• D&D: And The Most Popular Class Is...

    From Ubiquitous@21:1/5 to All on Tue Jul 21 15:46:55 2020
    Weíre looking at the most popular classes according to the latest
    data and seeing how your favorites stack up. But one class stands
    a cut above the rest.

    Itís time once again to look at the latest data released from D&D
    Beyond, which gathers stats from more than 30 million different
    characters to give you a snapshot of what the community is like. While
    itís not the only player population, itís still a significant enough
    sample size to give you insight into what the community is doing and
    what the big trends are. Today weíre taking a look at what the most
    popular classes are, with some newly updated data on single-classed
    characters.

    While slightly more than half of the playerbase typically multiclasses,
    thereís still a sizable chunk that donít. Especially if youíre just
    starting off. And from the data, which weíll get to in a second, we
    can learn a ton of interesting thingsĖnot only do we now the most
    popular class, we get a look at how traditional party composition has
    shifted. But you donít have to take my word for it, look at the
    numbers:

    https://www.belloflostsouls.net/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/dnd-beyond-popular-single-class.jpg

    Letís start with the most obvious stuff. Fighters are the most popular
    class in all of D&D, and Champion Fighters are the most popular
    Fighter. By a lot. This is something that D&D has said is true
    internally, itís something that D&D Beyond has correlated, and it
    remains trueĖfor single classed characters. If you take multiclassing
    into account, then itís Warlocks for days (but thatís because
    Warlock/Fighter is a popular combo). Weíll compare the two another
    time. But for now, letís look at another interesting trend. Warlocks
    are more popular than both Wizards and Sorcerers, so theyíre sort of
    stepping into that Mage role. Looking at the top classes, it looks
    like your average (single-classed) adventuring party is Fighter, Rogue, Warlock, and then either Cleric, Barbarian, or Wizard. This is a change
    from a year ago, when Wizards and Sorcerers were competing for popular positions in parties.

    https://www.belloflostsouls.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/dnd-beyond-party-composition.jpg

    The other thing worth looking at is which subclasses are getting the
    most play here. Many of these arenít surprising, in fact if you look
    at all the single-classed characters, the subclass option thatís
    included in the SRD is the most common, likely because more people
    play D&D than own the PHB on D&D Beyond. But looking at the
    distribution you see just how popular that gets. For comparisonís sake,
    hereís last yearís subclass data (w/o multiclass):

    https://www.belloflostsouls.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/top-subclass-dnd-beyond.jpg

    And hereís this yearís data again: https://www.belloflostsouls.net/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/dnd-beyond-popular-single-class.jpg

    Now, itís worth noting that one has all player options unlocked, and
    this compares all player data in general, but even with free-only
    classes, you still see some interesting emerging subclasses. Clerics
    have seen Tempest overtake the Forge Domain, meanwhile Circle of
    Shepherd Druids are quickly rising in popularity. Fighters look pretty
    much as they always have, with the Champion Fighter by far and away
    the most popular character/class combo. Iím glad to see the Way of the
    Drunken Master showing up for Monks.

    The biggest takeaway is that, as the new options trickle out, people
    are using them, and while thereís no competing with free, the basic
    picture of many of the classes is slowly shifting. Itíll be interesting
    to see where we are a year from now, when whatever player option book
    is coming has released.


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