• National Limerick Day (12 May) -- (can't be arsed repeating it)

    From HenHanna@21:1/5 to Ross Clark on Mon May 13 02:18:39 2024
    XPost: sci.lang, alt.usage.english, alt.poetry

    On 5/12/2024 6:53 PM, Ross Clark wrote:
    Birthday of Edward Lear (1812-1888).
    A Book of Nonsense (1846) has 112 of them.
    But he didn't invent it, says Crystal, and cites:

    And let me the canakin clink, clink;
    And let me the canakin clink;
    A soldier's a man
    O, man's life's but a span;
    Why, then, let a soldier drink.
    (Shakespeare, Othello)

    Yah, OK, he didn't invent the metrical pattern or the rhyme scheme.
    But still -- The Limerick As We Know It?

    He also didn't name it. Name first attested 1896, several years after
    Lear's death.
    Origin of name -- Crystal has a story, can't be arsed repeating it. May
    check with OED.



    i don't know that expression.
    [can't be arsed ...ing it] -- is that NZ English?


    what's the story?

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From HenHanna@21:1/5 to All on Mon May 13 02:45:51 2024
    XPost: sci.lang, alt.usage.english, alt.arts.limericks
    XPost: alt.jokes.limericks

    On 5/12/2024 6:53 PM, Ross Clark wrote:
    Birthday of Edward Lear (1812-1888).
    A Book of Nonsense (1846) has 112 of them.
    But he didn't invent it, says Crystal, and cites:

    And let me the canakin clink, clink;
    And let me the canakin clink;
    A soldier's a man
    O, man's life's but a span;
    Why, then, let a soldier drink.
    -- (Shakespeare, Othello)

    Yah, OK, he didn't invent the metrical pattern or the rhyme scheme.
    But still -- The Limerick As We Know It?

    He also didn't name it. Name first attested 1896, several years after
    Lear's death.
    Origin of name -- Crystal has a story, can't be arsed repeating it.
    May check with OED.





    what's the story?



    i don't know that expression. ...
    [can't be arsed repeating it] -- is that NZ English?



    Yes, "can't be arsed repeating it" is a common expression in New Zealand English. It's a vulgar slang way of saying "I can't be bothered
    repeating it" or "I'm too lazy to repeat it."

    Here's a breakdown:

    "Can't be arsed": This is a vulgar slang way of saying "can't be
    bothered." "Arsed" is a vulgar term for "having to do with the buttocks."

    Context: This expression is used informally among friends or
    acquaintances. It wouldn't be appropriate in formal settings.



    Here are some ニュージーランド英語 (New Zealand English) alternatives with a
    similar meaning, but less vulgar:

    -- "Can't be bothered repeating it"

    -- "I already said that"

    -- "Look it up yourself" (informal)

    While "can't be arsed" is understood in New Zealand, it's important to
    be aware of the informal and potentially offensive nature of the term.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)