• Accordion Family Instruments

    From aokimcneilly@gmail.com@21:1/5 to Doktorski Henry on Tue May 29 09:33:52 2018
    On Thursday, December 17, 1998 at 3:00:00 AM UTC-5, Doktorski Henry wrote:
    Sorry it took so long to respond; I've been having difficulty posting
    replies in dejanews.

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    Date: Sat, 28 Nov 1998 10:32:41 -0800
    From: srbarete <srbarete@northernnet.com>
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    Doktorski Henry wrote:
    I thank you all for your invigorating and entertaining posts. However,
    I don't believe that this analogy holds water, as it compares apples to oranges...

    Henry, so nice to hear from you again! I hope you and Mary Kaye are
    happy, healthy and content in your new marriage! Congratulations, again!

    Lynda, thank you for your kind words!

    So, I guess we'll just have to agree to disagree on our definitions and terms? Thank you for your opinion.

    ...By this faulty logic, if accordions, bandoneons and concertinas are
    all accordions, then one could equally assume that Lincoln Towncars, > Dodge Ram Trucks and Volkswagens are all Lincolns.

    You missed the point.

    ... However, we must not let our own geographical peculiarities color
    our vision ...

    I prefer to call them free-reed instruments as the term is accurate and 100% acceptable to all.

    Perhaps you'd see more clearly from *your* geographic location if you
    were to have visited *our* geographic location and actually played and examined the construction of the historic accordion family instruments
    you have described as a squeezebox historian. I find it curious to note
    that you have never been to the A World of Accordions Museum to actually
    view the nearly 1000 instruments on display and see their construction,
    yet you purport to be an expert in their history, classification and construction.

    Ah, Lynda! You have discovered my secret! I am not an authority on
    anything! I am simply a pretender!

    Please, before you make yourself out to be *the* authority in these
    matters, you should read the accordion family instrument entries soon to
    be published in the Groves Dictionary. Is this not considered to be
    *the* authority in the academic world of music?

    How can I read something which has not been published? Will you kindly
    send me a copy, as I assume you have read an advance copy.

    While purely academic and intellectual pursuits are worthwhile and
    admired, getting the practical experience in restoring, playing and
    comparing one instrument to another while they sit side-by-side and classifying these many old instruments in logical groupings is also worthwhile and academic in nature, I assure you. The invitation has been extended.

    Best regards,
    Lynda

    Hello again! I've been meaning to visit the museum ever since Hemil
    invited me a couple years ago; it is just a long drive for me -- close to 1000 miles.

    But may I suggest that a museum built by an accordionist might have a
    slight perponderance of accordions in it, just as a museum built by a bandoneonist might have a slight perponderance of bandoneons in it.

    I have visited a "so called" museum of free-reed instruments built by a harmonium repairer which might make one think that the accordion was
    simply a primitive relative of the reed organ!

    So... ._. idk what this is -.-

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  • From Ike Milligan@21:1/5 to aokimcneilly@gmail.com on Tue May 29 13:38:05 2018
    On 5/29/2018 12:33 PM, aokimcneilly@gmail.com wrote:
    On Thursday, December 17, 1998 at 3:00:00 AM UTC-5, Doktorski Henry wrote:
    Sorry it took so long to respond; I've been having difficulty posting
    replies in dejanews.

    Return-Path: <srbarete@northernnet.com>
    Received: from clancy.ispn.net by duq3a.cc.duq.edu with SMTP;
    Sat, 28 Nov 1998 11:30:47 -0500
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    Date: Sat, 28 Nov 1998 10:32:41 -0800
    From: srbarete <srbarete@northernnet.com>
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    CC: DOKTORS9549@duq3a.cc.duq.edu
    Subject: Re: Accordion Family Instruments
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    Doktorski Henry wrote:
    I thank you all for your invigorating and entertaining posts. However,
    I don't believe that this analogy holds water, as it compares apples to
    oranges...

    Henry, so nice to hear from you again! I hope you and Mary Kaye are
    happy, healthy and content in your new marriage! Congratulations, again!

    Lynda, thank you for your kind words!

    So, I guess we'll just have to agree to disagree on our definitions and
    terms? Thank you for your opinion.

    ...By this faulty logic, if accordions, bandoneons and concertinas are
    all accordions, then one could equally assume that Lincoln Towncars, > Dodge Ram Trucks and Volkswagens are all Lincolns.

    You missed the point.

    ... However, we must not let our own geographical peculiarities color
    our vision ...

    I prefer to call them free-reed instruments as the term is accurate and
    100% acceptable to all.

    Perhaps you'd see more clearly from *your* geographic location if you
    were to have visited *our* geographic location and actually played and
    examined the construction of the historic accordion family instruments
    you have described as a squeezebox historian. I find it curious to note
    that you have never been to the A World of Accordions Museum to actually
    view the nearly 1000 instruments on display and see their construction,
    yet you purport to be an expert in their history, classification and
    construction.

    Ah, Lynda! You have discovered my secret! I am not an authority on
    anything! I am simply a pretender!

    Please, before you make yourself out to be *the* authority in these
    matters, you should read the accordion family instrument entries soon to
    be published in the Groves Dictionary. Is this not considered to be
    *the* authority in the academic world of music?

    How can I read something which has not been published? Will you kindly
    send me a copy, as I assume you have read an advance copy.

    While purely academic and intellectual pursuits are worthwhile and
    admired, getting the practical experience in restoring, playing and
    comparing one instrument to another while they sit side-by-side and
    classifying these many old instruments in logical groupings is also
    worthwhile and academic in nature, I assure you. The invitation has been
    extended.

    Best regards,
    Lynda

    Hello again! I've been meaning to visit the museum ever since Hemil
    invited me a couple years ago; it is just a long drive for me -- close to
    1000 miles.

    But may I suggest that a museum built by an accordionist might have a
    slight perponderance of accordions in it, just as a museum built by a
    bandoneonist might have a slight perponderance of bandoneons in it.

    I have visited a "so called" museum of free-reed instruments built by a
    harmonium repairer which might make one think that the accordion was
    simply a primitive relative of the reed organ!

    So... ._. idk what this is -.-
    Neither do i. if you have a question, i have an opinion.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)