignore tire warranties, other than to use them as a (poor) gauge of
    longevity.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Michael Trew@21:1/5 to Scott Lurndal on Mon Jan 10 11:51:26 2022
    On 1/9/2022 11:41, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    Michael Trew<michael.trew@att.net> writes:
    On 1/7/2022 14:54, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Fri, 7 Jan 2022 09:02:18 -0600, Leon<lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On the Kia I'm not sure how many miles were on the tires as they were
    on the 5 year old vehicle when we bought it and they were NOT
    original. If they were the second set and the miles were put on in a
    uniform manner over the previous life of the car there were likely
    about 80000km on them. The tread was getting thin and, being
    Michelins, the sidewalls were also starting to crack.

    I've never seen such new tires with cracking side walls.

    I have. You'd be amazed at what air pollution (e.g. ozone) can do
    to rubber over 6 or 7 years.

    Perhaps that depends on locality then? I live in a rural area.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Ed Pawlowski@21:1/5 to Clare Snyder on Mon Jan 10 21:18:03 2022
    On 1/9/2022 12:19 AM, Clare Snyder wrote:



    I've never seen such new tires with cracking side walls. I would not
    buy that brand again if I were you. Only 7 years old, and 80% tread, if
    the sidewall cracks weren't severe, I certainly would have kept going
    with them personally for occasional use... unless you get into bad snow
    storms.
    Snow storms have nothing to do with it as I use SNOW TIRES in the
    winter. Cracking USUALLY is related to rubber compound deterioration
    - getting hard - or less flexible. Hard tires are no good in rain
    either - and when I'm doing over 75MPH down the busiest highway in
    Noth America in the rain I am NOT taking chances on tires. If I lose traction, or loose air, in the middle of 7 lanes going in one
    direction at 70MPH I'm not coming out of it unscathed. I can ALMOST
    guarantee that!!!!!
    Each set of tires and rims for my truck costs more than I paid for
    the truck (235/70 16 Nokian Hakkepellitta snows and Nokian One summers (replacing michelin Advantage) The tires on the Kia are a smaller
    fraction of the vehicle cost cue to the car being newer - (but are
    more expensive being 235-60-19 and 235-65 -18 tires)

    Like I said - the crackers were Michelins - I've had too many
    Michelin and BFG tires crack so am now runnining Nokians

    Never heard of Nokian but a few cars ago my local trusted tire dealer in
    CT recommended them. I got the WRG3 and it is a year round tire with a
    real snow rating. Put them on the next car too. Good performance.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to Ed Pawlowski on Mon Jan 10 23:20:33 2022
    On Mon, 10 Jan 2022 21:18:03 -0500, Ed Pawlowski <esp@snet.xxx> wrote:

    On 1/9/2022 12:19 AM, Clare Snyder wrote:



    I've never seen such new tires with cracking side walls. I would not
    buy that brand again if I were you. Only 7 years old, and 80% tread, if >>> the sidewall cracks weren't severe, I certainly would have kept going
    with them personally for occasional use... unless you get into bad snow
    storms.
    Snow storms have nothing to do with it as I use SNOW TIRES in the
    winter. Cracking USUALLY is related to rubber compound deterioration
    - getting hard - or less flexible. Hard tires are no good in rain
    either - and when I'm doing over 75MPH down the busiest highway in
    Noth America in the rain I am NOT taking chances on tires. If I lose
    traction, or loose air, in the middle of 7 lanes going in one
    direction at 70MPH I'm not coming out of it unscathed. I can ALMOST
    guarantee that!!!!!
    Each set of tires and rims for my truck costs more than I paid for
    the truck (235/70 16 Nokian Hakkepellitta snows and Nokian One summers
    (replacing michelin Advantage) The tires on the Kia are a smaller
    fraction of the vehicle cost cue to the car being newer - (but are
    more expensive being 235-60-19 and 235-65 -18 tires)

    Like I said - the crackers were Michelins - I've had too many
    Michelin and BFG tires crack so am now runnining Nokians

    Never heard of Nokian but a few cars ago my local trusted tire dealer in
    CT recommended them. I got the WRG3 and it is a year round tire with a
    real snow rating. Put them on the next car too. Good performance.

    When I liven in VT, Hakks were the go-to winter tires. They had crap
    longevity on dry pavement. To get the snow/ice performance, they used
    really soft rubber.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Leon@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Tue Jan 11 12:11:41 2022
    On 1/9/2022 4:07 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 9 Jan 2022 15:21:06 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 1/8/2022 5:28 PM, Michael Trew wrote:
    On 1/7/2022 14:54, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Fri, 7 Jan 2022 09:02:18 -0600, Leon<lcb11211@swbelldotnet>  wrote: >>>>
    On 1/6/2022 9:12 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Thu, 06 Jan 2022 21:56:56 -0500, Clare Snyder<clare@snyder.on.ca> >>>>>> wrote:

    On Tue, 04 Jan 2022 23:53:45 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net>  wrote:

    On 1/3/2022 12:00, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 11:50:51 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net>   wrote:

    On 1/2/2022 21:24, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Sun, 2 Jan 2022 14:49:08 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net>    wrote:

    On Sunday, January 2, 2022 at 3:33:44 PM UTC-5,
    k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 14:48:13 GMT, Puckdropper<em...@example.com> >>>>>>>>>>>>> wrote:
    Michael Trew<michae...@att.net>    wrote in
    news:sqohqs$f27$7...@dont-email.me:

    On 12/31/2021 16:59, k...@notreal.com wrote:

    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> anything for that
    matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)

    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol

    A good compressor that's easy to move (so not one of those >>>>>>>>>>>>>> 200 gallon
    monsters but also not a 1 1/2 gallon noise maker) would be a >>>>>>>>>>>>>> nice thing to
    pass down. Shoot, even if they just use it to inflate tires >>>>>>>>>>>>>> and beach
    balls, it would make their life that much easier.
    For tires I have one of these:

    <https://www.homedepot.com/p/RYOBI-ONE-18V-Lithium-Ion-Cordless-Power-Inflator-Kit-with-1-5-Ah-Battery-and-18V-Charger-P737DKN/311788879>


    SWMBO appreciates it very much.

    I looked at her "spare" a while back. Since it is small car >>>>>>>>>>>>> (Mustang), I knew it had to have a bicycle tire. Nope. Not even >>>>>>>>>>>>> that. Under the trunk liner is a 12V compressor and a can of >>>>>>>>>>>>> compressed tire gunk. Nice. A bicycle tire is an extra $250. >>>>>>>>>>>>
    Ever notice how all (?) spares are stored with the valve down >>>>>>>>>>>> or inward,
    forcing you to  remove the spare it to check/fill it?  The >>>>>>>>>>>> spare in my Odyssey
    is buried valve down under the carpet between the front and >>>>>>>>>>>> middle row seats.
    What a PITA to get it out.

    I have one configuration or another of these in all of my >>>>>>>>>>>> vehicles.

    https://www.amazon.com/Hotop-Stainless-Extension-Braided-Extender/dp/B09BMWQQ3R


    All of the spares in my vehicles look something like this so I >>>>>>>>>>>> can check/top
    them off without removing them.

    https://i.imgur.com/6IHvl8M.jpg

    https://i.imgur.com/nxJAKFf.jpg

    I wouldn't be surprised if half the folks in this group (that >>>>>>>>>>>> have spares) have
    spares that are sitting at 45-50 PSI.

    It's amazing how those tires hold up.  Especially the old bias-ply >>>>>>>>>> tires, to build on the post quoted below.  I have a '68 Ford >>>>>>>>>> Galaxie,
    and it has the full size spare installed on the front tire now, >>>>>>>>>> a 1968
    bias-ply tire.  I cannot believe that the thing still holds air >>>>>>>>>> pressure.  It's pretty well bald, however.

    Bicycle tires are designed to never be used.

    What about bicycle tires?

          The last time I actually USED my spare was on my '63 >>>>>>>>>>> Valiant back
    about 1970. I ALMOST had to use it 3 times on one trip with the PT >>>>>>>>>>> Cruiser on my trip to PEI when 3 valve stems failed and
    christmas 1972
    in Montana or Idaho or Wyoming or wherever when I got a cinder >>>>>>>>>>> puncture - managed to find a tire repair guy before it got all >>>>>>>>>>> the way
    flat.

    I always keep a full sized spare when traveling.  I can recall >>>>>>>>>> too many
    times that I needed it on a 1,000+ mile road trip, in recent >>>>>>>>>> history.

    A full-size tire would take up the entire trunk, making travel a >>>>>>>>> little difficult. Full-size truck spares work because there is waste >>>>>>>>> space under the bed. There is no wasted space in cars these days.  I >>>>>>>>> wonder that the (useless) electric trucks will do. AFAIK, the >>>>>>>>> batteries take up that space.

    I keep the full-size tire on rim behind the driver's seat.  On >>>>>>>> very long
    road trips, the back seat it otherwise full of luggage, cooler, >>>>>>>> blankets/pillows/air mattress/etc.

    I've heard that some new cars don't even have a donut spare.

    As I said earlier, my wife's Mustang came with a 12V tire pump and a >>>>>> can of fix-a-flat.  No spare of any kind.

        With 4 little chunks of rubber being the only thing between you >>>>>>> and
    your last breath, Tires are not where I am going to cut corners. >>>>>>>
    I just "decomissioned" a set of 7 year old michelins with 80% tread >>>>>> >from the Ranger, as well as a 5 or 6 year old set of Michelind with >>>>>>> about 40% tread from the Sorento.

    What did you do with them? It seems that every car needs a different >>>>>> size. Maybe I misunderstood.  Do you still have the cars just that the >>>>>> tires are too old to trust? Why 80%?

    Possibly 2 reasons for thread being in good shape when retired.  The >>>>> vehicle is not driven much.  My wife's car falls in that catagory.  Over
    6 years old and plenty of tread.
    Or the winter summer swap out and the tires were only used half the
    year.
       The tires were SCRAPPED. Still have both vehicles. The truck is 26 >>>> years old come april, with 376000Km  on it and still going strong. The >>>> tires were wearing VERY well - so still had 80+% tread left but the
    sidewalls were cracking. Combination of low miles/only used haf the
    year amd plain old age.

    On the Kia I'm not  sure how many miles were on the tires as they were >>>> on the 5 year old vehicle when we bought it and they were NOT
    original. If they were the second set and the miles were put on in a
    uniform manner over the previous life of the car there were likely
    about 80000km on them. The tread was getting thin and, being
    Michelins, the sidewalls were also starting to crack.

    I've never seen such new tires with cracking side walls.  I would not
    buy that brand again if I were you.

    Brand has nothing to do with cracking on the sidewall. That is a defect
    and every manufacturer puts out some duds. This happened to me with
    Michelin LTX M/S.
    Michelin authorized replacement at about 24K. The next set of Michelin,
    same tire, wore out in less than 25K. They adjusted the set again.

    At best they've pro-rated them, then charged full retail. Sale price,
    often at the same time, was a better deal.

    Yes, they always prorate from the retail price and if the tire needs to
    be replaced, later in it's life, buying at the sale price can often be
    less expensive. IIRC thse had a 70K mileage warranty and were wearing
    well, other than the sidewall checking. So I got a pretty good
    adjustment on replacements. The second set were worn out, according to Discount Tire, and the pro-rated cost was also pretty good.

    The trick is to bypass the retailer all together and go directly to the manufacturers web site to get assistance. Once upon a time I ran a tire
    store and learned a few tricks to get things done. ;~)
    If you cal the manufacturer be sure to give them the specifics. Tread
    depth and mileage and the issue.

    In the last case DT said 2 tires qualified to be adjusted the other 2
    were not. A call to Michelin indicating that the other 2 tires were
    about 1/16" from qualifying. They authorized replacement of all four
    and called my dealer to set that up.





    At worst, they blamed it on me and refused to refund anything. I
    ignore tire warranties, other than to use them as a (poor) gauge of longevity.

    Again, call/contact the manufacturer.
    In Michelin's case the 70K mileage warranty was an extremely poor gauge, considering they were just over 1/3 over the miles.

    And I know these were a fluke/bad batch of tires. I think the rubber
    was too hard causing the checking on the first set and to combat that
    issue the softer rubber compound on the second set caused them to wear
    out prematurely.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Leon@21:1/5 to Michael Trew on Tue Jan 11 12:13:48 2022
    On 1/10/2022 10:51 AM, Michael Trew wrote:
    On 1/9/2022 11:41, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    Michael Trew<michael.trew@att.net>  writes:
    On 1/7/2022 14:54, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Fri, 7 Jan 2022 09:02:18 -0600, Leon<lcb11211@swbelldotnet>   wrote: >>
    On the Kia I'm not  sure how many miles were on the tires as they were >>>> on the 5 year old vehicle when we bought it and they were NOT
    original. If they were the second set and the miles were put on in a
    uniform manner over the previous life of the car there were likely
    about 80000km on them. The tread was getting thin and, being
    Michelins, the sidewalls were also starting to crack.

    I've never seen such new tires with cracking side walls.

    I have.  You'd be amazed at what air pollution (e.g. ozone) can do
    to rubber over 6 or 7 years.

    Perhaps that depends on locality then?  I live in a rural area.


    Sunlight too if left out doors all the time. I had checking issues on
    one side of my truck, and that was after only 3~4 years.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Scott Lurndal@21:1/5 to Leon on Tue Jan 11 18:32:44 2022
    Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> writes:
    On 1/10/2022 10:51 AM, Michael Trew wrote:
    On 1/9/2022 11:41, Scott Lurndal wrote:
    Michael Trew<michael.trew@att.net>  writes:
    On 1/7/2022 14:54, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Fri, 7 Jan 2022 09:02:18 -0600, Leon<lcb11211@swbelldotnet>   wrote: >>>
    On the Kia I'm not  sure how many miles were on the tires as they were >>>>> on the 5 year old vehicle when we bought it and they were NOT
    original. If they were the second set and the miles were put on in a >>>>> uniform manner over the previous life of the car there were likely
    about 80000km on them. The tread was getting thin and, being
    Michelins, the sidewalls were also starting to crack.

    I've never seen such new tires with cracking side walls.

    I have.  You'd be amazed at what air pollution (e.g. ozone) can do
    to rubber over 6 or 7 years.

    Perhaps that depends on locality then?  I live in a rural area.


    Sunlight too if left out doors all the time. I had checking issues on
    one side of my truck, and that was after only 3~4 years.

    https://www.cnet.com/roadshow/news/tire-dry-rot-can-wear-out-your-tires-long-before-you-can-tell/

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From whit3rd@21:1/5 to k...@notreal.com on Tue Jan 11 15:13:21 2022
    On Monday, January 3, 2022 at 6:55:00 PM UTC-8, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 20:26:28 GMT, sc...@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal)
    wrote:

    Current numbers indicate a 10-40% drop in range in the winter - as much because
    the batteries need to be warmed up than the use of the heater. Although keeping
    the interior in the low 60's and wearing a coat and using the seat-heaters helps.

    Also depends on the technology - heat pump vs. resistance heat.

    Red herring. Heat pumps aren't going to work in a Minnesota winter. I
    heat with a heat pump. It switches to resistive heat at about 40F.

    Not the heat pump to use in Minnesota in winter, then; there's a variety of working fluids and your fluid (not the heat pump principle) is what
    sets the 40F threshold.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Scott Lurndal@21:1/5 to whit3rd@gmail.com on Wed Jan 12 00:36:14 2022
    whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com> writes:
    On Monday, January 3, 2022 at 6:55:00 PM UTC-8, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 20:26:28 GMT, sc...@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal)
    wrote:

    Current numbers indicate a 10-40% drop in range in the winter - as much because
    the batteries need to be warmed up than the use of the heater. Although keeping
    the interior in the low 60's and wearing a coat and using the seat-heaters helps.

    Also depends on the technology - heat pump vs. resistance heat.

    Red herring. Heat pumps aren't going to work in a Minnesota winter. I
    heat with a heat pump. It switches to resistive heat at about 40F.

    Not the heat pump to use in Minnesota in winter, then; there's a variety of >working fluids and your fluid (not the heat pump principle) is what
    sets the 40F threshold.

    As it happens, the Tesla Model Y uses a heat pump instead of resistance
    heat. Works just fine in Minnesota, Bismark or Calgary.

    In fact, heat pumps work amazingly well - even in very cold
    climates.

    "Below 0 Fahrenheit, heat pumps can still heat your
    home with more than twice the efficiency of gas heating
    or standard electric heating (such as electric furnaces
    and baseboard heaters)."

    KRW was stuck in 1975 and doesn't seem to be aware that the
    state of the art has progressed in half a century.

    https://sealed.com/resources/winter-heat-pump/

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to All on Tue Jan 11 20:50:13 2022
    On Tue, 11 Jan 2022 15:13:21 -0800 (PST), whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Monday, January 3, 2022 at 6:55:00 PM UTC-8, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 20:26:28 GMT, sc...@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal)
    wrote:

    Current numbers indicate a 10-40% drop in range in the winter - as much because
    the batteries need to be warmed up than the use of the heater. Although keeping
    the interior in the low 60's and wearing a coat and using the seat-heaters helps.

    Also depends on the technology - heat pump vs. resistance heat.

    Red herring. Heat pumps aren't going to work in a Minnesota winter. I
    heat with a heat pump. It switches to resistive heat at about 40F.

    Not the heat pump to use in Minnesota in winter, then; there's a variety of >working fluids and your fluid (not the heat pump principle) is what
    sets the 40F threshold.

    A distinction without a difference. There are only so many fluids
    allowed, particularly in automotive.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to All on Tue Jan 11 20:55:42 2022
    On Tue, 11 Jan 2022 12:11:41 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/9/2022 4:07 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 9 Jan 2022 15:21:06 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 1/8/2022 5:28 PM, Michael Trew wrote:
    On 1/7/2022 14:54, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Fri, 7 Jan 2022 09:02:18 -0600, Leon<lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote: >>>>>
    On 1/6/2022 9:12 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Thu, 06 Jan 2022 21:56:56 -0500, Clare Snyder<clare@snyder.on.ca> >>>>>>> wrote:

    On Tue, 04 Jan 2022 23:53:45 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/3/2022 12:00, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 11:50:51 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/2/2022 21:24, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Sun, 2 Jan 2022 14:49:08 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Sunday, January 2, 2022 at 3:33:44 PM UTC-5,
    k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 14:48:13 GMT, Puckdropper<em...@example.com> >>>>>>>>>>>>>> wrote:
    Michael Trew<michae...@att.net> wrote in
    news:sqohqs$f27$7...@dont-email.me:

    On 12/31/2021 16:59, k...@notreal.com wrote:

    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> anything for that
    matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)

    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol

    A good compressor that's easy to move (so not one of those >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 200 gallon
    monsters but also not a 1 1/2 gallon noise maker) would be a >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> nice thing to
    pass down. Shoot, even if they just use it to inflate tires >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> and beach
    balls, it would make their life that much easier. >>>>>>>>>>>>>> For tires I have one of these:

    <https://www.homedepot.com/p/RYOBI-ONE-18V-Lithium-Ion-Cordless-Power-Inflator-Kit-with-1-5-Ah-Battery-and-18V-Charger-P737DKN/311788879>


    SWMBO appreciates it very much.

    I looked at her "spare" a while back. Since it is small car >>>>>>>>>>>>>> (Mustang), I knew it had to have a bicycle tire. Nope. Not even >>>>>>>>>>>>>> that. Under the trunk liner is a 12V compressor and a can of >>>>>>>>>>>>>> compressed tire gunk. Nice. A bicycle tire is an extra $250. >>>>>>>>>>>>>
    Ever notice how all (?) spares are stored with the valve down >>>>>>>>>>>>> or inward,
    forcing you to remove the spare it to check/fill it? The >>>>>>>>>>>>> spare in my Odyssey
    is buried valve down under the carpet between the front and >>>>>>>>>>>>> middle row seats.
    What a PITA to get it out.

    I have one configuration or another of these in all of my >>>>>>>>>>>>> vehicles.

    https://www.amazon.com/Hotop-Stainless-Extension-Braided-Extender/dp/B09BMWQQ3R


    All of the spares in my vehicles look something like this so I >>>>>>>>>>>>> can check/top
    them off without removing them.

    https://i.imgur.com/6IHvl8M.jpg

    https://i.imgur.com/nxJAKFf.jpg

    I wouldn't be surprised if half the folks in this group (that >>>>>>>>>>>>> have spares) have
    spares that are sitting at 45-50 PSI.

    It's amazing how those tires hold up. Especially the old bias-ply >>>>>>>>>>> tires, to build on the post quoted below. I have a '68 Ford >>>>>>>>>>> Galaxie,
    and it has the full size spare installed on the front tire now, >>>>>>>>>>> a 1968
    bias-ply tire. I cannot believe that the thing still holds air >>>>>>>>>>> pressure. It's pretty well bald, however.

    Bicycle tires are designed to never be used.

    What about bicycle tires?

    The last time I actually USED my spare was on my '63 >>>>>>>>>>>> Valiant back
    about 1970. I ALMOST had to use it 3 times on one trip with the PT >>>>>>>>>>>> Cruiser on my trip to PEI when 3 valve stems failed and >>>>>>>>>>>> christmas 1972
    in Montana or Idaho or Wyoming or wherever when I got a cinder >>>>>>>>>>>> puncture - managed to find a tire repair guy before it got all >>>>>>>>>>>> the way
    flat.

    I always keep a full sized spare when traveling. I can recall >>>>>>>>>>> too many
    times that I needed it on a 1,000+ mile road trip, in recent >>>>>>>>>>> history.

    A full-size tire would take up the entire trunk, making travel a >>>>>>>>>> little difficult. Full-size truck spares work because there is waste >>>>>>>>>> space under the bed. There is no wasted space in cars these days. I >>>>>>>>>> wonder that the (useless) electric trucks will do. AFAIK, the >>>>>>>>>> batteries take up that space.

    I keep the full-size tire on rim behind the driver's seat. On >>>>>>>>> very long
    road trips, the back seat it otherwise full of luggage, cooler, >>>>>>>>> blankets/pillows/air mattress/etc.

    I've heard that some new cars don't even have a donut spare.

    As I said earlier, my wife's Mustang came with a 12V tire pump and a >>>>>>> can of fix-a-flat. No spare of any kind.

    With 4 little chunks of rubber being the only thing between you >>>>>>>> and
    your last breath, Tires are not where I am going to cut corners. >>>>>>>>
    I just "decomissioned" a set of 7 year old michelins with 80% tread >>>>>>> >from the Ranger, as well as a 5 or 6 year old set of Michelind with >>>>>>>> about 40% tread from the Sorento.

    What did you do with them? It seems that every car needs a different >>>>>>> size. Maybe I misunderstood. Do you still have the cars just that the >>>>>>> tires are too old to trust? Why 80%?

    Possibly 2 reasons for thread being in good shape when retired. The >>>>>> vehicle is not driven much. My wife's car falls in that catagory. Over >>>>>> 6 years old and plenty of tread.
    Or the winter summer swap out and the tires were only used half the >>>>>> year.
    The tires were SCRAPPED. Still have both vehicles. The truck is 26 >>>>> years old come april, with 376000Km on it and still going strong. The >>>>> tires were wearing VERY well - so still had 80+% tread left but the
    sidewalls were cracking. Combination of low miles/only used haf the
    year amd plain old age.

    On the Kia I'm not sure how many miles were on the tires as they were >>>>> on the 5 year old vehicle when we bought it and they were NOT
    original. If they were the second set and the miles were put on in a >>>>> uniform manner over the previous life of the car there were likely
    about 80000km on them. The tread was getting thin and, being
    Michelins, the sidewalls were also starting to crack.

    I've never seen such new tires with cracking side walls. I would not
    buy that brand again if I were you.

    Brand has nothing to do with cracking on the sidewall. That is a defect >>> and every manufacturer puts out some duds. This happened to me with
    Michelin LTX M/S.
    Michelin authorized replacement at about 24K. The next set of Michelin, >>> same tire, wore out in less than 25K. They adjusted the set again.

    At best they've pro-rated them, then charged full retail. Sale price,
    often at the same time, was a better deal.

    Yes, they always prorate from the retail price and if the tire needs to
    be replaced, later in it's life, buying at the sale price can often be
    less expensive. IIRC thse had a 70K mileage warranty and were wearing
    well, other than the sidewall checking. So I got a pretty good
    adjustment on replacements. The second set were worn out, according to >Discount Tire, and the pro-rated cost was also pretty good.

    The trick is to bypass the retailer all together and go directly to the >manufacturers web site to get assistance. Once upon a time I ran a tire >store and learned a few tricks to get things done. ;~)
    If you cal the manufacturer be sure to give them the specifics. Tread
    depth and mileage and the issue.

    In the last case DT said 2 tires qualified to be adjusted the other 2
    were not. A call to Michelin indicating that the other 2 tires were
    about 1/16" from qualifying. They authorized replacement of all four
    and called my dealer to set that up.





    At worst, they blamed it on me and refused to refund anything. I
    ignore tire warranties, other than to use them as a (poor) gauge of
    longevity.

    Again, call/contact the manufacturer.
    In Michelin's case the 70K mileage warranty was an extremely poor gauge, >considering they were just over 1/3 over the miles.

    And I know these were a fluke/bad batch of tires. I think the rubber
    was too hard causing the checking on the first set and to combat that
    issue the softer rubber compound on the second set caused them to wear
    out prematurely.

    The problems I've generally had was premature wear. The 70K tire only
    went 35-40K. The warranty was based on tread remaining. Wonderful.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Scott Lurndal@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Wed Jan 12 14:52:40 2022
    krw@notreal.com writes:
    On Tue, 11 Jan 2022 15:13:21 -0800 (PST), whit3rd <whit3rd@gmail.com>
    wrote:

    On Monday, January 3, 2022 at 6:55:00 PM UTC-8, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 20:26:28 GMT, sc...@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal)
    wrote:

    Current numbers indicate a 10-40% drop in range in the winter - as much because
    the batteries need to be warmed up than the use of the heater. Although keeping
    the interior in the low 60's and wearing a coat and using the seat-heaters helps.

    Also depends on the technology - heat pump vs. resistance heat.

    Red herring. Heat pumps aren't going to work in a Minnesota winter. I
    heat with a heat pump. It switches to resistive heat at about 40F.

    Not the heat pump to use in Minnesota in winter, then; there's a variety of >>working fluids and your fluid (not the heat pump principle) is what
    sets the 40F threshold.

    A distinction without a difference. There are only so many fluids
    allowed, particularly in automotive.

    https://insideevs.com/news/452464/tesla-model-y-heat-pump-system-details/

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Leon@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Wed Jan 12 10:54:41 2022
    On 1/11/2022 7:55 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Tue, 11 Jan 2022 12:11:41 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/9/2022 4:07 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 9 Jan 2022 15:21:06 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 1/8/2022 5:28 PM, Michael Trew wrote:
    On 1/7/2022 14:54, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Fri, 7 Jan 2022 09:02:18 -0600, Leon<lcb11211@swbelldotnet>  wrote: >>>>>>
    On 1/6/2022 9:12 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Thu, 06 Jan 2022 21:56:56 -0500, Clare Snyder<clare@snyder.on.ca> >>>>>>>> wrote:

    On Tue, 04 Jan 2022 23:53:45 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net>  wrote:

    On 1/3/2022 12:00, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 11:50:51 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net>   wrote:

    On 1/2/2022 21:24, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Sun, 2 Jan 2022 14:49:08 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net>    wrote:

    On Sunday, January 2, 2022 at 3:33:44 PM UTC-5,
    k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 14:48:13 GMT, Puckdropper<em...@example.com>
    wrote:
    Michael Trew<michae...@att.net>    wrote in >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> news:sqohqs$f27$7...@dont-email.me:

    On 12/31/2021 16:59, k...@notreal.com wrote: >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> anything for that
    matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)

    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol

    A good compressor that's easy to move (so not one of those >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 200 gallon
    monsters but also not a 1 1/2 gallon noise maker) would be a >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> nice thing to
    pass down. Shoot, even if they just use it to inflate tires >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> and beach
    balls, it would make their life that much easier. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> For tires I have one of these:

    <https://www.homedepot.com/p/RYOBI-ONE-18V-Lithium-Ion-Cordless-Power-Inflator-Kit-with-1-5-Ah-Battery-and-18V-Charger-P737DKN/311788879>


    SWMBO appreciates it very much.

    I looked at her "spare" a while back. Since it is small car >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> (Mustang), I knew it had to have a bicycle tire. Nope. Not even >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> that. Under the trunk liner is a 12V compressor and a can of >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> compressed tire gunk. Nice. A bicycle tire is an extra $250. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    Ever notice how all (?) spares are stored with the valve down >>>>>>>>>>>>>> or inward,
    forcing you to  remove the spare it to check/fill it?  The >>>>>>>>>>>>>> spare in my Odyssey
    is buried valve down under the carpet between the front and >>>>>>>>>>>>>> middle row seats.
    What a PITA to get it out.

    I have one configuration or another of these in all of my >>>>>>>>>>>>>> vehicles.

    https://www.amazon.com/Hotop-Stainless-Extension-Braided-Extender/dp/B09BMWQQ3R


    All of the spares in my vehicles look something like this so I >>>>>>>>>>>>>> can check/top
    them off without removing them.

    https://i.imgur.com/6IHvl8M.jpg

    https://i.imgur.com/nxJAKFf.jpg

    I wouldn't be surprised if half the folks in this group (that >>>>>>>>>>>>>> have spares) have
    spares that are sitting at 45-50 PSI.

    It's amazing how those tires hold up.  Especially the old bias-ply
    tires, to build on the post quoted below.  I have a '68 Ford >>>>>>>>>>>> Galaxie,
    and it has the full size spare installed on the front tire now, >>>>>>>>>>>> a 1968
    bias-ply tire.  I cannot believe that the thing still holds air >>>>>>>>>>>> pressure.  It's pretty well bald, however.

    Bicycle tires are designed to never be used.

    What about bicycle tires?

          The last time I actually USED my spare was on my '63 >>>>>>>>>>>>> Valiant back
    about 1970. I ALMOST had to use it 3 times on one trip with the PT
    Cruiser on my trip to PEI when 3 valve stems failed and >>>>>>>>>>>>> christmas 1972
    in Montana or Idaho or Wyoming or wherever when I got a cinder >>>>>>>>>>>>> puncture - managed to find a tire repair guy before it got all >>>>>>>>>>>>> the way
    flat.

    I always keep a full sized spare when traveling.  I can recall >>>>>>>>>>>> too many
    times that I needed it on a 1,000+ mile road trip, in recent >>>>>>>>>>>> history.

    A full-size tire would take up the entire trunk, making travel a >>>>>>>>>>> little difficult. Full-size truck spares work because there is waste
    space under the bed. There is no wasted space in cars these days.  I
    wonder that the (useless) electric trucks will do. AFAIK, the >>>>>>>>>>> batteries take up that space.

    I keep the full-size tire on rim behind the driver's seat.  On >>>>>>>>>> very long
    road trips, the back seat it otherwise full of luggage, cooler, >>>>>>>>>> blankets/pillows/air mattress/etc.

    I've heard that some new cars don't even have a donut spare. >>>>>>>>
    As I said earlier, my wife's Mustang came with a 12V tire pump and a >>>>>>>> can of fix-a-flat.  No spare of any kind.

        With 4 little chunks of rubber being the only thing between you
    and
    your last breath, Tires are not where I am going to cut corners. >>>>>>>>>
    I just "decomissioned" a set of 7 year old michelins with 80% tread >>>>>>>> >from the Ranger, as well as a 5 or 6 year old set of Michelind with >>>>>>>>> about 40% tread from the Sorento.

    What did you do with them? It seems that every car needs a different >>>>>>>> size. Maybe I misunderstood.  Do you still have the cars just that the
    tires are too old to trust? Why 80%?

    Possibly 2 reasons for thread being in good shape when retired.  The >>>>>>> vehicle is not driven much.  My wife's car falls in that catagory.  Over
    6 years old and plenty of tread.
    Or the winter summer swap out and the tires were only used half the >>>>>>> year.
       The tires were SCRAPPED. Still have both vehicles. The truck is 26
    years old come april, with 376000Km  on it and still going strong. The >>>>>> tires were wearing VERY well - so still had 80+% tread left but the >>>>>> sidewalls were cracking. Combination of low miles/only used haf the >>>>>> year amd plain old age.

    On the Kia I'm not  sure how many miles were on the tires as they were >>>>>> on the 5 year old vehicle when we bought it and they were NOT
    original. If they were the second set and the miles were put on in a >>>>>> uniform manner over the previous life of the car there were likely >>>>>> about 80000km on them. The tread was getting thin and, being
    Michelins, the sidewalls were also starting to crack.

    I've never seen such new tires with cracking side walls.  I would not >>>>> buy that brand again if I were you.

    Brand has nothing to do with cracking on the sidewall. That is a defect >>>> and every manufacturer puts out some duds. This happened to me with
    Michelin LTX M/S.
    Michelin authorized replacement at about 24K. The next set of Michelin, >>>> same tire, wore out in less than 25K. They adjusted the set again.

    At best they've pro-rated them, then charged full retail. Sale price,
    often at the same time, was a better deal.

    Yes, they always prorate from the retail price and if the tire needs to
    be replaced, later in it's life, buying at the sale price can often be
    less expensive. IIRC thse had a 70K mileage warranty and were wearing
    well, other than the sidewall checking. So I got a pretty good
    adjustment on replacements. The second set were worn out, according to
    Discount Tire, and the pro-rated cost was also pretty good.

    The trick is to bypass the retailer all together and go directly to the
    manufacturers web site to get assistance. Once upon a time I ran a tire
    store and learned a few tricks to get things done. ;~)
    If you cal the manufacturer be sure to give them the specifics. Tread
    depth and mileage and the issue.

    In the last case DT said 2 tires qualified to be adjusted the other 2
    were not. A call to Michelin indicating that the other 2 tires were
    about 1/16" from qualifying. They authorized replacement of all four
    and called my dealer to set that up.





    At worst, they blamed it on me and refused to refund anything. I
    ignore tire warranties, other than to use them as a (poor) gauge of
    longevity.

    Again, call/contact the manufacturer.
    In Michelin's case the 70K mileage warranty was an extremely poor gauge,
    considering they were just over 1/3 over the miles.

    And I know these were a fluke/bad batch of tires. I think the rubber
    was too hard causing the checking on the first set and to combat that
    issue the softer rubber compound on the second set caused them to wear
    out prematurely.

    The problems I've generally had was premature wear. The 70K tire only
    went 35-40K. The warranty was based on tread remaining. Wonderful.


    If there is uneven wear the tire will be adjusted according to average
    tread depth. If you took their word for how the tire should be
    adjusted, premature wear compared to the actual warranty, you should
    have talked to the manufacturer. They will contact the tire store and
    fill them in.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Clare Snyder@21:1/5 to All on Wed Jan 12 15:45:24 2022
    On Wed, 12 Jan 2022 10:54:41 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/11/2022 7:55 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Tue, 11 Jan 2022 12:11:41 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/9/2022 4:07 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 9 Jan 2022 15:21:06 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote: >>>>
    On 1/8/2022 5:28 PM, Michael Trew wrote:
    On 1/7/2022 14:54, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Fri, 7 Jan 2022 09:02:18 -0600, Leon<lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote: >>>>>>>
    On 1/6/2022 9:12 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Thu, 06 Jan 2022 21:56:56 -0500, Clare Snyder<clare@snyder.on.ca> >>>>>>>>> wrote:

    On Tue, 04 Jan 2022 23:53:45 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/3/2022 12:00, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 11:50:51 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/2/2022 21:24, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Sun, 2 Jan 2022 14:49:08 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03 >>>>>>>>>>>>>> <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Sunday, January 2, 2022 at 3:33:44 PM UTC-5,
    k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 14:48:13 GMT, Puckdropper<em...@example.com>
    wrote:
    Michael Trew<michae...@att.net> wrote in
    news:sqohqs$f27$7...@dont-email.me:

    On 12/31/2021 16:59, k...@notreal.com wrote: >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> anything for that
    matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)

    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol

    A good compressor that's easy to move (so not one of those >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 200 gallon
    monsters but also not a 1 1/2 gallon noise maker) would be a >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> nice thing to
    pass down. Shoot, even if they just use it to inflate tires >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> and beach
    balls, it would make their life that much easier. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> For tires I have one of these:

    <https://www.homedepot.com/p/RYOBI-ONE-18V-Lithium-Ion-Cordless-Power-Inflator-Kit-with-1-5-Ah-Battery-and-18V-Charger-P737DKN/311788879>


    SWMBO appreciates it very much.

    I looked at her "spare" a while back. Since it is small car >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> (Mustang), I knew it had to have a bicycle tire. Nope. Not even
    that. Under the trunk liner is a 12V compressor and a can of >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> compressed tire gunk. Nice. A bicycle tire is an extra $250. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    Ever notice how all (?) spares are stored with the valve down >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> or inward,
    forcing you to remove the spare it to check/fill it? The >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> spare in my Odyssey
    is buried valve down under the carpet between the front and >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> middle row seats.
    What a PITA to get it out.

    I have one configuration or another of these in all of my >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> vehicles.

    https://www.amazon.com/Hotop-Stainless-Extension-Braided-Extender/dp/B09BMWQQ3R


    All of the spares in my vehicles look something like this so I >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> can check/top
    them off without removing them.

    https://i.imgur.com/6IHvl8M.jpg

    https://i.imgur.com/nxJAKFf.jpg

    I wouldn't be surprised if half the folks in this group (that >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> have spares) have
    spares that are sitting at 45-50 PSI.

    It's amazing how those tires hold up. Especially the old bias-ply
    tires, to build on the post quoted below. I have a '68 Ford >>>>>>>>>>>>> Galaxie,
    and it has the full size spare installed on the front tire now, >>>>>>>>>>>>> a 1968
    bias-ply tire. I cannot believe that the thing still holds air >>>>>>>>>>>>> pressure. It's pretty well bald, however.

    Bicycle tires are designed to never be used.

    What about bicycle tires?

    The last time I actually USED my spare was on my '63 >>>>>>>>>>>>>> Valiant back
    about 1970. I ALMOST had to use it 3 times on one trip with the PT
    Cruiser on my trip to PEI when 3 valve stems failed and >>>>>>>>>>>>>> christmas 1972
    in Montana or Idaho or Wyoming or wherever when I got a cinder >>>>>>>>>>>>>> puncture - managed to find a tire repair guy before it got all >>>>>>>>>>>>>> the way
    flat.

    I always keep a full sized spare when traveling. I can recall >>>>>>>>>>>>> too many
    times that I needed it on a 1,000+ mile road trip, in recent >>>>>>>>>>>>> history.

    A full-size tire would take up the entire trunk, making travel a >>>>>>>>>>>> little difficult. Full-size truck spares work because there is waste
    space under the bed. There is no wasted space in cars these days. I
    wonder that the (useless) electric trucks will do. AFAIK, the >>>>>>>>>>>> batteries take up that space.

    I keep the full-size tire on rim behind the driver's seat. On >>>>>>>>>>> very long
    road trips, the back seat it otherwise full of luggage, cooler, >>>>>>>>>>> blankets/pillows/air mattress/etc.

    I've heard that some new cars don't even have a donut spare. >>>>>>>>>
    As I said earlier, my wife's Mustang came with a 12V tire pump and a >>>>>>>>> can of fix-a-flat. No spare of any kind.

    With 4 little chunks of rubber being the only thing between you
    and
    your last breath, Tires are not where I am going to cut corners. >>>>>>>>>>
    I just "decomissioned" a set of 7 year old michelins with 80% tread >>>>>>>>> >from the Ranger, as well as a 5 or 6 year old set of Michelind with >>>>>>>>>> about 40% tread from the Sorento.

    What did you do with them? It seems that every car needs a different >>>>>>>>> size. Maybe I misunderstood. Do you still have the cars just that the
    tires are too old to trust? Why 80%?

    Possibly 2 reasons for thread being in good shape when retired. The >>>>>>>> vehicle is not driven much. My wife's car falls in that catagory. Over
    6 years old and plenty of tread.
    Or the winter summer swap out and the tires were only used half the >>>>>>>> year.
    The tires were SCRAPPED. Still have both vehicles. The truck is 26 >>>>>>> years old come april, with 376000Km on it and still going strong. The >>>>>>> tires were wearing VERY well - so still had 80+% tread left but the >>>>>>> sidewalls were cracking. Combination of low miles/only used haf the >>>>>>> year amd plain old age.

    On the Kia I'm not sure how many miles were on the tires as they were >>>>>>> on the 5 year old vehicle when we bought it and they were NOT
    original. If they were the second set and the miles were put on in a >>>>>>> uniform manner over the previous life of the car there were likely >>>>>>> about 80000km on them. The tread was getting thin and, being
    Michelins, the sidewalls were also starting to crack.

    I've never seen such new tires with cracking side walls. I would not >>>>>> buy that brand again if I were you.

    Brand has nothing to do with cracking on the sidewall. That is a defect >>>>> and every manufacturer puts out some duds. This happened to me with >>>>> Michelin LTX M/S.
    Michelin authorized replacement at about 24K. The next set of Michelin, >>>>> same tire, wore out in less than 25K. They adjusted the set again.

    At best they've pro-rated them, then charged full retail. Sale price,
    often at the same time, was a better deal.

    Yes, they always prorate from the retail price and if the tire needs to
    be replaced, later in it's life, buying at the sale price can often be
    less expensive. IIRC thse had a 70K mileage warranty and were wearing
    well, other than the sidewall checking. So I got a pretty good
    adjustment on replacements. The second set were worn out, according to
    Discount Tire, and the pro-rated cost was also pretty good.

    The trick is to bypass the retailer all together and go directly to the
    manufacturers web site to get assistance. Once upon a time I ran a tire >>> store and learned a few tricks to get things done. ;~)
    If you cal the manufacturer be sure to give them the specifics. Tread
    depth and mileage and the issue.

    In the last case DT said 2 tires qualified to be adjusted the other 2
    were not. A call to Michelin indicating that the other 2 tires were
    about 1/16" from qualifying. They authorized replacement of all four
    and called my dealer to set that up.





    At worst, they blamed it on me and refused to refund anything. I
    ignore tire warranties, other than to use them as a (poor) gauge of
    longevity.

    Again, call/contact the manufacturer.
    In Michelin's case the 70K mileage warranty was an extremely poor gauge, >>> considering they were just over 1/3 over the miles.

    And I know these were a fluke/bad batch of tires. I think the rubber
    was too hard causing the checking on the first set and to combat that
    issue the softer rubber compound on the second set caused them to wear
    out prematurely.

    The problems I've generally had was premature wear. The 70K tire only
    went 35-40K. The warranty was based on tread remaining. Wonderful.


    If there is uneven wear the tire will be adjusted according to average
    tread depth. If you took their word for how the tire should be
    adjusted, premature wear compared to the actual warranty, you should
    have talked to the manufacturer. They will contact the tire store and
    fill them in.
    "premature wear" in not necessarilly uneven wear. IUn fact it is not
    even necessarilly "pre-mature" or "accellerated" - it is simply a
    higher than expected rate of wear either due to conditions or tire
    quality. Even accellerated wear is generally a sign of "not enough
    tire" or "cheap tire" - - or simply "WRONG TIRE" for the application.

    There were 3 diferent "Tiger Paw Touring" tires available to fit our
    Taurus. The cheap ones didn't stand up worth squat - and were out od
    round before they ware out. The expensive oned had good traction and
    rife but wore out quite quickly (like a "track tire"). The middle
    priced ones stood up very well, with more than adequate traction,
    treadwear, ride, and handling. The only spec that differed between
    them was the "speed rating" - and of course, the price!!!!

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Leon@21:1/5 to Clare Snyder on Wed Jan 12 15:28:14 2022
    On 1/12/2022 2:45 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Wed, 12 Jan 2022 10:54:41 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/11/2022 7:55 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Tue, 11 Jan 2022 12:11:41 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/9/2022 4:07 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 9 Jan 2022 15:21:06 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote: >>>>>
    On 1/8/2022 5:28 PM, Michael Trew wrote:
    On 1/7/2022 14:54, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Fri, 7 Jan 2022 09:02:18 -0600, Leon<lcb11211@swbelldotnet>  wrote:

    On 1/6/2022 9:12 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Thu, 06 Jan 2022 21:56:56 -0500, Clare Snyder<clare@snyder.on.ca> >>>>>>>>>> wrote:

    On Tue, 04 Jan 2022 23:53:45 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net>  wrote:

    On 1/3/2022 12:00, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 11:50:51 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net>   wrote:

    On 1/2/2022 21:24, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Sun, 2 Jan 2022 14:49:08 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03 >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <teamarrows@eznet.net>    wrote:

    On Sunday, January 2, 2022 at 3:33:44 PM UTC-5, >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 14:48:13 GMT, Puckdropper<em...@example.com>
    wrote:
    Michael Trew<michae...@att.net>    wrote in >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> news:sqohqs$f27$7...@dont-email.me:

    On 12/31/2021 16:59, k...@notreal.com wrote: >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> anything for that
    matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)

    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol

    A good compressor that's easy to move (so not one of those >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 200 gallon
    monsters but also not a 1 1/2 gallon noise maker) would be a >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> nice thing to
    pass down. Shoot, even if they just use it to inflate tires >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> and beach
    balls, it would make their life that much easier. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> For tires I have one of these:

    <https://www.homedepot.com/p/RYOBI-ONE-18V-Lithium-Ion-Cordless-Power-Inflator-Kit-with-1-5-Ah-Battery-and-18V-Charger-P737DKN/311788879>


    SWMBO appreciates it very much.

    I looked at her "spare" a while back. Since it is small car >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> (Mustang), I knew it had to have a bicycle tire. Nope. Not even
    that. Under the trunk liner is a 12V compressor and a can of >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> compressed tire gunk. Nice. A bicycle tire is an extra $250. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    Ever notice how all (?) spares are stored with the valve down >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> or inward,
    forcing you to  remove the spare it to check/fill it?  The >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> spare in my Odyssey
    is buried valve down under the carpet between the front and >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> middle row seats.
    What a PITA to get it out.

    I have one configuration or another of these in all of my >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> vehicles.

    https://www.amazon.com/Hotop-Stainless-Extension-Braided-Extender/dp/B09BMWQQ3R


    All of the spares in my vehicles look something like this so I >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> can check/top
    them off without removing them.

    https://i.imgur.com/6IHvl8M.jpg

    https://i.imgur.com/nxJAKFf.jpg

    I wouldn't be surprised if half the folks in this group (that >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> have spares) have
    spares that are sitting at 45-50 PSI.

    It's amazing how those tires hold up.  Especially the old bias-ply
    tires, to build on the post quoted below.  I have a '68 Ford >>>>>>>>>>>>>> Galaxie,
    and it has the full size spare installed on the front tire now, >>>>>>>>>>>>>> a 1968
    bias-ply tire.  I cannot believe that the thing still holds air >>>>>>>>>>>>>> pressure.  It's pretty well bald, however.

    Bicycle tires are designed to never be used.

    What about bicycle tires?

          The last time I actually USED my spare was on my '63
    Valiant back
    about 1970. I ALMOST had to use it 3 times on one trip with the PT
    Cruiser on my trip to PEI when 3 valve stems failed and >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> christmas 1972
    in Montana or Idaho or Wyoming or wherever when I got a cinder >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> puncture - managed to find a tire repair guy before it got all >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> the way
    flat.

    I always keep a full sized spare when traveling.  I can recall >>>>>>>>>>>>>> too many
    times that I needed it on a 1,000+ mile road trip, in recent >>>>>>>>>>>>>> history.

    A full-size tire would take up the entire trunk, making travel a >>>>>>>>>>>>> little difficult. Full-size truck spares work because there is waste
    space under the bed. There is no wasted space in cars these days.  I
    wonder that the (useless) electric trucks will do. AFAIK, the >>>>>>>>>>>>> batteries take up that space.

    I keep the full-size tire on rim behind the driver's seat.  On >>>>>>>>>>>> very long
    road trips, the back seat it otherwise full of luggage, cooler, >>>>>>>>>>>> blankets/pillows/air mattress/etc.

    I've heard that some new cars don't even have a donut spare. >>>>>>>>>>
    As I said earlier, my wife's Mustang came with a 12V tire pump and a >>>>>>>>>> can of fix-a-flat.  No spare of any kind.

        With 4 little chunks of rubber being the only thing between you
    and
    your last breath, Tires are not where I am going to cut corners. >>>>>>>>>>>
    I just "decomissioned" a set of 7 year old michelins with 80% tread >>>>>>>>>> >from the Ranger, as well as a 5 or 6 year old set of Michelind with >>>>>>>>>>> about 40% tread from the Sorento.

    What did you do with them? It seems that every car needs a different >>>>>>>>>> size. Maybe I misunderstood.  Do you still have the cars just that the
    tires are too old to trust? Why 80%?

    Possibly 2 reasons for thread being in good shape when retired.  The >>>>>>>>> vehicle is not driven much.  My wife's car falls in that catagory.  Over
    6 years old and plenty of tread.
    Or the winter summer swap out and the tires were only used half the >>>>>>>>> year.
       The tires were SCRAPPED. Still have both vehicles. The truck is 26
    years old come april, with 376000Km  on it and still going strong. The
    tires were wearing VERY well - so still had 80+% tread left but the >>>>>>>> sidewalls were cracking. Combination of low miles/only used haf the >>>>>>>> year amd plain old age.

    On the Kia I'm not  sure how many miles were on the tires as they were
    on the 5 year old vehicle when we bought it and they were NOT
    original. If they were the second set and the miles were put on in a >>>>>>>> uniform manner over the previous life of the car there were likely >>>>>>>> about 80000km on them. The tread was getting thin and, being
    Michelins, the sidewalls were also starting to crack.

    I've never seen such new tires with cracking side walls.  I would not >>>>>>> buy that brand again if I were you.

    Brand has nothing to do with cracking on the sidewall. That is a defect >>>>>> and every manufacturer puts out some duds. This happened to me with >>>>>> Michelin LTX M/S.
    Michelin authorized replacement at about 24K. The next set of Michelin, >>>>>> same tire, wore out in less than 25K. They adjusted the set again. >>>>>
    At best they've pro-rated them, then charged full retail. Sale price, >>>>> often at the same time, was a better deal.

    Yes, they always prorate from the retail price and if the tire needs to >>>> be replaced, later in it's life, buying at the sale price can often be >>>> less expensive. IIRC thse had a 70K mileage warranty and were wearing >>>> well, other than the sidewall checking. So I got a pretty good
    adjustment on replacements. The second set were worn out, according to >>>> Discount Tire, and the pro-rated cost was also pretty good.

    The trick is to bypass the retailer all together and go directly to the >>>> manufacturers web site to get assistance. Once upon a time I ran a tire >>>> store and learned a few tricks to get things done. ;~)
    If you cal the manufacturer be sure to give them the specifics. Tread >>>> depth and mileage and the issue.

    In the last case DT said 2 tires qualified to be adjusted the other 2
    were not. A call to Michelin indicating that the other 2 tires were
    about 1/16" from qualifying. They authorized replacement of all four
    and called my dealer to set that up.





    At worst, they blamed it on me and refused to refund anything. I
    ignore tire warranties, other than to use them as a (poor) gauge of
    longevity.

    Again, call/contact the manufacturer.
    In Michelin's case the 70K mileage warranty was an extremely poor gauge, >>>> considering they were just over 1/3 over the miles.

    And I know these were a fluke/bad batch of tires. I think the rubber
    was too hard causing the checking on the first set and to combat that
    issue the softer rubber compound on the second set caused them to wear >>>> out prematurely.

    The problems I've generally had was premature wear. The 70K tire only
    went 35-40K. The warranty was based on tread remaining. Wonderful.


    If there is uneven wear the tire will be adjusted according to average
    tread depth. If you took their word for how the tire should be
    adjusted, premature wear compared to the actual warranty, you should
    have talked to the manufacturer. They will contact the tire store and
    fill them in.
    "premature wear" in not necessarilly uneven wear. IUn fact it is not
    even necessarilly "pre-mature" or "accellerated" - it is simply a
    higher than expected rate of wear either due to conditions or tire
    quality. Even accellerated wear is generally a sign of "not enough
    tire" or "cheap tire" - - or simply "WRONG TIRE" for the application.

    FWIW premature wear is typically a tire issue with the assumption that
    the correct tire was used on the vehicle. In that instance the mileage
    should be used, again assuming the that there is a mileage warranty, for adjustment pricing.

    Uneven wear is 99.9% of the time not the fault of the tire. If the tire
    wears out premature due to uneven wear the average tread remaining is
    normally used if this is authorized.

    Uneven wear can be caused by many situations. Most often caused by not rotating the tires regularly, every x amount of miles. This normally
    shows up as excessive wear on the outside edge of the tread, and is
    cause by leaving the front tires in place too long before rotating.

    And under inflation can show up as uneven wear by excessive wear on the
    inside and out side of the tread. Over inflation shows up as uneven
    wear in the middle of the tire.
    This was more of a problem prior to radial tires becoming the normal replacement. This was an issue with biased ply tires.



    And uneven wear can be seen as scallopes along the edges or across the
    width of the tire. This is normally the result of unbalanced tires and
    worn out shock absorbers/struts. If those items are worn out the
    excessive bouncing can cause uneven wear spots.

    Uneven wear can be caused by alignment problems.

    Uneven wear is almost with out a doubt cause by one of the above
    mentioned conditions.

    Premature wear and uneven wear are 99% of th4e time not the same. That
    said I don't know of a manufacturer that will adjust a tire due to
    uneven wear. A lenient tire salesman will often offer some kind of
    adjustment for premature wear if uneven wear is not exaggerated. And as mentioned above they will adjust using an average of remaining tread and
    not use mileage as a basis.

    Having been in the tire business for 6 years and the auto dealership
    service department business for 10 years the wrong sized tire was the exception.





    There were 3 diferent "Tiger Paw Touring" tires available to fit our Taurus. The cheap ones didn't stand up worth squat - and were out od
    round before they ware out. The expensive oned had good traction and
    rife but wore out quite quickly (like a "track tire"). The middle
    priced ones stood up very well, with more than adequate traction,
    treadwear, ride, and handling. The only spec that differed between
    them was the "speed rating" - and of course, the price!!!!

    That would be an observation. As I have mentioned previously all brands
    have issues at some time or another. Even the same exact tire and size
    can have different issues.

    Recaping I had 3 sets of Michelin tires on my Tundra. All the same
    name/style and spec's and same size.

    The first 2 sets were adjusted and replaced for different reasons. The
    first set had side wall checking/cracking The mileage expectancy was indicating longer than the 70K warranty. The second set simply wore out
    long before half the 70K mileage warranty was reached. The first and
    seconds sets were identical except for manufacture date. What was not identical between the exact same named and sized tires was the rubber
    make up to make the tires last long on the first set and the rubber make
    up on the second to combat the checking issues, that simply wore out.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to All on Wed Jan 12 20:40:44 2022
    On Wed, 12 Jan 2022 10:54:41 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/11/2022 7:55 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Tue, 11 Jan 2022 12:11:41 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/9/2022 4:07 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 9 Jan 2022 15:21:06 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote: >>>>
    On 1/8/2022 5:28 PM, Michael Trew wrote:
    On 1/7/2022 14:54, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Fri, 7 Jan 2022 09:02:18 -0600, Leon<lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote: >>>>>>>
    On 1/6/2022 9:12 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Thu, 06 Jan 2022 21:56:56 -0500, Clare Snyder<clare@snyder.on.ca> >>>>>>>>> wrote:

    On Tue, 04 Jan 2022 23:53:45 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/3/2022 12:00, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 11:50:51 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/2/2022 21:24, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Sun, 2 Jan 2022 14:49:08 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03 >>>>>>>>>>>>>> <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Sunday, January 2, 2022 at 3:33:44 PM UTC-5,
    k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 14:48:13 GMT, Puckdropper<em...@example.com>
    wrote:
    Michael Trew<michae...@att.net> wrote in
    news:sqohqs$f27$7...@dont-email.me:

    On 12/31/2021 16:59, k...@notreal.com wrote: >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> anything for that
    matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)

    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol

    A good compressor that's easy to move (so not one of those >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 200 gallon
    monsters but also not a 1 1/2 gallon noise maker) would be a >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> nice thing to
    pass down. Shoot, even if they just use it to inflate tires >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> and beach
    balls, it would make their life that much easier. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> For tires I have one of these:

    <https://www.homedepot.com/p/RYOBI-ONE-18V-Lithium-Ion-Cordless-Power-Inflator-Kit-with-1-5-Ah-Battery-and-18V-Charger-P737DKN/311788879>


    SWMBO appreciates it very much.

    I looked at her "spare" a while back. Since it is small car >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> (Mustang), I knew it had to have a bicycle tire. Nope. Not even
    that. Under the trunk liner is a 12V compressor and a can of >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> compressed tire gunk. Nice. A bicycle tire is an extra $250. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    Ever notice how all (?) spares are stored with the valve down >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> or inward,
    forcing you to remove the spare it to check/fill it? The >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> spare in my Odyssey
    is buried valve down under the carpet between the front and >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> middle row seats.
    What a PITA to get it out.

    I have one configuration or another of these in all of my >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> vehicles.

    https://www.amazon.com/Hotop-Stainless-Extension-Braided-Extender/dp/B09BMWQQ3R


    All of the spares in my vehicles look something like this so I >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> can check/top
    them off without removing them.

    https://i.imgur.com/6IHvl8M.jpg

    https://i.imgur.com/nxJAKFf.jpg

    I wouldn't be surprised if half the folks in this group (that >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> have spares) have
    spares that are sitting at 45-50 PSI.

    It's amazing how those tires hold up. Especially the old bias-ply
    tires, to build on the post quoted below. I have a '68 Ford >>>>>>>>>>>>> Galaxie,
    and it has the full size spare installed on the front tire now, >>>>>>>>>>>>> a 1968
    bias-ply tire. I cannot believe that the thing still holds air >>>>>>>>>>>>> pressure. It's pretty well bald, however.

    Bicycle tires are designed to never be used.

    What about bicycle tires?

    The last time I actually USED my spare was on my '63 >>>>>>>>>>>>>> Valiant back
    about 1970. I ALMOST had to use it 3 times on one trip with the PT
    Cruiser on my trip to PEI when 3 valve stems failed and >>>>>>>>>>>>>> christmas 1972
    in Montana or Idaho or Wyoming or wherever when I got a cinder >>>>>>>>>>>>>> puncture - managed to find a tire repair guy before it got all >>>>>>>>>>>>>> the way
    flat.

    I always keep a full sized spare when traveling. I can recall >>>>>>>>>>>>> too many
    times that I needed it on a 1,000+ mile road trip, in recent >>>>>>>>>>>>> history.

    A full-size tire would take up the entire trunk, making travel a >>>>>>>>>>>> little difficult. Full-size truck spares work because there is waste
    space under the bed. There is no wasted space in cars these days. I
    wonder that the (useless) electric trucks will do. AFAIK, the >>>>>>>>>>>> batteries take up that space.

    I keep the full-size tire on rim behind the driver's seat. On >>>>>>>>>>> very long
    road trips, the back seat it otherwise full of luggage, cooler, >>>>>>>>>>> blankets/pillows/air mattress/etc.

    I've heard that some new cars don't even have a donut spare. >>>>>>>>>
    As I said earlier, my wife's Mustang came with a 12V tire pump and a >>>>>>>>> can of fix-a-flat. No spare of any kind.

    With 4 little chunks of rubber being the only thing between you
    and
    your last breath, Tires are not where I am going to cut corners. >>>>>>>>>>
    I just "decomissioned" a set of 7 year old michelins with 80% tread >>>>>>>>> >from the Ranger, as well as a 5 or 6 year old set of Michelind with >>>>>>>>>> about 40% tread from the Sorento.

    What did you do with them? It seems that every car needs a different >>>>>>>>> size. Maybe I misunderstood. Do you still have the cars just that the
    tires are too old to trust? Why 80%?

    Possibly 2 reasons for thread being in good shape when retired. The >>>>>>>> vehicle is not driven much. My wife's car falls in that catagory. Over
    6 years old and plenty of tread.
    Or the winter summer swap out and the tires were only used half the >>>>>>>> year.
    The tires were SCRAPPED. Still have both vehicles. The truck is 26 >>>>>>> years old come april, with 376000Km on it and still going strong. The >>>>>>> tires were wearing VERY well - so still had 80+% tread left but the >>>>>>> sidewalls were cracking. Combination of low miles/only used haf the >>>>>>> year amd plain old age.

    On the Kia I'm not sure how many miles were on the tires as they were >>>>>>> on the 5 year old vehicle when we bought it and they were NOT
    original. If they were the second set and the miles were put on in a >>>>>>> uniform manner over the previous life of the car there were likely >>>>>>> about 80000km on them. The tread was getting thin and, being
    Michelins, the sidewalls were also starting to crack.

    I've never seen such new tires with cracking side walls. I would not >>>>>> buy that brand again if I were you.

    Brand has nothing to do with cracking on the sidewall. That is a defect >>>>> and every manufacturer puts out some duds. This happened to me with >>>>> Michelin LTX M/S.
    Michelin authorized replacement at about 24K. The next set of Michelin, >>>>> same tire, wore out in less than 25K. They adjusted the set again.

    At best they've pro-rated them, then charged full retail. Sale price,
    often at the same time, was a better deal.

    Yes, they always prorate from the retail price and if the tire needs to
    be replaced, later in it's life, buying at the sale price can often be
    less expensive. IIRC thse had a 70K mileage warranty and were wearing
    well, other than the sidewall checking. So I got a pretty good
    adjustment on replacements. The second set were worn out, according to
    Discount Tire, and the pro-rated cost was also pretty good.

    The trick is to bypass the retailer all together and go directly to the
    manufacturers web site to get assistance. Once upon a time I ran a tire >>> store and learned a few tricks to get things done. ;~)
    If you cal the manufacturer be sure to give them the specifics. Tread
    depth and mileage and the issue.

    In the last case DT said 2 tires qualified to be adjusted the other 2
    were not. A call to Michelin indicating that the other 2 tires were
    about 1/16" from qualifying. They authorized replacement of all four
    and called my dealer to set that up.





    At worst, they blamed it on me and refused to refund anything. I
    ignore tire warranties, other than to use them as a (poor) gauge of
    longevity.

    Again, call/contact the manufacturer.
    In Michelin's case the 70K mileage warranty was an extremely poor gauge, >>> considering they were just over 1/3 over the miles.

    And I know these were a fluke/bad batch of tires. I think the rubber
    was too hard causing the checking on the first set and to combat that
    issue the softer rubber compound on the second set caused them to wear
    out prematurely.

    The problems I've generally had was premature wear. The 70K tire only
    went 35-40K. The warranty was based on tread remaining. Wonderful.


    If there is uneven wear the tire will be adjusted according to average
    tread depth. If you took their word for how the tire should be
    adjusted, premature wear compared to the actual warranty, you should
    have talked to the manufacturer. They will contact the tire store and
    fill them in.

    They treat it as the old "lifetime guarantee" on the watch mainspring
    (showing age). When spring breaks, the answer was "it died".

    For the kids here... A long time ago in a galaxy far away, watches
    weren't Bluetooth health tracking devices and didn't even have a
    battery. The watch was powered by a coiled spring that had to be
    wound every day. Springs get sprung, particularly cheap ones.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Clare Snyder@21:1/5 to All on Thu Jan 13 22:53:58 2022
    On Wed, 12 Jan 2022 15:28:14 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/12/2022 2:45 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Wed, 12 Jan 2022 10:54:41 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/11/2022 7:55 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Tue, 11 Jan 2022 12:11:41 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/9/2022 4:07 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 9 Jan 2022 15:21:06 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote: >>>>>>
    On 1/8/2022 5:28 PM, Michael Trew wrote:
    On 1/7/2022 14:54, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Fri, 7 Jan 2022 09:02:18 -0600, Leon<lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 1/6/2022 9:12 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Thu, 06 Jan 2022 21:56:56 -0500, Clare Snyder<clare@snyder.on.ca>
    wrote:

    On Tue, 04 Jan 2022 23:53:45 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/3/2022 12:00, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 11:50:51 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/2/2022 21:24, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Sun, 2 Jan 2022 14:49:08 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03 >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Sunday, January 2, 2022 at 3:33:44 PM UTC-5, >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 14:48:13 GMT, Puckdropper<em...@example.com>
    wrote:
    Michael Trew<michae...@att.net> wrote in >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> news:sqohqs$f27$7...@dont-email.me:

    On 12/31/2021 16:59, k...@notreal.com wrote: >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> anything for that
    matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)

    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    A good compressor that's easy to move (so not one of those >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 200 gallon
    monsters but also not a 1 1/2 gallon noise maker) would be a
    nice thing to
    pass down. Shoot, even if they just use it to inflate tires >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> and beach
    balls, it would make their life that much easier. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> For tires I have one of these:

    <https://www.homedepot.com/p/RYOBI-ONE-18V-Lithium-Ion-Cordless-Power-Inflator-Kit-with-1-5-Ah-Battery-and-18V-Charger-P737DKN/311788879>


    SWMBO appreciates it very much.

    I looked at her "spare" a while back. Since it is small car >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> (Mustang), I knew it had to have a bicycle tire. Nope. Not even
    that. Under the trunk liner is a 12V compressor and a can of >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> compressed tire gunk. Nice. A bicycle tire is an extra $250. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    Ever notice how all (?) spares are stored with the valve down >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> or inward,
    forcing you to remove the spare it to check/fill it? The >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> spare in my Odyssey
    is buried valve down under the carpet between the front and >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> middle row seats.
    What a PITA to get it out.

    I have one configuration or another of these in all of my >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> vehicles.

    https://www.amazon.com/Hotop-Stainless-Extension-Braided-Extender/dp/B09BMWQQ3R


    All of the spares in my vehicles look something like this so I
    can check/top
    them off without removing them.

    https://i.imgur.com/6IHvl8M.jpg

    https://i.imgur.com/nxJAKFf.jpg

    I wouldn't be surprised if half the folks in this group (that >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> have spares) have
    spares that are sitting at 45-50 PSI.

    It's amazing how those tires hold up. Especially the old bias-ply
    tires, to build on the post quoted below. I have a '68 Ford >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Galaxie,
    and it has the full size spare installed on the front tire now, >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> a 1968
    bias-ply tire. I cannot believe that the thing still holds air >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> pressure. It's pretty well bald, however.

    Bicycle tires are designed to never be used.

    What about bicycle tires?

    The last time I actually USED my spare was on my '63 >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Valiant back
    about 1970. I ALMOST had to use it 3 times on one trip with the PT
    Cruiser on my trip to PEI when 3 valve stems failed and >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> christmas 1972
    in Montana or Idaho or Wyoming or wherever when I got a cinder >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> puncture - managed to find a tire repair guy before it got all >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> the way
    flat.

    I always keep a full sized spare when traveling. I can recall >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> too many
    times that I needed it on a 1,000+ mile road trip, in recent >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> history.

    A full-size tire would take up the entire trunk, making travel a >>>>>>>>>>>>>> little difficult. Full-size truck spares work because there is waste
    space under the bed. There is no wasted space in cars these days. I
    wonder that the (useless) electric trucks will do. AFAIK, the >>>>>>>>>>>>>> batteries take up that space.

    I keep the full-size tire on rim behind the driver's seat. On >>>>>>>>>>>>> very long
    road trips, the back seat it otherwise full of luggage, cooler, >>>>>>>>>>>>> blankets/pillows/air mattress/etc.

    I've heard that some new cars don't even have a donut spare. >>>>>>>>>>>
    As I said earlier, my wife's Mustang came with a 12V tire pump and a
    can of fix-a-flat. No spare of any kind.

    With 4 little chunks of rubber being the only thing between you
    and
    your last breath, Tires are not where I am going to cut corners. >>>>>>>>>>>>
    I just "decomissioned" a set of 7 year old michelins with 80% tread
    from the Ranger, as well as a 5 or 6 year old set of Michelind with
    about 40% tread from the Sorento.

    What did you do with them? It seems that every car needs a different
    size. Maybe I misunderstood. Do you still have the cars just that the
    tires are too old to trust? Why 80%?

    Possibly 2 reasons for thread being in good shape when retired. The >>>>>>>>>> vehicle is not driven much. My wife's car falls in that catagory. Over
    6 years old and plenty of tread.
    Or the winter summer swap out and the tires were only used half the >>>>>>>>>> year.
    The tires were SCRAPPED. Still have both vehicles. The truck is 26
    years old come april, with 376000Km on it and still going strong. The
    tires were wearing VERY well - so still had 80+% tread left but the >>>>>>>>> sidewalls were cracking. Combination of low miles/only used haf the >>>>>>>>> year amd plain old age.

    On the Kia I'm not sure how many miles were on the tires as they were
    on the 5 year old vehicle when we bought it and they were NOT >>>>>>>>> original. If they were the second set and the miles were put on in a >>>>>>>>> uniform manner over the previous life of the car there were likely >>>>>>>>> about 80000km on them. The tread was getting thin and, being >>>>>>>>> Michelins, the sidewalls were also starting to crack.

    I've never seen such new tires with cracking side walls. I would not >>>>>>>> buy that brand again if I were you.

    Brand has nothing to do with cracking on the sidewall. That is a defect
    and every manufacturer puts out some duds. This happened to me with >>>>>>> Michelin LTX M/S.
    Michelin authorized replacement at about 24K. The next set of Michelin,
    same tire, wore out in less than 25K. They adjusted the set again. >>>>>>
    At best they've pro-rated them, then charged full retail. Sale price, >>>>>> often at the same time, was a better deal.

    Yes, they always prorate from the retail price and if the tire needs to >>>>> be replaced, later in it's life, buying at the sale price can often be >>>>> less expensive. IIRC thse had a 70K mileage warranty and were wearing >>>>> well, other than the sidewall checking. So I got a pretty good
    adjustment on replacements. The second set were worn out, according to >>>>> Discount Tire, and the pro-rated cost was also pretty good.

    The trick is to bypass the retailer all together and go directly to the >>>>> manufacturers web site to get assistance. Once upon a time I ran a tire >>>>> store and learned a few tricks to get things done. ;~)
    If you cal the manufacturer be sure to give them the specifics. Tread >>>>> depth and mileage and the issue.

    In the last case DT said 2 tires qualified to be adjusted the other 2 >>>>> were not. A call to Michelin indicating that the other 2 tires were >>>>> about 1/16" from qualifying. They authorized replacement of all four >>>>> and called my dealer to set that up.





    At worst, they blamed it on me and refused to refund anything. I
    ignore tire warranties, other than to use them as a (poor) gauge of >>>>>> longevity.

    Again, call/contact the manufacturer.
    In Michelin's case the 70K mileage warranty was an extremely poor gauge, >>>>> considering they were just over 1/3 over the miles.

    And I know these were a fluke/bad batch of tires. I think the rubber >>>>> was too hard causing the checking on the first set and to combat that >>>>> issue the softer rubber compound on the second set caused them to wear >>>>> out prematurely.

    The problems I've generally had was premature wear. The 70K tire only >>>> went 35-40K. The warranty was based on tread remaining. Wonderful.


    If there is uneven wear the tire will be adjusted according to average
    tread depth. If you took their word for how the tire should be
    adjusted, premature wear compared to the actual warranty, you should
    have talked to the manufacturer. They will contact the tire store and
    fill them in.
    "premature wear" in not necessarilly uneven wear. IUn fact it is not
    even necessarilly "pre-mature" or "accellerated" - it is simply a
    higher than expected rate of wear either due to conditions or tire
    quality. Even accellerated wear is generally a sign of "not enough
    tire" or "cheap tire" - - or simply "WRONG TIRE" for the application.

    FWIW premature wear is typically a tire issue with the assumption that
    the correct tire was used on the vehicle. In that instance the mileage >should be used, again assuming the that there is a mileage warranty, for >adjustment pricing.

    Uneven wear is 99.9% of the time not the fault of the tire. If the tire >wears out premature due to uneven wear the average tread remaining is >normally used if this is authorized.

    Uneven wear can be caused by many situations. Most often caused by not >rotating the tires regularly, every x amount of miles. This normally
    shows up as excessive wear on the outside edge of the tread, and is
    cause by leaving the front tires in place too long before rotating.

    And under inflation can show up as uneven wear by excessive wear on the >inside and out side of the tread. Over inflation shows up as uneven
    wear in the middle of the tire.
    This was more of a problem prior to radial tires becoming the normal >replacement. This was an issue with biased ply tires.



    And uneven wear can be seen as scallopes along the edges or across the
    width of the tire. This is normally the result of unbalanced tires and
    worn out shock absorbers/struts. If those items are worn out the
    excessive bouncing can cause uneven wear spots.

    Uneven wear can be caused by alignment problems.

    Uneven wear is almost with out a doubt cause by one of the above
    mentioned conditions.

    Premature wear and uneven wear are 99% of th4e time not the same. That
    said I don't know of a manufacturer that will adjust a tire due to
    uneven wear. A lenient tire salesman will often offer some kind of >adjustment for premature wear if uneven wear is not exaggerated. And as >mentioned above they will adjust using an average of remaining tread and
    not use mileage as a basis.

    Having been in the tire business for 6 years and the auto dealership
    service department business for 10 years the wrong sized tire was the >exception.


    Over 26 years active in the business including 10 as dealership
    servive manager. It's not so much the wrong "size" tire as the wrong
    tire eating - but under-spec / under-sized tires are far from the
    exception when you remember "for the application" as a quialifier




    There were 3 diferent "Tiger Paw Touring" tires available to fit our
    Taurus. The cheap ones didn't stand up worth squat - and were out od
    round before they ware out. The expensive oned had good traction and
    rife but wore out quite quickly (like a "track tire"). The middle
    priced ones stood up very well, with more than adequate traction,
    treadwear, ride, and handling. The only spec that differed between
    them was the "speed rating" - and of course, the price!!!!

    That would be an observation. As I have mentioned previously all brands
    have issues at some time or another. Even the same exact tire and size
    can have different issues.

    Yes = particu;arly when there are 3 (or more) tires with the same manufacturer, brand, model and subtypes made to different price
    points.

    Recaping I had 3 sets of Michelin tires on my Tundra. All the same >name/style and spec's and same size.

    The first 2 sets were adjusted and replaced for different reasons. The
    first set had side wall checking/cracking

    An extremely common issue on Michelins - and Michelin says it's from
    not adequately "exercizing" the tire - not "pumping" the plasticisers
    through the rubber edequately (on lightly loaded and low mileage
    tires)

    With tires over 6 years old there is virtually no "adjustment" left
    regaedless of tread wear. I think I'f have gotten $15 each towards
    list price replacement
    They were Defenser LTX 109T? 235/70 16s replacing original
    195-70r16 96T rated rubber.
    The mileage expectancy was
    indicating longer than the 70K warranty. The second set simply wore out
    long before half the 70K mileage warranty was reached. The first and
    seconds sets were identical except for manufacture date. What was not >identical between the exact same named and sized tires was the rubber
    make up to make the tires last long on the first set and the rubber make
    up on the second to combat the checking issues, that simply wore out.





    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Leon@21:1/5 to Clare Snyder on Fri Jan 14 14:01:45 2022
    On 1/13/2022 9:53 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Wed, 12 Jan 2022 15:28:14 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/12/2022 2:45 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Wed, 12 Jan 2022 10:54:41 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/11/2022 7:55 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Tue, 11 Jan 2022 12:11:41 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/9/2022 4:07 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 9 Jan 2022 15:21:06 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote: >>>>>>>
    On 1/8/2022 5:28 PM, Michael Trew wrote:
    On 1/7/2022 14:54, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Fri, 7 Jan 2022 09:02:18 -0600, Leon<lcb11211@swbelldotnet>  wrote:

    On 1/6/2022 9:12 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Thu, 06 Jan 2022 21:56:56 -0500, Clare Snyder<clare@snyder.on.ca>
    wrote:

    On Tue, 04 Jan 2022 23:53:45 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net>  wrote:

    On 1/3/2022 12:00, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 11:50:51 -0500, Michael Trew >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <michael.trew@att.net>   wrote:

    On 1/2/2022 21:24, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Sun, 2 Jan 2022 14:49:08 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03 >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <teamarrows@eznet.net>    wrote:

    On Sunday, January 2, 2022 at 3:33:44 PM UTC-5, >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 14:48:13 GMT, Puckdropper<em...@example.com>
    wrote:
    Michael Trew<michae...@att.net>    wrote in >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> news:sqohqs$f27$7...@dont-email.me:

    On 12/31/2021 16:59, k...@notreal.com wrote: >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> anything for that
    matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)

    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    A good compressor that's easy to move (so not one of those >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 200 gallon
    monsters but also not a 1 1/2 gallon noise maker) would be a
    nice thing to
    pass down. Shoot, even if they just use it to inflate tires
    and beach
    balls, it would make their life that much easier. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> For tires I have one of these:

    <https://www.homedepot.com/p/RYOBI-ONE-18V-Lithium-Ion-Cordless-Power-Inflator-Kit-with-1-5-Ah-Battery-and-18V-Charger-P737DKN/311788879>


    SWMBO appreciates it very much.

    I looked at her "spare" a while back. Since it is small car >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> (Mustang), I knew it had to have a bicycle tire. Nope. Not even
    that. Under the trunk liner is a 12V compressor and a can of
    compressed tire gunk. Nice. A bicycle tire is an extra $250.

    Ever notice how all (?) spares are stored with the valve down
    or inward,
    forcing you to  remove the spare it to check/fill it?  The >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> spare in my Odyssey
    is buried valve down under the carpet between the front and >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> middle row seats.
    What a PITA to get it out.

    I have one configuration or another of these in all of my >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> vehicles.

    https://www.amazon.com/Hotop-Stainless-Extension-Braided-Extender/dp/B09BMWQQ3R


    All of the spares in my vehicles look something like this so I
    can check/top
    them off without removing them.

    https://i.imgur.com/6IHvl8M.jpg

    https://i.imgur.com/nxJAKFf.jpg

    I wouldn't be surprised if half the folks in this group (that
    have spares) have
    spares that are sitting at 45-50 PSI.

    It's amazing how those tires hold up.  Especially the old bias-ply
    tires, to build on the post quoted below.  I have a '68 Ford >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Galaxie,
    and it has the full size spare installed on the front tire now,
    a 1968
    bias-ply tire.  I cannot believe that the thing still holds air
    pressure.  It's pretty well bald, however.

    Bicycle tires are designed to never be used.

    What about bicycle tires?

          The last time I actually USED my spare was on my '63
    Valiant back
    about 1970. I ALMOST had to use it 3 times on one trip with the PT
    Cruiser on my trip to PEI when 3 valve stems failed and >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> christmas 1972
    in Montana or Idaho or Wyoming or wherever when I got a cinder
    puncture - managed to find a tire repair guy before it got all
    the way
    flat.

    I always keep a full sized spare when traveling.  I can recall
    too many
    times that I needed it on a 1,000+ mile road trip, in recent >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> history.

    A full-size tire would take up the entire trunk, making travel a
    little difficult. Full-size truck spares work because there is waste
    space under the bed. There is no wasted space in cars these days.  I
    wonder that the (useless) electric trucks will do. AFAIK, the >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> batteries take up that space.

    I keep the full-size tire on rim behind the driver's seat.  On >>>>>>>>>>>>>> very long
    road trips, the back seat it otherwise full of luggage, cooler, >>>>>>>>>>>>>> blankets/pillows/air mattress/etc.

    I've heard that some new cars don't even have a donut spare. >>>>>>>>>>>>
    As I said earlier, my wife's Mustang came with a 12V tire pump and a
    can of fix-a-flat.  No spare of any kind.

        With 4 little chunks of rubber being the only thing between you
    and
    your last breath, Tires are not where I am going to cut corners. >>>>>>>>>>>>>
    I just "decomissioned" a set of 7 year old michelins with 80% tread
    from the Ranger, as well as a 5 or 6 year old set of Michelind with
    about 40% tread from the Sorento.

    What did you do with them? It seems that every car needs a different
    size. Maybe I misunderstood.  Do you still have the cars just that the
    tires are too old to trust? Why 80%?

    Possibly 2 reasons for thread being in good shape when retired.  The
    vehicle is not driven much.  My wife's car falls in that catagory.  Over
    6 years old and plenty of tread.
    Or the winter summer swap out and the tires were only used half the >>>>>>>>>>> year.
       The tires were SCRAPPED. Still have both vehicles. The truck is 26
    years old come april, with 376000Km  on it and still going strong. The
    tires were wearing VERY well - so still had 80+% tread left but the >>>>>>>>>> sidewalls were cracking. Combination of low miles/only used haf the >>>>>>>>>> year amd plain old age.

    On the Kia I'm not  sure how many miles were on the tires as they were
    on the 5 year old vehicle when we bought it and they were NOT >>>>>>>>>> original. If they were the second set and the miles were put on in a >>>>>>>>>> uniform manner over the previous life of the car there were likely >>>>>>>>>> about 80000km on them. The tread was getting thin and, being >>>>>>>>>> Michelins, the sidewalls were also starting to crack.

    I've never seen such new tires with cracking side walls.  I would not
    buy that brand again if I were you.

    Brand has nothing to do with cracking on the sidewall. That is a defect
    and every manufacturer puts out some duds. This happened to me with >>>>>>>> Michelin LTX M/S.
    Michelin authorized replacement at about 24K. The next set of Michelin,
    same tire, wore out in less than 25K. They adjusted the set again. >>>>>>>
    At best they've pro-rated them, then charged full retail. Sale price, >>>>>>> often at the same time, was a better deal.

    Yes, they always prorate from the retail price and if the tire needs to >>>>>> be replaced, later in it's life, buying at the sale price can often be >>>>>> less expensive. IIRC thse had a 70K mileage warranty and were wearing >>>>>> well, other than the sidewall checking. So I got a pretty good
    adjustment on replacements. The second set were worn out, according to >>>>>> Discount Tire, and the pro-rated cost was also pretty good.

    The trick is to bypass the retailer all together and go directly to the >>>>>> manufacturers web site to get assistance. Once upon a time I ran a tire >>>>>> store and learned a few tricks to get things done. ;~)
    If you cal the manufacturer be sure to give them the specifics. Tread >>>>>> depth and mileage and the issue.

    In the last case DT said 2 tires qualified to be adjusted the other 2 >>>>>> were not. A call to Michelin indicating that the other 2 tires were >>>>>> about 1/16" from qualifying. They authorized replacement of all four >>>>>> and called my dealer to set that up.





    At worst, they blamed it on me and refused to refund anything. I >>>>>>> ignore tire warranties, other than to use them as a (poor) gauge of >>>>>>> longevity.

    Again, call/contact the manufacturer.
    In Michelin's case the 70K mileage warranty was an extremely poor gauge, >>>>>> considering they were just over 1/3 over the miles.

    And I know these were a fluke/bad batch of tires. I think the rubber >>>>>> was too hard causing the checking on the first set and to combat that >>>>>> issue the softer rubber compound on the second set caused them to wear >>>>>> out prematurely.

    The problems I've generally had was premature wear. The 70K tire only >>>>> went 35-40K. The warranty was based on tread remaining. Wonderful.


    If there is uneven wear the tire will be adjusted according to average >>>> tread depth. If you took their word for how the tire should be
    adjusted, premature wear compared to the actual warranty, you should
    have talked to the manufacturer. They will contact the tire store and >>>> fill them in.
    "premature wear" in not necessarilly uneven wear. IUn fact it is not
    even necessarilly "pre-mature" or "accellerated" - it is simply a
    higher than expected rate of wear either due to conditions or tire
    quality. Even accellerated wear is generally a sign of "not enough
    tire" or "cheap tire" - - or simply "WRONG TIRE" for the application.

    FWIW premature wear is typically a tire issue with the assumption that
    the correct tire was used on the vehicle. In that instance the mileage
    should be used, again assuming the that there is a mileage warranty, for
    adjustment pricing.

    Uneven wear is 99.9% of the time not the fault of the tire. If the tire
    wears out premature due to uneven wear the average tread remaining is
    normally used if this is authorized.

    Uneven wear can be caused by many situations. Most often caused by not
    rotating the tires regularly, every x amount of miles. This normally
    shows up as excessive wear on the outside edge of the tread, and is
    cause by leaving the front tires in place too long before rotating.

    And under inflation can show up as uneven wear by excessive wear on the
    inside and out side of the tread. Over inflation shows up as uneven
    wear in the middle of the tire.
    This was more of a problem prior to radial tires becoming the normal
    replacement. This was an issue with biased ply tires.



    And uneven wear can be seen as scallopes along the edges or across the
    width of the tire. This is normally the result of unbalanced tires and
    worn out shock absorbers/struts. If those items are worn out the
    excessive bouncing can cause uneven wear spots.

    Uneven wear can be caused by alignment problems.

    Uneven wear is almost with out a doubt cause by one of the above
    mentioned conditions.

    Premature wear and uneven wear are 99% of th4e time not the same. That
    said I don't know of a manufacturer that will adjust a tire due to
    uneven wear. A lenient tire salesman will often offer some kind of
    adjustment for premature wear if uneven wear is not exaggerated. And as
    mentioned above they will adjust using an average of remaining tread and
    not use mileage as a basis.

    Having been in the tire business for 6 years and the auto dealership
    service department business for 10 years the wrong sized tire was the
    exception.


    Over 26 years active in the business including 10 as dealership
    servive manager. It's not so much the wrong "size" tire as the wrong
    tire eating - but under-spec / under-sized tires are far from the
    exception when you remember "for the application" as a quialifier

    Got me beat! LOL. I was only in the auto industry from 72 ~95. I
    worked as a teenager at the company/tire store, Ameron Automotice
    Centers in Corpus Christi, 2 years. Moved to Houston withe my parents
    when I was 19 and was asked to return to work for the same company in
    Houston. 2 years later I was running one of their centers. I saw a dead
    end and resigned to work at BF Goodrich for 8 months. Then was
    approached at 22 to run the parts department for a "yet to be opened"
    Olds Dealership in downtown Houston. Back to Corpus Christi to train at
    the parent dealership. Trained in the body shop, asst manager, and the
    parts department. 9 months later we opened the dealership, I was the
    parts manager for 4 or so years and then promoted to service sales
    manager for about 3 years. Then Parts director for the Olds and new
    Isuzu franchise. That all took almost 10 years. Then a job offer to be
    the GM for an AC/Delco/3M/Permatex dealer for about 8 years and then I
    retired at 40. Whew!


    And agreed, not so much the wrong size as the application. I was in the service end of the business for 15 years and back then, 1972-1987
    probably 90% of the tires sold were for automobiles. I am quite certain
    that percentage has changed more in the truck population direction.
    Back then the tires that came on trucks were rarely different than on automobiles. I know my 79 GMC had regular passenger car tires on it and
    I upgraded to a truck type tire for replacements. BUT the originals
    wore well as I drove the truck unloaded most of the time. When I
    sold/mounted tires at the tire store passenger tires came off and
    passenger tires went back on, in the 70's. Oldsmobile did not have many installs of tires and pretty much no trucks.








    There were 3 diferent "Tiger Paw Touring" tires available to fit our
    Taurus. The cheap ones didn't stand up worth squat - and were out od
    round before they ware out. The expensive oned had good traction and
    rife but wore out quite quickly (like a "track tire"). The middle
    priced ones stood up very well, with more than adequate traction,
    treadwear, ride, and handling. The only spec that differed between
    them was the "speed rating" - and of course, the price!!!!

    That would be an observation. As I have mentioned previously all brands
    have issues at some time or another. Even the same exact tire and size
    can have different issues.

    Yes = particu;arly when there are 3 (or more) tires with the same manufacturer, brand, model and subtypes made to different price
    points.

    Recaping I had 3 sets of Michelin tires on my Tundra. All the same
    name/style and spec's and same size.

    The first 2 sets were adjusted and replaced for different reasons. The
    first set had side wall checking/cracking

    An extremely common issue on Michelins - and Michelin says it's from
    not adequately "exercizing" the tire - not "pumping" the plasticisers
    through the rubber edequately (on lightly loaded and low mileage
    tires)

    With tires over 6 years old there is virtually no "adjustment" left regaedless of tread wear. I think I'f have gotten $15 each towards
    list price replacement
    They were Defenser LTX 109T? 235/70 16s replacing original
    195-70r16 96T rated rubber.
    The mileage expectancy was
    indicating longer than the 70K warranty. The second set simply wore out
    long before half the 70K mileage warranty was reached. The first and
    seconds sets were identical except for manufacture date. What was not
    identical between the exact same named and sized tires was the rubber
    make up to make the tires last long on the first set and the rubber make
    up on the second to combat the checking issues, that simply wore out.





    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Bob Davis@21:1/5 to Bob Davis on Fri Jan 14 18:20:20 2022
    On Friday, December 31, 2021 at 8:35:56 AM UTC-6, Bob Davis wrote:
    My ever faithful air compressor is finally getting tired. I've had it since the mid-70's. I am thinking about getting the exact same compressor. The design has been around at least 50 years and they still make it. It's an oil lubed cast iron workhorse.
    Maybe technology has marched and there is something better, so I seek opinions.

    Here is my current compressor:

    https://www.grainger.com/product/SPEEDAIRE-Portable-Air-Compressor-Oil-1NNF7

    Bob

    Ahem! getting back on the original topic of air compressors...

    My new compressor arrived. It is almost a clone of my original compressor. The motor is bigger and rated higher HP. Its 3.7 HP and 17 amps vs the original 3 HP and 15 amps. The intake air filter is significantly bigger. The old compressor had inch-
    high words "Made in USA" prominently embedded in the cast iron compressor body. The new compressor is basically all chinese. The new compressor seems heavier. It weighs 155lb. It runs extemely smooth.

    So I ran a comparison test between the two, knowing the old has significant wear. I had to reassure myself that it wasn't just a gut feel. I blocked off the outlets on both compressors, emptied the tanks, and timed how long it to to bring the 20
    gallon tanks up to cutoff pressure (135 PSI). The old compressor took 4:15. The new compressor took 1:45. Yep there is a difference. I hope the new one lasts 10 years.

    Bob

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Clare Snyder@21:1/5 to All on Sat Jan 15 01:06:18 2022
    On Fri, 14 Jan 2022 14:01:45 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/13/2022 9:53 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Wed, 12 Jan 2022 15:28:14 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/12/2022 2:45 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Wed, 12 Jan 2022 10:54:41 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/11/2022 7:55 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Tue, 11 Jan 2022 12:11:41 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/9/2022 4:07 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 9 Jan 2022 15:21:06 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote: >>>>>>>>
    On 1/8/2022 5:28 PM, Michael Trew wrote:
    On 1/7/2022 14:54, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Fri, 7 Jan 2022 09:02:18 -0600, Leon<lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 1/6/2022 9:12 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Thu, 06 Jan 2022 21:56:56 -0500, Clare Snyder<clare@snyder.on.ca>
    wrote:

    On Tue, 04 Jan 2022 23:53:45 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/3/2022 12:00, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 11:50:51 -0500, Michael Trew >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/2/2022 21:24, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Sun, 2 Jan 2022 14:49:08 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03 >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Sunday, January 2, 2022 at 3:33:44 PM UTC-5, >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 14:48:13 GMT, Puckdropper<em...@example.com>
    wrote:
    Michael Trew<michae...@att.net> wrote in >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> news:sqohqs$f27$7...@dont-email.me:

    On 12/31/2021 16:59, k...@notreal.com wrote: >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> anything for that
    matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)

    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    A good compressor that's easy to move (so not one of those
    200 gallon
    monsters but also not a 1 1/2 gallon noise maker) would be a
    nice thing to
    pass down. Shoot, even if they just use it to inflate tires
    and beach
    balls, it would make their life that much easier. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> For tires I have one of these:

    <https://www.homedepot.com/p/RYOBI-ONE-18V-Lithium-Ion-Cordless-Power-Inflator-Kit-with-1-5-Ah-Battery-and-18V-Charger-P737DKN/311788879>


    SWMBO appreciates it very much.

    I looked at her "spare" a while back. Since it is small car
    (Mustang), I knew it had to have a bicycle tire. Nope. Not even
    that. Under the trunk liner is a 12V compressor and a can of
    compressed tire gunk. Nice. A bicycle tire is an extra $250.

    Ever notice how all (?) spares are stored with the valve down
    or inward,
    forcing you to remove the spare it to check/fill it? The >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> spare in my Odyssey
    is buried valve down under the carpet between the front and >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> middle row seats.
    What a PITA to get it out.

    I have one configuration or another of these in all of my >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> vehicles.

    https://www.amazon.com/Hotop-Stainless-Extension-Braided-Extender/dp/B09BMWQQ3R


    All of the spares in my vehicles look something like this so I
    can check/top
    them off without removing them.

    https://i.imgur.com/6IHvl8M.jpg

    https://i.imgur.com/nxJAKFf.jpg

    I wouldn't be surprised if half the folks in this group (that
    have spares) have
    spares that are sitting at 45-50 PSI.

    It's amazing how those tires hold up. Especially the old bias-ply
    tires, to build on the post quoted below. I have a '68 Ford >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Galaxie,
    and it has the full size spare installed on the front tire now,
    a 1968
    bias-ply tire. I cannot believe that the thing still holds air
    pressure. It's pretty well bald, however.

    Bicycle tires are designed to never be used.

    What about bicycle tires?

    The last time I actually USED my spare was on my '63
    Valiant back
    about 1970. I ALMOST had to use it 3 times on one trip with the PT
    Cruiser on my trip to PEI when 3 valve stems failed and >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> christmas 1972
    in Montana or Idaho or Wyoming or wherever when I got a cinder
    puncture - managed to find a tire repair guy before it got all
    the way
    flat.

    I always keep a full sized spare when traveling. I can recall
    too many
    times that I needed it on a 1,000+ mile road trip, in recent >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> history.

    A full-size tire would take up the entire trunk, making travel a
    little difficult. Full-size truck spares work because there is waste
    space under the bed. There is no wasted space in cars these days. I
    wonder that the (useless) electric trucks will do. AFAIK, the >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> batteries take up that space.

    I keep the full-size tire on rim behind the driver's seat. On >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> very long
    road trips, the back seat it otherwise full of luggage, cooler, >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> blankets/pillows/air mattress/etc.

    I've heard that some new cars don't even have a donut spare. >>>>>>>>>>>>>
    As I said earlier, my wife's Mustang came with a 12V tire pump and a
    can of fix-a-flat. No spare of any kind.

    With 4 little chunks of rubber being the only thing between you
    and
    your last breath, Tires are not where I am going to cut corners. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    I just "decomissioned" a set of 7 year old michelins with 80% tread
    from the Ranger, as well as a 5 or 6 year old set of Michelind with
    about 40% tread from the Sorento.

    What did you do with them? It seems that every car needs a different
    size. Maybe I misunderstood. Do you still have the cars just that the
    tires are too old to trust? Why 80%?

    Possibly 2 reasons for thread being in good shape when retired. The
    vehicle is not driven much. My wife's car falls in that catagory. Over
    6 years old and plenty of tread.
    Or the winter summer swap out and the tires were only used half the
    year.
    The tires were SCRAPPED. Still have both vehicles. The truck is 26
    years old come april, with 376000Km on it and still going strong. The
    tires were wearing VERY well - so still had 80+% tread left but the >>>>>>>>>>> sidewalls were cracking. Combination of low miles/only used haf the >>>>>>>>>>> year amd plain old age.

    On the Kia I'm not sure how many miles were on the tires as they were
    on the 5 year old vehicle when we bought it and they were NOT >>>>>>>>>>> original. If they were the second set and the miles were put on in a
    uniform manner over the previous life of the car there were likely >>>>>>>>>>> about 80000km on them. The tread was getting thin and, being >>>>>>>>>>> Michelins, the sidewalls were also starting to crack.

    I've never seen such new tires with cracking side walls. I would not
    buy that brand again if I were you.

    Brand has nothing to do with cracking on the sidewall. That is a defect
    and every manufacturer puts out some duds. This happened to me with >>>>>>>>> Michelin LTX M/S.
    Michelin authorized replacement at about 24K. The next set of Michelin,
    same tire, wore out in less than 25K. They adjusted the set again. >>>>>>>>
    At best they've pro-rated them, then charged full retail. Sale price, >>>>>>>> often at the same time, was a better deal.

    Yes, they always prorate from the retail price and if the tire needs to >>>>>>> be replaced, later in it's life, buying at the sale price can often be >>>>>>> less expensive. IIRC thse had a 70K mileage warranty and were wearing >>>>>>> well, other than the sidewall checking. So I got a pretty good
    adjustment on replacements. The second set were worn out, according to >>>>>>> Discount Tire, and the pro-rated cost was also pretty good.

    The trick is to bypass the retailer all together and go directly to the >>>>>>> manufacturers web site to get assistance. Once upon a time I ran a tire
    store and learned a few tricks to get things done. ;~)
    If you cal the manufacturer be sure to give them the specifics. Tread >>>>>>> depth and mileage and the issue.

    In the last case DT said 2 tires qualified to be adjusted the other 2 >>>>>>> were not. A call to Michelin indicating that the other 2 tires were >>>>>>> about 1/16" from qualifying. They authorized replacement of all four >>>>>>> and called my dealer to set that up.





    At worst, they blamed it on me and refused to refund anything. I >>>>>>>> ignore tire warranties, other than to use them as a (poor) gauge of >>>>>>>> longevity.

    Again, call/contact the manufacturer.
    In Michelin's case the 70K mileage warranty was an extremely poor gauge,
    considering they were just over 1/3 over the miles.

    And I know these were a fluke/bad batch of tires. I think the rubber >>>>>>> was too hard causing the checking on the first set and to combat that >>>>>>> issue the softer rubber compound on the second set caused them to wear >>>>>>> out prematurely.

    The problems I've generally had was premature wear. The 70K tire only >>>>>> went 35-40K. The warranty was based on tread remaining. Wonderful. >>>>>

    If there is uneven wear the tire will be adjusted according to average >>>>> tread depth. If you took their word for how the tire should be
    adjusted, premature wear compared to the actual warranty, you should >>>>> have talked to the manufacturer. They will contact the tire store and >>>>> fill them in.
    "premature wear" in not necessarilly uneven wear. IUn fact it is not
    even necessarilly "pre-mature" or "accellerated" - it is simply a
    higher than expected rate of wear either due to conditions or tire
    quality. Even accellerated wear is generally a sign of "not enough
    tire" or "cheap tire" - - or simply "WRONG TIRE" for the application.

    FWIW premature wear is typically a tire issue with the assumption that
    the correct tire was used on the vehicle. In that instance the mileage
    should be used, again assuming the that there is a mileage warranty, for >>> adjustment pricing.

    Uneven wear is 99.9% of the time not the fault of the tire. If the tire >>> wears out premature due to uneven wear the average tread remaining is
    normally used if this is authorized.

    Uneven wear can be caused by many situations. Most often caused by not
    rotating the tires regularly, every x amount of miles. This normally
    shows up as excessive wear on the outside edge of the tread, and is
    cause by leaving the front tires in place too long before rotating.

    And under inflation can show up as uneven wear by excessive wear on the
    inside and out side of the tread. Over inflation shows up as uneven
    wear in the middle of the tire.
    This was more of a problem prior to radial tires becoming the normal
    replacement. This was an issue with biased ply tires.



    And uneven wear can be seen as scallopes along the edges or across the
    width of the tire. This is normally the result of unbalanced tires and
    worn out shock absorbers/struts. If those items are worn out the
    excessive bouncing can cause uneven wear spots.

    Uneven wear can be caused by alignment problems.

    Uneven wear is almost with out a doubt cause by one of the above
    mentioned conditions.

    Premature wear and uneven wear are 99% of th4e time not the same. That
    said I don't know of a manufacturer that will adjust a tire due to
    uneven wear. A lenient tire salesman will often offer some kind of
    adjustment for premature wear if uneven wear is not exaggerated. And as >>> mentioned above they will adjust using an average of remaining tread and >>> not use mileage as a basis.

    Having been in the tire business for 6 years and the auto dealership
    service department business for 10 years the wrong sized tire was the
    exception.


    Over 26 years active in the business including 10 as dealership
    servive manager. It's not so much the wrong "size" tire as the wrong
    tire eating - but under-spec / under-sized tires are far from the
    exception when you remember "for the application" as a quialifier

    Got me beat! LOL. I was only in the auto industry from 72 ~95. I
    worked as a teenager at the company/tire store, Ameron Automotice
    Centers in Corpus Christi, 2 years. Moved to Houston withe my parents
    when I was 19 and was asked to return to work for the same company in >Houston. 2 years later I was running one of their centers. I saw a dead
    end and resigned to work at BF Goodrich for 8 months. Then was
    approached at 22 to run the parts department for a "yet to be opened"
    Olds Dealership in downtown Houston. Back to Corpus Christi to train at
    the parent dealership. Trained in the body shop, asst manager, and the
    parts department. 9 months later we opened the dealership, I was the
    parts manager for 4 or so years and then promoted to service sales
    manager for about 3 years. Then Parts director for the Olds and new
    Isuzu franchise. That all took almost 10 years. Then a job offer to be
    the GM for an AC/Delco/3M/Permatex dealer for about 8 years and then I >retired at 40. Whew!


    And agreed, not so much the wrong size as the application. I was in the >service end of the business for 15 years and back then, 1972-1987
    probably 90% of the tires sold were for automobiles. I am quite certain
    that percentage has changed more in the truck population direction.
    Back then the tires that came on trucks were rarely different than on >automobiles. I know my 79 GMC had regular passenger car tires on it and
    I upgraded to a truck type tire for replacements. BUT the originals
    wore well as I drove the truck unloaded most of the time. When I >sold/mounted tires at the tire store passenger tires came off and
    passenger tires went back on, in the 70's. Oldsmobile did not have many >installs of tires and pretty much no trucks.

    Started my apprenticeship in '68 - graduated high school in '69,
    finished my apprenticeship at a Texaco general repair garage / farm
    equipment dealership in - 1971 -wrote my CofQ (top of my class) Dec
    '71, got my interprovincial licence in March '72.(At 19,youngest
    licensed mechanic in Ontario) Worked for Toyota dealer and then AMC /
    Jeep /Mazda / International Trucks dealer/ Esso station and as supply
    teacher. Then I taught trade level internationally for 2 years, then
    returned to working at CanadianTire, moving on to running the bays at
    an ESSO station, then to industrial equipment dealership, on to
    operating the bays at a shell station and back to the Toyota
    dealership where I became service manager within 3 weeks. I spent 10
    years as service manager, going from 2 mechanics plus myself to 7 plus
    myself before deciding to actively leave the trade. I've worked as a consultant to the trade in various capacities over the last 30 years
    off and on as a self employed IT / technoligy proffessional.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Michael Trew@21:1/5 to Bob Davis on Sat Jan 15 21:50:42 2022
    On 1/14/2022 21:20, Bob Davis wrote:
    On Friday, December 31, 2021 at 8:35:56 AM UTC-6, Bob Davis wrote:
    My ever faithful air compressor is finally getting tired. I've had it since the mid-70's. I am thinking about getting the exact same compressor. The design has been around at least 50 years and they still make it. It's an oil lubed cast iron workhorse.
    Maybe technology has marched and there is something better, so I seek opinions.

    Here is my current compressor:

    https://www.grainger.com/product/SPEEDAIRE-Portable-Air-Compressor-Oil-1NNF7 >>
    Bob

    Ahem! getting back on the original topic of air compressors...

    My new compressor arrived. It is almost a clone of my original compressor. The motor is bigger and rated higher HP. Its 3.7 HP and 17 amps vs the original 3 HP and 15 amps. The intake air filter is significantly bigger. The old compressor had inch-
    high words "Made in USA" prominently embedded in the cast iron compressor body. The new compressor is basically all chinese.. The new compressor seems heavier. It weighs 155lb. It runs extemely smooth.

    So I ran a comparison test between the two, knowing the old has significant wear. I had to reassure myself that it wasn't just a gut feel. I blocked off the outlets on both compressors, emptied the tanks, and timed how long it to to bring the 20
    gallon tanks up to cutoff pressure (135 PSI). The old compressor took 4:15. The new compressor took 1:45. Yep there is a difference. I hope the new one lasts 10 years.

    Bob

    Glad it's working out for you; I'd gladly take the old one off your
    hands if you were local... Lol

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Bob Davis@21:1/5 to Michael Trew on Sat Jan 15 19:17:39 2022
    On Saturday, January 15, 2022 at 8:50:38 PM UTC-6, Michael Trew wrote:
    On 1/14/2022 21:20, Bob Davis wrote:
    On Friday, December 31, 2021 at 8:35:56 AM UTC-6, Bob Davis wrote:
    My ever faithful air compressor is finally getting tired. I've had it since the mid-70's. I am thinking about getting the exact same compressor. The design has been around at least 50 years and they still make it. It's an oil lubed cast iron
    workhorse. Maybe technology has marched and there is something better, so I seek opinions.

    Here is my current compressor:

    https://www.grainger.com/product/SPEEDAIRE-Portable-Air-Compressor-Oil-1NNF7

    Bob

    Ahem! getting back on the original topic of air compressors...

    My new compressor arrived. It is almost a clone of my original compressor. The motor is bigger and rated higher HP. Its 3.7 HP and 17 amps vs the original 3 HP and 15 amps. The intake air filter is significantly bigger. The old compressor had inch-
    high words "Made in USA" prominently embedded in the cast iron compressor body. The new compressor is basically all chinese.. The new compressor seems heavier. It weighs 155lb. It runs extemely smooth.

    So I ran a comparison test between the two, knowing the old has significant wear. I had to reassure myself that it wasn't just a gut feel. I blocked off the outlets on both compressors, emptied the tanks, and timed how long it to to bring the 20
    gallon tanks up to cutoff pressure (135 PSI). The old compressor took 4:15. The new compressor took 1:45. Yep there is a difference. I hope the new one lasts 10 years.

    Bob
    Glad it's working out for you; I'd gladly take the old one off your
    hands if you were local... Lol

    Thank you.

    The new one is such a clone, it wouldn't surprise me if new parts fit the old one. The manual for the new compressor lists parts all the way to every screw, piston rings, and bearings. I wonder if the original phone number "call for parts" on the side
    of the old compressor still works. I am giving the old compressor to my personal trainer who is building an automotive repair business. He will probably rebuild it, if possible. In the meantime, I am certainly enjoying having a compressor again that
    keeps up with all my air needs.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Leon@21:1/5 to Clare Snyder on Sun Jan 16 13:33:42 2022
    On 1/15/2022 12:06 AM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Fri, 14 Jan 2022 14:01:45 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/13/2022 9:53 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Wed, 12 Jan 2022 15:28:14 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/12/2022 2:45 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Wed, 12 Jan 2022 10:54:41 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/11/2022 7:55 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Tue, 11 Jan 2022 12:11:41 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> >>>>>>> wrote:

    On 1/9/2022 4:07 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 9 Jan 2022 15:21:06 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 1/8/2022 5:28 PM, Michael Trew wrote:
    On 1/7/2022 14:54, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Fri, 7 Jan 2022 09:02:18 -0600, Leon<lcb11211@swbelldotnet>  wrote:

    On 1/6/2022 9:12 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Thu, 06 Jan 2022 21:56:56 -0500, Clare Snyder<clare@snyder.on.ca>
    wrote:

    On Tue, 04 Jan 2022 23:53:45 -0500, Michael Trew >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <michael.trew@att.net>  wrote:

    On 1/3/2022 12:00, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 11:50:51 -0500, Michael Trew >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <michael.trew@att.net>   wrote:

    On 1/2/2022 21:24, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Sun, 2 Jan 2022 14:49:08 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03 >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <teamarrows@eznet.net>    wrote:

    On Sunday, January 2, 2022 at 3:33:44 PM UTC-5, >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 14:48:13 GMT, Puckdropper<em...@example.com>
    wrote:
    Michael Trew<michae...@att.net>    wrote in >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> news:sqohqs$f27$7...@dont-email.me: >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    On 12/31/2021 16:59, k...@notreal.com wrote: >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> anything for that
    matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)

    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    A good compressor that's easy to move (so not one of those
    200 gallon
    monsters but also not a 1 1/2 gallon noise maker) would be a
    nice thing to
    pass down. Shoot, even if they just use it to inflate tires
    and beach
    balls, it would make their life that much easier. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> For tires I have one of these:

    <https://www.homedepot.com/p/RYOBI-ONE-18V-Lithium-Ion-Cordless-Power-Inflator-Kit-with-1-5-Ah-Battery-and-18V-Charger-P737DKN/311788879>


    SWMBO appreciates it very much.

    I looked at her "spare" a while back. Since it is small car
    (Mustang), I knew it had to have a bicycle tire. Nope. Not even
    that. Under the trunk liner is a 12V compressor and a can of
    compressed tire gunk. Nice. A bicycle tire is an extra $250.

    Ever notice how all (?) spares are stored with the valve down
    or inward,
    forcing you to  remove the spare it to check/fill it?  The
    spare in my Odyssey
    is buried valve down under the carpet between the front and
    middle row seats.
    What a PITA to get it out.

    I have one configuration or another of these in all of my >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> vehicles.

    https://www.amazon.com/Hotop-Stainless-Extension-Braided-Extender/dp/B09BMWQQ3R


    All of the spares in my vehicles look something like this so I
    can check/top
    them off without removing them.

    https://i.imgur.com/6IHvl8M.jpg

    https://i.imgur.com/nxJAKFf.jpg

    I wouldn't be surprised if half the folks in this group (that
    have spares) have
    spares that are sitting at 45-50 PSI.

    It's amazing how those tires hold up.  Especially the old bias-ply
    tires, to build on the post quoted below.  I have a '68 Ford
    Galaxie,
    and it has the full size spare installed on the front tire now,
    a 1968
    bias-ply tire.  I cannot believe that the thing still holds air
    pressure.  It's pretty well bald, however. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    Bicycle tires are designed to never be used.

    What about bicycle tires?

          The last time I actually USED my spare was on my '63
    Valiant back
    about 1970. I ALMOST had to use it 3 times on one trip with the PT
    Cruiser on my trip to PEI when 3 valve stems failed and >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> christmas 1972
    in Montana or Idaho or Wyoming or wherever when I got a cinder
    puncture - managed to find a tire repair guy before it got all
    the way
    flat.

    I always keep a full sized spare when traveling.  I can recall
    too many
    times that I needed it on a 1,000+ mile road trip, in recent >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> history.

    A full-size tire would take up the entire trunk, making travel a
    little difficult. Full-size truck spares work because there is waste
    space under the bed. There is no wasted space in cars these days.  I
    wonder that the (useless) electric trucks will do. AFAIK, the >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> batteries take up that space.

    I keep the full-size tire on rim behind the driver's seat.  On
    very long
    road trips, the back seat it otherwise full of luggage, cooler,
    blankets/pillows/air mattress/etc.

    I've heard that some new cars don't even have a donut spare. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    As I said earlier, my wife's Mustang came with a 12V tire pump and a
    can of fix-a-flat.  No spare of any kind.

        With 4 little chunks of rubber being the only thing between you
    and
    your last breath, Tires are not where I am going to cut corners.

    I just "decomissioned" a set of 7 year old michelins with 80% tread
    from the Ranger, as well as a 5 or 6 year old set of Michelind with
    about 40% tread from the Sorento.

    What did you do with them? It seems that every car needs a different
    size. Maybe I misunderstood.  Do you still have the cars just that the
    tires are too old to trust? Why 80%?

    Possibly 2 reasons for thread being in good shape when retired.  The
    vehicle is not driven much.  My wife's car falls in that catagory.  Over
    6 years old and plenty of tread.
    Or the winter summer swap out and the tires were only used half the
    year.
       The tires were SCRAPPED. Still have both vehicles. The truck is 26
    years old come april, with 376000Km  on it and still going strong. The
    tires were wearing VERY well - so still had 80+% tread left but the
    sidewalls were cracking. Combination of low miles/only used haf the
    year amd plain old age.

    On the Kia I'm not  sure how many miles were on the tires as they were
    on the 5 year old vehicle when we bought it and they were NOT >>>>>>>>>>>> original. If they were the second set and the miles were put on in a
    uniform manner over the previous life of the car there were likely >>>>>>>>>>>> about 80000km on them. The tread was getting thin and, being >>>>>>>>>>>> Michelins, the sidewalls were also starting to crack.

    I've never seen such new tires with cracking side walls.  I would not
    buy that brand again if I were you.

    Brand has nothing to do with cracking on the sidewall. That is a defect
    and every manufacturer puts out some duds. This happened to me with >>>>>>>>>> Michelin LTX M/S.
    Michelin authorized replacement at about 24K. The next set of Michelin,
    same tire, wore out in less than 25K. They adjusted the set again. >>>>>>>>>
    At best they've pro-rated them, then charged full retail. Sale price, >>>>>>>>> often at the same time, was a better deal.

    Yes, they always prorate from the retail price and if the tire needs to
    be replaced, later in it's life, buying at the sale price can often be >>>>>>>> less expensive. IIRC thse had a 70K mileage warranty and were wearing >>>>>>>> well, other than the sidewall checking. So I got a pretty good >>>>>>>> adjustment on replacements. The second set were worn out, according to
    Discount Tire, and the pro-rated cost was also pretty good.

    The trick is to bypass the retailer all together and go directly to the
    manufacturers web site to get assistance. Once upon a time I ran a tire
    store and learned a few tricks to get things done. ;~)
    If you cal the manufacturer be sure to give them the specifics. Tread >>>>>>>> depth and mileage and the issue.

    In the last case DT said 2 tires qualified to be adjusted the other 2 >>>>>>>> were not. A call to Michelin indicating that the other 2 tires were >>>>>>>> about 1/16" from qualifying. They authorized replacement of all four >>>>>>>> and called my dealer to set that up.





    At worst, they blamed it on me and refused to refund anything. I >>>>>>>>> ignore tire warranties, other than to use them as a (poor) gauge of >>>>>>>>> longevity.

    Again, call/contact the manufacturer.
    In Michelin's case the 70K mileage warranty was an extremely poor gauge,
    considering they were just over 1/3 over the miles.

    And I know these were a fluke/bad batch of tires. I think the rubber >>>>>>>> was too hard causing the checking on the first set and to combat that >>>>>>>> issue the softer rubber compound on the second set caused them to wear >>>>>>>> out prematurely.

    The problems I've generally had was premature wear. The 70K tire only >>>>>>> went 35-40K. The warranty was based on tread remaining. Wonderful. >>>>>>

    If there is uneven wear the tire will be adjusted according to average >>>>>> tread depth. If you took their word for how the tire should be
    adjusted, premature wear compared to the actual warranty, you should >>>>>> have talked to the manufacturer. They will contact the tire store and >>>>>> fill them in.
    "premature wear" in not necessarilly uneven wear. IUn fact it is not >>>>> even necessarilly "pre-mature" or "accellerated" - it is simply a
    higher than expected rate of wear either due to conditions or tire
    quality. Even accellerated wear is generally a sign of "not enough
    tire" or "cheap tire" - - or simply "WRONG TIRE" for the application. >>>>
    FWIW premature wear is typically a tire issue with the assumption that >>>> the correct tire was used on the vehicle. In that instance the mileage >>>> should be used, again assuming the that there is a mileage warranty, for >>>> adjustment pricing.

    Uneven wear is 99.9% of the time not the fault of the tire. If the tire >>>> wears out premature due to uneven wear the average tread remaining is
    normally used if this is authorized.

    Uneven wear can be caused by many situations. Most often caused by not >>>> rotating the tires regularly, every x amount of miles. This normally
    shows up as excessive wear on the outside edge of the tread, and is
    cause by leaving the front tires in place too long before rotating.

    And under inflation can show up as uneven wear by excessive wear on the >>>> inside and out side of the tread. Over inflation shows up as uneven
    wear in the middle of the tire.
    This was more of a problem prior to radial tires becoming the normal
    replacement. This was an issue with biased ply tires.



    And uneven wear can be seen as scallopes along the edges or across the >>>> width of the tire. This is normally the result of unbalanced tires and >>>> worn out shock absorbers/struts. If those items are worn out the
    excessive bouncing can cause uneven wear spots.

    Uneven wear can be caused by alignment problems.

    Uneven wear is almost with out a doubt cause by one of the above
    mentioned conditions.

    Premature wear and uneven wear are 99% of th4e time not the same. That >>>> said I don't know of a manufacturer that will adjust a tire due to
    uneven wear. A lenient tire salesman will often offer some kind of
    adjustment for premature wear if uneven wear is not exaggerated. And as >>>> mentioned above they will adjust using an average of remaining tread and >>>> not use mileage as a basis.

    Having been in the tire business for 6 years and the auto dealership
    service department business for 10 years the wrong sized tire was the >>>> exception.


    Over 26 years active in the business including 10 as dealership
    servive manager. It's not so much the wrong "size" tire as the wrong
    tire eating - but under-spec / under-sized tires are far from the
    exception when you remember "for the application" as a quialifier

    Got me beat! LOL. I was only in the auto industry from 72 ~95. I
    worked as a teenager at the company/tire store, Ameron Automotice
    Centers in Corpus Christi, 2 years. Moved to Houston withe my parents
    when I was 19 and was asked to return to work for the same company in
    Houston. 2 years later I was running one of their centers. I saw a dead
    end and resigned to work at BF Goodrich for 8 months. Then was
    approached at 22 to run the parts department for a "yet to be opened"
    Olds Dealership in downtown Houston. Back to Corpus Christi to train at
    the parent dealership. Trained in the body shop, asst manager, and the
    parts department. 9 months later we opened the dealership, I was the
    parts manager for 4 or so years and then promoted to service sales
    manager for about 3 years. Then Parts director for the Olds and new
    Isuzu franchise. That all took almost 10 years. Then a job offer to be
    the GM for an AC/Delco/3M/Permatex dealer for about 8 years and then I
    retired at 40. Whew!


    And agreed, not so much the wrong size as the application. I was in the
    service end of the business for 15 years and back then, 1972-1987
    probably 90% of the tires sold were for automobiles. I am quite certain
    that percentage has changed more in the truck population direction.
    Back then the tires that came on trucks were rarely different than on
    automobiles. I know my 79 GMC had regular passenger car tires on it and
    I upgraded to a truck type tire for replacements. BUT the originals
    wore well as I drove the truck unloaded most of the time. When I
    sold/mounted tires at the tire store passenger tires came off and
    passenger tires went back on, in the 70's. Oldsmobile did not have many
    installs of tires and pretty much no trucks.

    Started my apprenticeship in '68 - graduated high school in '69,
    finished my apprenticeship at a Texaco general repair garage / farm equipment dealership in - 1971 -wrote my CofQ (top of my class) Dec
    '71, got my interprovincial licence in March '72.(At 19,youngest
    licensed mechanic in Ontario) Worked for Toyota dealer and then AMC /
    Jeep /Mazda / International Trucks dealer/ Esso station and as supply teacher. Then I taught trade level internationally for 2 years, then
    returned to working at CanadianTire, moving on to running the bays at
    an ESSO station, then to industrial equipment dealership, on to
    operating the bays at a shell station and back to the Toyota
    dealership where I became service manager within 3 weeks. I spent 10
    years as service manager, going from 2 mechanics plus myself to 7 plus
    myself before deciding to actively leave the trade. I've worked as a consultant to the trade in various capacities over the last 30 years
    off and on as a self employed IT / technoligy proffessional.


    Well I guess I got you beat. LOL I had 6 service advisors, a service
    manager, and 50+ mechanics. We took in approximately 400 vehicles on a
    weekly basis.

    Thinking back to when I was working PT for Ameron Automotive centers, in
    Corpus Christi, there was a national holiday. The holiday was to
    observe the funeral procession of president Johnson. That coincided
    with a close out tire sale that we were having. We sold 400 tires on
    that single day. That was a 13 hour work day with no lunch break.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to All on Sun Jan 16 18:19:54 2022
    On Sun, 16 Jan 2022 13:33:42 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/15/2022 12:06 AM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Fri, 14 Jan 2022 14:01:45 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/13/2022 9:53 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Wed, 12 Jan 2022 15:28:14 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/12/2022 2:45 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Wed, 12 Jan 2022 10:54:41 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/11/2022 7:55 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Tue, 11 Jan 2022 12:11:41 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> >>>>>>>> wrote:

    On 1/9/2022 4:07 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 9 Jan 2022 15:21:06 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 1/8/2022 5:28 PM, Michael Trew wrote:
    On 1/7/2022 14:54, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Fri, 7 Jan 2022 09:02:18 -0600, Leon<lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 1/6/2022 9:12 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Thu, 06 Jan 2022 21:56:56 -0500, Clare Snyder<clare@snyder.on.ca>
    wrote:

    On Tue, 04 Jan 2022 23:53:45 -0500, Michael Trew >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/3/2022 12:00, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 11:50:51 -0500, Michael Trew >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/2/2022 21:24, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Sun, 2 Jan 2022 14:49:08 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03 >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Sunday, January 2, 2022 at 3:33:44 PM UTC-5, >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 14:48:13 GMT, Puckdropper<em...@example.com>
    wrote:
    Michael Trew<michae...@att.net> wrote in >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> news:sqohqs$f27$7...@dont-email.me: >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    On 12/31/2021 16:59, k...@notreal.com wrote: >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> anything for that
    matter, lasting 40 years? ;-) >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    A good compressor that's easy to move (so not one of those
    200 gallon
    monsters but also not a 1 1/2 gallon noise maker) would be a
    nice thing to
    pass down. Shoot, even if they just use it to inflate tires
    and beach
    balls, it would make their life that much easier. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> For tires I have one of these:

    <https://www.homedepot.com/p/RYOBI-ONE-18V-Lithium-Ion-Cordless-Power-Inflator-Kit-with-1-5-Ah-Battery-and-18V-Charger-P737DKN/311788879>


    SWMBO appreciates it very much.

    I looked at her "spare" a while back. Since it is small car
    (Mustang), I knew it had to have a bicycle tire. Nope. Not even
    that. Under the trunk liner is a 12V compressor and a can of
    compressed tire gunk. Nice. A bicycle tire is an extra $250.

    Ever notice how all (?) spares are stored with the valve down
    or inward,
    forcing you to remove the spare it to check/fill it? The
    spare in my Odyssey
    is buried valve down under the carpet between the front and
    middle row seats.
    What a PITA to get it out.

    I have one configuration or another of these in all of my >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> vehicles.

    https://www.amazon.com/Hotop-Stainless-Extension-Braided-Extender/dp/B09BMWQQ3R


    All of the spares in my vehicles look something like this so I
    can check/top
    them off without removing them.

    https://i.imgur.com/6IHvl8M.jpg

    https://i.imgur.com/nxJAKFf.jpg

    I wouldn't be surprised if half the folks in this group (that
    have spares) have
    spares that are sitting at 45-50 PSI.

    It's amazing how those tires hold up. Especially the old bias-ply
    tires, to build on the post quoted below. I have a '68 Ford
    Galaxie,
    and it has the full size spare installed on the front tire now,
    a 1968
    bias-ply tire. I cannot believe that the thing still holds air
    pressure. It's pretty well bald, however. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    Bicycle tires are designed to never be used. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    What about bicycle tires?

    The last time I actually USED my spare was on my '63
    Valiant back
    about 1970. I ALMOST had to use it 3 times on one trip with the PT
    Cruiser on my trip to PEI when 3 valve stems failed and >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> christmas 1972
    in Montana or Idaho or Wyoming or wherever when I got a cinder
    puncture - managed to find a tire repair guy before it got all
    the way
    flat.

    I always keep a full sized spare when traveling. I can recall
    too many
    times that I needed it on a 1,000+ mile road trip, in recent
    history.

    A full-size tire would take up the entire trunk, making travel a
    little difficult. Full-size truck spares work because there is waste
    space under the bed. There is no wasted space in cars these days. I
    wonder that the (useless) electric trucks will do. AFAIK, the
    batteries take up that space.

    I keep the full-size tire on rim behind the driver's seat. On
    very long
    road trips, the back seat it otherwise full of luggage, cooler,
    blankets/pillows/air mattress/etc.

    I've heard that some new cars don't even have a donut spare. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    As I said earlier, my wife's Mustang came with a 12V tire pump and a
    can of fix-a-flat. No spare of any kind.

    With 4 little chunks of rubber being the only thing between you
    and
    your last breath, Tires are not where I am going to cut corners.

    I just "decomissioned" a set of 7 year old michelins with 80% tread
    from the Ranger, as well as a 5 or 6 year old set of Michelind with
    about 40% tread from the Sorento.

    What did you do with them? It seems that every car needs a different
    size. Maybe I misunderstood. Do you still have the cars just that the
    tires are too old to trust? Why 80%?

    Possibly 2 reasons for thread being in good shape when retired. The
    vehicle is not driven much. My wife's car falls in that catagory. Over
    6 years old and plenty of tread.
    Or the winter summer swap out and the tires were only used half the
    year.
    The tires were SCRAPPED. Still have both vehicles. The truck is 26
    years old come april, with 376000Km on it and still going strong. The
    tires were wearing VERY well - so still had 80+% tread left but the
    sidewalls were cracking. Combination of low miles/only used haf the
    year amd plain old age.

    On the Kia I'm not sure how many miles were on the tires as they were
    on the 5 year old vehicle when we bought it and they were NOT >>>>>>>>>>>>> original. If they were the second set and the miles were put on in a
    uniform manner over the previous life of the car there were likely
    about 80000km on them. The tread was getting thin and, being >>>>>>>>>>>>> Michelins, the sidewalls were also starting to crack. >>>>>>>>>>>>
    I've never seen such new tires with cracking side walls. I would not
    buy that brand again if I were you.

    Brand has nothing to do with cracking on the sidewall. That is a defect
    and every manufacturer puts out some duds. This happened to me with
    Michelin LTX M/S.
    Michelin authorized replacement at about 24K. The next set of Michelin,
    same tire, wore out in less than 25K. They adjusted the set again. >>>>>>>>>>
    At best they've pro-rated them, then charged full retail. Sale price,
    often at the same time, was a better deal.

    Yes, they always prorate from the retail price and if the tire needs to
    be replaced, later in it's life, buying at the sale price can often be
    less expensive. IIRC thse had a 70K mileage warranty and were wearing
    well, other than the sidewall checking. So I got a pretty good >>>>>>>>> adjustment on replacements. The second set were worn out, according to
    Discount Tire, and the pro-rated cost was also pretty good.

    The trick is to bypass the retailer all together and go directly to the
    manufacturers web site to get assistance. Once upon a time I ran a tire
    store and learned a few tricks to get things done. ;~)
    If you cal the manufacturer be sure to give them the specifics. Tread
    depth and mileage and the issue.

    In the last case DT said 2 tires qualified to be adjusted the other 2 >>>>>>>>> were not. A call to Michelin indicating that the other 2 tires were >>>>>>>>> about 1/16" from qualifying. They authorized replacement of all four >>>>>>>>> and called my dealer to set that up.





    At worst, they blamed it on me and refused to refund anything. I >>>>>>>>>> ignore tire warranties, other than to use them as a (poor) gauge of >>>>>>>>>> longevity.

    Again, call/contact the manufacturer.
    In Michelin's case the 70K mileage warranty was an extremely poor gauge,
    considering they were just over 1/3 over the miles.

    And I know these were a fluke/bad batch of tires. I think the rubber >>>>>>>>> was too hard causing the checking on the first set and to combat that >>>>>>>>> issue the softer rubber compound on the second set caused them to wear
    out prematurely.

    The problems I've generally had was premature wear. The 70K tire only >>>>>>>> went 35-40K. The warranty was based on tread remaining. Wonderful. >>>>>>>

    If there is uneven wear the tire will be adjusted according to average >>>>>>> tread depth. If you took their word for how the tire should be
    adjusted, premature wear compared to the actual warranty, you should >>>>>>> have talked to the manufacturer. They will contact the tire store and >>>>>>> fill them in.
    "premature wear" in not necessarilly uneven wear. IUn fact it is not >>>>>> even necessarilly "pre-mature" or "accellerated" - it is simply a
    higher than expected rate of wear either due to conditions or tire >>>>>> quality. Even accellerated wear is generally a sign of "not enough >>>>>> tire" or "cheap tire" - - or simply "WRONG TIRE" for the application. >>>>>
    FWIW premature wear is typically a tire issue with the assumption that >>>>> the correct tire was used on the vehicle. In that instance the mileage >>>>> should be used, again assuming the that there is a mileage warranty, for >>>>> adjustment pricing.

    Uneven wear is 99.9% of the time not the fault of the tire. If the tire >>>>> wears out premature due to uneven wear the average tread remaining is >>>>> normally used if this is authorized.

    Uneven wear can be caused by many situations. Most often caused by not >>>>> rotating the tires regularly, every x amount of miles. This normally >>>>> shows up as excessive wear on the outside edge of the tread, and is
    cause by leaving the front tires in place too long before rotating.

    And under inflation can show up as uneven wear by excessive wear on the >>>>> inside and out side of the tread. Over inflation shows up as uneven >>>>> wear in the middle of the tire.
    This was more of a problem prior to radial tires becoming the normal >>>>> replacement. This was an issue with biased ply tires.



    And uneven wear can be seen as scallopes along the edges or across the >>>>> width of the tire. This is normally the result of unbalanced tires and >>>>> worn out shock absorbers/struts. If those items are worn out the
    excessive bouncing can cause uneven wear spots.

    Uneven wear can be caused by alignment problems.

    Uneven wear is almost with out a doubt cause by one of the above
    mentioned conditions.

    Premature wear and uneven wear are 99% of th4e time not the same. That >>>>> said I don't know of a manufacturer that will adjust a tire due to
    uneven wear. A lenient tire salesman will often offer some kind of
    adjustment for premature wear if uneven wear is not exaggerated. And as >>>>> mentioned above they will adjust using an average of remaining tread and >>>>> not use mileage as a basis.

    Having been in the tire business for 6 years and the auto dealership >>>>> service department business for 10 years the wrong sized tire was the >>>>> exception.


    Over 26 years active in the business including 10 as dealership
    servive manager. It's not so much the wrong "size" tire as the wrong
    tire eating - but under-spec / under-sized tires are far from the
    exception when you remember "for the application" as a quialifier

    Got me beat! LOL. I was only in the auto industry from 72 ~95. I
    worked as a teenager at the company/tire store, Ameron Automotice
    Centers in Corpus Christi, 2 years. Moved to Houston withe my parents
    when I was 19 and was asked to return to work for the same company in
    Houston. 2 years later I was running one of their centers. I saw a dead
    end and resigned to work at BF Goodrich for 8 months. Then was
    approached at 22 to run the parts department for a "yet to be opened"
    Olds Dealership in downtown Houston. Back to Corpus Christi to train at >>> the parent dealership. Trained in the body shop, asst manager, and the
    parts department. 9 months later we opened the dealership, I was the
    parts manager for 4 or so years and then promoted to service sales
    manager for about 3 years. Then Parts director for the Olds and new
    Isuzu franchise. That all took almost 10 years. Then a job offer to be
    the GM for an AC/Delco/3M/Permatex dealer for about 8 years and then I
    retired at 40. Whew!


    And agreed, not so much the wrong size as the application. I was in the >>> service end of the business for 15 years and back then, 1972-1987
    probably 90% of the tires sold were for automobiles. I am quite certain >>> that percentage has changed more in the truck population direction.
    Back then the tires that came on trucks were rarely different than on
    automobiles. I know my 79 GMC had regular passenger car tires on it and >>> I upgraded to a truck type tire for replacements. BUT the originals
    wore well as I drove the truck unloaded most of the time. When I
    sold/mounted tires at the tire store passenger tires came off and
    passenger tires went back on, in the 70's. Oldsmobile did not have many >>> installs of tires and pretty much no trucks.

    Started my apprenticeship in '68 - graduated high school in '69,
    finished my apprenticeship at a Texaco general repair garage / farm
    equipment dealership in - 1971 -wrote my CofQ (top of my class) Dec
    '71, got my interprovincial licence in March '72.(At 19,youngest
    licensed mechanic in Ontario) Worked for Toyota dealer and then AMC /
    Jeep /Mazda / International Trucks dealer/ Esso station and as supply
    teacher. Then I taught trade level internationally for 2 years, then
    returned to working at CanadianTire, moving on to running the bays at
    an ESSO station, then to industrial equipment dealership, on to
    operating the bays at a shell station and back to the Toyota
    dealership where I became service manager within 3 weeks. I spent 10
    years as service manager, going from 2 mechanics plus myself to 7 plus
    myself before deciding to actively leave the trade. I've worked as a
    consultant to the trade in various capacities over the last 30 years
    off and on as a self employed IT / technoligy proffessional.


    Well I guess I got you beat. LOL I had 6 service advisors, a service >manager, and 50+ mechanics. We took in approximately 400 vehicles on a >weekly basis.

    Thinking back to when I was working PT for Ameron Automotive centers, in >Corpus Christi, there was a national holiday. The holiday was to
    observe the funeral procession of president Johnson. That coincided
    with a close out tire sale that we were having. We sold 400 tires on
    that single day. That was a 13 hour work day with no lunch break.

    Does that say something about what people thought about Johnson? ;-)

    My wife is something like his third cousin, a fact that she doesn't
    appreciate being spread around. ;-)

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Markem618@21:1/5 to krw@notreal.com on Sun Jan 16 18:16:27 2022
    On Sun, 16 Jan 2022 18:19:54 -0500, krw@notreal.com wrote:

    On Sun, 16 Jan 2022 13:33:42 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/15/2022 12:06 AM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Fri, 14 Jan 2022 14:01:45 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/13/2022 9:53 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Wed, 12 Jan 2022 15:28:14 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/12/2022 2:45 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Wed, 12 Jan 2022 10:54:41 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> >>>>>>> wrote:

    On 1/11/2022 7:55 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Tue, 11 Jan 2022 12:11:41 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> >>>>>>>>> wrote:

    On 1/9/2022 4:07 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 9 Jan 2022 15:21:06 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 1/8/2022 5:28 PM, Michael Trew wrote:
    On 1/7/2022 14:54, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Fri, 7 Jan 2022 09:02:18 -0600, Leon<lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 1/6/2022 9:12 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Thu, 06 Jan 2022 21:56:56 -0500, Clare Snyder<clare@snyder.on.ca>
    wrote:

    On Tue, 04 Jan 2022 23:53:45 -0500, Michael Trew >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/3/2022 12:00, krw@notreal.com wrote: >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 11:50:51 -0500, Michael Trew >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/2/2022 21:24, Clare Snyder wrote: >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> On Sun, 2 Jan 2022 14:49:08 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03 >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Sunday, January 2, 2022 at 3:33:44 PM UTC-5, >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 14:48:13 GMT, Puckdropper<em...@example.com>
    wrote:
    Michael Trew<michae...@att.net> wrote in >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> news:sqohqs$f27$7...@dont-email.me: >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    On 12/31/2021 16:59, k...@notreal.com wrote: >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> anything for that
    matter, lasting 40 years? ;-) >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    A good compressor that's easy to move (so not one of those
    200 gallon
    monsters but also not a 1 1/2 gallon noise maker) would be a
    nice thing to
    pass down. Shoot, even if they just use it to inflate tires
    and beach
    balls, it would make their life that much easier. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> For tires I have one of these:

    <https://www.homedepot.com/p/RYOBI-ONE-18V-Lithium-Ion-Cordless-Power-Inflator-Kit-with-1-5-Ah-Battery-and-18V-Charger-P737DKN/311788879>


    SWMBO appreciates it very much.

    I looked at her "spare" a while back. Since it is small car
    (Mustang), I knew it had to have a bicycle tire. Nope. Not even
    that. Under the trunk liner is a 12V compressor and a can of
    compressed tire gunk. Nice. A bicycle tire is an extra $250.

    Ever notice how all (?) spares are stored with the valve down
    or inward,
    forcing you to remove the spare it to check/fill it? The
    spare in my Odyssey
    is buried valve down under the carpet between the front and
    middle row seats.
    What a PITA to get it out.

    I have one configuration or another of these in all of my
    vehicles.

    https://www.amazon.com/Hotop-Stainless-Extension-Braided-Extender/dp/B09BMWQQ3R


    All of the spares in my vehicles look something like this so I
    can check/top
    them off without removing them.

    https://i.imgur.com/6IHvl8M.jpg

    https://i.imgur.com/nxJAKFf.jpg

    I wouldn't be surprised if half the folks in this group (that
    have spares) have
    spares that are sitting at 45-50 PSI. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    It's amazing how those tires hold up. Especially the old bias-ply
    tires, to build on the post quoted below. I have a '68 Ford
    Galaxie,
    and it has the full size spare installed on the front tire now,
    a 1968
    bias-ply tire. I cannot believe that the thing still holds air
    pressure. It's pretty well bald, however. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    Bicycle tires are designed to never be used. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    What about bicycle tires?

    The last time I actually USED my spare was on my '63
    Valiant back
    about 1970. I ALMOST had to use it 3 times on one trip with the PT
    Cruiser on my trip to PEI when 3 valve stems failed and >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> christmas 1972
    in Montana or Idaho or Wyoming or wherever when I got a cinder
    puncture - managed to find a tire repair guy before it got all
    the way
    flat.

    I always keep a full sized spare when traveling. I can recall
    too many
    times that I needed it on a 1,000+ mile road trip, in recent
    history.

    A full-size tire would take up the entire trunk, making travel a
    little difficult. Full-size truck spares work because there is waste
    space under the bed. There is no wasted space in cars these days. I
    wonder that the (useless) electric trucks will do. AFAIK, the
    batteries take up that space.

    I keep the full-size tire on rim behind the driver's seat. On
    very long
    road trips, the back seat it otherwise full of luggage, cooler,
    blankets/pillows/air mattress/etc.

    I've heard that some new cars don't even have a donut spare. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    As I said earlier, my wife's Mustang came with a 12V tire pump and a
    can of fix-a-flat. No spare of any kind.

    With 4 little chunks of rubber being the only thing between you
    and
    your last breath, Tires are not where I am going to cut corners.

    I just "decomissioned" a set of 7 year old michelins with 80% tread
    from the Ranger, as well as a 5 or 6 year old set of Michelind with
    about 40% tread from the Sorento.

    What did you do with them? It seems that every car needs a different
    size. Maybe I misunderstood. Do you still have the cars just that the
    tires are too old to trust? Why 80%?

    Possibly 2 reasons for thread being in good shape when retired. The
    vehicle is not driven much. My wife's car falls in that catagory. Over
    6 years old and plenty of tread.
    Or the winter summer swap out and the tires were only used half the
    year.
    The tires were SCRAPPED. Still have both vehicles. The truck is 26
    years old come april, with 376000Km on it and still going strong. The
    tires were wearing VERY well - so still had 80+% tread left but the
    sidewalls were cracking. Combination of low miles/only used haf the
    year amd plain old age.

    On the Kia I'm not sure how many miles were on the tires as they were
    on the 5 year old vehicle when we bought it and they were NOT >>>>>>>>>>>>>> original. If they were the second set and the miles were put on in a
    uniform manner over the previous life of the car there were likely
    about 80000km on them. The tread was getting thin and, being >>>>>>>>>>>>>> Michelins, the sidewalls were also starting to crack. >>>>>>>>>>>>>
    I've never seen such new tires with cracking side walls. I would not
    buy that brand again if I were you.

    Brand has nothing to do with cracking on the sidewall. That is a defect
    and every manufacturer puts out some duds. This happened to me with
    Michelin LTX M/S.
    Michelin authorized replacement at about 24K. The next set of Michelin,
    same tire, wore out in less than 25K. They adjusted the set again.

    At best they've pro-rated them, then charged full retail. Sale price,
    often at the same time, was a better deal.

    Yes, they always prorate from the retail price and if the tire needs to
    be replaced, later in it's life, buying at the sale price can often be
    less expensive. IIRC thse had a 70K mileage warranty and were wearing
    well, other than the sidewall checking. So I got a pretty good >>>>>>>>>> adjustment on replacements. The second set were worn out, according to
    Discount Tire, and the pro-rated cost was also pretty good. >>>>>>>>>>
    The trick is to bypass the retailer all together and go directly to the
    manufacturers web site to get assistance. Once upon a time I ran a tire
    store and learned a few tricks to get things done. ;~)
    If you cal the manufacturer be sure to give them the specifics. Tread
    depth and mileage and the issue.

    In the last case DT said 2 tires qualified to be adjusted the other 2
    were not. A call to Michelin indicating that the other 2 tires were >>>>>>>>>> about 1/16" from qualifying. They authorized replacement of all four
    and called my dealer to set that up.





    At worst, they blamed it on me and refused to refund anything. I >>>>>>>>>>> ignore tire warranties, other than to use them as a (poor) gauge of >>>>>>>>>>> longevity.

    Again, call/contact the manufacturer.
    In Michelin's case the 70K mileage warranty was an extremely poor gauge,
    considering they were just over 1/3 over the miles.

    And I know these were a fluke/bad batch of tires. I think the rubber
    was too hard causing the checking on the first set and to combat that
    issue the softer rubber compound on the second set caused them to wear
    out prematurely.

    The problems I've generally had was premature wear. The 70K tire only
    went 35-40K. The warranty was based on tread remaining. Wonderful. >>>>>>>>

    If there is uneven wear the tire will be adjusted according to average >>>>>>>> tread depth. If you took their word for how the tire should be >>>>>>>> adjusted, premature wear compared to the actual warranty, you should >>>>>>>> have talked to the manufacturer. They will contact the tire store and >>>>>>>> fill them in.
    "premature wear" in not necessarilly uneven wear. IUn fact it is not >>>>>>> even necessarilly "pre-mature" or "accellerated" - it is simply a >>>>>>> higher than expected rate of wear either due to conditions or tire >>>>>>> quality. Even accellerated wear is generally a sign of "not enough >>>>>>> tire" or "cheap tire" - - or simply "WRONG TIRE" for the application. >>>>>>
    FWIW premature wear is typically a tire issue with the assumption that >>>>>> the correct tire was used on the vehicle. In that instance the mileage >>>>>> should be used, again assuming the that there is a mileage warranty, for >>>>>> adjustment pricing.

    Uneven wear is 99.9% of the time not the fault of the tire. If the tire >>>>>> wears out premature due to uneven wear the average tread remaining is >>>>>> normally used if this is authorized.

    Uneven wear can be caused by many situations. Most often caused by not >>>>>> rotating the tires regularly, every x amount of miles. This normally >>>>>> shows up as excessive wear on the outside edge of the tread, and is >>>>>> cause by leaving the front tires in place too long before rotating. >>>>>>
    And under inflation can show up as uneven wear by excessive wear on the >>>>>> inside and out side of the tread. Over inflation shows up as uneven >>>>>> wear in the middle of the tire.
    This was more of a problem prior to radial tires becoming the normal >>>>>> replacement. This was an issue with biased ply tires.



    And uneven wear can be seen as scallopes along the edges or across the >>>>>> width of the tire. This is normally the result of unbalanced tires and >>>>>> worn out shock absorbers/struts. If those items are worn out the >>>>>> excessive bouncing can cause uneven wear spots.

    Uneven wear can be caused by alignment problems.

    Uneven wear is almost with out a doubt cause by one of the above
    mentioned conditions.

    Premature wear and uneven wear are 99% of th4e time not the same. That >>>>>> said I don't know of a manufacturer that will adjust a tire due to >>>>>> uneven wear. A lenient tire salesman will often offer some kind of >>>>>> adjustment for premature wear if uneven wear is not exaggerated. And as >>>>>> mentioned above they will adjust using an average of remaining tread and >>>>>> not use mileage as a basis.

    Having been in the tire business for 6 years and the auto dealership >>>>>> service department business for 10 years the wrong sized tire was the >>>>>> exception.


    Over 26 years active in the business including 10 as dealership
    servive manager. It's not so much the wrong "size" tire as the wrong >>>>> tire eating - but under-spec / under-sized tires are far from the
    exception when you remember "for the application" as a quialifier

    Got me beat! LOL. I was only in the auto industry from 72 ~95. I
    worked as a teenager at the company/tire store, Ameron Automotice
    Centers in Corpus Christi, 2 years. Moved to Houston withe my parents >>>> when I was 19 and was asked to return to work for the same company in
    Houston. 2 years later I was running one of their centers. I saw a dead >>>> end and resigned to work at BF Goodrich for 8 months. Then was
    approached at 22 to run the parts department for a "yet to be opened"
    Olds Dealership in downtown Houston. Back to Corpus Christi to train at >>>> the parent dealership. Trained in the body shop, asst manager, and the >>>> parts department. 9 months later we opened the dealership, I was the
    parts manager for 4 or so years and then promoted to service sales
    manager for about 3 years. Then Parts director for the Olds and new
    Isuzu franchise. That all took almost 10 years. Then a job offer to be >>>> the GM for an AC/Delco/3M/Permatex dealer for about 8 years and then I >>>> retired at 40. Whew!


    And agreed, not so much the wrong size as the application. I was in the >>>> service end of the business for 15 years and back then, 1972-1987
    probably 90% of the tires sold were for automobiles. I am quite certain >>>> that percentage has changed more in the truck population direction.
    Back then the tires that came on trucks were rarely different than on
    automobiles. I know my 79 GMC had regular passenger car tires on it and >>>> I upgraded to a truck type tire for replacements. BUT the originals
    wore well as I drove the truck unloaded most of the time. When I
    sold/mounted tires at the tire store passenger tires came off and
    passenger tires went back on, in the 70's. Oldsmobile did not have many >>>> installs of tires and pretty much no trucks.

    Started my apprenticeship in '68 - graduated high school in '69,
    finished my apprenticeship at a Texaco general repair garage / farm
    equipment dealership in - 1971 -wrote my CofQ (top of my class) Dec
    '71, got my interprovincial licence in March '72.(At 19,youngest
    licensed mechanic in Ontario) Worked for Toyota dealer and then AMC /
    Jeep /Mazda / International Trucks dealer/ Esso station and as supply
    teacher. Then I taught trade level internationally for 2 years, then
    returned to working at CanadianTire, moving on to running the bays at
    an ESSO station, then to industrial equipment dealership, on to
    operating the bays at a shell station and back to the Toyota
    dealership where I became service manager within 3 weeks. I spent 10
    years as service manager, going from 2 mechanics plus myself to 7 plus
    myself before deciding to actively leave the trade. I've worked as a
    consultant to the trade in various capacities over the last 30 years
    off and on as a self employed IT / technoligy proffessional.


    Well I guess I got you beat. LOL I had 6 service advisors, a service >>manager, and 50+ mechanics. We took in approximately 400 vehicles on a >>weekly basis.

    Thinking back to when I was working PT for Ameron Automotive centers, in >>Corpus Christi, there was a national holiday. The holiday was to
    observe the funeral procession of president Johnson. That coincided
    with a close out tire sale that we were having. We sold 400 tires on
    that single day. That was a 13 hour work day with no lunch break.

    Does that say something about what people thought about Johnson? ;-)

    My wife is something like his third cousin, a fact that she doesn't >appreciate being spread around. ;-)

    Say a lot about what Texans thought of him.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DerbyDad03@21:1/5 to All on Sun Jan 16 17:45:55 2022
    On Sunday, January 16, 2022 at 7:16:37 PM UTC-5, Markem618 wrote:
    On Sun, 16 Jan 2022 18:19:54 -0500, k...@notreal.com wrote:

    On Sun, 16 Jan 2022 13:33:42 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/15/2022 12:06 AM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Fri, 14 Jan 2022 14:01:45 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/13/2022 9:53 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Wed, 12 Jan 2022 15:28:14 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/12/2022 2:45 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Wed, 12 Jan 2022 10:54:41 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> >>>>>>> wrote:

    On 1/11/2022 7:55 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Tue, 11 Jan 2022 12:11:41 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> >>>>>>>>> wrote:

    On 1/9/2022 4:07 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 9 Jan 2022 15:21:06 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 1/8/2022 5:28 PM, Michael Trew wrote:
    On 1/7/2022 14:54, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Fri, 7 Jan 2022 09:02:18 -0600, Leon<lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 1/6/2022 9:12 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Thu, 06 Jan 2022 21:56:56 -0500, Clare Snyder<cl...@snyder.on.ca>
    wrote:

    On Tue, 04 Jan 2022 23:53:45 -0500, Michael Trew >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <michae...@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/3/2022 12:00, k...@notreal.com wrote: >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 11:50:51 -0500, Michael Trew >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <michae...@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/2/2022 21:24, Clare Snyder wrote: >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> On Sun, 2 Jan 2022 14:49:08 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03 >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <teama...@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Sunday, January 2, 2022 at 3:33:44 PM UTC-5, >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 14:48:13 GMT, Puckdropper<em...@example.com>
    wrote:
    Michael Trew<michae...@att.net> wrote in >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> news:sqohqs$f27$7...@dont-email.me: >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    On 12/31/2021 16:59, k...@notreal.com wrote: >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> anything for that
    matter, lasting 40 years? ;-) >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    A good compressor that's easy to move (so not one of those
    200 gallon
    monsters but also not a 1 1/2 gallon noise maker) would be a
    nice thing to
    pass down. Shoot, even if they just use it to inflate tires
    and beach
    balls, it would make their life that much easier. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> For tires I have one of these: >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    <https://www.homedepot.com/p/RYOBI-ONE-18V-Lithium-Ion-Cordless-Power-Inflator-Kit-with-1-5-Ah-Battery-and-18V-Charger-P737DKN/311788879>


    SWMBO appreciates it very much. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    I looked at her "spare" a while back. Since it is small car
    (Mustang), I knew it had to have a bicycle tire. Nope. Not even
    that. Under the trunk liner is a 12V compressor and a can of
    compressed tire gunk. Nice. A bicycle tire is an extra $250.

    Ever notice how all (?) spares are stored with the valve down
    or inward,
    forcing you to remove the spare it to check/fill it? The
    spare in my Odyssey
    is buried valve down under the carpet between the front and
    middle row seats.
    What a PITA to get it out.

    I have one configuration or another of these in all of my
    vehicles.

    https://www.amazon.com/Hotop-Stainless-Extension-Braided-Extender/dp/B09BMWQQ3R


    All of the spares in my vehicles look something like this so I
    can check/top
    them off without removing them.

    https://i.imgur.com/6IHvl8M.jpg

    https://i.imgur.com/nxJAKFf.jpg

    I wouldn't be surprised if half the folks in this group (that
    have spares) have
    spares that are sitting at 45-50 PSI. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    It's amazing how those tires hold up. Especially the old bias-ply
    tires, to build on the post quoted below. I have a '68 Ford
    Galaxie,
    and it has the full size spare installed on the front tire now,
    a 1968
    bias-ply tire. I cannot believe that the thing still holds air
    pressure. It's pretty well bald, however. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    Bicycle tires are designed to never be used. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    What about bicycle tires?

    The last time I actually USED my spare was on my '63
    Valiant back
    about 1970. I ALMOST had to use it 3 times on one trip with the PT
    Cruiser on my trip to PEI when 3 valve stems failed and >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> christmas 1972
    in Montana or Idaho or Wyoming or wherever when I got a cinder
    puncture - managed to find a tire repair guy before it got all
    the way
    flat.

    I always keep a full sized spare when traveling. I can recall
    too many
    times that I needed it on a 1,000+ mile road trip, in recent
    history.

    A full-size tire would take up the entire trunk, making travel a
    little difficult. Full-size truck spares work because there is waste
    space under the bed. There is no wasted space in cars these days. I
    wonder that the (useless) electric trucks will do. AFAIK, the
    batteries take up that space.

    I keep the full-size tire on rim behind the driver's seat. On
    very long
    road trips, the back seat it otherwise full of luggage, cooler,
    blankets/pillows/air mattress/etc.

    I've heard that some new cars don't even have a donut spare.

    As I said earlier, my wife's Mustang came with a 12V tire pump and a
    can of fix-a-flat. No spare of any kind.

    With 4 little chunks of rubber being the only thing between you
    and
    your last breath, Tires are not where I am going to cut corners.

    I just "decomissioned" a set of 7 year old michelins with 80% tread
    from the Ranger, as well as a 5 or 6 year old set of Michelind with
    about 40% tread from the Sorento.

    What did you do with them? It seems that every car needs a different
    size. Maybe I misunderstood. Do you still have the cars just that the
    tires are too old to trust? Why 80%?

    Possibly 2 reasons for thread being in good shape when retired. The
    vehicle is not driven much. My wife's car falls in that catagory. Over
    6 years old and plenty of tread.
    Or the winter summer swap out and the tires were only used half the
    year.
    The tires were SCRAPPED. Still have both vehicles. The truck is 26
    years old come april, with 376000Km on it and still going strong. The
    tires were wearing VERY well - so still had 80+% tread left but the
    sidewalls were cracking. Combination of low miles/only used haf the
    year amd plain old age.

    On the Kia I'm not sure how many miles were on the tires as they were
    on the 5 year old vehicle when we bought it and they were NOT >>>>>>>>>>>>>> original. If they were the second set and the miles were put on in a
    uniform manner over the previous life of the car there were likely
    about 80000km on them. The tread was getting thin and, being >>>>>>>>>>>>>> Michelins, the sidewalls were also starting to crack. >>>>>>>>>>>>>
    I've never seen such new tires with cracking side walls. I would not
    buy that brand again if I were you.

    Brand has nothing to do with cracking on the sidewall. That is a defect
    and every manufacturer puts out some duds. This happened to me with
    Michelin LTX M/S.
    Michelin authorized replacement at about 24K. The next set of Michelin,
    same tire, wore out in less than 25K. They adjusted the set again.

    At best they've pro-rated them, then charged full retail. Sale price,
    often at the same time, was a better deal.

    Yes, they always prorate from the retail price and if the tire needs to
    be replaced, later in it's life, buying at the sale price can often be
    less expensive. IIRC thse had a 70K mileage warranty and were wearing
    well, other than the sidewall checking. So I got a pretty good >>>>>>>>>> adjustment on replacements. The second set were worn out, according to
    Discount Tire, and the pro-rated cost was also pretty good. >>>>>>>>>>
    The trick is to bypass the retailer all together and go directly to the
    manufacturers web site to get assistance. Once upon a time I ran a tire
    store and learned a few tricks to get things done. ;~)
    If you cal the manufacturer be sure to give them the specifics. Tread
    depth and mileage and the issue.

    In the last case DT said 2 tires qualified to be adjusted the other 2
    were not. A call to Michelin indicating that the other 2 tires were
    about 1/16" from qualifying. They authorized replacement of all four
    and called my dealer to set that up.





    At worst, they blamed it on me and refused to refund anything. I >>>>>>>>>>> ignore tire warranties, other than to use them as a (poor) gauge of
    longevity.

    Again, call/contact the manufacturer.
    In Michelin's case the 70K mileage warranty was an extremely poor gauge,
    considering they were just over 1/3 over the miles.

    And I know these were a fluke/bad batch of tires. I think the rubber
    was too hard causing the checking on the first set and to combat that
    issue the softer rubber compound on the second set caused them to wear
    out prematurely.

    The problems I've generally had was premature wear. The 70K tire only
    went 35-40K. The warranty was based on tread remaining. Wonderful. >>>>>>>>

    If there is uneven wear the tire will be adjusted according to average
    tread depth. If you took their word for how the tire should be >>>>>>>> adjusted, premature wear compared to the actual warranty, you should >>>>>>>> have talked to the manufacturer. They will contact the tire store and
    fill them in.
    "premature wear" in not necessarilly uneven wear. IUn fact it is not >>>>>>> even necessarilly "pre-mature" or "accellerated" - it is simply a >>>>>>> higher than expected rate of wear either due to conditions or tire >>>>>>> quality. Even accellerated wear is generally a sign of "not enough >>>>>>> tire" or "cheap tire" - - or simply "WRONG TIRE" for the application. >>>>>>
    FWIW premature wear is typically a tire issue with the assumption that >>>>>> the correct tire was used on the vehicle. In that instance the mileage >>>>>> should be used, again assuming the that there is a mileage warranty, for
    adjustment pricing.

    Uneven wear is 99.9% of the time not the fault of the tire. If the tire
    wears out premature due to uneven wear the average tread remaining is >>>>>> normally used if this is authorized.

    Uneven wear can be caused by many situations. Most often caused by not >>>>>> rotating the tires regularly, every x amount of miles. This normally >>>>>> shows up as excessive wear on the outside edge of the tread, and is >>>>>> cause by leaving the front tires in place too long before rotating. >>>>>>
    And under inflation can show up as uneven wear by excessive wear on the
    inside and out side of the tread. Over inflation shows up as uneven >>>>>> wear in the middle of the tire.
    This was more of a problem prior to radial tires becoming the normal >>>>>> replacement. This was an issue with biased ply tires.



    And uneven wear can be seen as scallopes along the edges or across the >>>>>> width of the tire. This is normally the result of unbalanced tires and >>>>>> worn out shock absorbers/struts. If those items are worn out the >>>>>> excessive bouncing can cause uneven wear spots.

    Uneven wear can be caused by alignment problems.

    Uneven wear is almost with out a doubt cause by one of the above >>>>>> mentioned conditions.

    Premature wear and uneven wear are 99% of th4e time not the same. That >>>>>> said I don't know of a manufacturer that will adjust a tire due to >>>>>> uneven wear. A lenient tire salesman will often offer some kind of >>>>>> adjustment for premature wear if uneven wear is not exaggerated. And as
    mentioned above they will adjust using an average of remaining tread and
    not use mileage as a basis.

    Having been in the tire business for 6 years and the auto dealership >>>>>> service department business for 10 years the wrong sized tire was the >>>>>> exception.


    Over 26 years active in the business including 10 as dealership
    servive manager. It's not so much the wrong "size" tire as the wrong >>>>> tire eating - but under-spec / under-sized tires are far from the
    exception when you remember "for the application" as a quialifier

    Got me beat! LOL. I was only in the auto industry from 72 ~95. I
    worked as a teenager at the company/tire store, Ameron Automotice
    Centers in Corpus Christi, 2 years. Moved to Houston withe my parents >>>> when I was 19 and was asked to return to work for the same company in >>>> Houston. 2 years later I was running one of their centers. I saw a dead >>>> end and resigned to work at BF Goodrich for 8 months. Then was
    approached at 22 to run the parts department for a "yet to be opened" >>>> Olds Dealership in downtown Houston. Back to Corpus Christi to train at >>>> the parent dealership. Trained in the body shop, asst manager, and the >>>> parts department. 9 months later we opened the dealership, I was the >>>> parts manager for 4 or so years and then promoted to service sales
    manager for about 3 years. Then Parts director for the Olds and new
    Isuzu franchise. That all took almost 10 years. Then a job offer to be >>>> the GM for an AC/Delco/3M/Permatex dealer for about 8 years and then I >>>> retired at 40. Whew!


    And agreed, not so much the wrong size as the application. I was in the >>>> service end of the business for 15 years and back then, 1972-1987
    probably 90% of the tires sold were for automobiles. I am quite certain >>>> that percentage has changed more in the truck population direction.
    Back then the tires that came on trucks were rarely different than on >>>> automobiles. I know my 79 GMC had regular passenger car tires on it and >>>> I upgraded to a truck type tire for replacements. BUT the originals
    wore well as I drove the truck unloaded most of the time. When I
    sold/mounted tires at the tire store passenger tires came off and
    passenger tires went back on, in the 70's. Oldsmobile did not have many >>>> installs of tires and pretty much no trucks.

    Started my apprenticeship in '68 - graduated high school in '69,
    finished my apprenticeship at a Texaco general repair garage / farm
    equipment dealership in - 1971 -wrote my CofQ (top of my class) Dec
    '71, got my interprovincial licence in March '72.(At 19,youngest
    licensed mechanic in Ontario) Worked for Toyota dealer and then AMC /
    Jeep /Mazda / International Trucks dealer/ Esso station and as supply
    teacher. Then I taught trade level internationally for 2 years, then
    returned to working at CanadianTire, moving on to running the bays at
    an ESSO station, then to industrial equipment dealership, on to
    operating the bays at a shell station and back to the Toyota
    dealership where I became service manager within 3 weeks. I spent 10
    years as service manager, going from 2 mechanics plus myself to 7 plus >>> myself before deciding to actively leave the trade. I've worked as a
    consultant to the trade in various capacities over the last 30 years
    off and on as a self employed IT / technoligy proffessional.


    Well I guess I got you beat. LOL I had 6 service advisors, a service >>manager, and 50+ mechanics. We took in approximately 400 vehicles on a >>weekly basis.

    Thinking back to when I was working PT for Ameron Automotive centers, in >>Corpus Christi, there was a national holiday. The holiday was to
    observe the funeral procession of president Johnson. That coincided
    with a close out tire sale that we were having. We sold 400 tires on
    that single day. That was a 13 hour work day with no lunch break.

    Does that say something about what people thought about Johnson? ;-)

    My wife is something like his third cousin, a fact that she doesn't >appreciate being spread around. ;-)
    Say a lot about what Texans thought of him.

    Yeah...like maybe 100 Texans. Not exactly an overwhelming majority. ;-)

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DerbyDad03@21:1/5 to k...@notreal.com on Sun Jan 16 17:42:54 2022
    On Sunday, January 16, 2022 at 6:19:58 PM UTC-5, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 16 Jan 2022 13:33:42 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/15/2022 12:06 AM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Fri, 14 Jan 2022 14:01:45 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/13/2022 9:53 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Wed, 12 Jan 2022 15:28:14 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/12/2022 2:45 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Wed, 12 Jan 2022 10:54:41 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> >>>>>> wrote:

    On 1/11/2022 7:55 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Tue, 11 Jan 2022 12:11:41 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> >>>>>>>> wrote:

    On 1/9/2022 4:07 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 9 Jan 2022 15:21:06 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 1/8/2022 5:28 PM, Michael Trew wrote:
    On 1/7/2022 14:54, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Fri, 7 Jan 2022 09:02:18 -0600, Leon<lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 1/6/2022 9:12 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Thu, 06 Jan 2022 21:56:56 -0500, Clare Snyder<cl...@snyder.on.ca>
    wrote:

    On Tue, 04 Jan 2022 23:53:45 -0500, Michael Trew >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <michae...@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/3/2022 12:00, k...@notreal.com wrote: >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 11:50:51 -0500, Michael Trew >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <michae...@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/2/2022 21:24, Clare Snyder wrote: >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> On Sun, 2 Jan 2022 14:49:08 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03 >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <teama...@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Sunday, January 2, 2022 at 3:33:44 PM UTC-5, >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 14:48:13 GMT, Puckdropper<em...@example.com>
    wrote:
    Michael Trew<michae...@att.net> wrote in >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> news:sqohqs$f27$7...@dont-email.me: >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    On 12/31/2021 16:59, k...@notreal.com wrote: >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> anything for that
    matter, lasting 40 years? ;-) >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    A good compressor that's easy to move (so not one of those
    200 gallon
    monsters but also not a 1 1/2 gallon noise maker) would be a
    nice thing to
    pass down. Shoot, even if they just use it to inflate tires
    and beach
    balls, it would make their life that much easier. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> For tires I have one of these:

    <https://www.homedepot.com/p/RYOBI-ONE-18V-Lithium-Ion-Cordless-Power-Inflator-Kit-with-1-5-Ah-Battery-and-18V-Charger-P737DKN/311788879>


    SWMBO appreciates it very much.

    I looked at her "spare" a while back. Since it is small car
    (Mustang), I knew it had to have a bicycle tire. Nope. Not even
    that. Under the trunk liner is a 12V compressor and a can of
    compressed tire gunk. Nice. A bicycle tire is an extra $250.

    Ever notice how all (?) spares are stored with the valve down
    or inward,
    forcing you to remove the spare it to check/fill it? The
    spare in my Odyssey
    is buried valve down under the carpet between the front and
    middle row seats.
    What a PITA to get it out.

    I have one configuration or another of these in all of my
    vehicles.

    https://www.amazon.com/Hotop-Stainless-Extension-Braided-Extender/dp/B09BMWQQ3R


    All of the spares in my vehicles look something like this so I
    can check/top
    them off without removing them.

    https://i.imgur.com/6IHvl8M.jpg

    https://i.imgur.com/nxJAKFf.jpg

    I wouldn't be surprised if half the folks in this group (that
    have spares) have
    spares that are sitting at 45-50 PSI. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    It's amazing how those tires hold up. Especially the old bias-ply
    tires, to build on the post quoted below. I have a '68 Ford
    Galaxie,
    and it has the full size spare installed on the front tire now,
    a 1968
    bias-ply tire. I cannot believe that the thing still holds air
    pressure. It's pretty well bald, however. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    Bicycle tires are designed to never be used. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    What about bicycle tires?

    The last time I actually USED my spare was on my '63
    Valiant back
    about 1970. I ALMOST had to use it 3 times on one trip with the PT
    Cruiser on my trip to PEI when 3 valve stems failed and >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> christmas 1972
    in Montana or Idaho or Wyoming or wherever when I got a cinder
    puncture - managed to find a tire repair guy before it got all
    the way
    flat.

    I always keep a full sized spare when traveling. I can recall
    too many
    times that I needed it on a 1,000+ mile road trip, in recent
    history.

    A full-size tire would take up the entire trunk, making travel a
    little difficult. Full-size truck spares work because there is waste
    space under the bed. There is no wasted space in cars these days. I
    wonder that the (useless) electric trucks will do. AFAIK, the
    batteries take up that space.

    I keep the full-size tire on rim behind the driver's seat. On
    very long
    road trips, the back seat it otherwise full of luggage, cooler,
    blankets/pillows/air mattress/etc.

    I've heard that some new cars don't even have a donut spare.

    As I said earlier, my wife's Mustang came with a 12V tire pump and a
    can of fix-a-flat. No spare of any kind.

    With 4 little chunks of rubber being the only thing between you
    and
    your last breath, Tires are not where I am going to cut corners.

    I just "decomissioned" a set of 7 year old michelins with 80% tread
    from the Ranger, as well as a 5 or 6 year old set of Michelind with
    about 40% tread from the Sorento.

    What did you do with them? It seems that every car needs a different
    size. Maybe I misunderstood. Do you still have the cars just that the
    tires are too old to trust? Why 80%?

    Possibly 2 reasons for thread being in good shape when retired. The
    vehicle is not driven much. My wife's car falls in that catagory. Over
    6 years old and plenty of tread.
    Or the winter summer swap out and the tires were only used half the
    year.
    The tires were SCRAPPED. Still have both vehicles. The truck is 26
    years old come april, with 376000Km on it and still going strong. The
    tires were wearing VERY well - so still had 80+% tread left but the
    sidewalls were cracking. Combination of low miles/only used haf the
    year amd plain old age.

    On the Kia I'm not sure how many miles were on the tires as they were
    on the 5 year old vehicle when we bought it and they were NOT >>>>>>>>>>>>> original. If they were the second set and the miles were put on in a
    uniform manner over the previous life of the car there were likely
    about 80000km on them. The tread was getting thin and, being >>>>>>>>>>>>> Michelins, the sidewalls were also starting to crack. >>>>>>>>>>>>
    I've never seen such new tires with cracking side walls. I would not
    buy that brand again if I were you.

    Brand has nothing to do with cracking on the sidewall. That is a defect
    and every manufacturer puts out some duds. This happened to me with
    Michelin LTX M/S.
    Michelin authorized replacement at about 24K. The next set of Michelin,
    same tire, wore out in less than 25K. They adjusted the set again.

    At best they've pro-rated them, then charged full retail. Sale price,
    often at the same time, was a better deal.

    Yes, they always prorate from the retail price and if the tire needs to
    be replaced, later in it's life, buying at the sale price can often be
    less expensive. IIRC thse had a 70K mileage warranty and were wearing
    well, other than the sidewall checking. So I got a pretty good >>>>>>>>> adjustment on replacements. The second set were worn out, according to
    Discount Tire, and the pro-rated cost was also pretty good. >>>>>>>>>
    The trick is to bypass the retailer all together and go directly to the
    manufacturers web site to get assistance. Once upon a time I ran a tire
    store and learned a few tricks to get things done. ;~)
    If you cal the manufacturer be sure to give them the specifics. Tread
    depth and mileage and the issue.

    In the last case DT said 2 tires qualified to be adjusted the other 2
    were not. A call to Michelin indicating that the other 2 tires were >>>>>>>>> about 1/16" from qualifying. They authorized replacement of all four
    and called my dealer to set that up.





    At worst, they blamed it on me and refused to refund anything. I >>>>>>>>>> ignore tire warranties, other than to use them as a (poor) gauge of
    longevity.

    Again, call/contact the manufacturer.
    In Michelin's case the 70K mileage warranty was an extremely poor gauge,
    considering they were just over 1/3 over the miles.

    And I know these were a fluke/bad batch of tires. I think the rubber
    was too hard causing the checking on the first set and to combat that
    issue the softer rubber compound on the second set caused them to wear
    out prematurely.

    The problems I've generally had was premature wear. The 70K tire only
    went 35-40K. The warranty was based on tread remaining. Wonderful. >>>>>>>

    If there is uneven wear the tire will be adjusted according to average
    tread depth. If you took their word for how the tire should be >>>>>>> adjusted, premature wear compared to the actual warranty, you should >>>>>>> have talked to the manufacturer. They will contact the tire store and >>>>>>> fill them in.
    "premature wear" in not necessarilly uneven wear. IUn fact it is not >>>>>> even necessarilly "pre-mature" or "accellerated" - it is simply a >>>>>> higher than expected rate of wear either due to conditions or tire >>>>>> quality. Even accellerated wear is generally a sign of "not enough >>>>>> tire" or "cheap tire" - - or simply "WRONG TIRE" for the application. >>>>>
    FWIW premature wear is typically a tire issue with the assumption that >>>>> the correct tire was used on the vehicle. In that instance the mileage >>>>> should be used, again assuming the that there is a mileage warranty, for
    adjustment pricing.

    Uneven wear is 99.9% of the time not the fault of the tire. If the tire >>>>> wears out premature due to uneven wear the average tread remaining is >>>>> normally used if this is authorized.

    Uneven wear can be caused by many situations. Most often caused by not >>>>> rotating the tires regularly, every x amount of miles. This normally >>>>> shows up as excessive wear on the outside edge of the tread, and is >>>>> cause by leaving the front tires in place too long before rotating. >>>>>
    And under inflation can show up as uneven wear by excessive wear on the >>>>> inside and out side of the tread. Over inflation shows up as uneven >>>>> wear in the middle of the tire.
    This was more of a problem prior to radial tires becoming the normal >>>>> replacement. This was an issue with biased ply tires.



    And uneven wear can be seen as scallopes along the edges or across the >>>>> width of the tire. This is normally the result of unbalanced tires and >>>>> worn out shock absorbers/struts. If those items are worn out the
    excessive bouncing can cause uneven wear spots.

    Uneven wear can be caused by alignment problems.

    Uneven wear is almost with out a doubt cause by one of the above
    mentioned conditions.

    Premature wear and uneven wear are 99% of th4e time not the same. That >>>>> said I don't know of a manufacturer that will adjust a tire due to >>>>> uneven wear. A lenient tire salesman will often offer some kind of >>>>> adjustment for premature wear if uneven wear is not exaggerated. And as >>>>> mentioned above they will adjust using an average of remaining tread and
    not use mileage as a basis.

    Having been in the tire business for 6 years and the auto dealership >>>>> service department business for 10 years the wrong sized tire was the >>>>> exception.


    Over 26 years active in the business including 10 as dealership
    servive manager. It's not so much the wrong "size" tire as the wrong >>>> tire eating - but under-spec / under-sized tires are far from the
    exception when you remember "for the application" as a quialifier

    Got me beat! LOL. I was only in the auto industry from 72 ~95. I
    worked as a teenager at the company/tire store, Ameron Automotice
    Centers in Corpus Christi, 2 years. Moved to Houston withe my parents
    when I was 19 and was asked to return to work for the same company in
    Houston. 2 years later I was running one of their centers. I saw a dead >>> end and resigned to work at BF Goodrich for 8 months. Then was
    approached at 22 to run the parts department for a "yet to be opened"
    Olds Dealership in downtown Houston. Back to Corpus Christi to train at >>> the parent dealership. Trained in the body shop, asst manager, and the >>> parts department. 9 months later we opened the dealership, I was the
    parts manager for 4 or so years and then promoted to service sales
    manager for about 3 years. Then Parts director for the Olds and new
    Isuzu franchise. That all took almost 10 years. Then a job offer to be >>> the GM for an AC/Delco/3M/Permatex dealer for about 8 years and then I >>> retired at 40. Whew!


    And agreed, not so much the wrong size as the application. I was in the >>> service end of the business for 15 years and back then, 1972-1987
    probably 90% of the tires sold were for automobiles. I am quite certain >>> that percentage has changed more in the truck population direction.
    Back then the tires that came on trucks were rarely different than on
    automobiles. I know my 79 GMC had regular passenger car tires on it and >>> I upgraded to a truck type tire for replacements. BUT the originals
    wore well as I drove the truck unloaded most of the time. When I
    sold/mounted tires at the tire store passenger tires came off and
    passenger tires went back on, in the 70's. Oldsmobile did not have many >>> installs of tires and pretty much no trucks.

    Started my apprenticeship in '68 - graduated high school in '69,
    finished my apprenticeship at a Texaco general repair garage / farm
    equipment dealership in - 1971 -wrote my CofQ (top of my class) Dec
    '71, got my interprovincial licence in March '72.(At 19,youngest
    licensed mechanic in Ontario) Worked for Toyota dealer and then AMC /
    Jeep /Mazda / International Trucks dealer/ Esso station and as supply
    teacher. Then I taught trade level internationally for 2 years, then
    returned to working at CanadianTire, moving on to running the bays at
    an ESSO station, then to industrial equipment dealership, on to
    operating the bays at a shell station and back to the Toyota
    dealership where I became service manager within 3 weeks. I spent 10
    years as service manager, going from 2 mechanics plus myself to 7 plus
    myself before deciding to actively leave the trade. I've worked as a
    consultant to the trade in various capacities over the last 30 years
    off and on as a self employed IT / technoligy proffessional.


    Well I guess I got you beat. LOL I had 6 service advisors, a service >manager, and 50+ mechanics. We took in approximately 400 vehicles on a >weekly basis.

    Thinking back to when I was working PT for Ameron Automotive centers, in >Corpus Christi, there was a national holiday. The holiday was to
    observe the funeral procession of president Johnson. That coincided
    with a close out tire sale that we were having. We sold 400 tires on
    that single day. That was a 13 hour work day with no lunch break.

    Does that say something about what people thought about Johnson? ;-)

    400 tires = ~100 people. Not sure that says anything except that a very,
    very small percentage of Texans took advantage of their day off to get
    a good price on tires.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From DerbyDad03@21:1/5 to All on Sun Jan 16 18:34:36 2022
    On Sunday, January 16, 2022 at 9:24:08 PM UTC-5, Markem618 wrote:
    On Sun, 16 Jan 2022 17:42:54 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
    <teama...@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Sunday, January 16, 2022 at 6:19:58 PM UTC-5, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 16 Jan 2022 13:33:42 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/15/2022 12:06 AM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Fri, 14 Jan 2022 14:01:45 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/13/2022 9:53 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Wed, 12 Jan 2022 15:28:14 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/12/2022 2:45 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Wed, 12 Jan 2022 10:54:41 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/11/2022 7:55 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Tue, 11 Jan 2022 12:11:41 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> >> >>>>>>>> wrote:

    On 1/9/2022 4:07 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 9 Jan 2022 15:21:06 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 1/8/2022 5:28 PM, Michael Trew wrote:
    On 1/7/2022 14:54, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Fri, 7 Jan 2022 09:02:18 -0600, Leon<lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 1/6/2022 9:12 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Thu, 06 Jan 2022 21:56:56 -0500, Clare Snyder<cl...@snyder.on.ca>
    wrote:

    On Tue, 04 Jan 2022 23:53:45 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michae...@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/3/2022 12:00, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 11:50:51 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michae...@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/2/2022 21:24, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Sun, 2 Jan 2022 14:49:08 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03 >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <teama...@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Sunday, January 2, 2022 at 3:33:44 PM UTC-5,
    k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 14:48:13 GMT, Puckdropper<em...@example.com>
    wrote:
    Michael Trew<michae...@att.net> wrote in
    news:sqohqs$f27$7...@dont-email.me:

    On 12/31/2021 16:59, k...@notreal.com wrote:

    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or
    anything for that
    matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)

    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol

    A good compressor that's easy to move (so not one of those
    200 gallon
    monsters but also not a 1 1/2 gallon noise maker) would be a
    nice thing to
    pass down. Shoot, even if they just use it to inflate tires
    and beach
    balls, it would make their life that much easier. >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> For tires I have one of these:

    <https://www.homedepot.com/p/RYOBI-ONE-18V-Lithium-Ion-Cordless-Power-Inflator-Kit-with-1-5-Ah-Battery-and-18V-Charger-P737DKN/311788879>


    SWMBO appreciates it very much.

    I looked at her "spare" a while back. Since it is small car
    (Mustang), I knew it had to have a bicycle tire. Nope. Not even
    that. Under the trunk liner is a 12V compressor and a can of
    compressed tire gunk. Nice. A bicycle tire is an extra $250.

    Ever notice how all (?) spares are stored with the valve down
    or inward,
    forcing you to remove the spare it to check/fill it? The
    spare in my Odyssey
    is buried valve down under the carpet between the front and
    middle row seats.
    What a PITA to get it out.

    I have one configuration or another of these in all of my
    vehicles.

    https://www.amazon.com/Hotop-Stainless-Extension-Braided-Extender/dp/B09BMWQQ3R


    All of the spares in my vehicles look something like this so I
    can check/top
    them off without removing them.

    https://i.imgur.com/6IHvl8M.jpg

    https://i.imgur.com/nxJAKFf.jpg

    I wouldn't be surprised if half the folks in this group (that
    have spares) have
    spares that are sitting at 45-50 PSI.

    It's amazing how those tires hold up. Especially the old bias-ply
    tires, to build on the post quoted below. I have a '68 Ford
    Galaxie,
    and it has the full size spare installed on the front tire now,
    a 1968
    bias-ply tire. I cannot believe that the thing still holds air
    pressure. It's pretty well bald, however.

    Bicycle tires are designed to never be used.

    What about bicycle tires?

    The last time I actually USED my spare was on my '63 >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Valiant back
    about 1970. I ALMOST had to use it 3 times on one trip with the PT
    Cruiser on my trip to PEI when 3 valve stems failed and
    christmas 1972
    in Montana or Idaho or Wyoming or wherever when I got a cinder
    puncture - managed to find a tire repair guy before it got all
    the way
    flat.

    I always keep a full sized spare when traveling. I can recall
    too many
    times that I needed it on a 1,000+ mile road trip, in recent
    history.

    A full-size tire would take up the entire trunk, making travel a
    little difficult. Full-size truck spares work because there is waste
    space under the bed. There is no wasted space in cars these days. I
    wonder that the (useless) electric trucks will do. AFAIK, the
    batteries take up that space.

    I keep the full-size tire on rim behind the driver's seat. On
    very long
    road trips, the back seat it otherwise full of luggage, cooler,
    blankets/pillows/air mattress/etc.

    I've heard that some new cars don't even have a donut spare.

    As I said earlier, my wife's Mustang came with a 12V tire pump and a
    can of fix-a-flat. No spare of any kind.

    With 4 little chunks of rubber being the only thing between you
    and
    your last breath, Tires are not where I am going to cut corners.

    I just "decomissioned" a set of 7 year old michelins with 80% tread
    from the Ranger, as well as a 5 or 6 year old set of Michelind with
    about 40% tread from the Sorento.

    What did you do with them? It seems that every car needs a different
    size. Maybe I misunderstood. Do you still have the cars just that the
    tires are too old to trust? Why 80%?

    Possibly 2 reasons for thread being in good shape when retired. The
    vehicle is not driven much. My wife's car falls in that catagory. Over
    6 years old and plenty of tread.
    Or the winter summer swap out and the tires were only used half the
    year.
    The tires were SCRAPPED. Still have both vehicles. The truck is 26
    years old come april, with 376000Km on it and still going strong. The
    tires were wearing VERY well - so still had 80+% tread left but the
    sidewalls were cracking. Combination of low miles/only used haf the
    year amd plain old age.

    On the Kia I'm not sure how many miles were on the tires as they were
    on the 5 year old vehicle when we bought it and they were NOT
    original. If they were the second set and the miles were put on in a
    uniform manner over the previous life of the car there were likely
    about 80000km on them. The tread was getting thin and, being >> >>>>>>>>>>>>> Michelins, the sidewalls were also starting to crack.

    I've never seen such new tires with cracking side walls. I would not
    buy that brand again if I were you.

    Brand has nothing to do with cracking on the sidewall. That is a defect
    and every manufacturer puts out some duds. This happened to me with
    Michelin LTX M/S.
    Michelin authorized replacement at about 24K. The next set of Michelin,
    same tire, wore out in less than 25K. They adjusted the set again.

    At best they've pro-rated them, then charged full retail. Sale price,
    often at the same time, was a better deal.

    Yes, they always prorate from the retail price and if the tire needs to
    be replaced, later in it's life, buying at the sale price can often be
    less expensive. IIRC thse had a 70K mileage warranty and were wearing
    well, other than the sidewall checking. So I got a pretty good >> >>>>>>>>> adjustment on replacements. The second set were worn out, according to
    Discount Tire, and the pro-rated cost was also pretty good.

    The trick is to bypass the retailer all together and go directly to the
    manufacturers web site to get assistance. Once upon a time I ran a tire
    store and learned a few tricks to get things done. ;~)
    If you cal the manufacturer be sure to give them the specifics. Tread
    depth and mileage and the issue.

    In the last case DT said 2 tires qualified to be adjusted the other 2
    were not. A call to Michelin indicating that the other 2 tires were
    about 1/16" from qualifying. They authorized replacement of all four
    and called my dealer to set that up.





    At worst, they blamed it on me and refused to refund anything. I
    ignore tire warranties, other than to use them as a (poor) gauge of
    longevity.

    Again, call/contact the manufacturer.
    In Michelin's case the 70K mileage warranty was an extremely poor gauge,
    considering they were just over 1/3 over the miles.

    And I know these were a fluke/bad batch of tires. I think the rubber
    was too hard causing the checking on the first set and to combat that
    issue the softer rubber compound on the second set caused them to wear
    out prematurely.

    The problems I've generally had was premature wear. The 70K tire only
    went 35-40K. The warranty was based on tread remaining. Wonderful.


    If there is uneven wear the tire will be adjusted according to average
    tread depth. If you took their word for how the tire should be
    adjusted, premature wear compared to the actual warranty, you should
    have talked to the manufacturer. They will contact the tire store and
    fill them in.
    "premature wear" in not necessarilly uneven wear. IUn fact it is not
    even necessarilly "pre-mature" or "accellerated" - it is simply a >> >>>>>> higher than expected rate of wear either due to conditions or tire >> >>>>>> quality. Even accellerated wear is generally a sign of "not enough >> >>>>>> tire" or "cheap tire" - - or simply "WRONG TIRE" for the application.

    FWIW premature wear is typically a tire issue with the assumption that
    the correct tire was used on the vehicle. In that instance the mileage
    should be used, again assuming the that there is a mileage warranty, for
    adjustment pricing.

    Uneven wear is 99.9% of the time not the fault of the tire. If the tire
    wears out premature due to uneven wear the average tread remaining is
    normally used if this is authorized.

    Uneven wear can be caused by many situations. Most often caused by not
    rotating the tires regularly, every x amount of miles. This normally >> >>>>> shows up as excessive wear on the outside edge of the tread, and is >> >>>>> cause by leaving the front tires in place too long before rotating. >> >>>>>
    And under inflation can show up as uneven wear by excessive wear on the
    inside and out side of the tread. Over inflation shows up as uneven >> >>>>> wear in the middle of the tire.
    This was more of a problem prior to radial tires becoming the normal >> >>>>> replacement. This was an issue with biased ply tires.



    And uneven wear can be seen as scallopes along the edges or across the
    width of the tire. This is normally the result of unbalanced tires and
    worn out shock absorbers/struts. If those items are worn out the
    excessive bouncing can cause uneven wear spots.

    Uneven wear can be caused by alignment problems.

    Uneven wear is almost with out a doubt cause by one of the above
    mentioned conditions.

    Premature wear and uneven wear are 99% of th4e time not the same. That
    said I don't know of a manufacturer that will adjust a tire due to >> >>>>> uneven wear. A lenient tire salesman will often offer some kind of >> >>>>> adjustment for premature wear if uneven wear is not exaggerated. And as
    mentioned above they will adjust using an average of remaining tread and
    not use mileage as a basis.

    Having been in the tire business for 6 years and the auto dealership >> >>>>> service department business for 10 years the wrong sized tire was the
    exception.


    Over 26 years active in the business including 10 as dealership
    servive manager. It's not so much the wrong "size" tire as the wrong >> >>>> tire eating - but under-spec / under-sized tires are far from the
    exception when you remember "for the application" as a quialifier

    Got me beat! LOL. I was only in the auto industry from 72 ~95. I
    worked as a teenager at the company/tire store, Ameron Automotice
    Centers in Corpus Christi, 2 years. Moved to Houston withe my parents >> >>> when I was 19 and was asked to return to work for the same company in >> >>> Houston. 2 years later I was running one of their centers. I saw a dead
    end and resigned to work at BF Goodrich for 8 months. Then was
    approached at 22 to run the parts department for a "yet to be opened" >> >>> Olds Dealership in downtown Houston. Back to Corpus Christi to train at
    the parent dealership. Trained in the body shop, asst manager, and the >> >>> parts department. 9 months later we opened the dealership, I was the >> >>> parts manager for 4 or so years and then promoted to service sales
    manager for about 3 years. Then Parts director for the Olds and new
    Isuzu franchise. That all took almost 10 years. Then a job offer to be >> >>> the GM for an AC/Delco/3M/Permatex dealer for about 8 years and then I >> >>> retired at 40. Whew!


    And agreed, not so much the wrong size as the application. I was in the
    service end of the business for 15 years and back then, 1972-1987
    probably 90% of the tires sold were for automobiles. I am quite certain
    that percentage has changed more in the truck population direction.
    Back then the tires that came on trucks were rarely different than on >> >>> automobiles. I know my 79 GMC had regular passenger car tires on it and
    I upgraded to a truck type tire for replacements. BUT the originals
    wore well as I drove the truck unloaded most of the time. When I
    sold/mounted tires at the tire store passenger tires came off and
    passenger tires went back on, in the 70's. Oldsmobile did not have many
    installs of tires and pretty much no trucks.

    Started my apprenticeship in '68 - graduated high school in '69,
    finished my apprenticeship at a Texaco general repair garage / farm
    equipment dealership in - 1971 -wrote my CofQ (top of my class) Dec
    '71, got my interprovincial licence in March '72.(At 19,youngest
    licensed mechanic in Ontario) Worked for Toyota dealer and then AMC / >> >> Jeep /Mazda / International Trucks dealer/ Esso station and as supply >> >> teacher. Then I taught trade level internationally for 2 years, then
    returned to working at CanadianTire, moving on to running the bays at >> >> an ESSO station, then to industrial equipment dealership, on to
    operating the bays at a shell station and back to the Toyota
    dealership where I became service manager within 3 weeks. I spent 10
    years as service manager, going from 2 mechanics plus myself to 7 plus >> >> myself before deciding to actively leave the trade. I've worked as a
    consultant to the trade in various capacities over the last 30 years
    off and on as a self employed IT / technoligy proffessional.


    Well I guess I got you beat. LOL I had 6 service advisors, a service
    manager, and 50+ mechanics. We took in approximately 400 vehicles on a
    weekly basis.

    Thinking back to when I was working PT for Ameron Automotive centers, in >> >Corpus Christi, there was a national holiday. The holiday was to
    observe the funeral procession of president Johnson. That coincided
    with a close out tire sale that we were having. We sold 400 tires on
    that single day. That was a 13 hour work day with no lunch break.

    Does that say something about what people thought about Johnson? ;-)

    400 tires = ~100 people. Not sure that says anything except that a very, >very small percentage of Texans took advantage of their day off to get
    a good price on tires.
    But what was the book hours on tire change, split between how many
    service techs, bet it was a good day all around other that 13 hours in
    Texas heat in a garage.

    What's that got to do with the previous comment?

    What does 100 people buying tires say about what people thought
    about Johnson? It would be quite a stretch to say that it says anything
    from a political standpoint.

    Tells me that it was a pretty good sale, timed correctly by the dealer.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to teamarrows@eznet.net on Sun Jan 16 22:13:08 2022
    On Sun, 16 Jan 2022 17:42:54 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Sunday, January 16, 2022 at 6:19:58 PM UTC-5, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 16 Jan 2022 13:33:42 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/15/2022 12:06 AM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Fri, 14 Jan 2022 14:01:45 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/13/2022 9:53 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Wed, 12 Jan 2022 15:28:14 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/12/2022 2:45 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Wed, 12 Jan 2022 10:54:41 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/11/2022 7:55 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Tue, 11 Jan 2022 12:11:41 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/9/2022 4:07 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 9 Jan 2022 15:21:06 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 1/8/2022 5:28 PM, Michael Trew wrote:
    On 1/7/2022 14:54, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Fri, 7 Jan 2022 09:02:18 -0600, Leon<lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 1/6/2022 9:12 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Thu, 06 Jan 2022 21:56:56 -0500, Clare Snyder<cl...@snyder.on.ca>
    wrote:

    On Tue, 04 Jan 2022 23:53:45 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michae...@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/3/2022 12:00, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 11:50:51 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michae...@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/2/2022 21:24, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Sun, 2 Jan 2022 14:49:08 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
    <teama...@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Sunday, January 2, 2022 at 3:33:44 PM UTC-5,
    k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 14:48:13 GMT, Puckdropper<em...@example.com>
    wrote:
    Michael Trew<michae...@att.net> wrote in
    news:sqohqs$f27$7...@dont-email.me:

    On 12/31/2021 16:59, k...@notreal.com wrote:

    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> anything for that
    matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)

    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol

    A good compressor that's easy to move (so not one of those
    200 gallon
    monsters but also not a 1 1/2 gallon noise maker) would be a
    nice thing to
    pass down. Shoot, even if they just use it to inflate tires
    and beach
    balls, it would make their life that much easier.
    For tires I have one of these:

    <https://www.homedepot.com/p/RYOBI-ONE-18V-Lithium-Ion-Cordless-Power-Inflator-Kit-with-1-5-Ah-Battery-and-18V-Charger-P737DKN/311788879>


    SWMBO appreciates it very much.

    I looked at her "spare" a while back. Since it is small car
    (Mustang), I knew it had to have a bicycle tire. Nope. Not even
    that. Under the trunk liner is a 12V compressor and a can of
    compressed tire gunk. Nice. A bicycle tire is an extra $250.

    Ever notice how all (?) spares are stored with the valve down
    or inward,
    forcing you to remove the spare it to check/fill it? The
    spare in my Odyssey
    is buried valve down under the carpet between the front and
    middle row seats.
    What a PITA to get it out.

    I have one configuration or another of these in all of my
    vehicles.

    https://www.amazon.com/Hotop-Stainless-Extension-Braided-Extender/dp/B09BMWQQ3R


    All of the spares in my vehicles look something like this so I
    can check/top
    them off without removing them.

    https://i.imgur.com/6IHvl8M.jpg

    https://i.imgur.com/nxJAKFf.jpg

    I wouldn't be surprised if half the folks in this group (that
    have spares) have
    spares that are sitting at 45-50 PSI.

    It's amazing how those tires hold up. Especially the old bias-ply
    tires, to build on the post quoted below. I have a '68 Ford
    Galaxie,
    and it has the full size spare installed on the front tire now,
    a 1968
    bias-ply tire. I cannot believe that the thing still holds air
    pressure. It's pretty well bald, however.

    Bicycle tires are designed to never be used.

    What about bicycle tires?

    The last time I actually USED my spare was on my '63
    Valiant back
    about 1970. I ALMOST had to use it 3 times on one trip with the PT
    Cruiser on my trip to PEI when 3 valve stems failed and >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> christmas 1972
    in Montana or Idaho or Wyoming or wherever when I got a cinder
    puncture - managed to find a tire repair guy before it got all
    the way
    flat.

    I always keep a full sized spare when traveling. I can recall
    too many
    times that I needed it on a 1,000+ mile road trip, in recent
    history.

    A full-size tire would take up the entire trunk, making travel a
    little difficult. Full-size truck spares work because there is waste
    space under the bed. There is no wasted space in cars these days. I
    wonder that the (useless) electric trucks will do. AFAIK, the
    batteries take up that space.

    I keep the full-size tire on rim behind the driver's seat. On
    very long
    road trips, the back seat it otherwise full of luggage, cooler,
    blankets/pillows/air mattress/etc.

    I've heard that some new cars don't even have a donut spare.

    As I said earlier, my wife's Mustang came with a 12V tire pump and a
    can of fix-a-flat. No spare of any kind.

    With 4 little chunks of rubber being the only thing between you
    and
    your last breath, Tires are not where I am going to cut corners.

    I just "decomissioned" a set of 7 year old michelins with 80% tread
    from the Ranger, as well as a 5 or 6 year old set of Michelind with
    about 40% tread from the Sorento.

    What did you do with them? It seems that every car needs a different
    size. Maybe I misunderstood. Do you still have the cars just that the
    tires are too old to trust? Why 80%?

    Possibly 2 reasons for thread being in good shape when retired. The
    vehicle is not driven much. My wife's car falls in that catagory. Over
    6 years old and plenty of tread.
    Or the winter summer swap out and the tires were only used half the
    year.
    The tires were SCRAPPED. Still have both vehicles. The truck is 26
    years old come april, with 376000Km on it and still going strong. The
    tires were wearing VERY well - so still had 80+% tread left but the
    sidewalls were cracking. Combination of low miles/only used haf the
    year amd plain old age.

    On the Kia I'm not sure how many miles were on the tires as they were
    on the 5 year old vehicle when we bought it and they were NOT >> >>>>>>>>>>>>> original. If they were the second set and the miles were put on in a
    uniform manner over the previous life of the car there were likely
    about 80000km on them. The tread was getting thin and, being >> >>>>>>>>>>>>> Michelins, the sidewalls were also starting to crack.

    I've never seen such new tires with cracking side walls. I would not
    buy that brand again if I were you.

    Brand has nothing to do with cracking on the sidewall. That is a defect
    and every manufacturer puts out some duds. This happened to me with
    Michelin LTX M/S.
    Michelin authorized replacement at about 24K. The next set of Michelin,
    same tire, wore out in less than 25K. They adjusted the set again.

    At best they've pro-rated them, then charged full retail. Sale price,
    often at the same time, was a better deal.

    Yes, they always prorate from the retail price and if the tire needs to
    be replaced, later in it's life, buying at the sale price can often be
    less expensive. IIRC thse had a 70K mileage warranty and were wearing
    well, other than the sidewall checking. So I got a pretty good
    adjustment on replacements. The second set were worn out, according to
    Discount Tire, and the pro-rated cost was also pretty good.

    The trick is to bypass the retailer all together and go directly to the
    manufacturers web site to get assistance. Once upon a time I ran a tire
    store and learned a few tricks to get things done. ;~)
    If you cal the manufacturer be sure to give them the specifics. Tread
    depth and mileage and the issue.

    In the last case DT said 2 tires qualified to be adjusted the other 2
    were not. A call to Michelin indicating that the other 2 tires were
    about 1/16" from qualifying. They authorized replacement of all four
    and called my dealer to set that up.





    At worst, they blamed it on me and refused to refund anything. I >> >>>>>>>>>> ignore tire warranties, other than to use them as a (poor) gauge of
    longevity.

    Again, call/contact the manufacturer.
    In Michelin's case the 70K mileage warranty was an extremely poor gauge,
    considering they were just over 1/3 over the miles.

    And I know these were a fluke/bad batch of tires. I think the rubber
    was too hard causing the checking on the first set and to combat that
    issue the softer rubber compound on the second set caused them to wear
    out prematurely.

    The problems I've generally had was premature wear. The 70K tire only
    went 35-40K. The warranty was based on tread remaining. Wonderful. >> >>>>>>>

    If there is uneven wear the tire will be adjusted according to average
    tread depth. If you took their word for how the tire should be
    adjusted, premature wear compared to the actual warranty, you should >> >>>>>>> have talked to the manufacturer. They will contact the tire store and
    fill them in.
    "premature wear" in not necessarilly uneven wear. IUn fact it is not >> >>>>>> even necessarilly "pre-mature" or "accellerated" - it is simply a
    higher than expected rate of wear either due to conditions or tire
    quality. Even accellerated wear is generally a sign of "not enough
    tire" or "cheap tire" - - or simply "WRONG TIRE" for the application. >> >>>>>
    FWIW premature wear is typically a tire issue with the assumption that >> >>>>> the correct tire was used on the vehicle. In that instance the mileage >> >>>>> should be used, again assuming the that there is a mileage warranty, for
    adjustment pricing.

    Uneven wear is 99.9% of the time not the fault of the tire. If the tire
    wears out premature due to uneven wear the average tread remaining is >> >>>>> normally used if this is authorized.

    Uneven wear can be caused by many situations. Most often caused by not >> >>>>> rotating the tires regularly, every x amount of miles. This normally >> >>>>> shows up as excessive wear on the outside edge of the tread, and is
    cause by leaving the front tires in place too long before rotating.

    And under inflation can show up as uneven wear by excessive wear on the
    inside and out side of the tread. Over inflation shows up as uneven
    wear in the middle of the tire.
    This was more of a problem prior to radial tires becoming the normal >> >>>>> replacement. This was an issue with biased ply tires.



    And uneven wear can be seen as scallopes along the edges or across the >> >>>>> width of the tire. This is normally the result of unbalanced tires and >> >>>>> worn out shock absorbers/struts. If those items are worn out the
    excessive bouncing can cause uneven wear spots.

    Uneven wear can be caused by alignment problems.

    Uneven wear is almost with out a doubt cause by one of the above
    mentioned conditions.

    Premature wear and uneven wear are 99% of th4e time not the same. That >> >>>>> said I don't know of a manufacturer that will adjust a tire due to
    uneven wear. A lenient tire salesman will often offer some kind of
    adjustment for premature wear if uneven wear is not exaggerated. And as
    mentioned above they will adjust using an average of remaining tread and
    not use mileage as a basis.

    Having been in the tire business for 6 years and the auto dealership >> >>>>> service department business for 10 years the wrong sized tire was the >> >>>>> exception.


    Over 26 years active in the business including 10 as dealership
    servive manager. It's not so much the wrong "size" tire as the wrong
    tire eating - but under-spec / under-sized tires are far from the
    exception when you remember "for the application" as a quialifier

    Got me beat! LOL. I was only in the auto industry from 72 ~95. I
    worked as a teenager at the company/tire store, Ameron Automotice
    Centers in Corpus Christi, 2 years. Moved to Houston withe my parents
    when I was 19 and was asked to return to work for the same company in
    Houston. 2 years later I was running one of their centers. I saw a dead >> >>> end and resigned to work at BF Goodrich for 8 months. Then was
    approached at 22 to run the parts department for a "yet to be opened"
    Olds Dealership in downtown Houston. Back to Corpus Christi to train at >> >>> the parent dealership. Trained in the body shop, asst manager, and the >> >>> parts department. 9 months later we opened the dealership, I was the
    parts manager for 4 or so years and then promoted to service sales
    manager for about 3 years. Then Parts director for the Olds and new
    Isuzu franchise. That all took almost 10 years. Then a job offer to be >> >>> the GM for an AC/Delco/3M/Permatex dealer for about 8 years and then I >> >>> retired at 40. Whew!


    And agreed, not so much the wrong size as the application. I was in the >> >>> service end of the business for 15 years and back then, 1972-1987
    probably 90% of the tires sold were for automobiles. I am quite certain >> >>> that percentage has changed more in the truck population direction.
    Back then the tires that came on trucks were rarely different than on
    automobiles. I know my 79 GMC had regular passenger car tires on it and >> >>> I upgraded to a truck type tire for replacements. BUT the originals
    wore well as I drove the truck unloaded most of the time. When I
    sold/mounted tires at the tire store passenger tires came off and
    passenger tires went back on, in the 70's. Oldsmobile did not have many >> >>> installs of tires and pretty much no trucks.

    Started my apprenticeship in '68 - graduated high school in '69,
    finished my apprenticeship at a Texaco general repair garage / farm
    equipment dealership in - 1971 -wrote my CofQ (top of my class) Dec
    '71, got my interprovincial licence in March '72.(At 19,youngest
    licensed mechanic in Ontario) Worked for Toyota dealer and then AMC /
    Jeep /Mazda / International Trucks dealer/ Esso station and as supply
    teacher. Then I taught trade level internationally for 2 years, then
    returned to working at CanadianTire, moving on to running the bays at
    an ESSO station, then to industrial equipment dealership, on to
    operating the bays at a shell station and back to the Toyota
    dealership where I became service manager within 3 weeks. I spent 10
    years as service manager, going from 2 mechanics plus myself to 7 plus
    myself before deciding to actively leave the trade. I've worked as a
    consultant to the trade in various capacities over the last 30 years
    off and on as a self employed IT / technoligy proffessional.


    Well I guess I got you beat. LOL I had 6 service advisors, a service
    manager, and 50+ mechanics. We took in approximately 400 vehicles on a
    weekly basis.

    Thinking back to when I was working PT for Ameron Automotive centers, in
    Corpus Christi, there was a national holiday. The holiday was to
    observe the funeral procession of president Johnson. That coincided
    with a close out tire sale that we were having. We sold 400 tires on
    that single day. That was a 13 hour work day with no lunch break.

    Does that say something about what people thought about Johnson? ;-)

    400 tires = ~100 people. Not sure that says anything except that a very,
    very small percentage of Texans took advantage of their day off to get
    a good price on tires.

    Not so small but if you say so.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Markem618@21:1/5 to teamarrows@eznet.net on Sun Jan 16 20:23:48 2022
    On Sun, 16 Jan 2022 17:42:54 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Sunday, January 16, 2022 at 6:19:58 PM UTC-5, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 16 Jan 2022 13:33:42 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/15/2022 12:06 AM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Fri, 14 Jan 2022 14:01:45 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/13/2022 9:53 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Wed, 12 Jan 2022 15:28:14 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/12/2022 2:45 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Wed, 12 Jan 2022 10:54:41 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/11/2022 7:55 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Tue, 11 Jan 2022 12:11:41 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/9/2022 4:07 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 9 Jan 2022 15:21:06 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 1/8/2022 5:28 PM, Michael Trew wrote:
    On 1/7/2022 14:54, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Fri, 7 Jan 2022 09:02:18 -0600, Leon<lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 1/6/2022 9:12 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Thu, 06 Jan 2022 21:56:56 -0500, Clare Snyder<cl...@snyder.on.ca>
    wrote:

    On Tue, 04 Jan 2022 23:53:45 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michae...@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/3/2022 12:00, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 11:50:51 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michae...@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/2/2022 21:24, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Sun, 2 Jan 2022 14:49:08 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
    <teama...@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Sunday, January 2, 2022 at 3:33:44 PM UTC-5,
    k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 14:48:13 GMT, Puckdropper<em...@example.com>
    wrote:
    Michael Trew<michae...@att.net> wrote in
    news:sqohqs$f27$7...@dont-email.me:

    On 12/31/2021 16:59, k...@notreal.com wrote:

    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> anything for that
    matter, lasting 40 years? ;-)

    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol

    A good compressor that's easy to move (so not one of those
    200 gallon
    monsters but also not a 1 1/2 gallon noise maker) would be a
    nice thing to
    pass down. Shoot, even if they just use it to inflate tires
    and beach
    balls, it would make their life that much easier.
    For tires I have one of these:

    <https://www.homedepot.com/p/RYOBI-ONE-18V-Lithium-Ion-Cordless-Power-Inflator-Kit-with-1-5-Ah-Battery-and-18V-Charger-P737DKN/311788879>


    SWMBO appreciates it very much.

    I looked at her "spare" a while back. Since it is small car
    (Mustang), I knew it had to have a bicycle tire. Nope. Not even
    that. Under the trunk liner is a 12V compressor and a can of
    compressed tire gunk. Nice. A bicycle tire is an extra $250.

    Ever notice how all (?) spares are stored with the valve down
    or inward,
    forcing you to remove the spare it to check/fill it? The
    spare in my Odyssey
    is buried valve down under the carpet between the front and
    middle row seats.
    What a PITA to get it out.

    I have one configuration or another of these in all of my
    vehicles.

    https://www.amazon.com/Hotop-Stainless-Extension-Braided-Extender/dp/B09BMWQQ3R


    All of the spares in my vehicles look something like this so I
    can check/top
    them off without removing them.

    https://i.imgur.com/6IHvl8M.jpg

    https://i.imgur.com/nxJAKFf.jpg

    I wouldn't be surprised if half the folks in this group (that
    have spares) have
    spares that are sitting at 45-50 PSI.

    It's amazing how those tires hold up. Especially the old bias-ply
    tires, to build on the post quoted below. I have a '68 Ford
    Galaxie,
    and it has the full size spare installed on the front tire now,
    a 1968
    bias-ply tire. I cannot believe that the thing still holds air
    pressure. It's pretty well bald, however.

    Bicycle tires are designed to never be used.

    What about bicycle tires?

    The last time I actually USED my spare was on my '63
    Valiant back
    about 1970. I ALMOST had to use it 3 times on one trip with the PT
    Cruiser on my trip to PEI when 3 valve stems failed and >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> christmas 1972
    in Montana or Idaho or Wyoming or wherever when I got a cinder
    puncture - managed to find a tire repair guy before it got all
    the way
    flat.

    I always keep a full sized spare when traveling. I can recall
    too many
    times that I needed it on a 1,000+ mile road trip, in recent
    history.

    A full-size tire would take up the entire trunk, making travel a
    little difficult. Full-size truck spares work because there is waste
    space under the bed. There is no wasted space in cars these days. I
    wonder that the (useless) electric trucks will do. AFAIK, the
    batteries take up that space.

    I keep the full-size tire on rim behind the driver's seat. On
    very long
    road trips, the back seat it otherwise full of luggage, cooler,
    blankets/pillows/air mattress/etc.

    I've heard that some new cars don't even have a donut spare.

    As I said earlier, my wife's Mustang came with a 12V tire pump and a
    can of fix-a-flat. No spare of any kind.

    With 4 little chunks of rubber being the only thing between you
    and
    your last breath, Tires are not where I am going to cut corners.

    I just "decomissioned" a set of 7 year old michelins with 80% tread
    from the Ranger, as well as a 5 or 6 year old set of Michelind with
    about 40% tread from the Sorento.

    What did you do with them? It seems that every car needs a different
    size. Maybe I misunderstood. Do you still have the cars just that the
    tires are too old to trust? Why 80%?

    Possibly 2 reasons for thread being in good shape when retired. The
    vehicle is not driven much. My wife's car falls in that catagory. Over
    6 years old and plenty of tread.
    Or the winter summer swap out and the tires were only used half the
    year.
    The tires were SCRAPPED. Still have both vehicles. The truck is 26
    years old come april, with 376000Km on it and still going strong. The
    tires were wearing VERY well - so still had 80+% tread left but the
    sidewalls were cracking. Combination of low miles/only used haf the
    year amd plain old age.

    On the Kia I'm not sure how many miles were on the tires as they were
    on the 5 year old vehicle when we bought it and they were NOT >> >>>>>>>>>>>>> original. If they were the second set and the miles were put on in a
    uniform manner over the previous life of the car there were likely
    about 80000km on them. The tread was getting thin and, being >> >>>>>>>>>>>>> Michelins, the sidewalls were also starting to crack.

    I've never seen such new tires with cracking side walls. I would not
    buy that brand again if I were you.

    Brand has nothing to do with cracking on the sidewall. That is a defect
    and every manufacturer puts out some duds. This happened to me with
    Michelin LTX M/S.
    Michelin authorized replacement at about 24K. The next set of Michelin,
    same tire, wore out in less than 25K. They adjusted the set again.

    At best they've pro-rated them, then charged full retail. Sale price,
    often at the same time, was a better deal.

    Yes, they always prorate from the retail price and if the tire needs to
    be replaced, later in it's life, buying at the sale price can often be
    less expensive. IIRC thse had a 70K mileage warranty and were wearing
    well, other than the sidewall checking. So I got a pretty good
    adjustment on replacements. The second set were worn out, according to
    Discount Tire, and the pro-rated cost was also pretty good.

    The trick is to bypass the retailer all together and go directly to the
    manufacturers web site to get assistance. Once upon a time I ran a tire
    store and learned a few tricks to get things done. ;~)
    If you cal the manufacturer be sure to give them the specifics. Tread
    depth and mileage and the issue.

    In the last case DT said 2 tires qualified to be adjusted the other 2
    were not. A call to Michelin indicating that the other 2 tires were
    about 1/16" from qualifying. They authorized replacement of all four
    and called my dealer to set that up.





    At worst, they blamed it on me and refused to refund anything. I >> >>>>>>>>>> ignore tire warranties, other than to use them as a (poor) gauge of
    longevity.

    Again, call/contact the manufacturer.
    In Michelin's case the 70K mileage warranty was an extremely poor gauge,
    considering they were just over 1/3 over the miles.

    And I know these were a fluke/bad batch of tires. I think the rubber
    was too hard causing the checking on the first set and to combat that
    issue the softer rubber compound on the second set caused them to wear
    out prematurely.

    The problems I've generally had was premature wear. The 70K tire only
    went 35-40K. The warranty was based on tread remaining. Wonderful. >> >>>>>>>

    If there is uneven wear the tire will be adjusted according to average
    tread depth. If you took their word for how the tire should be
    adjusted, premature wear compared to the actual warranty, you should >> >>>>>>> have talked to the manufacturer. They will contact the tire store and
    fill them in.
    "premature wear" in not necessarilly uneven wear. IUn fact it is not >> >>>>>> even necessarilly "pre-mature" or "accellerated" - it is simply a
    higher than expected rate of wear either due to conditions or tire
    quality. Even accellerated wear is generally a sign of "not enough
    tire" or "cheap tire" - - or simply "WRONG TIRE" for the application. >> >>>>>
    FWIW premature wear is typically a tire issue with the assumption that >> >>>>> the correct tire was used on the vehicle. In that instance the mileage >> >>>>> should be used, again assuming the that there is a mileage warranty, for
    adjustment pricing.

    Uneven wear is 99.9% of the time not the fault of the tire. If the tire
    wears out premature due to uneven wear the average tread remaining is >> >>>>> normally used if this is authorized.

    Uneven wear can be caused by many situations. Most often caused by not >> >>>>> rotating the tires regularly, every x amount of miles. This normally >> >>>>> shows up as excessive wear on the outside edge of the tread, and is
    cause by leaving the front tires in place too long before rotating.

    And under inflation can show up as uneven wear by excessive wear on the
    inside and out side of the tread. Over inflation shows up as uneven
    wear in the middle of the tire.
    This was more of a problem prior to radial tires becoming the normal >> >>>>> replacement. This was an issue with biased ply tires.



    And uneven wear can be seen as scallopes along the edges or across the >> >>>>> width of the tire. This is normally the result of unbalanced tires and >> >>>>> worn out shock absorbers/struts. If those items are worn out the
    excessive bouncing can cause uneven wear spots.

    Uneven wear can be caused by alignment problems.

    Uneven wear is almost with out a doubt cause by one of the above
    mentioned conditions.

    Premature wear and uneven wear are 99% of th4e time not the same. That >> >>>>> said I don't know of a manufacturer that will adjust a tire due to
    uneven wear. A lenient tire salesman will often offer some kind of
    adjustment for premature wear if uneven wear is not exaggerated. And as
    mentioned above they will adjust using an average of remaining tread and
    not use mileage as a basis.

    Having been in the tire business for 6 years and the auto dealership >> >>>>> service department business for 10 years the wrong sized tire was the >> >>>>> exception.


    Over 26 years active in the business including 10 as dealership
    servive manager. It's not so much the wrong "size" tire as the wrong
    tire eating - but under-spec / under-sized tires are far from the
    exception when you remember "for the application" as a quialifier

    Got me beat! LOL. I was only in the auto industry from 72 ~95. I
    worked as a teenager at the company/tire store, Ameron Automotice
    Centers in Corpus Christi, 2 years. Moved to Houston withe my parents
    when I was 19 and was asked to return to work for the same company in
    Houston. 2 years later I was running one of their centers. I saw a dead >> >>> end and resigned to work at BF Goodrich for 8 months. Then was
    approached at 22 to run the parts department for a "yet to be opened"
    Olds Dealership in downtown Houston. Back to Corpus Christi to train at >> >>> the parent dealership. Trained in the body shop, asst manager, and the >> >>> parts department. 9 months later we opened the dealership, I was the
    parts manager for 4 or so years and then promoted to service sales
    manager for about 3 years. Then Parts director for the Olds and new
    Isuzu franchise. That all took almost 10 years. Then a job offer to be >> >>> the GM for an AC/Delco/3M/Permatex dealer for about 8 years and then I >> >>> retired at 40. Whew!


    And agreed, not so much the wrong size as the application. I was in the >> >>> service end of the business for 15 years and back then, 1972-1987
    probably 90% of the tires sold were for automobiles. I am quite certain >> >>> that percentage has changed more in the truck population direction.
    Back then the tires that came on trucks were rarely different than on
    automobiles. I know my 79 GMC had regular passenger car tires on it and >> >>> I upgraded to a truck type tire for replacements. BUT the originals
    wore well as I drove the truck unloaded most of the time. When I
    sold/mounted tires at the tire store passenger tires came off and
    passenger tires went back on, in the 70's. Oldsmobile did not have many >> >>> installs of tires and pretty much no trucks.

    Started my apprenticeship in '68 - graduated high school in '69,
    finished my apprenticeship at a Texaco general repair garage / farm
    equipment dealership in - 1971 -wrote my CofQ (top of my class) Dec
    '71, got my interprovincial licence in March '72.(At 19,youngest
    licensed mechanic in Ontario) Worked for Toyota dealer and then AMC /
    Jeep /Mazda / International Trucks dealer/ Esso station and as supply
    teacher. Then I taught trade level internationally for 2 years, then
    returned to working at CanadianTire, moving on to running the bays at
    an ESSO station, then to industrial equipment dealership, on to
    operating the bays at a shell station and back to the Toyota
    dealership where I became service manager within 3 weeks. I spent 10
    years as service manager, going from 2 mechanics plus myself to 7 plus
    myself before deciding to actively leave the trade. I've worked as a
    consultant to the trade in various capacities over the last 30 years
    off and on as a self employed IT / technoligy proffessional.


    Well I guess I got you beat. LOL I had 6 service advisors, a service
    manager, and 50+ mechanics. We took in approximately 400 vehicles on a
    weekly basis.

    Thinking back to when I was working PT for Ameron Automotive centers, in
    Corpus Christi, there was a national holiday. The holiday was to
    observe the funeral procession of president Johnson. That coincided
    with a close out tire sale that we were having. We sold 400 tires on
    that single day. That was a 13 hour work day with no lunch break.

    Does that say something about what people thought about Johnson? ;-)

    400 tires = ~100 people. Not sure that says anything except that a very,
    very small percentage of Texans took advantage of their day off to get
    a good price on tires.

    But what was the book hours on tire change, split between how many
    service techs, bet it was a good day all around other that 13 hours in
    Texas heat in a garage.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Clare Snyder@21:1/5 to All on Sun Jan 16 21:42:00 2022
    On Sun, 16 Jan 2022 13:33:42 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/15/2022 12:06 AM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Fri, 14 Jan 2022 14:01:45 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/13/2022 9:53 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Wed, 12 Jan 2022 15:28:14 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/12/2022 2:45 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Wed, 12 Jan 2022 10:54:41 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/11/2022 7:55 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Tue, 11 Jan 2022 12:11:41 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> >>>>>>>> wrote:

    On 1/9/2022 4:07 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 9 Jan 2022 15:21:06 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 1/8/2022 5:28 PM, Michael Trew wrote:
    On 1/7/2022 14:54, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Fri, 7 Jan 2022 09:02:18 -0600, Leon<lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 1/6/2022 9:12 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Thu, 06 Jan 2022 21:56:56 -0500, Clare Snyder<clare@snyder.on.ca>
    wrote:

    On Tue, 04 Jan 2022 23:53:45 -0500, Michael Trew >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/3/2022 12:00, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 11:50:51 -0500, Michael Trew >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/2/2022 21:24, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Sun, 2 Jan 2022 14:49:08 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03 >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Sunday, January 2, 2022 at 3:33:44 PM UTC-5, >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 14:48:13 GMT, Puckdropper<em...@example.com>
    wrote:
    Michael Trew<michae...@att.net> wrote in >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> news:sqohqs$f27$7...@dont-email.me: >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    On 12/31/2021 16:59, k...@notreal.com wrote: >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> anything for that
    matter, lasting 40 years? ;-) >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    A good compressor that's easy to move (so not one of those
    200 gallon
    monsters but also not a 1 1/2 gallon noise maker) would be a
    nice thing to
    pass down. Shoot, even if they just use it to inflate tires
    and beach
    balls, it would make their life that much easier. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> For tires I have one of these:

    <https://www.homedepot.com/p/RYOBI-ONE-18V-Lithium-Ion-Cordless-Power-Inflator-Kit-with-1-5-Ah-Battery-and-18V-Charger-P737DKN/311788879>


    SWMBO appreciates it very much.

    I looked at her "spare" a while back. Since it is small car
    (Mustang), I knew it had to have a bicycle tire. Nope. Not even
    that. Under the trunk liner is a 12V compressor and a can of
    compressed tire gunk. Nice. A bicycle tire is an extra $250.

    Ever notice how all (?) spares are stored with the valve down
    or inward,
    forcing you to remove the spare it to check/fill it? The
    spare in my Odyssey
    is buried valve down under the carpet between the front and
    middle row seats.
    What a PITA to get it out.

    I have one configuration or another of these in all of my >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> vehicles.

    https://www.amazon.com/Hotop-Stainless-Extension-Braided-Extender/dp/B09BMWQQ3R


    All of the spares in my vehicles look something like this so I
    can check/top
    them off without removing them.

    https://i.imgur.com/6IHvl8M.jpg

    https://i.imgur.com/nxJAKFf.jpg

    I wouldn't be surprised if half the folks in this group (that
    have spares) have
    spares that are sitting at 45-50 PSI.

    It's amazing how those tires hold up. Especially the old bias-ply
    tires, to build on the post quoted below. I have a '68 Ford
    Galaxie,
    and it has the full size spare installed on the front tire now,
    a 1968
    bias-ply tire. I cannot believe that the thing still holds air
    pressure. It's pretty well bald, however. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    Bicycle tires are designed to never be used. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    What about bicycle tires?

    The last time I actually USED my spare was on my '63
    Valiant back
    about 1970. I ALMOST had to use it 3 times on one trip with the PT
    Cruiser on my trip to PEI when 3 valve stems failed and >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> christmas 1972
    in Montana or Idaho or Wyoming or wherever when I got a cinder
    puncture - managed to find a tire repair guy before it got all
    the way
    flat.

    I always keep a full sized spare when traveling. I can recall
    too many
    times that I needed it on a 1,000+ mile road trip, in recent
    history.

    A full-size tire would take up the entire trunk, making travel a
    little difficult. Full-size truck spares work because there is waste
    space under the bed. There is no wasted space in cars these days. I
    wonder that the (useless) electric trucks will do. AFAIK, the
    batteries take up that space.

    I keep the full-size tire on rim behind the driver's seat. On
    very long
    road trips, the back seat it otherwise full of luggage, cooler,
    blankets/pillows/air mattress/etc.

    I've heard that some new cars don't even have a donut spare. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    As I said earlier, my wife's Mustang came with a 12V tire pump and a
    can of fix-a-flat. No spare of any kind.

    With 4 little chunks of rubber being the only thing between you
    and
    your last breath, Tires are not where I am going to cut corners.

    I just "decomissioned" a set of 7 year old michelins with 80% tread
    from the Ranger, as well as a 5 or 6 year old set of Michelind with
    about 40% tread from the Sorento.

    What did you do with them? It seems that every car needs a different
    size. Maybe I misunderstood. Do you still have the cars just that the
    tires are too old to trust? Why 80%?

    Possibly 2 reasons for thread being in good shape when retired. The
    vehicle is not driven much. My wife's car falls in that catagory. Over
    6 years old and plenty of tread.
    Or the winter summer swap out and the tires were only used half the
    year.
    The tires were SCRAPPED. Still have both vehicles. The truck is 26
    years old come april, with 376000Km on it and still going strong. The
    tires were wearing VERY well - so still had 80+% tread left but the
    sidewalls were cracking. Combination of low miles/only used haf the
    year amd plain old age.

    On the Kia I'm not sure how many miles were on the tires as they were
    on the 5 year old vehicle when we bought it and they were NOT >>>>>>>>>>>>> original. If they were the second set and the miles were put on in a
    uniform manner over the previous life of the car there were likely
    about 80000km on them. The tread was getting thin and, being >>>>>>>>>>>>> Michelins, the sidewalls were also starting to crack. >>>>>>>>>>>>
    I've never seen such new tires with cracking side walls. I would not
    buy that brand again if I were you.

    Brand has nothing to do with cracking on the sidewall. That is a defect
    and every manufacturer puts out some duds. This happened to me with
    Michelin LTX M/S.
    Michelin authorized replacement at about 24K. The next set of Michelin,
    same tire, wore out in less than 25K. They adjusted the set again. >>>>>>>>>>
    At best they've pro-rated them, then charged full retail. Sale price,
    often at the same time, was a better deal.

    Yes, they always prorate from the retail price and if the tire needs to
    be replaced, later in it's life, buying at the sale price can often be
    less expensive. IIRC thse had a 70K mileage warranty and were wearing
    well, other than the sidewall checking. So I got a pretty good >>>>>>>>> adjustment on replacements. The second set were worn out, according to
    Discount Tire, and the pro-rated cost was also pretty good.

    The trick is to bypass the retailer all together and go directly to the
    manufacturers web site to get assistance. Once upon a time I ran a tire
    store and learned a few tricks to get things done. ;~)
    If you cal the manufacturer be sure to give them the specifics. Tread
    depth and mileage and the issue.

    In the last case DT said 2 tires qualified to be adjusted the other 2 >>>>>>>>> were not. A call to Michelin indicating that the other 2 tires were >>>>>>>>> about 1/16" from qualifying. They authorized replacement of all four >>>>>>>>> and called my dealer to set that up.





    At worst, they blamed it on me and refused to refund anything. I >>>>>>>>>> ignore tire warranties, other than to use them as a (poor) gauge of >>>>>>>>>> longevity.

    Again, call/contact the manufacturer.
    In Michelin's case the 70K mileage warranty was an extremely poor gauge,
    considering they were just over 1/3 over the miles.

    And I know these were a fluke/bad batch of tires. I think the rubber >>>>>>>>> was too hard causing the checking on the first set and to combat that >>>>>>>>> issue the softer rubber compound on the second set caused them to wear
    out prematurely.

    The problems I've generally had was premature wear. The 70K tire only >>>>>>>> went 35-40K. The warranty was based on tread remaining. Wonderful. >>>>>>>

    If there is uneven wear the tire will be adjusted according to average >>>>>>> tread depth. If you took their word for how the tire should be
    adjusted, premature wear compared to the actual warranty, you should >>>>>>> have talked to the manufacturer. They will contact the tire store and >>>>>>> fill them in.
    "premature wear" in not necessarilly uneven wear. IUn fact it is not >>>>>> even necessarilly "pre-mature" or "accellerated" - it is simply a
    higher than expected rate of wear either due to conditions or tire >>>>>> quality. Even accellerated wear is generally a sign of "not enough >>>>>> tire" or "cheap tire" - - or simply "WRONG TIRE" for the application. >>>>>
    FWIW premature wear is typically a tire issue with the assumption that >>>>> the correct tire was used on the vehicle. In that instance the mileage >>>>> should be used, again assuming the that there is a mileage warranty, for >>>>> adjustment pricing.

    Uneven wear is 99.9% of the time not the fault of the tire. If the tire >>>>> wears out premature due to uneven wear the average tread remaining is >>>>> normally used if this is authorized.

    Uneven wear can be caused by many situations. Most often caused by not >>>>> rotating the tires regularly, every x amount of miles. This normally >>>>> shows up as excessive wear on the outside edge of the tread, and is
    cause by leaving the front tires in place too long before rotating.

    And under inflation can show up as uneven wear by excessive wear on the >>>>> inside and out side of the tread. Over inflation shows up as uneven >>>>> wear in the middle of the tire.
    This was more of a problem prior to radial tires becoming the normal >>>>> replacement. This was an issue with biased ply tires.



    And uneven wear can be seen as scallopes along the edges or across the >>>>> width of the tire. This is normally the result of unbalanced tires and >>>>> worn out shock absorbers/struts. If those items are worn out the
    excessive bouncing can cause uneven wear spots.

    Uneven wear can be caused by alignment problems.

    Uneven wear is almost with out a doubt cause by one of the above
    mentioned conditions.

    Premature wear and uneven wear are 99% of th4e time not the same. That >>>>> said I don't know of a manufacturer that will adjust a tire due to
    uneven wear. A lenient tire salesman will often offer some kind of
    adjustment for premature wear if uneven wear is not exaggerated. And as >>>>> mentioned above they will adjust using an average of remaining tread and >>>>> not use mileage as a basis.

    Having been in the tire business for 6 years and the auto dealership >>>>> service department business for 10 years the wrong sized tire was the >>>>> exception.


    Over 26 years active in the business including 10 as dealership
    servive manager. It's not so much the wrong "size" tire as the wrong
    tire eating - but under-spec / under-sized tires are far from the
    exception when you remember "for the application" as a quialifier

    Got me beat! LOL. I was only in the auto industry from 72 ~95. I
    worked as a teenager at the company/tire store, Ameron Automotice
    Centers in Corpus Christi, 2 years. Moved to Houston withe my parents
    when I was 19 and was asked to return to work for the same company in
    Houston. 2 years later I was running one of their centers. I saw a dead
    end and resigned to work at BF Goodrich for 8 months. Then was
    approached at 22 to run the parts department for a "yet to be opened"
    Olds Dealership in downtown Houston. Back to Corpus Christi to train at >>> the parent dealership. Trained in the body shop, asst manager, and the
    parts department. 9 months later we opened the dealership, I was the
    parts manager for 4 or so years and then promoted to service sales
    manager for about 3 years. Then Parts director for the Olds and new
    Isuzu franchise. That all took almost 10 years. Then a job offer to be
    the GM for an AC/Delco/3M/Permatex dealer for about 8 years and then I
    retired at 40. Whew!


    And agreed, not so much the wrong size as the application. I was in the >>> service end of the business for 15 years and back then, 1972-1987
    probably 90% of the tires sold were for automobiles. I am quite certain >>> that percentage has changed more in the truck population direction.
    Back then the tires that came on trucks were rarely different than on
    automobiles. I know my 79 GMC had regular passenger car tires on it and >>> I upgraded to a truck type tire for replacements. BUT the originals
    wore well as I drove the truck unloaded most of the time. When I
    sold/mounted tires at the tire store passenger tires came off and
    passenger tires went back on, in the 70's. Oldsmobile did not have many >>> installs of tires and pretty much no trucks.

    Started my apprenticeship in '68 - graduated high school in '69,
    finished my apprenticeship at a Texaco general repair garage / farm
    equipment dealership in - 1971 -wrote my CofQ (top of my class) Dec
    '71, got my interprovincial licence in March '72.(At 19,youngest
    licensed mechanic in Ontario) Worked for Toyota dealer and then AMC /
    Jeep /Mazda / International Trucks dealer/ Esso station and as supply
    teacher. Then I taught trade level internationally for 2 years, then
    returned to working at CanadianTire, moving on to running the bays at
    an ESSO station, then to industrial equipment dealership, on to
    operating the bays at a shell station and back to the Toyota
    dealership where I became service manager within 3 weeks. I spent 10
    years as service manager, going from 2 mechanics plus myself to 7 plus
    myself before deciding to actively leave the trade. I've worked as a
    consultant to the trade in various capacities over the last 30 years
    off and on as a self employed IT / technoligy proffessional.


    Well I guess I got you beat. LOL I had 6 service advisors, a service >manager, and 50+ mechanics. We took in approximately 400 vehicles on a >weekly basis.

    Thinking back to when I was working PT for Ameron Automotive centers, in >Corpus Christi, there was a national holiday. The holiday was to
    observe the funeral procession of president Johnson. That coincided
    with a close out tire sale that we were having. We sold 400 tires on
    that single day. That was a 13 hour work day with no lunch break.

    No problem.Our little dealership did OK.
    In the 10 years I was mamager we never had an absorption rate under
    90% and were usually over 110,best year better than 130% - and our 3
    year retention rate never dripped under 90% - the final couple years I
    was running in excess of 123% . That means I was servicing 123 cars
    for every 100 we sold 3 years down the road - I was servicing cars
    sold in cambridge, Kitchener, London, Hamilton, Scarborough, Whitby,Orangeville, even Ottawa - at least 3 times a year when they
    were 3 years old.. Had to be doing SOMETHING right!!! If the
    dealership didn't sell a single vehicle for the entire year the
    profits from parts and service covered the entire operating expense
    including management salaries and made a 30% profit on our best year.

    Not bad in what was basically a 6 bay garage, and starting out as
    service manager in the third year of operation with an apprentice and
    a licenced mechanic and myself. (and a "lot boy")
    It was big enough for a "working service manager" - I worked on the
    bench with the mechanics - doing a lot of diagnostics as well as A/C
    installs etc as well as major repairs (transmissions, cyl heads, etc).
    - Can't do that in a Mega-Dealership.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From krw@notreal.com@21:1/5 to All on Sun Jan 16 22:20:49 2022
    On Sun, 16 Jan 2022 21:42:00 -0500, Clare Snyder <clare@snyder.on.ca>
    wrote:

    On Sun, 16 Jan 2022 13:33:42 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/15/2022 12:06 AM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Fri, 14 Jan 2022 14:01:45 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/13/2022 9:53 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Wed, 12 Jan 2022 15:28:14 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/12/2022 2:45 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Wed, 12 Jan 2022 10:54:41 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> >>>>>>> wrote:

    On 1/11/2022 7:55 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Tue, 11 Jan 2022 12:11:41 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> >>>>>>>>> wrote:

    On 1/9/2022 4:07 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 9 Jan 2022 15:21:06 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 1/8/2022 5:28 PM, Michael Trew wrote:
    On 1/7/2022 14:54, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Fri, 7 Jan 2022 09:02:18 -0600, Leon<lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 1/6/2022 9:12 PM, krw@notreal.com wrote:
    On Thu, 06 Jan 2022 21:56:56 -0500, Clare Snyder<clare@snyder.on.ca>
    wrote:

    On Tue, 04 Jan 2022 23:53:45 -0500, Michael Trew >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/3/2022 12:00, krw@notreal.com wrote: >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 11:50:51 -0500, Michael Trew >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <michael.trew@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/2/2022 21:24, Clare Snyder wrote: >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> On Sun, 2 Jan 2022 14:49:08 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03 >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Sunday, January 2, 2022 at 3:33:44 PM UTC-5, >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 14:48:13 GMT, Puckdropper<em...@example.com>
    wrote:
    Michael Trew<michae...@att.net> wrote in >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> news:sqohqs$f27$7...@dont-email.me: >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    On 12/31/2021 16:59, k...@notreal.com wrote: >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    How many of us are concerned about compressors, or >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> anything for that
    matter, lasting 40 years? ;-) >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    Me, but I might stand alone here... Lol >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    A good compressor that's easy to move (so not one of those
    200 gallon
    monsters but also not a 1 1/2 gallon noise maker) would be a
    nice thing to
    pass down. Shoot, even if they just use it to inflate tires
    and beach
    balls, it would make their life that much easier. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> For tires I have one of these:

    <https://www.homedepot.com/p/RYOBI-ONE-18V-Lithium-Ion-Cordless-Power-Inflator-Kit-with-1-5-Ah-Battery-and-18V-Charger-P737DKN/311788879>


    SWMBO appreciates it very much.

    I looked at her "spare" a while back. Since it is small car
    (Mustang), I knew it had to have a bicycle tire. Nope. Not even
    that. Under the trunk liner is a 12V compressor and a can of
    compressed tire gunk. Nice. A bicycle tire is an extra $250.

    Ever notice how all (?) spares are stored with the valve down
    or inward,
    forcing you to remove the spare it to check/fill it? The
    spare in my Odyssey
    is buried valve down under the carpet between the front and
    middle row seats.
    What a PITA to get it out.

    I have one configuration or another of these in all of my
    vehicles.

    https://www.amazon.com/Hotop-Stainless-Extension-Braided-Extender/dp/B09BMWQQ3R


    All of the spares in my vehicles look something like this so I
    can check/top
    them off without removing them.

    https://i.imgur.com/6IHvl8M.jpg

    https://i.imgur.com/nxJAKFf.jpg

    I wouldn't be surprised if half the folks in this group (that
    have spares) have
    spares that are sitting at 45-50 PSI. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    It's amazing how those tires hold up. Especially the old bias-ply
    tires, to build on the post quoted below. I have a '68 Ford
    Galaxie,
    and it has the full size spare installed on the front tire now,
    a 1968
    bias-ply tire. I cannot believe that the thing still holds air
    pressure. It's pretty well bald, however. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    Bicycle tires are designed to never be used. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    What about bicycle tires?

    The last time I actually USED my spare was on my '63
    Valiant back
    about 1970. I ALMOST had to use it 3 times on one trip with the PT
    Cruiser on my trip to PEI when 3 valve stems failed and >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> christmas 1972
    in Montana or Idaho or Wyoming or wherever when I got a cinder
    puncture - managed to find a tire repair guy before it got all
    the way
    flat.

    I always keep a full sized spare when traveling. I can recall
    too many
    times that I needed it on a 1,000+ mile road trip, in recent
    history.

    A full-size tire would take up the entire trunk, making travel a
    little difficult. Full-size truck spares work because there is waste
    space under the bed. There is no wasted space in cars these days. I
    wonder that the (useless) electric trucks will do. AFAIK, the
    batteries take up that space.

    I keep the full-size tire on rim behind the driver's seat. On
    very long
    road trips, the back seat it otherwise full of luggage, cooler,
    blankets/pillows/air mattress/etc.

    I've heard that some new cars don't even have a donut spare. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    As I said earlier, my wife's Mustang came with a 12V tire pump and a
    can of fix-a-flat. No spare of any kind.

    With 4 little chunks of rubber being the only thing between you
    and
    your last breath, Tires are not where I am going to cut corners.

    I just "decomissioned" a set of 7 year old michelins with 80% tread
    from the Ranger, as well as a 5 or 6 year old set of Michelind with
    about 40% tread from the Sorento.

    What did you do with them? It seems that every car needs a different
    size. Maybe I misunderstood. Do you still have the cars just that the
    tires are too old to trust? Why 80%?

    Possibly 2 reasons for thread being in good shape when retired. The
    vehicle is not driven much. My wife's car falls in that catagory. Over
    6 years old and plenty of tread.
    Or the winter summer swap out and the tires were only used half the
    year.
    The tires were SCRAPPED. Still have both vehicles. The truck is 26
    years old come april, with 376000Km on it and still going strong. The
    tires were wearing VERY well - so still had 80+% tread left but the
    sidewalls were cracking. Combination of low miles/only used haf the
    year amd plain old age.

    On the Kia I'm not sure how many miles were on the tires as they were
    on the 5 year old vehicle when we bought it and they were NOT >>>>>>>>>>>>>> original. If they were the second set and the miles were put on in a
    uniform manner over the previous life of the car there were likely
    about 80000km on them. The tread was getting thin and, being >>>>>>>>>>>>>> Michelins, the sidewalls were also starting to crack. >>>>>>>>>>>>>
    I've never seen such new tires with cracking side walls. I would not
    buy that brand again if I were you.

    Brand has nothing to do with cracking on the sidewall. That is a defect
    and every manufacturer puts out some duds. This happened to me with
    Michelin LTX M/S.
    Michelin authorized replacement at about 24K. The next set of Michelin,
    same tire, wore out in less than 25K. They adjusted the set again.

    At best they've pro-rated them, then charged full retail. Sale price,
    often at the same time, was a better deal.

    Yes, they always prorate from the retail price and if the tire needs to
    be replaced, later in it's life, buying at the sale price can often be
    less expensive. IIRC thse had a 70K mileage warranty and were wearing
    well, other than the sidewall checking. So I got a pretty good >>>>>>>>>> adjustment on replacements. The second set were worn out, according to
    Discount Tire, and the pro-rated cost was also pretty good. >>>>>>>>>>
    The trick is to bypass the retailer all together and go directly to the
    manufacturers web site to get assistance. Once upon a time I ran a tire
    store and learned a few tricks to get things done. ;~)
    If you cal the manufacturer be sure to give them the specifics. Tread
    depth and mileage and the issue.

    In the last case DT said 2 tires qualified to be adjusted the other 2
    were not. A call to Michelin indicating that the other 2 tires were >>>>>>>>>> about 1/16" from qualifying. They authorized replacement of all four
    and called my dealer to set that up.





    At worst, they blamed it on me and refused to refund anything. I >>>>>>>>>>> ignore tire warranties, other than to use them as a (poor) gauge of >>>>>>>>>>> longevity.

    Again, call/contact the manufacturer.
    In Michelin's case the 70K mileage warranty was an extremely poor gauge,
    considering they were just over 1/3 over the miles.

    And I know these were a fluke/bad batch of tires. I think the rubber
    was too hard causing the checking on the first set and to combat that
    issue the softer rubber compound on the second set caused them to wear
    out prematurely.

    The problems I've generally had was premature wear. The 70K tire only
    went 35-40K. The warranty was based on tread remaining. Wonderful. >>>>>>>>

    If there is uneven wear the tire will be adjusted according to average >>>>>>>> tread depth. If you took their word for how the tire should be >>>>>>>> adjusted, premature wear compared to the actual warranty, you should >>>>>>>> have talked to the manufacturer. They will contact the tire store and >>>>>>>> fill them in.
    "premature wear" in not necessarilly uneven wear. IUn fact it is not >>>>>>> even necessarilly "pre-mature" or "accellerated" - it is simply a >>>>>>> higher than expected rate of wear either due to conditions or tire >>>>>>> quality. Even accellerated wear is generally a sign of "not enough >>>>>>> tire" or "cheap tire" - - or simply "WRONG TIRE" for the application. >>>>>>
    FWIW premature wear is typically a tire issue with the assumption that >>>>>> the correct tire was used on the vehicle. In that instance the mileage >>>>>> should be used, again assuming the that there is a mileage warranty, for >>>>>> adjustment pricing.

    Uneven wear is 99.9% of the time not the fault of the tire. If the tire >>>>>> wears out premature due to uneven wear the average tread remaining is >>>>>> normally used if this is authorized.

    Uneven wear can be caused by many situations. Most often caused by not >>>>>> rotating the tires regularly, every x amount of miles. This normally >>>>>> shows up as excessive wear on the outside edge of the tread, and is >>>>>> cause by leaving the front tires in place too long before rotating. >>>>>>
    And under inflation can show up as uneven wear by excessive wear on the >>>>>> inside and out side of the tread. Over inflation shows up as uneven >>>>>> wear in the middle of the tire.
    This was more of a problem prior to radial tires becoming the normal >>>>>> replacement. This was an issue with biased ply tires.



    And uneven wear can be seen as scallopes along the edges or across the >>>>>> width of the tire. This is normally the result of unbalanced tires and >>>>>> worn out shock absorbers/struts. If those items are worn out the >>>>>> excessive bouncing can cause uneven wear spots.

    Uneven wear can be caused by alignment problems.

    Uneven wear is almost with out a doubt cause by one of the above
    mentioned conditions.

    Premature wear and uneven wear are 99% of th4e time not the same. That >>>>>> said I don't know of a manufacturer that will adjust a tire due to >>>>>> uneven wear. A lenient tire salesman will often offer some kind of >>>>>> adjustment for premature wear if uneven wear is not exaggerated. And as >>>>>> mentioned above they will adjust using an average of remaining tread and >>>>>> not use mileage as a basis.

    Having been in the tire business for 6 years and the auto dealership >>>>>> service department business for 10 years the wrong sized tire was the >>>>>> exception.


    Over 26 years active in the business including 10 as dealership
    servive manager. It's not so much the wrong "size" tire as the wrong >>>>> tire eating - but under-spec / under-sized tires are far from the
    exception when you remember "for the application" as a quialifier

    Got me beat! LOL. I was only in the auto industry from 72 ~95. I
    worked as a teenager at the company/tire store, Ameron Automotice
    Centers in Corpus Christi, 2 years. Moved to Houston withe my parents >>>> when I was 19 and was asked to return to work for the same company in
    Houston. 2 years later I was running one of their centers. I saw a dead >>>> end and resigned to work at BF Goodrich for 8 months. Then was
    approached at 22 to run the parts department for a "yet to be opened"
    Olds Dealership in downtown Houston. Back to Corpus Christi to train at >>>> the parent dealership. Trained in the body shop, asst manager, and the >>>> parts department. 9 months later we opened the dealership, I was the
    parts manager for 4 or so years and then promoted to service sales
    manager for about 3 years. Then Parts director for the Olds and new
    Isuzu franchise. That all took almost 10 years. Then a job offer to be >>>> the GM for an AC/Delco/3M/Permatex dealer for about 8 years and then I >>>> retired at 40. Whew!


    And agreed, not so much the wrong size as the application. I was in the >>>> service end of the business for 15 years and back then, 1972-1987
    probably 90% of the tires sold were for automobiles. I am quite certain >>>> that percentage has changed more in the truck population direction.
    Back then the tires that came on trucks were rarely different than on
    automobiles. I know my 79 GMC had regular passenger car tires on it and >>>> I upgraded to a truck type tire for replacements. BUT the originals
    wore well as I drove the truck unloaded most of the time. When I
    sold/mounted tires at the tire store passenger tires came off and
    passenger tires went back on, in the 70's. Oldsmobile did not have many >>>> installs of tires and pretty much no trucks.

    Started my apprenticeship in '68 - graduated high school in '69,
    finished my apprenticeship at a Texaco general repair garage / farm
    equipment dealership in - 1971 -wrote my CofQ (top of my class) Dec
    '71, got my interprovincial licence in March '72.(At 19,youngest
    licensed mechanic in Ontario) Worked for Toyota dealer and then AMC /
    Jeep /Mazda / International Trucks dealer/ Esso station and as supply
    teacher. Then I taught trade level internationally for 2 years, then
    returned to working at CanadianTire, moving on to running the bays at
    an ESSO station, then to industrial equipment dealership, on to
    operating the bays at a shell station and back to the Toyota
    dealership where I became service manager within 3 weeks. I spent 10
    years as service manager, going from 2 mechanics plus myself to 7 plus
    myself before deciding to actively leave the trade. I've worked as a
    consultant to the trade in various capacities over the last 30 years
    off and on as a self employed IT / technoligy proffessional.


    Well I guess I got you beat. LOL I had 6 service advisors, a service >>manager, and 50+ mechanics. We took in approximately 400 vehicles on a >>weekly basis.

    Thinking back to when I was working PT for Ameron Automotive centers, in >>Corpus Christi, there was a national holiday. The holiday was to
    observe the funeral procession of president Johnson. That coincided
    with a close out tire sale that we were having. We sold 400 tires on
    that single day. That was a 13 hour work day with no lunch break.

    No problem.Our little dealership did OK.
    In the 10 years I was mamager we never had an absorption rate under
    90% and were usually over 110,best year better than 130% - and our 3
    year retention rate never dripped under 90% - the final couple years I
    was running in excess of 123% . That means I was servicing 123 cars
    for every 100 we sold 3 years down the road - I was servicing cars
    sold in cambridge, Kitchener, London, Hamilton, Scarborough, >Whitby,Orangeville, even Ottawa - at least 3 times a year when they
    were 3 years old.. Had to be doing SOMETHING right!!! If the
    dealership didn't sell a single vehicle for the entire year the
    profits from parts and service covered the entire operating expense
    including management salaries and made a 30% profit on our best year.

    The real money is made by the finance manager. Loans, option up-sells, warranties, and "destination charges" are where the big profit lies in
    new cars. Used cars is even larger profit in used cars.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Markem618@21:1/5 to teamarrows@eznet.net on Sun Jan 16 22:53:33 2022
    On Sun, 16 Jan 2022 18:34:36 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
    <teamarrows@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Sunday, January 16, 2022 at 9:24:08 PM UTC-5, Markem618 wrote:
    On Sun, 16 Jan 2022 17:42:54 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
    <teama...@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Sunday, January 16, 2022 at 6:19:58 PM UTC-5, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 16 Jan 2022 13:33:42 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/15/2022 12:06 AM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Fri, 14 Jan 2022 14:01:45 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/13/2022 9:53 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Wed, 12 Jan 2022 15:28:14 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet>
    wrote:

    On 1/12/2022 2:45 PM, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Wed, 12 Jan 2022 10:54:41 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> >> >> >>>>>> wrote:

    On 1/11/2022 7:55 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Tue, 11 Jan 2022 12:11:41 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> >> >> >>>>>>>> wrote:

    On 1/9/2022 4:07 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 9 Jan 2022 15:21:06 -0600, Leon <lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 1/8/2022 5:28 PM, Michael Trew wrote:
    On 1/7/2022 14:54, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Fri, 7 Jan 2022 09:02:18 -0600, Leon<lcb11211@swbelldotnet> wrote:

    On 1/6/2022 9:12 PM, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Thu, 06 Jan 2022 21:56:56 -0500, Clare Snyder<cl...@snyder.on.ca>
    wrote:

    On Tue, 04 Jan 2022 23:53:45 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michae...@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/3/2022 12:00, k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Mon, 03 Jan 2022 11:50:51 -0500, Michael Trew
    <michae...@att.net> wrote:

    On 1/2/2022 21:24, Clare Snyder wrote:
    On Sun, 2 Jan 2022 14:49:08 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03 >> >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <teama...@eznet.net> wrote:

    On Sunday, January 2, 2022 at 3:33:44 PM UTC-5,
    k...@notreal.com wrote:
    On Sun, 02 Jan 2022 14:48:13 GMT, Puckdropper<em...@example.com>
    wrote:
    Michael Trew<michae...@att.net> wrote in