• Do not fertilize elderberry for the first year so as not to damage root

    From John Robertson@21:1/5 to All on Wed Mar 31 20:14:31 2021
    I am a homeowner without botany experience or knowledge.
    I try to use logical "common sense" when/if/where I can be sensible.

    I want to grow more elderberries (I have one adult elderberry bush only).

    Googling how to propagate elderberry bushes I find this quote:
    "Do not fertilize for the first year so as not to damage roots." https://homeguides.sfgate.com/transplant-elderberry-45396.html

    If fertilizing is good for plants how can fertilizing in the
    first year be damaging to the plants?

    They didn't say "too much" fertilizer.
    They said not to fertilize transplanted plants (in the first year).
    And yet they said to put compost into the hole (isn't that fertilizer?).

    Does that specific fertilizer advice from that site make any sense to you?
    If so, can you explain the logic to me?
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  • From David E. Ross@21:1/5 to John Robertson on Wed Mar 31 20:04:51 2021
    On 3/31/2021 7:14 PM, John Robertson wrote:
    I am a homeowner without botany experience or knowledge.
    I try to use logical "common sense" when/if/where I can be sensible.

    I want to grow more elderberries (I have one adult elderberry bush only).

    Googling how to propagate elderberry bushes I find this quote:
    "Do not fertilize for the first year so as not to damage roots." https://homeguides.sfgate.com/transplant-elderberry-45396.html

    If fertilizing is good for plants how can fertilizing in the
    first year be damaging to the plants?

    They didn't say "too much" fertilizer.
    They said not to fertilize transplanted plants (in the first year).
    And yet they said to put compost into the hole (isn't that fertilizer?).

    Does that specific fertilizer advice from that site make any sense to you?
    If so, can you explain the logic to me?


    I do not fertilize a newly planted rose bush the first year it is in the ground. Fertilizer will generally promote the growth of foliage.
    However, the roots have been disturbed and might not recover
    sufficiently to support (e.g., provide sufficient moisture) to support
    abundant foliage during warm weather. Fertilizer might also promote
    flowering, which stresses the plant while it is still trying to become established. All this might also be applicable to elderberry.

    I make an exception to this only if the rose bush has flowers despite
    not being fed. Only then I give it a very light feeding.

    For most woody plants, withholding fertilizer in the first year tends to
    be a good practice. However, I do put bone meal or superphosphate in
    the planting hole and then a small amount of soil to separate the new
    roots from the phosphorus. Phosphorus does not readily dissolve and
    thus needs to be placed where the roots will find it.

    --
    David E. Ross
    <http://www.rossde.com>

    While a "vaccination passport" to prove someone has been
    vaccinated against COVID-19 seems to be a good idea, most
    concepts involve smart phones. What about those of us
    who have been vaccinated but do not have a smart phone?

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  • From John Robertson@21:1/5 to David E. Ross on Wed Mar 31 21:39:19 2021
    On 2021/03/31 9:4 pm, David E. Ross wrote:


    I do not fertilize a newly planted rose bush the first year it is in the ground. Fertilizer will generally promote the growth of foliage.
    However, the roots have been disturbed and might not recover
    sufficiently to support (e.g., provide sufficient moisture) to support abundant foliage during warm weather. Fertilizer might also promote flowering, which stresses the plant while it is still trying to become established. All this might also be applicable to elderberry.

    I make an exception to this only if the rose bush has flowers despite
    not being fed. Only then I give it a very light feeding.

    For most woody plants, withholding fertilizer in the first year tends to
    be a good practice. However, I do put bone meal or superphosphate in
    the planting hole and then a small amount of soil to separate the new
    roots from the phosphorus. Phosphorus does not readily dissolve and
    thus needs to be placed where the roots will find it.

    Thanks for all that good advice.
    You sound like you have experience.

    I did find this which contradicts what I first found.
    So it looks like it is a bit more technical than I at first knew it to be.

    https://gardenerspath.com/plants/fruit/grow-elderberries/
    "The Horticulture Department at Cornell also recommends that you apply 1/8 pound of ammonium nitrate (or 0.5 lbs. 10-10-10) for each year of the
    plant's age, up to one pound per plant (or up to 4 lbs. 10-10-10). This
    should be done in the spring every year after its initial planting.

    --
    (Please post followups or tech inquiries to the USENET newsgroup)

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