• WAYLTL - November 2022

    From Oscar@21:1/5 to All on Sat Nov 5 14:34:26 2022
    The October thread was one of the longest in recent memory. Let's keep it going.

    Brahms: Sonatas for violin and piano, Op.120 Nos.1 & 2
    Dohnányi: Sonata in C-sharp minor for violin and piano, Op.21

    Jenna Sherry (vln) & Dániel Lőwenberg (pf, 1898 Steinway & Sons grand, model B)

    Budapest Music Center Records BMC CD 295 ℗ © 2020. CD.
    Recorded at BMC Studio, Budapest, on January 30 & 31, 2018 (Dohnányi); and January 3-5, 2020 (Brahms).
    Recording producer: Péter Aczél.
    Sound engineer: Viktor Szabó.
    Supported by the National Cultural Fund of Hungary.
    Artwork: László Huszár / Greenroom.
    Booklet note: Márton Keréfky
    English translation by Richard Robinson.
    Produced by László Gőz.
    Label manager: Tamás Bognár.
    ℗ 2020 Budapest Music Center Records.
    Printed in Hungary.
    https://www.bmcrecords.hu

    COMMENT: Ms. Sherry is from New Orleans, La., and now lives in London. Mr. Lőwenberg was born and raised in Budapest. In 2012, he published a biography of Hungarian violinist and conductor Sándor Végh, the only monograph of this famous Hungarian
    musician. Re the music on this CD, the Brahms Sonatas are pretty bulletproof works. Beautiful playing here. Solid intonation, relaxed tempos and purity of sound mark these performances, which for me engendered feelings of sympathy, harmony and autumnal
    color.

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  • From Al Eisner@21:1/5 to All on Sun Nov 6 15:53:12 2022
    This message is in MIME format. The first part should be readable text,
    while the remaining parts are likely unreadable without MIME-aware tools.

    Thanks, Oscar for starting this month's thread.

    "America": 20th century American choral music, performed (of course) by non-Americans: the SWR Vokalensemble, Stuttgart, directed by
    Marcus Creed. Label: SWR/Hnssler. recorded 2013.

    Works included:

    Copland - Four Motets
    Reich - Proverb
    Cage - Five
    Feldman - The Rothko Chapel
    Bernstein - Missa Brevis
    Barber - A Stopwatch and an Ordnance Map

    The Copland and Cage are purely a capella; the othes include some percussion, and the Feldman viola and keyboard(s) too. By far the most substantial
    and (to me) most fascinating work is the Feldman. I would also put in
    a particular word for Barber's effective dirge and for Bernstein's late conservative Missa Brevis, the latter of which is very well-crafted and features very effective use of bells and drums to support the vocalists.
    The Copland is an attractive but not all-that-interesting student work; I
    have mixed feelings about the Reich and Cage.

    The performers seemed quite effective; I would especially single out the violist (Andra Darzins) in the Feldman and the countertenor (Franz Vitzthum)
    in the Bernstein. (I have no idea if the Cage, which allows a great deal
    of freedom, was at all idiomatically performed.)

    I am not familiar with other recordings (and, indeed, the majority of the
    works were new to me), but I think it safe to recommend this CD.
    --
    Al Eisner

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  • From Dan Koren@21:1/5 to All on Mon Nov 7 23:44:12 2022
    Gabriela Montero, Piano Concerto No 1 "Latin":

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ofL3E9dF6C4

    Superb!

    dk

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  • From JohnGavin@21:1/5 to All on Tue Nov 8 05:42:47 2022
    Rachmaninoff: Liturgy of Saint John Chrysostom - Estonian Philharmonic chamber choir, Kasparov Putnins
    BIS

    Two composers who did not wear their spirituality on their sleeves but radiated it through their art. Sergei Rachmaninoff and Francis Poulenc!

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  • From Frank Berger@21:1/5 to Dan Koren on Tue Nov 8 10:00:49 2022
    On 11/8/2022 2:44 AM, Dan Koren wrote:
    Gabriela Montero, Piano Concerto No 1 "Latin":

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ofL3E9dF6C4

    Superb!

    dk


    I bought this long ago, probably on someone's recommendation here. Maybe elsewhere. I don't think I got around to listening, until now. It's lovely. You can hear obvious influences and that makes it comfortable listening at first hearing. Will it hold
    up in repeated listening (taking into account diminishing marginal utility)? If I could bring back the excitement of hearing Prokofiev's 2nd sonata for violin and piano for the first time, I would.

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  • From Oscar@21:1/5 to JohnGavin on Tue Nov 8 11:24:41 2022
    On Tuesday, November 8, 2022 at 5:42:49 AM, JohnGavin wrote:

    Rachmaninoff: Liturgy of Saint John Chrysostom - Estonian Philharmonic chamber choir, Kasparov Putnins
    BIS

    Great esnsemble. All their discs on Bis are worthwhile listens.

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  • From Chris J.@21:1/5 to All on Wed Nov 9 14:17:11 2022
    On 5 Nov 2022 Oscar wrote:

    The October thread was one of the longest in recent memory. Let's keep
    it going.

    Ignaz Jacob Holzbauer, Justin Heinrich Knecht, Ludwig van Beethoven,
    symphonies performed by AAMB.

    https://www.swrfernsehen.de/kulturmatinee/beethovens-sinfonien-und-ihre- vorbilder-werke-von-ignaz-jacob-holzbauer-justin-heinrich-knecht-l-v- beethoven-100.html

    Short url: https://preview.tinyurl.com/2p92pwzh

    Chris

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  • From James Goodzeit@21:1/5 to Al Eisner on Wed Nov 9 07:41:38 2022
    On Sunday, November 6, 2022 at 6:53:22 PM UTC-5, Al Eisner wrote:
    Thanks, Oscar for starting this month's thread.

    "America": 20th century American choral music, performed (of course) by non-Americans: the SWR Vokalensemble, Stuttgart, directed by
    Marcus Creed. Label: SWR/Hänssler. recorded 2013.

    Works included:

    Copland - Four Motets
    Reich - Proverb
    Cage - Five
    Feldman - The Rothko Chapel
    Bernstein - Missa Brevis
    Barber - A Stopwatch and an Ordnance Map

    The Copland and Cage are purely a capella; the othes include some percussion,
    and the Feldman viola and keyboard(s) too. By far the most substantial
    and (to me) most fascinating work is the Feldman. I would also put in
    a particular word for Barber's effective dirge and for Bernstein's late conservative Missa Brevis, the latter of which is very well-crafted and features very effective use of bells and drums to support the vocalists.
    The Copland is an attractive but not all-that-interesting student work; I have mixed feelings about the Reich and Cage.

    The performers seemed quite effective; I would especially single out the violist (Andra Darzins) in the Feldman and the countertenor (Franz Vitzthum) in the Bernstein. (I have no idea if the Cage, which allows a great deal
    of freedom, was at all idiomatically performed.)

    I am not familiar with other recordings (and, indeed, the majority of the works were new to me), but I think it safe to recommend this CD.
    --
    Al Eisner
    I don't have too much time for listening or posting, so I hope to chime in this thread with stuff I have been listening to going back to July.

    Right now, Villa-Lobos quartets with the Cuarteto Latinoamericano, to celebrate Brazil's recent bicentennial and rejection of fascism at the ballot box. They are very listenable and solidly technical. Only, other than #1 which is actually a suite of
    dance movements and #5 which is also dance/folk influenced, the others are similar enough that it is hard to take them more than 2 at a time.

    Working way through Szell box set and the Yo-Yo Ma 30 years outside the box. For now, I recall a mention of Dvorak's symphonies, how ##7, 8 had better development sections than #9. Listening to the development section Schubert's Unfinished. I can just
    say wow, that is intense!

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  • From HT@21:1/5 to All on Wed Nov 9 07:38:16 2022
    My favourite version of the Chopinata - by the arranger himself, an excellent pianist:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QzT1y98PxIs

    Henk

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  • From HT@21:1/5 to All on Wed Nov 9 07:49:46 2022
    Something more substantive, a concerto by Jean Wiener:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PcnLFzcuOLs

    Henk

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  • From Lawrence Kart@21:1/5 to hvt...@xs4all.nl on Fri Nov 11 15:35:43 2022
    On Wednesday, November 9, 2022 at 9:49:48 AM UTC-6, hvt...@xs4all.nl wrote:
    Something more substantive, a concerto by Jean Wiener:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PcnLFzcuOLs

    Henk



    Brice Pauset "Preludes" (aeon)

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  • From Al Eisner@21:1/5 to All on Sun Nov 13 18:54:05 2022
    Brahms String Quintets: #1 in F (Op. 88) and #2 in G (Op.111).

    Boston Symphony Chamber Players: Joseph Silverstein and Max Hobart (violins), Burton Fine and Patricia McCarty (violas), Jules Eskin (cello), recorded
    in 1982 for Nonesuch (and hence not in the recent BSO players box set).

    I also listened to the 1937 Budapest Quartet (with Alfred Hobday, viola) performance of #1.

    Like all of the chamber music Brahms allowed to survive, these are
    great works, and like the sextets very accessible. I came late to them,
    but better late than never. The Boston group is wonderful in the first movement of #1, with a beautifully blended sound, yet bringing out the individual lines when needed. The mostly-slow second movement also
    sounds fine to me, but the finale is perhaps a bit overly-emphatic.

    The Budapest, in less good sound, disappoints in the opening by omitting
    the exposition repeat (standard chamber music practice, I think, in the
    1930's, and are generally less smooth than the Bostons - while still attractive. But I really love their other movements: the Grave second
    has their hallmark intensity, and the finale has a grace which I find just right.

    I have no signficiant reservations about the Boston #2. Their first
    movement is joyous, their superb second both lyrical and dramatic. And so
    on. (I did not listen to comparisons, and I admit not being all that familiar with this work.) I certainly recommend their disk.
    --
    Al Eisner

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  • From Notsure01@21:1/5 to All on Mon Nov 14 05:30:49 2022
    I've been stuck at home due to illness, so in addition to pestering
    people with long posts, I've been revisiting old favorites and exploring
    new works.

    Thanks to a recent RMCR thread on Scriabin's piano Sonata no. 5 I
    discovered this fantastic work - it packs enormous beauty and excitement
    into 10 minutes or so - absolutely phenomenal!

    I started with a Horowitz performance which was sitting on my shelves in
    a Sony Original Jackets Horowitz box unplayed for years. That box seems
    to be available on Amazon or the single Scriabin "RCA" CD is here: https://www.amazon.com/Horowitz-Plays-Scriabin-Alexander/dp/B000003EOZ

    There is also a different Sony Original Jackets Horowitz box which has
    the Scriabin album which was originally on Columbia: https://music.apple.com/us/album/the-original-jacket-collection-vladimir-horowitz/345674796
    This includes 10 albums of prime Horowitz and can be downloaded from
    Apple for $10! Based on good advice here (I assume) I also downloaded Sofronitsky performances here: https://www.prestomusic.com/classical/products/8604503--scriabine-sonates-pour-piano-les-indispensables-de-diapason

    As a contrast to Scriabin, I've been listening to a Hilde Gueden
    operatic aria album: https://www.amazon.com/Sings-Songs-Lehar-VARIOUS-ARTISTS/dp/B00000C3R4/ref=sr_1_1?crid=E3JR34ZFVTRP&keywords=hilde+guden&qid=1668419580&sprefix=hilde+guden%2Caps%2C106&sr=8-1

    This includes Kalman, Lehar, Fall, Stolz as well as Korngold - and
    Charpentier! Hilde is very lively but not in perfect voice, and the
    orchestra and chorus tends to be overpowering. Still it is very
    enjoyable, particularly the famous "Nun's Chorus" which was arranged by Benatzky from scraps of Johann Strauss music.

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  • From gggg gggg@21:1/5 to All on Mon Nov 14 10:31:39 2022
    On Monday, November 14, 2022 at 2:30:54 AM UTC-8, Notsure01 wrote:
    I've been stuck at home due to illness, so in addition to pestering
    people with long posts, I've been revisiting old favorites and exploring
    new works.

    Thanks to a recent RMCR thread on Scriabin's piano Sonata no. 5 I
    discovered this fantastic work - it packs enormous beauty and excitement
    into 10 minutes or so - absolutely phenomenal!

    I started with a Horowitz performance which was sitting on my shelves in
    a Sony Original Jackets Horowitz box unplayed for years. That box seems
    to be available on Amazon or the single Scriabin "RCA" CD is here: https://www.amazon.com/Horowitz-Plays-Scriabin-Alexander/dp/B000003EOZ

    There is also a different Sony Original Jackets Horowitz box which has
    the Scriabin album which was originally on Columbia: https://music.apple.com/us/album/the-original-jacket-collection-vladimir-horowitz/345674796
    This includes 10 albums of prime Horowitz and can be downloaded from
    Apple for $10! Based on good advice here (I assume) I also downloaded Sofronitsky performances here: https://www.prestomusic.com/classical/products/8604503--scriabine-sonates-pour-piano-les-indispensables-de-diapason

    As a contrast to Scriabin, I've been listening to a Hilde Gueden
    operatic aria album: https://www.amazon.com/Sings-Songs-Lehar-VARIOUS-ARTISTS/dp/B00000C3R4/ref=sr_1_1?crid=E3JR34ZFVTRP&keywords=hilde+guden&qid=1668419580&sprefix=hilde+guden%2Caps%2C106&sr=8-1

    This includes Kalman, Lehar, Fall, Stolz as well as Korngold - and Charpentier! Hilde is very lively but not in perfect voice, and the
    orchestra and chorus tends to be overpowering. Still it is very
    enjoyable, particularly the famous "Nun's Chorus" which was arranged by Benatzky from scraps of Johann Strauss music.

    Didn't she record the first complete studio DAPHNE?

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  • From gggg gggg@21:1/5 to All on Mon Nov 14 11:11:03 2022
    On Monday, November 14, 2022 at 2:30:54 AM UTC-8, Notsure01 wrote:
    I've been stuck at home due to illness, so in addition to pestering
    people with long posts, I've been revisiting old favorites and exploring
    new works.

    Thanks to a recent RMCR thread on Scriabin's piano Sonata no. 5 I
    discovered this fantastic work - it packs enormous beauty and excitement
    into 10 minutes or so - absolutely phenomenal!

    I started with a Horowitz performance which was sitting on my shelves in
    a Sony Original Jackets Horowitz box unplayed for years. That box seems
    to be available on Amazon or the single Scriabin "RCA" CD is here: https://www.amazon.com/Horowitz-Plays-Scriabin-Alexander/dp/B000003EOZ

    There is also a different Sony Original Jackets Horowitz box which has
    the Scriabin album which was originally on Columbia: https://music.apple.com/us/album/the-original-jacket-collection-vladimir-horowitz/345674796
    This includes 10 albums of prime Horowitz and can be downloaded from
    Apple for $10! Based on good advice here (I assume) I also downloaded Sofronitsky performances here: https://www.prestomusic.com/classical/products/8604503--scriabine-sonates-pour-piano-les-indispensables-de-diapason

    As a contrast to Scriabin, I've been listening to a Hilde Gueden
    operatic aria album: https://www.amazon.com/Sings-Songs-Lehar-VARIOUS-ARTISTS/dp/B00000C3R4/ref=sr_1_1?crid=E3JR34ZFVTRP&keywords=hilde+guden&qid=1668419580&sprefix=hilde+guden%2Caps%2C106&sr=8-1

    This includes Kalman, Lehar, Fall, Stolz as well as Korngold - and Charpentier! Hilde is very lively but not in perfect voice, and the
    orchestra and chorus tends to be overpowering. Still it is very
    enjoyable, particularly the famous "Nun's Chorus" which was arranged by Benatzky from scraps of Johann Strauss music.

    If you like that kind of music, you might wish to see if the contents of the following lp has been issued on cd. Fredericke Sailer is an overlooked, underrated and neglected soprano:

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/324528431666

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  • From gggg gggg@21:1/5 to All on Mon Nov 14 13:02:47 2022
    On Monday, November 14, 2022 at 2:30:54 AM UTC-8, Notsure01 wrote:
    I've been stuck at home due to illness, so in addition to pestering
    people with long posts, I've been revisiting old favorites and exploring
    new works.

    Thanks to a recent RMCR thread on Scriabin's piano Sonata no. 5 I
    discovered this fantastic work - it packs enormous beauty and excitement
    into 10 minutes or so - absolutely phenomenal!

    I started with a Horowitz performance which was sitting on my shelves in
    a Sony Original Jackets Horowitz box unplayed for years. That box seems
    to be available on Amazon or the single Scriabin "RCA" CD is here: https://www.amazon.com/Horowitz-Plays-Scriabin-Alexander/dp/B000003EOZ

    There is also a different Sony Original Jackets Horowitz box which has
    the Scriabin album which was originally on Columbia: https://music.apple.com/us/album/the-original-jacket-collection-vladimir-horowitz/345674796
    This includes 10 albums of prime Horowitz and can be downloaded from
    Apple for $10! Based on good advice here (I assume) I also downloaded Sofronitsky performances here: https://www.prestomusic.com/classical/products/8604503--scriabine-sonates-pour-piano-les-indispensables-de-diapason

    As a contrast to Scriabin, I've been listening to a Hilde Gueden
    operatic aria album: https://www.amazon.com/Sings-Songs-Lehar-VARIOUS-ARTISTS/dp/B00000C3R4/ref=sr_1_1?crid=E3JR34ZFVTRP&keywords=hilde+guden&qid=1668419580&sprefix=hilde+guden%2Caps%2C106&sr=8-1

    This includes Kalman, Lehar, Fall, Stolz as well as Korngold - and Charpentier! Hilde is very lively but not in perfect voice, and the
    orchestra and chorus tends to be overpowering. Still it is very
    enjoyable, particularly the famous "Nun's Chorus" which was arranged by Benatzky from scraps of Johann Strauss music.

    If you like that kind of music, you might wish to see if the contents of the following lp has been issued on cd. Fredericke Sailer is an overlooked, underrated and neglected soprano:

    https://www.discogs.com/release/12292169-Fritz-Wunderlich-Friederike-Sailer-Songs-From-Viennese-Operettas

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  • From Marc S@21:1/5 to james.g...@gmail.com on Mon Nov 14 14:01:33 2022
    james.g...@gmail.com schrieb am Mittwoch, 9. November 2022 um 16:41:41 UTC+1:
    On Sunday, November 6, 2022 at 6:53:22 PM UTC-5, Al Eisner wrote:
    Thanks, Oscar for starting this month's thread.

    "America": 20th century American choral music, performed (of course) by non-Americans: the SWR Vokalensemble, Stuttgart, directed by
    Marcus Creed. Label: SWR/Hänssler. recorded 2013.

    Works included:

    Copland - Four Motets
    Reich - Proverb
    Cage - Five
    Feldman - The Rothko Chapel
    Bernstein - Missa Brevis
    Barber - A Stopwatch and an Ordnance Map

    The Copland and Cage are purely a capella; the othes include some percussion,
    and the Feldman viola and keyboard(s) too. By far the most substantial
    and (to me) most fascinating work is the Feldman. I would also put in
    a particular word for Barber's effective dirge and for Bernstein's late conservative Missa Brevis, the latter of which is very well-crafted and features very effective use of bells and drums to support the vocalists. The Copland is an attractive but not all-that-interesting student work; I have mixed feelings about the Reich and Cage.

    The performers seemed quite effective; I would especially single out the violist (Andra Darzins) in the Feldman and the countertenor (Franz Vitzthum)
    in the Bernstein. (I have no idea if the Cage, which allows a great deal of freedom, was at all idiomatically performed.)

    I am not familiar with other recordings (and, indeed, the majority of the works were new to me), but I think it safe to recommend this CD.
    --
    Al Eisner
    I don't have too much time for listening or posting, so I hope to chime in this thread with stuff I have been listening to going back to July.

    Right now, Villa-Lobos quartets with the Cuarteto Latinoamericano, to celebrate Brazil's recent bicentennial and rejection of fascism at the ballot box.

    James Goodzeit at it again... displaying his utter ignorance...

    -Lula who welcomed Holocaust Denier Ahmadinejad to Brazil.

    -Lula who refused to lay a wreath at Herzl's grave, but happily did so for Arafat.

    -Lula who recognized the "Palestinian State".

    But ofc... in James' world Lula is an antifascist ;D Let us all celebrate the great antifascist Lula! And fuck the antisemite Bolsonora for visiting the western wall and all ;)

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Notsure01@21:1/5 to gggg gggg on Mon Nov 14 18:56:10 2022
    On 11/14/22 4:02 PM, gggg gggg wrote:
    On Monday, November 14, 2022 at 2:30:54 AM UTC-8, Notsure01 wrote:

    As a contrast to Scriabin, I've been listening to a Hilde Gueden
    operatic aria album:
    https://www.amazon.com/Sings-Songs-Lehar-VARIOUS-ARTISTS/dp/B00000C3R4/ref=sr_1_1?crid=E3JR34ZFVTRP&keywords=hilde+guden&qid=1668419580&sprefix=hilde+guden%2Caps%2C106&sr=8-1

    This includes Kalman, Lehar, Fall, Stolz as well as Korngold - and
    Charpentier! Hilde is very lively but not in perfect voice, and the
    orchestra and chorus tends to be overpowering. Still it is very
    enjoyable, particularly the famous "Nun's Chorus" which was arranged by
    Benatzky from scraps of Johann Strauss music.

    If you like that kind of music, you might wish to see if the contents of the following lp has been issued on cd. Fredericke Sailer is an overlooked, underrated and neglected soprano:

    https://www.discogs.com/release/12292169-Fritz-Wunderlich-Friederike-Sailer-Songs-From-Viennese-Operettas

    Thanks, Greg, for the suggestion. The name Friederike Sailer was
    somewhat familiar to me, and then, amazingly enough it occurred to me
    that I had recently listened to her! She appears on the Fritz Werner
    version of Bach's cantata no. 26, one that has been a favorite recording
    of mine ever since I had the MHS LP years ago.

    In my defense I checked and see that she sings for only 51 seconds - but
    does a fine job! Also, as a Szellot in good standing I have Szell's
    Salzburg performance of Magic Flute and she has a weightier part - First Lady...

    I do enjoy what is called Operetta and am NotSure why it is considered
    by some to be a lesser art form. Sullivan, Lehar, and J. Strauss in
    their best work have created masterpieces - and Offenbach was the
    greatest of all (not sure about Dostal...)

    I did a quick search for Friederike Sailer recordings and found this: https://www.prestomusic.com/classical/products/8723529--beliebte-operettenmelodien

    Thanks again.

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  • From Al Eisner@21:1/5 to Al Eisner on Sat Nov 19 22:08:45 2022
    On Sun, 13 Nov 2022, Al Eisner wrote:

    Brahms String Quintets: #1 in F (Op. 88) and #2 in G (Op.111).

    Boston Symphony Chamber Players: Joseph Silverstein and Max Hobart (violins),
    Burton Fine and Patricia McCarty (violas), Jules Eskin (cello), recorded
    in 1982 for Nonesuch (and hence not in the recent BSO players box set).

    I also listened to the 1937 Budapest Quartet (with Alfred Hobday, viola) performance of #1.

    Like all of the chamber music Brahms allowed to survive, these are
    great works, and like the sextets very accessible. I came late to them, but better late than never. The Boston group is wonderful in the first
    movement of #1, with a beautifully blended sound, yet bringing out the individual lines when needed. The mostly-slow second movement also
    sounds fine to me, but the finale is perhaps a bit overly-emphatic.

    The Budapest, in less good sound, disappoints in the opening by omitting
    the exposition repeat (standard chamber music practice, I think, in the 1930's, and are generally less smooth than the Bostons - while still attractive. But I really love their other movements: the Grave second
    has their hallmark intensity, and the finale has a grace which I find just right.

    I have no signficiant reservations about the Boston #2. Their first
    movement is joyous, their superb second both lyrical and dramatic. And so on. (I did not listen to comparisons, and I admit not being all that familiar with this work.) I certainly recommend their disk.

    Continuing with the Brahms chamber music theme: 1930's performances by
    the Budapest String Quartet on a 2-CD Biddulph set, LAB-120, transerred
    by Ward Marston. The set includes the two String Quintets, String
    Quartets 2 znd 3, and the second String Sextet. So far as I can tell
    from dates in a Budapest discigraphy, the lineup for the first four works
    was Joseph Roisman, Alexander Schneider, Istvan Ipolyi, and Mischa
    Schneider; fo the Sextet (which I have not listened to), violist Ipolyi
    had been succeeded by Boris Kroyt.

    The first quintet is the performance I mentioned in the previous post.
    In the second (with Hans Mahlke), the first movement is as exuberant as
    that of the Boston players (the absence of the exposition repeat does
    not bother me all that much), while the Budapest (ii) is a bit less
    affecting. Their wonderful finale is all-out exciting. Who said Brahms
    in his last years was necessarily autumnal? The Op, 51 quartets are
    not my favorite of Brahms chamber music, and too often come across as
    dense, but the Budapest brings out the best in #2, playing with
    admirable transparency. And #3 is even better. Highly recommended.
    [Note that this is NOT the 1050's set of all three quartets, also on
    Biddulph. The 1930's set is available used at Amazon, not cheap but
    also not awful.]
    --
    Al Eisner

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  • From Andrew Clarke@21:1/5 to Oscar on Sat Nov 19 23:49:49 2022
    On Sunday, November 6, 2022 at 8:34:29 AM UTC+11, Oscar wrote:
    The October thread was one of the longest in recent memory. Let's keep it going.

    Eternal Heaven. A collection of Handel arias sung by Lea Desandre and Iestyn Davies, with the ensemble Jupiter led by lutenist Thomas Dunford, recorded by Erato. Brilliant, unless you think that Dame Joan knew everything there was to know about Handel
    singing ...

    Andrew Clarke
    Canberra

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  • From Andrew Clarke@21:1/5 to All on Sat Nov 19 23:44:35 2022
    On Tuesday, November 15, 2022 at 10:56:15 AM UTC+11, Notsure01 wrote:
    On 11/14/22 4:02 PM, gggg gggg wrote:
    On Monday, November 14, 2022 at 2:30:54 AM UTC-8, Notsure01 wrote:

    As a contrast to Scriabin, I've been listening to a Hilde Gueden
    operatic aria album:
    https://www.amazon.com/Sings-Songs-Lehar-VARIOUS-ARTISTS/dp/B00000C3R4/ref=sr_1_1?crid=E3JR34ZFVTRP&keywords=hilde+guden&qid=1668419580&sprefix=hilde+guden%2Caps%2C106&sr=8-1

    This includes Kalman, Lehar, Fall, Stolz as well as Korngold - and
    Charpentier! Hilde is very lively but not in perfect voice, and the
    orchestra and chorus tends to be overpowering. Still it is very
    enjoyable, particularly the famous "Nun's Chorus" which was arranged by >> Benatzky from scraps of Johann Strauss music.

    If you like that kind of music, you might wish to see if the contents of the following lp has been issued on cd. Fredericke Sailer is an overlooked, underrated and neglected soprano:

    https://www.discogs.com/release/12292169-Fritz-Wunderlich-Friederike-Sailer-Songs-From-Viennese-Operettas
    Thanks, Greg, for the suggestion. The name Friederike Sailer was
    somewhat familiar to me, and then, amazingly enough it occurred to me
    that I had recently listened to her! She appears on the Fritz Werner
    version of Bach's cantata no. 26, one that has been a favorite recording
    of mine ever since I had the MHS LP years ago.

    In my defense I checked and see that she sings for only 51 seconds - but does a fine job! Also, as a Szellot in good standing I have Szell's
    Salzburg performance of Magic Flute and she has a weightier part - First Lady...

    I do enjoy what is called Operetta and am NotSure why it is considered
    by some to be a lesser art form. Sullivan, Lehar, and J. Strauss in
    their best work have created masterpieces - and Offenbach was the
    greatest of all (not sure about Dostal...)

    I did a quick search for Friederike Sailer recordings and found this: https://www.prestomusic.com/classical/products/8723529--beliebte-operettenmelodien

    Thanks again.

    Mr Sure, have you seen the videorecordings of Laurent Pelly's productions of the Offenbach operettas, accompanied by Les Musiciens du Louvre under Marc Minkowski? La Belle Helene is a particular favourite. You can sample bits and pieces on You Tube. I
    like Fledermaus with Eberhart Waechter (getting on a bit) and Janet Perry (in full flight) and Carlos Kleiber too.

    Andrew Clarke
    Canberra

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  • From Herman@21:1/5 to Al Eisner on Sun Nov 20 00:18:24 2022
    On Sunday, November 20, 2022 at 7:08:56 AM UTC+1, Al Eisner wrote:
    On Sun, 13 Nov 2022, Al Eisner wrote:

    Brahms String Quintets: #1 in F (Op. 88) and #2 in G (Op.111).

    Boston Symphony Chamber Players: Joseph Silverstein and Max Hobart (violins),
    Burton Fine and Patricia McCarty (violas), Jules Eskin (cello), recorded
    in 1982 for Nonesuch (and hence not in the recent BSO players box set).

    I also listened to the 1937 Budapest Quartet (with Alfred Hobday, viola) performance of #1.

    Like all of the chamber music Brahms allowed to survive, these are
    great works, and like the sextets very accessible. I came late to them, but better late than never. The Boston group is wonderful in the first
    movement of #1, with a beautifully blended sound, yet bringing out the individual lines when needed. The mostly-slow second movement also
    sounds fine to me, but the finale is perhaps a bit overly-emphatic.

    The Budapest, in less good sound, disappoints in the opening by omitting the exposition repeat (standard chamber music practice, I think, in the 1930's, and are generally less smooth than the Bostons - while still attractive. But I really love their other movements: the Grave second
    has their hallmark intensity, and the finale has a grace which I find just right.

    I have no signficiant reservations about the Boston #2. Their first movement is joyous, their superb second both lyrical and dramatic. And so on. (I did not listen to comparisons, and I admit not being all that familiar with this work.) I certainly recommend their disk.
    Continuing with the Brahms chamber music theme: 1930's performances by
    the Budapest String Quartet on a 2-CD Biddulph set, LAB-120, transerred
    by Ward Marston. The set includes the two String Quintets, String
    Quartets 2 znd 3, and the second String Sextet. So far as I can tell
    from dates in a Budapest discigraphy, the lineup for the first four works
    was Joseph Roisman, Alexander Schneider, Istvan Ipolyi, and Mischa
    Schneider; fo the Sextet (which I have not listened to), violist Ipolyi
    had been succeeded by Boris Kroyt.

    Who said Brahms
    in his last years was necessarily autumnal?

    Not me. I think the 'autumnal' thing is just complacent BS.

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  • From Andrew Clarke@21:1/5 to Oscar on Sun Nov 20 00:38:29 2022
    On Sunday, November 6, 2022 at 8:34:29 AM UTC+11, Oscar wrote:
    The October thread was one of the longest in recent memory. Let's keep it going.


    The 2011 ROH production of Verdi's Macbeth with Simon Keenlyside and the terrifying Liudmylla Monastirska, conducted by Sir Antonio Pappano. I would imagine that if the Ukrainian authorities had projected Mme Monastirska's performance on to giant screens
    on the Russian border, Putin's 'special operation' might never have happened.

    Andrew Clarke
    Canberra

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  • From HT@21:1/5 to All on Sun Nov 20 07:10:56 2022
    Yakov Flier. Everything on YT. IMO even easier to listen to than Gilels. The Russian Piano School at its very best.
    Livia Rev. Debussy Études. Heard it for the first time. A great performance.

    Henk

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  • From Dan Koren@21:1/5 to hvt...@xs4all.nl on Sun Nov 20 12:28:08 2022
    On Sunday, November 20, 2022 at 7:10:58 AM UTC-8, hvt...@xs4all.nl wrote:

    Yakov Flier. Everything on YT. IMO
    even easier to listen to than Gilels.

    Obviously! He was the better pianist.

    The Russian Piano School at its very
    best.

    Using racist concepts and language
    again? ;-)

    dk

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  • From HT@21:1/5 to All on Sun Nov 20 13:34:22 2022
    Op zondag 20 november 2022 om 21:28:10 UTC+1 schreef dan....@gmail.com:
    On Sunday, November 20, 2022 at 7:10:58 AM UTC-8, hvt...@xs4all.nl wrote:

    Yakov Flier. Everything on YT. IMO
    even easier to listen to than Gilels.
    Obviously! He was the better pianist.
    The Russian Piano School at its very
    best.
    Using racist concepts and language
    again? ;-)

    <g> Mea maxima culpa ...

    Henk

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  • From Marc S@21:1/5 to dan....@gmail.com on Sun Nov 20 13:40:00 2022
    dan....@gmail.com schrieb am Sonntag, 20. November 2022 um 21:28:10 UTC+1:
    On Sunday, November 20, 2022 at 7:10:58 AM UTC-8, hvt...@xs4all.nl wrote:

    Yakov Flier. Everything on YT. IMO
    even easier to listen to than Gilels.
    Obviously! He was the better pianist.
    The Russian Piano School at its very
    best.
    Using racist concepts and language
    again? ;-)

    dk

    I've been listening to Sokolov in Brahms PC 2 quite a bit (with the Finnish Radio Symphony Orchestra and Saraste - I prefer it to the one with Jia) - I love it! My favorite now.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rr4yH25qNdA

    I think it was thanks to a link from you that I found it. It even beats Rubinstein and Krips (however I still need to listen to Volodos). Dan, I really can't get it in my head ;D HJ Lim really sucks... in Brahms, in Mozart and in Bach and Beethoven. And
    no... she is not the "heir" of Richter's style or we... she is just really bad... fix your ears or sth ;D

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  • From Dan Koren@21:1/5 to Marc S on Sun Nov 20 14:49:13 2022
    On Sunday, November 20, 2022 at 1:40:03 PM UTC-8, Marc S wrote:
    dan....@gmail.com schrieb am Sonntag, 20. November 2022 um 21:28:10 UTC+1:
    On Sunday, November 20, 2022 at 7:10:58 AM UTC-8, hvt...@xs4all.nl wrote:

    Yakov Flier. Everything on YT. IMO
    even easier to listen to than Gilels.
    Obviously! He was the better pianist.
    The Russian Piano School at its very
    best.
    Using racist concepts and language
    again? ;-)

    I've been listening to Sokolov in Brahms PC 2
    quite a bit (with the Finnish Radio Symphony
    Orchestra and Saraste - I prefer it to the one
    with Jia) - I love it! My favorite now.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rr4yH25qNdA

    I know it. Overdone and overthought.

    I think it was thanks to a link from you that I
    found it. It even beats Rubinstein and Krips

    No, it doesn't. It is a different approach.

    (however I still need to listen to Volodos).

    Why bother if you found one you like?

    Dan, I really can't get it in my head ;D HJ Lim
    really sucks... in Brahms, in Mozart and in

    She doesn't. She plays like an improvisation,
    not like a "masterpiece" that must be treated
    with "respect".

    Bach and Beethoven. And no... she is
    not the "heir" of Richter's style or we...

    I never said she was. She is herself.
    Sometimes she reminds me of the
    younger Richter you probably never
    heard, e.g.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1IRP4GO1NyA

    Leslie Gerber famously described
    this performance as "blisters paint".

    she is just really bad... fix your ears
    or sth ;D

    My ears are just fine, thank you. They
    have just been lubricated for winter
    with Mobil One 0W-50 racing oil! ;-)

    dk

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  • From Notsure01@21:1/5 to Andrew Clarke on Sun Nov 20 22:28:14 2022
    On 11/20/22 2:44 AM, Andrew Clarke wrote:
    On Tuesday, November 15, 2022 at 10:56:15 AM UTC+11, Notsure01 wrote:

    As a contrast to Scriabin, I've been listening to a Hilde Gueden
    operatic aria album.

    I do enjoy what is called Operetta and am NotSure why it is considered
    by some to be a lesser art form. Sullivan, Lehar, and J. Strauss in
    their best work have created masterpieces - and Offenbach was the
    greatest of all (not sure about Dostal.

    Mr Sure, have you seen the videorecordings of Laurent Pelly's productions of the Offenbach operettas, accompanied by Les Musiciens du Louvre under Marc Minkowski? La Belle Helene is a particular favourite. You can sample bits and pieces on You Tube. I
    like Fledermaus with Eberhart Waechter (getting on a bit) and Janet Perry (in full flight) and Carlos Kleiber too.

    Andrew Clarke
    Canberra

    Indeed I have! I've always liked Offenbach including Hoffman, Perichole,
    etc, but particularly enjoyed Grande Duchesse which I had with Zareska
    on a Urania LP. Just a few months ago I listened again - but I never had
    a libretto. I looked online for one, but this work has been so
    shamefully treated that the online libretti didn't match the performance.

    In the end I bought the Laurent Pelly/Minkowski DVD to get subtitles at
    least. I hesitated since the production appeared to be Eurotrash -
    soldiers gassed coming back to life, a cabinet full of skulls, etc - but
    this all seemed only a small part of the production and the acting was splendid.

    Particularly Felicity Lott - the role was really meant for a young
    woman, but Flott made it work. Comedy is hard and the cast had the right
    tone. and the singing was fine.

    (I hesitated to use the term Eurotrash since I recall this had caused considerable controversy here. For me, while I'm happy to see different interesting perspectives on familiar works, we don't need to see Tristan
    as performed by two salamanders in an abandoned coal mine in Ecuador...)

    (I also just enjoyed Nacht in Venedig - would be glad to discuss if
    there is interest)

    (And no need to call me Mr Sure - you can call me Not)

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  • From Andrew Clarke@21:1/5 to All on Sun Nov 20 23:13:15 2022
    On Monday, November 21, 2022 at 2:28:18 PM UTC+11, Notsure01 wrote:
    On 11/20/22 2:44 AM, Andrew Clarke wrote:
    On Tuesday, November 15, 2022 at 10:56:15 AM UTC+11, Notsure01 wrote:

    As a contrast to Scriabin, I've been listening to a Hilde Gueden
    operatic aria album.
    I do enjoy what is called Operetta and am NotSure why it is considered
    by some to be a lesser art form. Sullivan, Lehar, and J. Strauss in
    their best work have created masterpieces - and Offenbach was the
    greatest of all (not sure about Dostal.

    Mr Sure, have you seen the videorecordings of Laurent Pelly's productions of the Offenbach operettas, accompanied by Les Musiciens du Louvre under Marc Minkowski? La Belle Helene is a particular favourite. You can sample bits and pieces on You Tube.
    I like Fledermaus with Eberhart Waechter (getting on a bit) and Janet Perry (in full flight) and Carlos Kleiber too.

    Andrew Clarke
    Canberra
    Indeed I have! I've always liked Offenbach including Hoffman, Perichole, etc, but particularly enjoyed Grande Duchesse which I had with Zareska
    on a Urania LP. Just a few months ago I listened again - but I never had
    a libretto. I looked online for one, but this work has been so
    shamefully treated that the online libretti didn't match the performance.

    In the end I bought the Laurent Pelly/Minkowski DVD to get subtitles at least. I hesitated since the production appeared to be Eurotrash -
    soldiers gassed coming back to life, a cabinet full of skulls, etc - but this all seemed only a small part of the production and the acting was splendid.

    Particularly Felicity Lott - the role was really meant for a young
    woman, but Flott made it work. Comedy is hard and the cast had the right tone. and the singing was fine.

    (I hesitated to use the term Eurotrash since I recall this had caused considerable controversy here. For me, while I'm happy to see different interesting perspectives on familiar works, we don't need to see Tristan
    as performed by two salamanders in an abandoned coal mine in Ecuador...)

    (I also just enjoyed Nacht in Venedig - would be glad to discuss if
    there is interest)

    (And no need to call me Mr Sure - you can call me Not)

    Dear Not,

    I get the impression that French directors take considerable liberties with the spoken dialogue in Offenbach, usually to update the jokes, and the author of the new material appears in in the credits. In the case of the "Olympic Games" in La Belle Helene,
    the last riddle that stumps everybody, except, of course, Paris, has been completely replaced in the English subtitles, because the French original just doesn't work in translation. I agree, Dame Felicity's rather acid humour works beautifully in La
    Grande Duchesse, and, indeed in La Belle Helene too, where references to Greece touriswm are rife ...

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  • From Marc S@21:1/5 to dan....@gmail.com on Mon Nov 21 00:50:24 2022
    dan....@gmail.com schrieb am Sonntag, 20. November 2022 um 23:49:15 UTC+1:
    On Sunday, November 20, 2022 at 1:40:03 PM UTC-8, Marc S wrote:
    dan....@gmail.com schrieb am Sonntag, 20. November 2022 um 21:28:10 UTC+1:
    On Sunday, November 20, 2022 at 7:10:58 AM UTC-8, hvt...@xs4all.nl wrote:

    Yakov Flier. Everything on YT. IMO
    even easier to listen to than Gilels.
    Obviously! He was the better pianist.
    The Russian Piano School at its very
    best.
    Using racist concepts and language
    again? ;-)

    I've been listening to Sokolov in Brahms PC 2
    quite a bit (with the Finnish Radio Symphony
    Orchestra and Saraste - I prefer it to the one
    with Jia) - I love it! My favorite now.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rr4yH25qNdA
    I know it. Overdone and overthought.

    Then I probably didn't find it through a link of you, but by myself - wasn't quite sure when writing this. I think I got it mixed up with a Sokolov Bach Partita link that you recently posted.

    In regards to "overdone" I can see where you are coming from (when comparing it to Rubinstein/Krips), although I wouldn't use the word "overdone" to describe it - it "rocks" more (sorry, but I am just too lazy to come up with a better description now).
    And it also really doesn't feel "overthought" to me, it feels natural (probably precisely because "thought" has gone into it), and Rubinstein/Krips is "quite well thought out" as well... So what you are saying doesn't really make a lot of sense to me.

    I think "overdone" could be much better applied to HJ Lims Brahms PC2 performance, just as her Bach and Beethoven performances; the other problem being: HJ Lim obviously doesn't take enough time to think about what mess she is doing... in that regard she
    could learn much from the "ouverthoughtness" of Sokolov and Krips.

    I think it was thanks to a link from you that I
    found it. It even beats Rubinstein and Krips
    No, it doesn't. It is a different approach.

    My dear friend, ofc it is a different approach... just as Schnabel's approach to KV 466 is different than YES' or Michelangeli's... It still beats Rubinstein -imo; just as Schnabel beats YES' and Michelangeli beats both.

    I would agree with you that both are valid approaches (although you probably don't think Sokolov is good here), but for me - as you should have realized by now - I look for the approach that I like the most.

    You see... Richter also thought some performances were untoppable, or rather he thought he couldn't top them, which is why he didn't perform them. So, there might be different approaches that work, I still look for the one that I like best. Dan, this isn'
    t difficult to understand... I explained myself countless times, yet you don't understand the way I am looking at things. Just as you have explained yourself countless times on this ng, only to be misunderstood or something ;D

    (however I still need to listen to Volodos).
    Why bother if you found one you like?

    Dan, is this a serious question? Or are you trying to needle me? ;)

    In any case: Learn to think will ya... then you would stop asking stupid questions.

    Dan, I really can't get it in my head ;D HJ Lim
    really sucks... in Brahms, in Mozart and in
    She doesn't. She plays like an improvisation,
    not like a "masterpiece" that must be treated
    with "respect".

    Yeah, just as Rubinstein doesn't treat Brahms with respect... Rubinstein and Sokolov make it sound like an improvisation and a masterpiece at the same time ;D How about that? ;)

    I don't care whether HJ Lim "treats the piece as a masterpiece" or not, she just makes it sound like shit.

    I read on a German forum that Fanny Davies (british pianist) reached out to Brahms to ask him about concrete instructions (for I guess some) of his piano pieces, and Brahms answer was "Do whatever you like, just make it beautiful". And my dear friend, as
    mentioned already, she makes it sound like shit.

    Bach and Beethoven. And no... she is
    not the "heir" of Richter's style or we...
    I never said she was. She is herself.
    Sometimes she reminds me of the
    younger Richter you probably never
    heard, e.g.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1IRP4GO1NyA

    Leslie Gerber famously described
    this performance as "blisters paint".

    I am eager to learn in general. I will take a listen.

    And Dan, I think I do sort of understand where you are coming from (or where she is coming from) in regards to style... but she is no Richter. And Richter always showed respect and treated every piece he played as a masterpiece (sort of) - so your point
    again doesn't make any sense. She is no "Richter-heir".

    Yes Richter liked pieces played differently... but he didn't always like Gould even though Gould played things differently...

    she is just really bad... fix your ears
    or sth ;D
    My ears are just fine, thank you. They
    have just been lubricated for winter
    with Mobil One 0W-50 racing oil! ;-)

    dk

    My dear friend, if you want your ears (and Brain, ahem) fixed, you need to come to me ;D The place you go to seems to fuck up things even more...

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  • From Herman@21:1/5 to All on Mon Nov 21 04:17:32 2022
    After hearing / seeing a clip of Sabine Deveilhe in the fireplace coloratura aria in Ravel's l'Enfant et les Sortileges I couldn't help myself and watched the whole 45 minute opera with the Radio France Orchestra and Choir conducted by the Finnish
    conductor Mikko Franck.
    The coloratura soprano here turned out to be Jodie DeVos and the Enfant Chloe Briot.
    It's an incredible piece of music, yes, very funny, but also deeply moving, especially when Daphnis & Chloe sounds start churning up towards the end and the choir is searching for the redemptive word 'Maman', which, after all, may be one of the first
    words in any language. (Ironically, the mother role may be one of the weaker spots in this cast.)
    The performance is concertante.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y-YwjICCLN0

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  • From Marc S@21:1/5 to dan....@gmail.com on Mon Nov 21 10:18:00 2022
    dan....@gmail.com schrieb am Sonntag, 20. November 2022 um 23:49:15 UTC+1:
    I never said she was. She is herself.
    Sometimes she reminds me of the
    younger Richter you probably never
    heard, e.g.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1IRP4GO1NyA

    Listening to this made me realize how stupid I was in saying that I sort of get where you are coming from in regards to style (comparing her to Richter) ;D

    I really can't see where you are coming from. Or where she is coming from.

    I have no intention to listen to HJ Lim ever again...

    And in regards to the Sokolov Brahms PC 2: I think there are parts where the orchestra could breathe a little bit more (still amazing playing!), but Sokolov is just really great here imo. Rubinstein/Krips I love as well... but hmm... just as I couldn't
    listen to anyone else in Brahms PC 2 after Rubinstein/Krips, it seems to be the same with Sokolov/Saraste for me now. I will probably reevaluate sometime in the future - but these two would certainly be my top choices here.

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  • From Andrew Clarke@21:1/5 to Andrew Clarke on Mon Nov 21 16:15:24 2022
    On Monday, November 21, 2022 at 6:13:17 PM UTC+11, Andrew Clarke wrote:
    On Monday, November 21, 2022 at 2:28:18 PM UTC+11, Notsure01 wrote:
    On 11/20/22 2:44 AM, Andrew Clarke wrote:
    On Tuesday, November 15, 2022 at 10:56:15 AM UTC+11, Notsure01 wrote:

    As a contrast to Scriabin, I've been listening to a Hilde Gueden
    operatic aria album.
    I do enjoy what is called Operetta and am NotSure why it is considered >> by some to be a lesser art form. Sullivan, Lehar, and J. Strauss in
    their best work have created masterpieces - and Offenbach was the
    greatest of all (not sure about Dostal.

    Mr Sure, have you seen the videorecordings of Laurent Pelly's productions of the Offenbach operettas, accompanied by Les Musiciens du Louvre under Marc Minkowski? La Belle Helene is a particular favourite. You can sample bits and pieces on You Tube.
    I like Fledermaus with Eberhart Waechter (getting on a bit) and Janet Perry (in full flight) and Carlos Kleiber too.

    Andrew Clarke
    Canberra
    Indeed I have! I've always liked Offenbach including Hoffman, Perichole, etc, but particularly enjoyed Grande Duchesse which I had with Zareska
    on a Urania LP. Just a few months ago I listened again - but I never had
    a libretto. I looked online for one, but this work has been so
    shamefully treated that the online libretti didn't match the performance.

    In the end I bought the Laurent Pelly/Minkowski DVD to get subtitles at least. I hesitated since the production appeared to be Eurotrash - soldiers gassed coming back to life, a cabinet full of skulls, etc - but this all seemed only a small part of the production and the acting was splendid.

    Particularly Felicity Lott - the role was really meant for a young
    woman, but Flott made it work. Comedy is hard and the cast had the right tone. and the singing was fine.

    (I hesitated to use the term Eurotrash since I recall this had caused considerable controversy here. For me, while I'm happy to see different interesting perspectives on familiar works, we don't need to see Tristan as performed by two salamanders in an abandoned coal mine in Ecuador...)

    (I also just enjoyed Nacht in Venedig - would be glad to discuss if
    there is interest)

    (And no need to call me Mr Sure - you can call me Not)
    Dear Not,

    I get the impression that French directors take considerable liberties with the spoken dialogue in Offenbach, usually to update the jokes, and the author of the new material appears in in the credits. In the case of the "Olympic Games" in La Belle
    Helene, the last riddle that stumps everybody, except, of course, Paris, has been completely replaced in the English subtitles, because the French original just doesn't work in translation. I agree, Dame Felicity's rather acid humour works beautifully in
    La Grande Duchesse, and, indeed in La Belle Helene too, where references to Greece tourism are rife ...

    With respect to EuroTrash, that is what you get when the director decides that his or her ideas about Life are much more important than those of the composer, and the latter tends to get crowded out. This doesn't happen with Pelly, whose ideas tend to
    complement Offenbach rather than squash the man flat. The most extended example is Pelly's "Belle Helene" where the entire action is the dream of an increasingly frustrated Helene, who is going to bed while the overture is being played on the bedside
    clock radio. In the bed is her husband, a rather ordinary, pudgy little middle-aged man who could be a grocer somewhere, and, yet again, he is fast asleep. In despair, Helene, sung again by Flott, takes a couple of sleeping pills and retires for the
    night. It isn't until the entry of the other kings, who in turn announce their names and their exploits, that he sits up in bed and announces himself:

    "Je suis l'epoux de la reine, poux de la reine, poux de la reine,
    Le roi Menelas ... "

    A real coup de theatre!

    Andrew Clarke
    Canberra

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  • From Marc S@21:1/5 to dan....@gmail.com on Mon Nov 21 23:41:39 2022
    dan....@gmail.com schrieb am Sonntag, 20. November 2022 um 23:49:15 UTC+1:
    I think it was thanks to a link from you that I
    found it. It even beats Rubinstein and Krips

    No, it doesn't.

    I think you may be right that he doesn't beat Rubinstein/Krips, I will have to think about this a little more (and listen a little more) - probably I would choose Rubinstein/Krips over Sokolov/Saraste as a desert island choice (for now)... but I need
    more time to sort my thoughts (and feelings). Maybe it is too much "in your face" sometimes, but I have to say that it really hooked me.

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  • From number_six@21:1/5 to All on Tue Nov 22 16:42:13 2022
    Donna Hightower - Take One /Gee Baby, Ain't i Good to You (Fresh Sound)

    Glass - Concerto Fantasy for two Timpanists and Orch [transcr. Lortz]
    Fairouz - Sym 4 In the Shadow of No Towers
    Played by Popiel, KU Wind Ensemble etc on Naxos

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  • From Dan Koren@21:1/5 to Marc S on Wed Nov 23 08:24:01 2022
    On Monday, November 21, 2022 at 11:41:42 PM UTC-8, Marc S wrote:
    dan....@gmail.com schrieb am Sonntag, 20. November 2022 um 23:49:15 UTC+1:
    I think it was thanks to a link from you that I
    found it. It even beats Rubinstein and Krips

    No, it doesn't.

    I think you may be right that he doesn't beat
    Rubinstein/Krips, I will have to think about
    this a little more (and listen a little more) -
    probably I would choose Rubinstein/Krips
    over Sokolov/Saraste as a desert island
    choice (for now)... but I need more time to
    sort my thoughts (and feelings). Maybe it
    is too much "in your face" sometimes, but
    I have to say that it really hooked me.

    To my ears, Sokolov sounds too "driven" in
    Brahms. This works to some extent in the
    sonata op. 5, and a few other pieces. It
    also works in the 1st piano concerto.

    It doesn't work however in the 2nd piano
    concerto, especially not in the 3rd and 4th
    movements. No one beats Rubinstein and
    HJ Lim in the last movement.

    dk

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  • From Marc S@21:1/5 to dan....@gmail.com on Wed Nov 23 11:16:03 2022
    dan....@gmail.com schrieb am Mittwoch, 23. November 2022 um 17:24:04 UTC+1:
    On Monday, November 21, 2022 at 11:41:42 PM UTC-8, Marc S wrote:
    To my ears, Sokolov sounds too "driven" in
    Brahms. This works to some extent in the
    sonata op. 5, and a few other pieces. It
    also works in the 1st piano concerto.


    Yes, he certainly does. There were moments while listening to it etc that it felt that way to me as well, but the pianism and how he takes some parts, I was just really floored at first, and this made me look past my doubts I guess. Still I think a great
    performance. Just not as good as Rubinstein's - so, thanks for your thoughts.

    And ya, I can follow you in regards to op 5 and PC 1, but hmm... even then, not too driven I think...

    It doesn't work however in the 2nd piano
    concerto, especially not in the 3rd and 4th
    movements. No one beats Rubinstein and
    HJ Lim in the last movement.

    dk

    I will not listen to HJ Lim again in Brahms, sorry. I really did try (maybe I will listen to the 4th movement later or tomorrow just because you said so... but I don't see me changing my mind). And you know, for me it's funny, because I usually love your
    recs (1930s-1980s), but now you come up with HJ lim etc... wth ;D

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  • From Dan Koren@21:1/5 to Marc S on Wed Nov 23 15:47:17 2022
    On Wednesday, November 23, 2022 at 11:16:05 AM UTC-8, Marc S wrote:
    dan....@gmail.com schrieb am Mittwoch, 23. November 2022 um 17:24:04 UTC+1:

    It doesn't work however in the 2nd piano
    concerto, especially not in the 3rd and 4th
    movements. No one beats Rubinstein and
    HJ Lim in the last movement.

    I will not listen to HJ Lim again in Brahms, sorry.

    No skin off my nose.

    I really did try (maybe I will listen to the 4th movement
    later or tomorrow just because you said so... but I don't
    see me changing my mind). And you know, for me it's

    One should never do anything because of what someone
    recommends or doesn't. Follow your own brain and ears.

    funny, because I usually love your recs (1930s-1980s),
    but now you come up with HJ lim etc... wth ;D

    Your loss.

    dk

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