• Point-trick game: Double King Pied

    From jpdeneufville@gmail.com@21:1/5 to All on Mon Jul 11 18:35:48 2016
    Jake,
    I personally appreciate your dialog on double king pede. I played it in Bridgewater, VT a few nights in December 1963. I forgot all the rules but remembered the name. Thanks to Google and you I can now teach this to my family. Thanks.
    John

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From danielelwinmeadmxmliv@gmail.com@21:1/5 to Jake Patterson on Wed Nov 9 13:33:51 2016
    On Monday, December 4, 2000 at 9:23:35 PM UTC-5, Jake Patterson wrote:
    My family traditionally plays a point-trick game called Double King Pied (not
    sure of spelling of "Pied".) The game was played by my grand parrents in Woodstock, Vermont. I was wondering if anyone has heard of it.

    The game is played by four players in fixed teams of two. It is played with a 53 card deck consisting of the normal cards plus one Joker.

    The Deal:

    Each player is dealt twelve cards, with the remaining five going to the center
    of the table.

    Bidding and Declaring trump:

    Bidding is clockwise starting from the person after the dealer, each player bids the number of points that they think they can take (from 1 to 100). They
    can also opt to pass. Bidding continues clockwise amoung the players who have
    not passed until three players have passed. The winning bidder takes the five
    cards from the center of the table and then declares the trump suit. The set
    of cards that are in-trump include the cards of the trump suit, plus the opposite suit king, nine, and five, plus the Joker.

    Discard:

    Each player then discards down to six cards, at this stage the winning bidder
    has the oppurtunity to ask their partner if they can take a number of (in trump) cards that would otherwise be discarded. For example, if the winning bidder has nine cards that are in trump, they might say to their partner: "Can you take three cards?" Their partner would likely say "Yes". Since there are fewer cards that are "in trump" then held by players after discard,
    one or more player will hold some cards that are out of trump, but I will get
    to that later.

    Play:

    Six tricks are then played, with the winning bidder leading the first trick. Supposing the trump suit is Spades, the order of power, and point values,
    are as follows:

    Ace of Spades 1 point
    King of Spades 25 points
    King of Clubs 25 points
    Queen of Spades
    Jack of Spades
    Ten of Spades
    Nine of Spades 10 points
    Nine of Clubs 10 points
    Eight of Spades
    Seven of Spades
    Six of Spades
    Five of Spades 5 points
    Five of Clubs 5 points
    Four of Spades
    Three of Spades
    Two of Spades 1 point
    Joker 18 points

    The most powerfull card played in a trick takes the trick, and captures the three other cards played in that trick. Therefore, the player who holds the Joker (which is the least powerfull card, but worth lots of points) has the responsibility to play it when they are sure that their partner's card will take that trick, lest its points be captured by one of their opponents.

    Each trick after the first is lead by the player who took the last trick. That player can "throw off" by playing an out-of-trump card, in order to get rid of any such cards that they have (it may be desireable to save an in-trump
    card for a later trick.) If a player throws off, the next player may throw off as well. Out-of-trump cards have no power and are worth no points. If a
    player has no more in-trump cards, then they are "out" and they simply put their cards down, the remaining three players continue to play tricks as normal.

    Scoring:

    The points are added up and if the team that won the bidding has captured enough points to cover their bid, then they get the number of points that they
    captured. Otherwise, they go back by the difference. The other team gets the
    number of points that they captured. Play continues until one team gets to 500 points.

    I would be interested to hear if anyone else has any experience with this game.

    --
    |@ ]@[ @|
    |@ ]@[ @| /@@@@@\ |@@@@@@@@@| /@@@@@\ +@@@@@@@@K |@@@|
    J@ ]@[ @K ;@@@^@@@;|@@@@@@@@@|;@@@^@@@; |@@@| \@@@L |@@@|
    .@| ]@[ |@. J@@' `@@K |@@@| J@@' `@@K |@@@| /@@@K |@@@|
    J@' ]@[ `@K ;@@@@@@@@@; |@@@| ;@@@@@@@@@; |@@@@@@@@L |@@@|
    J@F ]@[ `@K J@@@@@@@@@K |@@@| J@@@@@@@@@K |@@@|\@@@\ |@@@|
    J@@' ]@[ `@@K ;@@@@ @@@@; |@@@| ;@@@@ @@@@;|@@@| `@@@L |@@@|
    J@@P ]@[ 9@@K J@@@V ?@@@K |@@@| J@@@V ?@@@K|@@@| \@@@|@@@| @@P ]@[ 9@@K

    Dan Mead - My grandparents and parents - residents of Rutland County, Vt. and Washington County, NY played this game a quite often. It resulted in many rousing tricks, and not a few heated arguments. My grandfather, Henri LaRose (a transplanted
    Quebecois) was especially fond of it.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From agibbs1981@gmail.com@21:1/5 to All on Sun Apr 16 10:59:04 2017
    Grew up playing this game and LOVE it. Learned as a kid also in vt

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From dragonfly1664@gmail.com@21:1/5 to All on Fri May 19 11:07:08 2017
    I learned this game when I lived in Vermont in the 80's. Been years since I've played, wish I knew others that played too, to refresh my memory!

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From pathofstjames@gmail.com@21:1/5 to All on Wed Feb 7 06:51:02 2018
    My grandfather, uncle, father and I used to play this game in Vermont - specifically Lincoln. And whenever I ask anyone about this game, they always learned it in Vermont. Have not played in years. And I better hurry up as I am as old as my grandfather
    now!

    Dolly Anagnostis
    Saco, Maine
    dollyaldrich@icloud.com

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From schneidermartha92@gmail.com@21:1/5 to All on Fri Feb 9 11:52:14 2018
    My family played a game we called "Pied"(not sure of spelling). My Dad would call it "24 for 48" because that was the highest bid you could make if you thought you and your partner could take all the tricks and win 48 points. They also called it "High-
    Low-Jack and Game".

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From schneidermartha92@gmail.com@21:1/5 to All on Fri Feb 9 12:55:59 2018
    They would play in pairs or two teams of three, or if enough of the family had gathered, they would have 2 tables of 4. They would play "men vs.women", and occasionally a family member would have to play as a member of the opposite sex. I think my
    grandparents learned the game in Vermont, as they lived in New Hampshire, but had friends in VT.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From terryincolor@gmail.com@21:1/5 to Jake Patterson on Thu Jul 12 08:34:05 2018
    Hi, All!
    My grandparents learned this game from their landlord in the 1920's or early 30's in Crown Point, NY.
    I played for years with my mother, aunts and uncles. I am now teaching my adult children how to play.
    They called it "King Peed" and I'm not sure of the spelling, either.
    HERE IS HOW I WAS TAUGHT THIS GAME:

    KING PEID

    Power rank from most to least:
    Trump Opposite Points
    (same color)
    Ace 1

    King King 25 each

    Queen -

    Jack Jack 1 (trump only)

    10 1 (trump only)

    9 9 9 each
    8 -
    7 -
    6 -

    5 5 5 each

    4 -
    3 -

    2 1 point

    Joker 18 points

    Total points possible: 100 per hand.
    Play to 500.

    DIRECTIONS

    Object of the game: to win tricks containing cards with points. Odds of winning are increased by being highest bidder (providing you have enough winning cards to take enough tricks).
    Deal: 9 cards to 4 players; then four “kitty” cards to each, which can not be seen until after bidding. Dealer gets 5 in the kitty. (53 cards total)
    After each player looks at their 9 cards, “airplane bidding” starts with the first person after the dealer until one person wins the bid. Then the kitty cards may be added to each player’s hand. High bidder then names the suit to be trump for the
    hand. Ace has highest rank (to take a trick), Joker has none. Joker can only “take” itself if no trump is led and then no trump played by all during that trick.
    Trump MUST be played on the first trick, led out by the highest bidder. When trump is led, players must play trump if they have it.
    Players keep 6 cards and discard the rest before play begins. Should a player have more than 6 trump cards, the extra cards can be passed to their partner. Should the partner also have more than 6 cards, their lowest non-point cards should be discarded.
    Bid winner passes to partner first. (Partners should not pass back and forth – only one passing per hand.) Whoever takes the trick leads out next.
    END
    ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////


    On Monday, December 4, 2000 at 9:23:35 PM UTC-5, Jake Patterson wrote:
    My family traditionally plays a point-trick game called Double King Pied (not
    sure of spelling of "Pied".) The game was played by my grand parrents in Woodstock, Vermont. I was wondering if anyone has heard of it.

    The game is played by four players in fixed teams of two. It is played with a 53 card deck consisting of the normal cards plus one Joker.

    The Deal:

    Each player is dealt twelve cards, with the remaining five going to the center
    of the table.

    Bidding and Declaring trump:

    Bidding is clockwise starting from the person after the dealer, each player bids the number of points that they think they can take (from 1 to 100). They
    can also opt to pass. Bidding continues clockwise amoung the players who have
    not passed until three players have passed. The winning bidder takes the five
    cards from the center of the table and then declares the trump suit. The set
    of cards that are in-trump include the cards of the trump suit, plus the opposite suit king, nine, and five, plus the Joker.

    Discard:

    Each player then discards down to six cards, at this stage the winning bidder
    has the oppurtunity to ask their partner if they can take a number of (in trump) cards that would otherwise be discarded. For example, if the winning bidder has nine cards that are in trump, they might say to their partner: "Can you take three cards?" Their partner would likely say "Yes". Since there are fewer cards that are "in trump" then held by players after discard,
    one or more player will hold some cards that are out of trump, but I will get
    to that later.

    Play:

    Six tricks are then played, with the winning bidder leading the first trick. Supposing the trump suit is Spades, the order of power, and point values,
    are as follows:

    Ace of Spades 1 point
    King of Spades 25 points
    King of Clubs 25 points
    Queen of Spades
    Jack of Spades
    Ten of Spades
    Nine of Spades 10 points
    Nine of Clubs 10 points
    Eight of Spades
    Seven of Spades
    Six of Spades
    Five of Spades 5 points
    Five of Clubs 5 points
    Four of Spades
    Three of Spades
    Two of Spades 1 point
    Joker 18 points

    The most powerfull card played in a trick takes the trick, and captures the three other cards played in that trick. Therefore, the player who holds the Joker (which is the least powerfull card, but worth lots of points) has the responsibility to play it when they are sure that their partner's card will take that trick, lest its points be captured by one of their opponents.

    Each trick after the first is lead by the player who took the last trick. That player can "throw off" by playing an out-of-trump card, in order to get rid of any such cards that they have (it may be desireable to save an in-trump
    card for a later trick.) If a player throws off, the next player may throw off as well. Out-of-trump cards have no power and are worth no points. If a
    player has no more in-trump cards, then they are "out" and they simply put their cards down, the remaining three players continue to play tricks as normal.

    Scoring:

    The points are added up and if the team that won the bidding has captured enough points to cover their bid, then they get the number of points that they
    captured. Otherwise, they go back by the difference. The other team gets the
    number of points that they captured. Play continues until one team gets to 500 points.

    I would be interested to hear if anyone else has any experience with this game.

    --
    |@ ]@[ @|
    |@ ]@[ @| /@@@@@\ |@@@@@@@@@| /@@@@@\ +@@@@@@@@K |@@@|
    J@ ]@[ @K ;@@@^@@@;|@@@@@@@@@|;@@@^@@@; |@@@| \@@@L |@@@|
    .@| ]@[ |@. J@@' `@@K |@@@| J@@' `@@K |@@@| /@@@K |@@@|
    J@' ]@[ `@K ;@@@@@@@@@; |@@@| ;@@@@@@@@@; |@@@@@@@@L |@@@|
    J@F ]@[ `@K J@@@@@@@@@K |@@@| J@@@@@@@@@K |@@@|\@@@\ |@@@|
    J@@' ]@[ `@@K ;@@@@ @@@@; |@@@| ;@@@@ @@@@;|@@@| `@@@L |@@@|
    J@@P ]@[ 9@@K J@@@V ?@@@K |@@@| J@@@V ?@@@K|@@@| \@@@|@@@| @@P ]@[ 9@@K

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From kimtatrowhite@gmail.com@21:1/5 to All on Sun Oct 28 13:31:55 2018
    My parents used to come to my house and play! My mom passed about two years ago and now we don’t play 😢

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From kimtatrowhite@gmail.com@21:1/5 to All on Sun Oct 28 13:33:04 2018
    My mom and dad taught my husband and I we loved playing with them.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Timothy Perron@21:1/5 to Jake Patterson on Sat Apr 10 20:44:35 2021
    On Monday, December 4, 2000 at 9:23:35 PM UTC-5, Jake Patterson wrote:
    My family traditionally plays a point-trick game called Double King Pied (not
    sure of spelling of "Pied".) The game was played by my grand parrents in Woodstock, Vermont. I was wondering if anyone has heard of it.
    The game is played by four players in fixed teams of two. It is played with a 53 card deck consisting of the normal cards plus one Joker.
    The Deal:
    Each player is dealt twelve cards, with the remaining five going to the center
    of the table.
    Bidding and Declaring trump:
    Bidding is clockwise starting from the person after the dealer, each player bids the number of points that they think they can take (from 1 to 100). They
    can also opt to pass. Bidding continues clockwise amoung the players who have
    not passed until three players have passed. The winning bidder takes the five cards from the center of the table and then declares the trump suit. The set of cards that are in-trump include the cards of the trump suit, plus the opposite suit king, nine, and five, plus the Joker.
    Discard:
    Each player then discards down to six cards, at this stage the winning bidder
    has the oppurtunity to ask their partner if they can take a number of (in trump) cards that would otherwise be discarded. For example, if the winning bidder has nine cards that are in trump, they might say to their partner: "Can you take three cards?" Their partner would likely say "Yes". Since there are fewer cards that are "in trump" then held by players after discard,
    one or more player will hold some cards that are out of trump, but I will get
    to that later.
    Play:
    Six tricks are then played, with the winning bidder leading the first trick. Supposing the trump suit is Spades, the order of power, and point values,
    are as follows:
    Ace of Spades 1 point
    King of Spades 25 points
    King of Clubs 25 points
    Queen of Spades
    Jack of Spades
    Ten of Spades
    Nine of Spades 10 points
    Nine of Clubs 10 points
    Eight of Spades
    Seven of Spades
    Six of Spades
    Five of Spades 5 points
    Five of Clubs 5 points
    Four of Spades
    Three of Spades
    Two of Spades 1 point
    Joker 18 points
    The most powerfull card played in a trick takes the trick, and captures the three other cards played in that trick. Therefore, the player who holds the Joker (which is the least powerfull card, but worth lots of points) has the responsibility to play it when they are sure that their partner's card will take that trick, lest its points be captured by one of their opponents.
    Each trick after the first is lead by the player who took the last trick. That player can "throw off" by playing an out-of-trump card, in order to get rid of any such cards that they have (it may be desireable to save an in-trump
    card for a later trick.) If a player throws off, the next player may throw off as well. Out-of-trump cards have no power and are worth no points. If a player has no more in-trump cards, then they are "out" and they simply put their cards down, the remaining three players continue to play tricks as normal.
    Scoring:
    The points are added up and if the team that won the bidding has captured enough points to cover their bid, then they get the number of points that they
    captured. Otherwise, they go back by the difference. The other team gets the number of points that they captured. Play continues until one team gets to 500 points.
    I would be interested to hear if anyone else has any experience with this game.
    --
    |@ ]@[ @|
    |@ ]@[ @| /@@@@@\ |@@@@@@@@@| /@@@@@\ +@@@@@@@@K |@@@|
    J@ ]@[ @K ;@@@^@@@;|@@@@@@@@@|;@@@^@@@; |@@@| \@@@L |@@@|
    .@| ]@[ |@. J@@' `@@K |@@@| J@@' `@@K |@@@| /@@@K |@@@|
    J@' ]@[ `@K ;@@@@@@@@@; |@@@| ;@@@@@@@@@; |@@@@@@@@L |@@@|
    J@F ]@[ `@K J@@@@@@@@@K |@@@| J@@@@@@@@@K |@@@|\@@@\ |@@@|
    J@@' ]@[ `@@K ;@@@@ @@@@; |@@@| ;@@@@ @@@@;|@@@| `@@@L |@@@|
    J@@P ]@[ 9@@K J@@@V ?@@@K |@@@| J@@@V ?@@@K|@@@| \@@@|@@@|
    @@P ]@[ 9@@K

    I'm now 36, but my Me'mere (grandma) taught me how to play this game when I was in high school. But this was not a game we played only with a few people. Rather, my Me'mere used to play every week with a group (and I would often join in) of about 20-30
    people in Ferrisburgh, VT. She lived in Vergennes, VT just adjacent to Ferrisburgh. So it was quite well-known in that area, at least among that generation. Besides me and my younger brother, there was no one there under the age of 70. And I never knew
    anyone in my generation or my parents' generation who knew or even heard of the game so unfortunately it looks like it is passing away into history at least in that area of VT. But I absolutely love the game, and so I hope it can find a following through
    which it can continue!

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)