• Overtime

    From floaterjr@21:1/5 to All on Mon Jan 24 04:40:22 2022
    Is a coin toss and the sudden death (first to score a touchdown) rule fair to both teams? Especially when you have Mahone and Allen dueling. I think not.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Con Reeder, unhyphenated American@21:1/5 to floaterjr on Mon Jan 24 14:06:46 2022
    On 2022-01-24, floaterjr <gpgmga@gmail.com> wrote:
    On Monday, January 24, 2022 at 8:22:39 AM UTC-5, Johnny RSFCootball wrote:
    On Monday, January 24, 2022 at 6:40:25 AM UTC-6, floaterjr wrote:
    Is a coin toss and the sudden death (first to score a touchdown) rule fair to both teams? Especially when you have Mahone and Allen dueling. I think not.
    It’s fair to both teams, assuming a fair coin flip. However, it
    does introduce a random event whose outcome does change the win
    probability of each team.


    To me both teams have to have the opportunity to score without a game
    of chance giving one side an unequal probability of success.


    Those of us who understand that there is random chance in any series
    of plays in football would downplay such an obsession.

    --
    An amateur practices until he gets it right. A pro
    practices until he can't get it wrong. -- unknown

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Johnny RSFCootball@21:1/5 to floaterjr on Mon Jan 24 05:22:36 2022
    On Monday, January 24, 2022 at 6:40:25 AM UTC-6, floaterjr wrote:
    Is a coin toss and the sudden death (first to score a touchdown) rule fair to both teams? Especially when you have Mahone and Allen dueling. I think not.

    It’s fair to both teams, assuming a fair coin flip. However, it does introduce a random event whose outcome does change the win probability of each team.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From floaterjr@21:1/5 to Johnny RSFCootball on Mon Jan 24 06:01:06 2022
    On Monday, January 24, 2022 at 8:22:39 AM UTC-5, Johnny RSFCootball wrote:
    On Monday, January 24, 2022 at 6:40:25 AM UTC-6, floaterjr wrote:
    Is a coin toss and the sudden death (first to score a touchdown) rule fair to both teams? Especially when you have Mahone and Allen dueling. I think not.
    It’s fair to both teams, assuming a fair coin flip. However, it does introduce a random event whose outcome does change the win probability of each team.
    To me both teams have to have the opportunity to score without a game of chance giving one side an unequal probability of success.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From floaterjr@21:1/5 to unhyphenated American on Mon Jan 24 06:33:57 2022
    On Monday, January 24, 2022 at 9:06:50 AM UTC-5, Con Reeder, unhyphenated American wrote:
    On 2022-01-24, floaterjr <gpg...@gmail.com> wrote:
    On Monday, January 24, 2022 at 8:22:39 AM UTC-5, Johnny RSFCootball wrote:
    On Monday, January 24, 2022 at 6:40:25 AM UTC-6, floaterjr wrote:
    Is a coin toss and the sudden death (first to score a touchdown) rule fair to both teams? Especially when you have Mahone and Allen dueling. I think not.
    It’s fair to both teams, assuming a fair coin flip. However, it
    does introduce a random event whose outcome does change the win
    probability of each team.


    To me both teams have to have the opportunity to score without a game
    of chance giving one side an unequal probability of success.

    Those of us who understand that there is random chance in any series
    of plays in football would downplay such an obsession.

    --
    An amateur practices until he gets it right. A pro
    practices until he can't get it wrong. -- unknown
    Random chance is part of life. The Chiefs tried to change the overtime rule because of what happen in 2018 playoffs against the Patriots. So does that mean since they benefited this year from the rules that makes


    things even out? I think it means the overtime rules do not make overtime equal for both teams

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Con Reeder, unhyphenated American@21:1/5 to floaterjr on Mon Jan 24 15:23:10 2022
    On 2022-01-24, floaterjr <gpgmga@gmail.com> wrote:
    On Monday, January 24, 2022 at 9:06:50 AM UTC-5, Con Reeder, unhyphenated American wrote:
    On 2022-01-24, floaterjr <gpg...@gmail.com> wrote:
    On Monday, January 24, 2022 at 8:22:39 AM UTC-5, Johnny RSFCootball wrote: >> >> On Monday, January 24, 2022 at 6:40:25 AM UTC-6, floaterjr wrote:
    Is a coin toss and the sudden death (first to score a touchdown) rule fair to both teams? Especially when you have Mahone and Allen dueling. I think not.
    It’s fair to both teams, assuming a fair coin flip. However, it
    does introduce a random event whose outcome does change the win
    probability of each team.


    To me both teams have to have the opportunity to score without a game
    of chance giving one side an unequal probability of success.

    Those of us who understand that there is random chance in any series
    of plays in football would downplay such an obsession.

    --
    An amateur practices until he gets it right. A pro
    practices until he can't get it wrong. -- unknown

    Random chance is part of life. The Chiefs tried to change the
    overtime rule because of what happen in 2018 playoffs against the
    Patriots. So does that mean since they benefited this year from the
    rules that makes

    things even out? I think it means the overtime rules do not make overtime equal for both teams


    It is never going to be equal, that is the point. Just like life.

    --
    Life isn't fair, but it's good. -- Regina Brett

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From floaterjr@21:1/5 to unhyphenated American on Mon Jan 24 07:39:09 2022
    On Monday, January 24, 2022 at 10:23:14 AM UTC-5, Con Reeder, unhyphenated American wrote:
    On 2022-01-24, floaterjr <gpg...@gmail.com> wrote:
    On Monday, January 24, 2022 at 9:06:50 AM UTC-5, Con Reeder, unhyphenated American wrote:
    On 2022-01-24, floaterjr <gpg...@gmail.com> wrote:
    On Monday, January 24, 2022 at 8:22:39 AM UTC-5, Johnny RSFCootball wrote:
    On Monday, January 24, 2022 at 6:40:25 AM UTC-6, floaterjr wrote:
    Is a coin toss and the sudden death (first to score a touchdown) rule fair to both teams? Especially when you have Mahone and Allen dueling. I think not.
    It’s fair to both teams, assuming a fair coin flip. However, it
    does introduce a random event whose outcome does change the win
    probability of each team.


    To me both teams have to have the opportunity to score without a game >> > of chance giving one side an unequal probability of success.

    Those of us who understand that there is random chance in any series
    of plays in football would downplay such an obsession.

    --
    An amateur practices until he gets it right. A pro
    practices until he can't get it wrong. -- unknown

    Random chance is part of life. The Chiefs tried to change the
    overtime rule because of what happen in 2018 playoffs against the Patriots. So does that mean since they benefited this year from the
    rules that makes

    things even out? I think it means the overtime rules do not make overtime equal for both teams

    It is never going to be equal, that is the point. Just like life.

    --
    Life isn't fair, but it's good. -- Regina Brett
    It can't be won the way the game is run. 1$ to Jackson Browne

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From xyzzy@21:1/5 to unhyphenated American on Mon Jan 24 17:43:01 2022
    Con Reeder, unhyphenated American <constance@duxmail.com> wrote:
    On 2022-01-24, floaterjr <gpgmga@gmail.com> wrote:
    On Monday, January 24, 2022 at 9:06:50 AM UTC-5, Con Reeder, unhyphenated American wrote:
    On 2022-01-24, floaterjr <gpg...@gmail.com> wrote:
    On Monday, January 24, 2022 at 8:22:39 AM UTC-5, Johnny RSFCootball wrote: >>>>> On Monday, January 24, 2022 at 6:40:25 AM UTC-6, floaterjr wrote:
    Is a coin toss and the sudden death (first to score a touchdown)
    rule fair to both teams? Especially when you have Mahone and Allen >>>>>> dueling. I think not.
    It’s fair to both teams, assuming a fair coin flip. However, it
    does introduce a random event whose outcome does change the win
    probability of each team.


    To me both teams have to have the opportunity to score without a game
    of chance giving one side an unequal probability of success.

    Those of us who understand that there is random chance in any series
    of plays in football would downplay such an obsession.

    --
    An amateur practices until he gets it right. A pro
    practices until he can't get it wrong. -- unknown

    Random chance is part of life. The Chiefs tried to change the
    overtime rule because of what happen in 2018 playoffs against the
    Patriots. So does that mean since they benefited this year from the
    rules that makes

    things even out? I think it means the overtime rules do not make
    overtime equal for both teams


    It is never going to be equal, that is the point. Just like life.

    Except for playing full overtime quarters there is no way to do OT that doesn’t eventually boil down to asymmetric sudden death.

    And that would leave the winner exhausted and beat up for the next round.

    --
    “I usually skip over your posts because of your disguistng, contrarian, liberal personality.” — Altie

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From xyzzy@21:1/5 to floaterjr on Mon Jan 24 17:41:02 2022
    floaterjr <gpgmga@gmail.com> wrote:
    Is a coin toss and the sudden death (first to score a touchdown) rule
    fair to both teams? Especially when you have Mahone and Allen dueling. I think not.


    Defense is part of the game ($1).

    --
    “I usually skip over your posts because of your disguistng, contrarian, liberal personality.” — Altie

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Con Reeder, unhyphenated American@21:1/5 to xyzzy on Mon Jan 24 18:32:56 2022
    On 2022-01-24, xyzzy <xyzzy.dude@gmail.com> wrote:
    Con Reeder, unhyphenated American <constance@duxmail.com> wrote:
    On 2022-01-24, floaterjr <gpgmga@gmail.com> wrote:
    On Monday, January 24, 2022 at 9:06:50 AM UTC-5, Con Reeder, unhyphenated American wrote:
    On 2022-01-24, floaterjr <gpg...@gmail.com> wrote:
    On Monday, January 24, 2022 at 8:22:39 AM UTC-5, Johnny RSFCootball wrote:
    On Monday, January 24, 2022 at 6:40:25 AM UTC-6, floaterjr wrote: >>>>>>> Is a coin toss and the sudden death (first to score a touchdown) >>>>>>> rule fair to both teams? Especially when you have Mahone and Allen >>>>>>> dueling. I think not.
    It’s fair to both teams, assuming a fair coin flip. However, it
    does introduce a random event whose outcome does change the win
    probability of each team.


    To me both teams have to have the opportunity to score without a game >>>>> of chance giving one side an unequal probability of success.

    Those of us who understand that there is random chance in any series
    of plays in football would downplay such an obsession.

    --
    An amateur practices until he gets it right. A pro
    practices until he can't get it wrong. -- unknown

    Random chance is part of life. The Chiefs tried to change the
    overtime rule because of what happen in 2018 playoffs against the
    Patriots. So does that mean since they benefited this year from the
    rules that makes

    things even out? I think it means the overtime rules do not make
    overtime equal for both teams


    It is never going to be equal, that is the point. Just like life.

    Except for playing full overtime quarters there is no way to do OT that doesn’t eventually boil down to asymmetric sudden death.

    And that would leave the winner exhausted and beat up for the next round.


    Even then, receiving the ball first in a quarter is a material advantage.
    So the coin flip again comes into play.

    Perhaps progressives can institute a melanin test and the team that
    scores higher gets the ball first. What the sign is I'll leave to
    the imagination.

    --
    "It is a remarkable fact that despite the worldwide expenditure of perhaps US$50 billion since 1990, and the efforts of tens of thousands of scientists worldwide, no human climate signal has yet been detected that is distinct
    from natural variation." - Bob Carter

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From xyzzy@21:1/5 to unhyphenated American on Mon Jan 24 19:14:07 2022
    Con Reeder, unhyphenated American <constance@duxmail.com> wrote:
    On 2022-01-24, xyzzy <xyzzy.dude@gmail.com> wrote:
    Con Reeder, unhyphenated American <constance@duxmail.com> wrote:
    On 2022-01-24, floaterjr <gpgmga@gmail.com> wrote:
    On Monday, January 24, 2022 at 9:06:50 AM UTC-5, Con Reeder,
    unhyphenated American wrote:
    On 2022-01-24, floaterjr <gpg...@gmail.com> wrote:
    On Monday, January 24, 2022 at 8:22:39 AM UTC-5, Johnny RSFCootball wrote:
    On Monday, January 24, 2022 at 6:40:25 AM UTC-6, floaterjr wrote: >>>>>>>> Is a coin toss and the sudden death (first to score a touchdown) >>>>>>>> rule fair to both teams? Especially when you have Mahone and Allen >>>>>>>> dueling. I think not.
    It’s fair to both teams, assuming a fair coin flip. However, it >>>>>>> does introduce a random event whose outcome does change the win
    probability of each team.


    To me both teams have to have the opportunity to score without a game >>>>>> of chance giving one side an unequal probability of success.

    Those of us who understand that there is random chance in any series >>>>> of plays in football would downplay such an obsession.

    --
    An amateur practices until he gets it right. A pro
    practices until he can't get it wrong. -- unknown

    Random chance is part of life. The Chiefs tried to change the
    overtime rule because of what happen in 2018 playoffs against the
    Patriots. So does that mean since they benefited this year from the
    rules that makes

    things even out? I think it means the overtime rules do not make
    overtime equal for both teams


    It is never going to be equal, that is the point. Just like life.

    Except for playing full overtime quarters there is no way to do OT that
    doesn’t eventually boil down to asymmetric sudden death.

    And that would leave the winner exhausted and beat up for the next round.


    Even then, receiving the ball first in a quarter is a material advantage.
    So the coin flip again comes into play.

    Is it? Unless you’re Navy planning a 15 minute option drive your opponent will have a chance to answer.

    --
    “I usually skip over your posts because of your disguistng, contrarian, liberal personality.” — Altie

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From RoddyMcCorley@21:1/5 to floaterjr on Mon Jan 24 15:17:11 2022
    On 1/24/2022 7:40 AM, floaterjr wrote:
    Is a coin toss and the sudden death (first to score a touchdown) rule fair to both teams? Especially when you have Mahone and Allen dueling. I think not.

    It is what it is. Do we want teams trading 50-yd FGs? I think not.
    For this particular game, one team just had to hold the other team
    scoreless for 13 seconds and could not. Maybe rush five or six men
    instead of playing a quasi-prevent?

    --
    "In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice. In
    practice, there is." Ruben Goldberg

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Johnny RSFCootball@21:1/5 to xyzzy on Mon Jan 24 12:28:10 2022
    On Monday, January 24, 2022 at 1:14:11 PM UTC-6, xyzzy wrote:
    Con Reeder, unhyphenated American <cons...@duxmail.com> wrote:
    On 2022-01-24, xyzzy <xyzzy...@gmail.com> wrote:
    Con Reeder, unhyphenated American <cons...@duxmail.com> wrote:
    On 2022-01-24, floaterjr <gpg...@gmail.com> wrote:
    On Monday, January 24, 2022 at 9:06:50 AM UTC-5, Con Reeder,
    unhyphenated American wrote:
    On 2022-01-24, floaterjr <gpg...@gmail.com> wrote:
    On Monday, January 24, 2022 at 8:22:39 AM UTC-5, Johnny RSFCootball wrote:
    On Monday, January 24, 2022 at 6:40:25 AM UTC-6, floaterjr wrote: >>>>>>>> Is a coin toss and the sudden death (first to score a touchdown) >>>>>>>> rule fair to both teams? Especially when you have Mahone and Allen >>>>>>>> dueling. I think not.
    It’s fair to both teams, assuming a fair coin flip. However, it >>>>>>> does introduce a random event whose outcome does change the win >>>>>>> probability of each team.


    To me both teams have to have the opportunity to score without a game >>>>>> of chance giving one side an unequal probability of success.

    Those of us who understand that there is random chance in any series >>>>> of plays in football would downplay such an obsession.

    --
    An amateur practices until he gets it right. A pro
    practices until he can't get it wrong. -- unknown

    Random chance is part of life. The Chiefs tried to change the
    overtime rule because of what happen in 2018 playoffs against the
    Patriots. So does that mean since they benefited this year from the >>>> rules that makes

    things even out? I think it means the overtime rules do not make
    overtime equal for both teams


    It is never going to be equal, that is the point. Just like life.

    Except for playing full overtime quarters there is no way to do OT that >> doesn’t eventually boil down to asymmetric sudden death.

    And that would leave the winner exhausted and beat up for the next round. >>

    Even then, receiving the ball first in a quarter is a material advantage. So the coin flip again comes into play.
    Is it? Unless you’re Navy planning a 15 minute option drive your opponent will have a chance to answer.
    --
    “I usually skip over your posts because of your disguistng, contrarian, liberal personality.” — Altie

    Whoever has the first possession of a half has an advantage for that particular half. Of course one team’s first half advantage gets negated by the other team’s second half advantage.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Con Reeder, unhyphenated American@21:1/5 to xyzzy on Tue Jan 25 03:20:17 2022
    On 2022-01-24, xyzzy <xyzzy.dude@gmail.com> wrote:
    Con Reeder, unhyphenated American <constance@duxmail.com> wrote:
    On 2022-01-24, xyzzy <xyzzy.dude@gmail.com> wrote:
    Con Reeder, unhyphenated American <constance@duxmail.com> wrote:
    On 2022-01-24, floaterjr <gpgmga@gmail.com> wrote:
    On Monday, January 24, 2022 at 9:06:50 AM UTC-5, Con Reeder,
    unhyphenated American wrote:
    On 2022-01-24, floaterjr <gpg...@gmail.com> wrote:
    On Monday, January 24, 2022 at 8:22:39 AM UTC-5, Johnny RSFCootball wrote:
    On Monday, January 24, 2022 at 6:40:25 AM UTC-6, floaterjr wrote: >>>>>>>>> Is a coin toss and the sudden death (first to score a touchdown) >>>>>>>>> rule fair to both teams? Especially when you have Mahone and Allen >>>>>>>>> dueling. I think not.
    It’s fair to both teams, assuming a fair coin flip. However, it >>>>>>>> does introduce a random event whose outcome does change the win >>>>>>>> probability of each team.


    To me both teams have to have the opportunity to score without a game >>>>>>> of chance giving one side an unequal probability of success.

    Those of us who understand that there is random chance in any series >>>>>> of plays in football would downplay such an obsession.

    --
    An amateur practices until he gets it right. A pro
    practices until he can't get it wrong. -- unknown

    Random chance is part of life. The Chiefs tried to change the
    overtime rule because of what happen in 2018 playoffs against the
    Patriots. So does that mean since they benefited this year from the
    rules that makes

    things even out? I think it means the overtime rules do not make
    overtime equal for both teams


    It is never going to be equal, that is the point. Just like life.

    Except for playing full overtime quarters there is no way to do OT that
    doesn’t eventually boil down to asymmetric sudden death.

    And that would leave the winner exhausted and beat up for the next round. >>>

    Even then, receiving the ball first in a quarter is a material advantage.
    So the coin flip again comes into play.

    Is it? Unless you’re Navy planning a 15 minute option drive your opponent will have a chance to answer.


    Back at you when the second team to possess can't run out the clock at the
    end of their possession.

    Note that Buffalo did pretty well, to leave only 13 seconds, but it
    wasn't enough. KC got one more possession in that half; they received
    the kickoff at the beginning of it.

    --
    The U.S. Senate -- white male millionaires working for YOU! -- Dave Barry

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Con Reeder, unhyphenated American@21:1/5 to Johnny RSFCootball on Tue Jan 25 03:21:49 2022
    On 2022-01-24, Johnny RSFCootball <1jay1miller1970@gmail.com> wrote:
    On Monday, January 24, 2022 at 1:14:11 PM UTC-6, xyzzy wrote:
    Con Reeder, unhyphenated American <cons...@duxmail.com> wrote:
    On 2022-01-24, xyzzy <xyzzy...@gmail.com> wrote:
    Con Reeder, unhyphenated American <cons...@duxmail.com> wrote:
    On 2022-01-24, floaterjr <gpg...@gmail.com> wrote:
    On Monday, January 24, 2022 at 9:06:50 AM UTC-5, Con Reeder,
    unhyphenated American wrote:
    On 2022-01-24, floaterjr <gpg...@gmail.com> wrote:
    On Monday, January 24, 2022 at 8:22:39 AM UTC-5, Johnny RSFCootball wrote:
    On Monday, January 24, 2022 at 6:40:25 AM UTC-6, floaterjr wrote:
    Is a coin toss and the sudden death (first to score a touchdown)
    rule fair to both teams? Especially when you have Mahone and Allen >> >>>>>>>> dueling. I think not.
    It’s fair to both teams, assuming a fair coin flip. However, it
    does introduce a random event whose outcome does change the win
    probability of each team.


    To me both teams have to have the opportunity to score without a game >> >>>>>> of chance giving one side an unequal probability of success.

    Those of us who understand that there is random chance in any series >> >>>>> of plays in football would downplay such an obsession.

    --
    An amateur practices until he gets it right. A pro
    practices until he can't get it wrong. -- unknown

    Random chance is part of life. The Chiefs tried to change the
    overtime rule because of what happen in 2018 playoffs against the
    Patriots. So does that mean since they benefited this year from the
    rules that makes

    things even out? I think it means the overtime rules do not make
    overtime equal for both teams


    It is never going to be equal, that is the point. Just like life.

    Except for playing full overtime quarters there is no way to do OT that >> >> doesn’t eventually boil down to asymmetric sudden death.

    And that would leave the winner exhausted and beat up for the next round. >> >>

    Even then, receiving the ball first in a quarter is a material advantage. >> > So the coin flip again comes into play.
    Is it? Unless you’re Navy planning a 15 minute option drive your opponent >> will have a chance to answer.
    --
    “I usually skip over your posts because of your disguistng, contrarian,
    liberal personality.” — Altie

    Whoever has the first possession of a half has an advantage for that particular half. Of course one team’s first half advantage gets
    negated by the other team’s second half advantage.

    Then to make it "fair" you'd have to have two more halves.

    I suppose you could do it the way college does, but that's a
    fustercluck of different color.

    --
    Being against torture ought to be sort of a bipartisan thing.
    -- Karl Lehenbauer

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From JGibson@21:1/5 to The NOTBCS Guy on Wed Jan 26 10:49:08 2022
    On Wednesday, January 26, 2022 at 1:25:40 PM UTC-5, The NOTBCS Guy wrote:
    Want a fair system? Do what they used to do in Australian Rules Football: come back next week and play the entire game over again. In fact, the World Cup Final had a rule saying that if the final was tied after 90 minutes and again after 120, everybody
    comes back two days later and they do it over again. Then again, this is the FIFA that went on to add, "If the second match is also tied after 90 and 120 minutes, screw it; declare them co-winners, and if they argue about who gets the cup, break out a
    hacksaw.")

    That actually works for the finals, but not the semifinals or quarterfinals. What did they do then?

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From The NOTBCS Guy@21:1/5 to All on Wed Jan 26 10:25:38 2022
    Want a fair system? Do what they used to do in Australian Rules Football: come back next week and play the entire game over again. In fact, the World Cup Final had a rule saying that if the final was tied after 90 minutes and again after 120, everybody
    comes back two days later and they do it over again. Then again, this is the FIFA that went on to add, "If the second match is also tied after 90 and 120 minutes, screw it; declare them co-winners, and if they argue about who gets the cup, break out a
    hacksaw.")

    I have a couple of ideas, if you're up for a good laugh:

    1. Toss the coin; the winner decides which team specifies the distance for an all-or-nothing field goal attempt that can't be blocked (i.e. it is like a "free kick" after a fair catch); the other team then decides which team takes the kick. If it's good,
    the kicking team wins; if not, the other team wins.

    2. Go back to "first team to score wins," but if time runs out at the end of regulation, whoever has the ball keeps it with the same down and distance - in other words, treat the end of the fourth quarter as if it was the end of the third quarter, except
    (a) the teams don't change ends and (b) each team has three time outs that will last the first two OT periods, the way postseason does now.
    (2a. No additional time outs - if a team used them all in the second half, too bad; it's an extension of the fourth quarter.)

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From JGibson@21:1/5 to The NOTBCS Guy on Wed Jan 26 10:53:47 2022
    On Wednesday, January 26, 2022 at 1:25:40 PM UTC-5, The NOTBCS Guy wrote:
    Want a fair system? Do what they used to do in Australian Rules Football: come back next week and play the entire game over again. In fact, the World Cup Final had a rule saying that if the final was tied after 90 minutes and again after 120, everybody
    comes back two days later and they do it over again. Then again, this is the FIFA that went on to add, "If the second match is also tied after 90 and 120 minutes, screw it; declare them co-winners, and if they argue about who gets the cup, break out a
    hacksaw.")

    I have a couple of ideas, if you're up for a good laugh:

    1. Toss the coin; the winner decides which team specifies the distance for an all-or-nothing field goal attempt that can't be blocked (i.e. it is like a "free kick" after a fair catch); the other team then decides which team takes the kick. If it's
    good, the kicking team wins; if not, the other team wins.

    2. Go back to "first team to score wins," but if time runs out at the end of regulation, whoever has the ball keeps it with the same down and distance - in other words, treat the end of the fourth quarter as if it was the end of the third quarter,
    except (a) the teams don't change ends and (b) each team has three time outs that will last the first two OT periods, the way postseason does now.
    (2a. No additional time outs - if a team used them all in the second half, too bad; it's an extension of the fourth quarter.)

    Could play 5th and 6th quarters like this: 5th quarter is under the same rules as the 1st and 3rd quarters with a new coin toss. Play full 15 minutes. Whoever is winning at the end of Q5 wins. Q6 then starts only if there is a tie and starts with
    possession, down, and distance same as it was at the end of Q5. But now it's sudden death.

    I'm basically fine with the way it is, though. Defense is part of the game. And TD vs FG rule prevents a short drive to FG distance for a kick to be the sudden death winner.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From The NOTBCS Guy@21:1/5 to All on Wed Jan 26 11:42:59 2022
    Want a fair system? Do what they used to do in Australian Rules Football: come back next week and play the entire game over again. In fact, the World Cup Final had a rule saying that if the final was tied after 90 minutes and again after 120,
    everybody comes back two days later and they do it over again. Then again, this is the FIFA that went on to add, "If the second match is also tied after 90 and 120 minutes, screw it; declare them co-winners, and if they argue about who gets the cup,
    break out a hacksaw.")

    That actually works for the finals, but not the semifinals or quarterfinals. What did they do then?

    They didn't have quarterfinals back then; the first and second rounds were both round-robin group rounds, and then the semi-finals and final. If the semi-final was tied after 120 minutes, IIRC, they tossed a coin - penalty kick shootouts weren't even
    considered before 1990.

    That's nothing, compared to how England's FA Cup used to work; in every round except the final and (I think) the semi-final, there was no overtime; any match that was tied after 90 minutes was played over again, as many times as it took. I think the
    record for most matches needed to determine a winner is seven.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Tim VanWagoner@21:1/5 to floaterjr on Thu Jan 27 04:52:52 2022
    On Monday, January 24, 2022 at 6:40:25 AM UTC-6, floaterjr wrote:
    Is a coin toss and the sudden death (first to score a touchdown) rule fair to both teams? Especially when you have Mahone and Allen dueling. I think not.

    “Including the postseason, there have been 163 overtime games under the current NFL overtime rules. Teams that won the coin coss have a record of 86-67-10 (52.8%).

    There have been 11 overtime playoff game under the new rules. Teams that won the coin toss have a record of 10-1 with the only loss being the New Orleans Saints against the Los Angeles Rams in the 2018 NFC Championship Game.”

    Sounds overall pretty fair. Is the issue in the playoffs just a fluke (small sample size) or a legitimate issue?

    Either way, this is the end result of more than 60 minutes of play. There were many chances by both teams to make a greater impact on the final score than the coin toss in the overtime. And to have a chance to get a possession in the overtime, you just
    need to hold them to a field goal or less.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Johnny RSFCootball@21:1/5 to tim.vanwa...@gmail.com on Thu Jan 27 05:18:29 2022
    On Thursday, January 27, 2022 at 6:52:54 AM UTC-6, tim.vanwa...@gmail.com wrote:
    On Monday, January 24, 2022 at 6:40:25 AM UTC-6, floaterjr wrote:
    Is a coin toss and the sudden death (first to score a touchdown) rule fair to both teams? Especially when you have Mahone and Allen dueling. I think not.
    “Including the postseason, there have been 163 overtime games under the current NFL overtime rules. Teams that won the coin coss have a record of 86-67-10 (52.8%).

    There have been 11 overtime playoff game under the new rules. Teams that won the coin toss have a record of 10-1 with the only loss being the New Orleans Saints against the Los Angeles Rams in the 2018 NFC Championship Game.”

    Sounds overall pretty fair. Is the issue in the playoffs just a fluke (small sample size) or a legitimate issue?

    Either way, this is the end result of more than 60 minutes of play. There were many chances by both teams to make a greater impact on the final score than the coin toss in the overtime. And to have a chance to get a possession in the overtime, you just
    need to hold them to a field goal or less.

    The fact that coin toss winners do better in OT doesn’t mean the system is unfair, assuming a fair coin. I think some people might be confusing “unfair” with “unlucky”. Hell, you could have a competition that consisted entirely of guessing coin
    flips. That competition would be “fair”, but it wouldn’t be very interesting to watch.

    One OT proposal I saw that was submitted by one of the teams sounds intriguing to me: One team decides the starting field position for OT, and the other team chooses which team starts on offense.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From leonard hofstatder@21:1/5 to Tim VanWagoner on Thu Jan 27 10:14:33 2022
    On 1/27/2022 6:52 AM, Tim VanWagoner wrote:
    On Monday, January 24, 2022 at 6:40:25 AM UTC-6, floaterjr wrote:
    Is a coin toss and the sudden death (first to score a touchdown) rule fair to both teams? Especially when you have Mahone and Allen dueling. I think not.

    “Including the postseason, there have been 163 overtime games under the current NFL overtime rules. Teams that won the coin coss have a record of 86-67-10 (52.8%).

    There have been 11 overtime playoff game under the new rules. Teams that won the coin toss have a record of 10-1 with the only loss being the New Orleans Saints against the Los Angeles Rams in the 2018 NFC Championship Game.”



    and, in 7 of those games both teams had the ball I heard somewhere


    Sounds overall pretty fair. Is the issue in the playoffs just a fluke (small sample size) or a legitimate issue?

    Either way, this is the end result of more than 60 minutes of play. There were many chances by both teams to make a greater impact on the final score than the coin toss in the overtime. And to have a chance to get a possession in the overtime, you just
    need to hold them to a field goal or less.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)