• RQFTCIMM11 Game 7, Rounds 4,6: whistleblowers and wine

    From Mark Brader@21:1/5 to All on Thu Oct 7 22:57:18 2021
    These questions were written to be asked in Toronto on 2011-06-27,
    and should be interpreted accordingly. All questions were written
    by members of the Misplaced Modifiers, but have been reformatted
    and may have been retyped and/or edited by me. I will reveal the
    correct answers in about 3 days.

    For further information, including an explanation of the """ notation
    that may appear in these rounds, see my 2021-07-20 companion posting
    on "Reposted Questions from the Canadian Inquisition (RQFTCI*)".


    * Game 7, Round 4 - History - Whistleblowers, or "You Can't Handle the Truth!"

    1. At the CIA's request, this diplomat went to Niger and discovered
    that Saddam Hussein likely hadn't bought yellowcake uranium from
    there. Displeased, the US Administration suppressed the report.
    Undeterred, the diplomat published it in the "New York Times".
    Miffed, the administration exposed his wife as a CIA operative.
    Name either the diplomat or his wife.

    2. Which US private was arrested in May 2010 for passing classified
    documents to Wikileaks?

    3. A military analyst working with the US State Department,
    Daniel Ellsberg released classified documents to the "New York
    Times" in 1969, demonstrating that the Johnson administration
    had systematically lied to the public and to Congress about
    the Vietnam War. What are these documents called?

    4. In 2004, Sgt. Joe Darby provided a disk of photos and an
    anonymous note to Army Criminal Investigations, exposing
    violations of the Geneva Convention, including torture and
    abuse -- at *which Iraqi prison*?

    5. Mark Felt came out of the whistleblower's closet in 2005,
    30 years after leaking secrets about Nixon's involvement in
    the Watergate scandal. In that context, how was he better known?

    6. Mordechai Vanunu was a nuclear technician who revealed details
    of his country's clandestine nuclear weapons program in 1986.
    He was arrested and spent 18 years in prison, 11 of them in
    solitary. Which country did he tattle on?

    7. He said he'd repeatedly informed senior officials of the
    potential torture of prisoners once they'd been handed over to
    Afghani authorities; the officials denied ever knowing about it.
    During an inquiry in 2007 into Canadian military actions,
    he was the only witness to come forward despite threatening
    letters from the Dept of Justice. What """is""" his name?

    8. She was Canada's first Integrity Commissioner, a position
    created by the Harper government to protect whistleblowers in the
    public sector -- they said. In 3 years, her office investigated
    a whopping 5 out of 228 complaints -- and remarkably, found
    no cases of wrongdoing. Amidst allegations of negligence,
    harassment, and retaliation against staff, she resigned """last
    fall""" with a $400,000 severance package. What """is"""
    her name?

    9. He was the first New York City cop to speak out about corruption
    in the department. In 1970, he contributed to a front-page story
    in the New York Times that led to a commission to investigate
    the allegations. He survived a gunshot wound to the face, and
    eventually retired to northern New York State. Who """is""" he?

    10. This union activist was a chemical technician in Oklahoma,
    making plutonium pellets for nuclear fuel rods. Before going
    public about dangerous mishandling of contaminants, she was
    killed in a collision. Name her.


    * Game 7, Round 6 - Science - Viniculture

    For each question, select from the following list the wine grape
    that best fits the clue. Answers will not repeat.

    | Aligotť | GewŁrztraminer | Sauvignon Blanc
    | Cabernet Franc | Grenache | Sťmillon
    | Cabernet Sauvignon | Merlot | Sylvaner
    | Chardonnay | MourvŤdre | Syrah
    | Chasselas | Muscadelle | Ugni Blanc
    | Chenin | Pinot Noir | Viognier
    | Gamay | Riesling

    1. The basic grape for Cognac and Armagnac. Also known as
    Trebbiano, and used under that name in many Italian white wines.

    2. The white grape predominant in Bordeaux. Grown also in the
    Loire Valley, where, for example, it is used in Pouilly-Fumť.

    3. White wine, Rhone Valley grape, used to make Condrieu.

    4. Known as a temperamental grape, sensitive to many diseases.
    The dominant red-wine grape of Burgundy. Germany is its second
    home, where it is known as Spštburgunder.

    5. In France found almost exclusively in Alsace. Dominant in
    Rhine and Mosel wines; used to make ice wine as well. Known also
    as Johannisberg, after Schloss Johannisberg in Germany.

    6. Great white wine grape of Burgundy; used to make Pouilly-Fuissť;
    also used for Champagne.

    7. In France, cultivated mainly in the northern Rhone area.
    Among competing theories of its origin: a crusader brought it
    back from Iran (Persia).

    8. Dominant grape used in Mťdoc; around the world, the most
    widespread red wine grape after Merlot.

    9. This white wine grape goes by the name Fendant in Switzerland,
    where it covers 30% of the country's vineyards.

    10. The predominant grape in Ch‚teauneuf-du-Pape. Used also in
    Tavel Rosť. It ripens late, so it needs hot, dry conditions such
    as those found in Spain, the south of France, and California's
    San Joaquin Valley.

    --
    Mark Brader | "Oh, especially if it's accurate. There's nothing worse Toronto | than *accurate*, ill-informed, irresponsible press msb@vex.net | speculation." -- Lynn & Jay: "Yes, Prime Minister"

    My text in this article is in the public domain.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Joshua Kreitzer@21:1/5 to Mark Brader on Thu Oct 7 22:06:24 2021
    On Thursday, October 7, 2021 at 10:57:23 PM UTC-5, Mark Brader wrote:

    * Game 7, Round 4 - History - Whistleblowers, or "You Can't Handle the Truth!"

    2. Which US private was arrested in May 2010 for passing classified documents to Wikileaks?

    Manning

    3. A military analyst working with the US State Department,
    Daniel Ellsberg released classified documents to the "New York
    Times" in 1969, demonstrating that the Johnson administration
    had systematically lied to the public and to Congress about
    the Vietnam War. What are these documents called?

    The Pentagon Papers

    4. In 2004, Sgt. Joe Darby provided a disk of photos and an
    anonymous note to Army Criminal Investigations, exposing
    violations of the Geneva Convention, including torture and
    abuse -- at *which Iraqi prison*?

    Abu Ghraib

    5. Mark Felt came out of the whistleblower's closet in 2005,
    30 years after leaking secrets about Nixon's involvement in
    the Watergate scandal. In that context, how was he better known?

    Deep Throat

    6. Mordechai Vanunu was a nuclear technician who revealed details
    of his country's clandestine nuclear weapons program in 1986.
    He was arrested and spent 18 years in prison, 11 of them in
    solitary. Which country did he tattle on?

    Israel

    9. He was the first New York City cop to speak out about corruption
    in the department. In 1970, he contributed to a front-page story
    in the New York Times that led to a commission to investigate
    the allegations. He survived a gunshot wound to the face, and
    eventually retired to northern New York State. Who """is""" he?

    Serpico

    10. This union activist was a chemical technician in Oklahoma,
    making plutonium pellets for nuclear fuel rods. Before going
    public about dangerous mishandling of contaminants, she was
    killed in a collision. Name her.

    Silkwood

    * Game 7, Round 6 - Science - Viniculture

    For each question, select from the following list the wine grape
    that best fits the clue. Answers will not repeat.

    | Aligot√© | Gew√ľrztraminer | Sauvignon Blanc
    | Cabernet Franc | Grenache | Sémillon
    | Cabernet Sauvignon | Merlot | Sylvaner
    | Chardonnay | Mourvèdre | Syrah
    | Chasselas | Muscadelle | Ugni Blanc
    | Chenin | Pinot Noir | Viognier
    | Gamay | Riesling

    1. The basic grape for Cognac and Armagnac. Also known as
    Trebbiano, and used under that name in many Italian white wines.

    Viognier; Grenache

    2. The white grape predominant in Bordeaux. Grown also in the
    Loire Valley, where, for example, it is used in Pouilly-Fumé.

    Sylvaner; Sauvignon Blanc

    3. White wine, Rhone Valley grape, used to make Condrieu.

    Aligoté; Chenin

    4. Known as a temperamental grape, sensitive to many diseases.
    The dominant red-wine grape of Burgundy. Germany is its second
    home, where it is known as Spätburgunder.

    Sémillon; Mourvèdre

    5. In France found almost exclusively in Alsace. Dominant in
    Rhine and Mosel wines; used to make ice wine as well. Known also
    as Johannisberg, after Schloss Johannisberg in Germany.

    Muscadelle; Chasselas

    6. Great white wine grape of Burgundy; used to make Pouilly-Fuissé;
    also used for Champagne.

    Viognier; Grenache

    7. In France, cultivated mainly in the northern Rhone area.
    Among competing theories of its origin: a crusader brought it
    back from Iran (Persia).

    Syrah

    8. Dominant grape used in Médoc; around the world, the most
    widespread red wine grape after Merlot.

    Chardonnay

    9. This white wine grape goes by the name Fendant in Switzerland,
    where it covers 30% of the country's vineyards.

    Ugni Blanc; Sauvignon Blanc

    10. The predominant grape in Ch√Ęteauneuf-du-Pape. Used also in
    Tavel Rosé. It ripens late, so it needs hot, dry conditions such
    as those found in Spain, the south of France, and California's
    San Joaquin Valley.

    Cabernet Sauvignon; Merlot

    --
    Joshua Kreitzer
    gromit82@hotmail.com

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Dan Tilque@21:1/5 to Mark Brader on Sat Oct 9 00:00:23 2021
    On 10/7/21 8:57 PM, Mark Brader wrote:


    * Game 7, Round 4 - History - Whistleblowers, or "You Can't Handle the Truth!"

    1. At the CIA's request, this diplomat went to Niger and discovered
    that Saddam Hussein likely hadn't bought yellowcake uranium from
    there. Displeased, the US Administration suppressed the report.
    Undeterred, the diplomat published it in the "New York Times".
    Miffed, the administration exposed his wife as a CIA operative.
    Name either the diplomat or his wife.

    Plame


    2. Which US private was arrested in May 2010 for passing classified
    documents to Wikileaks?

    Snowden


    3. A military analyst working with the US State Department,
    Daniel Ellsberg released classified documents to the "New York
    Times" in 1969, demonstrating that the Johnson administration
    had systematically lied to the public and to Congress about
    the Vietnam War. What are these documents called?

    Pentagon Papers


    4. In 2004, Sgt. Joe Darby provided a disk of photos and an
    anonymous note to Army Criminal Investigations, exposing
    violations of the Geneva Convention, including torture and
    abuse -- at *which Iraqi prison*?

    Abu Ghraib


    5. Mark Felt came out of the whistleblower's closet in 2005,
    30 years after leaking secrets about Nixon's involvement in
    the Watergate scandal. In that context, how was he better known?

    Deep Throat


    6. Mordechai Vanunu was a nuclear technician who revealed details
    of his country's clandestine nuclear weapons program in 1986.
    He was arrested and spent 18 years in prison, 11 of them in
    solitary. Which country did he tattle on?

    Israel


    7. He said he'd repeatedly informed senior officials of the
    potential torture of prisoners once they'd been handed over to
    Afghani authorities; the officials denied ever knowing about it.
    During an inquiry in 2007 into Canadian military actions,
    he was the only witness to come forward despite threatening
    letters from the Dept of Justice. What """is""" his name?

    8. She was Canada's first Integrity Commissioner, a position
    created by the Harper government to protect whistleblowers in the
    public sector -- they said. In 3 years, her office investigated
    a whopping 5 out of 228 complaints -- and remarkably, found
    no cases of wrongdoing. Amidst allegations of negligence,
    harassment, and retaliation against staff, she resigned """last
    fall""" with a $400,000 severance package. What """is"""
    her name?

    9. He was the first New York City cop to speak out about corruption
    in the department. In 1970, he contributed to a front-page story
    in the New York Times that led to a commission to investigate
    the allegations. He survived a gunshot wound to the face, and
    eventually retired to northern New York State. Who """is""" he?

    10. This union activist was a chemical technician in Oklahoma,
    making plutonium pellets for nuclear fuel rods. Before going
    public about dangerous mishandling of contaminants, she was
    killed in a collision. Name her.


    * Game 7, Round 6 - Science - Viniculture

    For each question, select from the following list the wine grape
    that best fits the clue. Answers will not repeat.

    | Aligot√© | Gew√ľrztraminer | Sauvignon Blanc
    | Cabernet Franc | Grenache | Sémillon
    | Cabernet Sauvignon | Merlot | Sylvaner
    | Chardonnay | Mourvèdre | Syrah
    | Chasselas | Muscadelle | Ugni Blanc
    | Chenin | Pinot Noir | Viognier
    | Gamay | Riesling

    1. The basic grape for Cognac and Armagnac. Also known as
    Trebbiano, and used under that name in many Italian white wines.

    2. The white grape predominant in Bordeaux. Grown also in the
    Loire Valley, where, for example, it is used in Pouilly-Fumé.

    pinot noir


    3. White wine, Rhone Valley grape, used to make Condrieu.

    4. Known as a temperamental grape, sensitive to many diseases.
    The dominant red-wine grape of Burgundy. Germany is its second
    home, where it is known as Spätburgunder.

    syrah


    5. In France found almost exclusively in Alsace. Dominant in
    Rhine and Mosel wines; used to make ice wine as well. Known also
    as Johannisberg, after Schloss Johannisberg in Germany.

    Riesling


    6. Great white wine grape of Burgundy; used to make Pouilly-Fuissé;
    also used for Champagne.

    chardonnay


    7. In France, cultivated mainly in the northern Rhone area.
    Among competing theories of its origin: a crusader brought it
    back from Iran (Persia).

    8. Dominant grape used in Médoc; around the world, the most
    widespread red wine grape after Merlot.

    cabernet sauvignon


    9. This white wine grape goes by the name Fendant in Switzerland,
    where it covers 30% of the country's vineyards.

    10. The predominant grape in Ch√Ęteauneuf-du-Pape. Used also in
    Tavel Rosé. It ripens late, so it needs hot, dry conditions such
    as those found in Spain, the south of France, and California's
    San Joaquin Valley.


    --
    Dan Tilque

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Dan Blum@21:1/5 to Mark Brader on Sat Oct 9 13:05:25 2021
    Mark Brader <msb@vex.net> wrote:

    * Game 7, Round 4 - History - Whistleblowers, or "You Can't Handle the Truth!"

    1. At the CIA's request, this diplomat went to Niger and discovered
    that Saddam Hussein likely hadn't bought yellowcake uranium from
    there. Displeased, the US Administration suppressed the report.
    Undeterred, the diplomat published it in the "New York Times".
    Miffed, the administration exposed his wife as a CIA operative.
    Name either the diplomat or his wife.

    Wilson

    2. Which US private was arrested in May 2010 for passing classified
    documents to Wikileaks?

    Manning

    3. A military analyst working with the US State Department,
    Daniel Ellsberg released classified documents to the "New York
    Times" in 1969, demonstrating that the Johnson administration
    had systematically lied to the public and to Congress about
    the Vietnam War. What are these documents called?

    Pentagon Papers

    4. In 2004, Sgt. Joe Darby provided a disk of photos and an
    anonymous note to Army Criminal Investigations, exposing
    violations of the Geneva Convention, including torture and
    abuse -- at *which Iraqi prison*?

    Abu Ghraib

    5. Mark Felt came out of the whistleblower's closet in 2005,
    30 years after leaking secrets about Nixon's involvement in
    the Watergate scandal. In that context, how was he better known?

    Deep Throat

    6. Mordechai Vanunu was a nuclear technician who revealed details
    of his country's clandestine nuclear weapons program in 1986.
    He was arrested and spent 18 years in prison, 11 of them in
    solitary. Which country did he tattle on?

    Israel

    9. He was the first New York City cop to speak out about corruption
    in the department. In 1970, he contributed to a front-page story
    in the New York Times that led to a commission to investigate
    the allegations. He survived a gunshot wound to the face, and
    eventually retired to northern New York State. Who """is""" he?

    Serpico

    10. This union activist was a chemical technician in Oklahoma,
    making plutonium pellets for nuclear fuel rods. Before going
    public about dangerous mishandling of contaminants, she was
    killed in a collision. Name her.

    Silkwood

    * Game 7, Round 6 - Science - Viniculture

    For each question, select from the following list the wine grape
    that best fits the clue. Answers will not repeat.

    | Aligot? | Gew?rztraminer | Sauvignon Blanc
    | Cabernet Franc | Grenache | S?millon
    | Cabernet Sauvignon | Merlot | Sylvaner
    | Chardonnay | Mourv?dre | Syrah
    | Chasselas | Muscadelle | Ugni Blanc
    | Chenin | Pinot Noir | Viognier
    | Gamay | Riesling

    1. The basic grape for Cognac and Armagnac. Also known as
    Trebbiano, and used under that name in many Italian white wines.

    Sauvignon Blanc; Ugni Blanc

    2. The white grape predominant in Bordeaux. Grown also in the
    Loire Valley, where, for example, it is used in Pouilly-Fum?.

    Chardonnay; Sauvignon Blanc

    3. White wine, Rhone Valley grape, used to make Condrieu.

    Riesling; Ugni Blanc

    4. Known as a temperamental grape, sensitive to many diseases.
    The dominant red-wine grape of Burgundy. Germany is its second
    home, where it is known as Sp?tburgunder.

    Cabernet Sauvignon; Merlot

    5. In France found almost exclusively in Alsace. Dominant in
    Rhine and Mosel wines; used to make ice wine as well. Known also
    as Johannisberg, after Schloss Johannisberg in Germany.

    Gewuerztraminer

    6. Great white wine grape of Burgundy; used to make Pouilly-Fuiss?;
    also used for Champagne.

    Viognier; Chardonnay

    7. In France, cultivated mainly in the northern Rhone area.
    Among competing theories of its origin: a crusader brought it
    back from Iran (Persia).

    Syrah

    8. Dominant grape used in M?doc; around the world, the most
    widespread red wine grape after Merlot.

    Pinot Noir; Cabernet Sauvignon

    9. This white wine grape goes by the name Fendant in Switzerland,
    where it covers 30% of the country's vineyards.

    Chenin; Gamay

    10. The predominant grape in Ch?teauneuf-du-Pape. Used also in
    Tavel Ros?. It ripens late, so it needs hot, dry conditions such
    as those found in Spain, the south of France, and California's
    San Joaquin Valley.

    Chasselas; Gamay

    --
    _______________________________________________________________________
    Dan Blum tool@panix.com
    "I wouldn't have believed it myself if I hadn't just made it up."

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Erland Sommarskog@21:1/5 to Mark Brader on Sun Oct 10 00:09:50 2021
    Mark Brader (msb@vex.net) writes:
    * Game 7, Round 4 - History - Whistleblowers, or "You Can't Handle the
    Truth!"

    2. Which US private was arrested in May 2010 for passing classified
    documents to Wikileaks?

    Manning

    3. A military analyst working with the US State Department,
    Daniel Ellsberg released classified documents to the "New York
    Times" in 1969, demonstrating that the Johnson administration
    had systematically lied to the public and to Congress about
    the Vietnam War. What are these documents called?

    The Pentagon Papers

    5. Mark Felt came out of the whistleblower's closet in 2005,
    30 years after leaking secrets about Nixon's involvement in
    the Watergate scandal. In that context, how was he better known?

    Deep Throad

    6. Mordechai Vanunu was a nuclear technician who revealed details
    of his country's clandestine nuclear weapons program in 1986.
    He was arrested and spent 18 years in prison, 11 of them in
    solitary. Which country did he tattle on?

    Israel

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Pete Gayde@21:1/5 to Mark Brader on Sun Oct 10 21:26:33 2021
    Mark Brader wrote:
    These questions were written to be asked in Toronto on 2011-06-27,
    and should be interpreted accordingly. All questions were written
    by members of the Misplaced Modifiers, but have been reformatted
    and may have been retyped and/or edited by me. I will reveal the
    correct answers in about 3 days.

    For further information, including an explanation of the """ notation
    that may appear in these rounds, see my 2021-07-20 companion posting
    on "Reposted Questions from the Canadian Inquisition (RQFTCI*)".


    * Game 7, Round 4 - History - Whistleblowers, or "You Can't Handle the Truth!"

    1. At the CIA's request, this diplomat went to Niger and discovered
    that Saddam Hussein likely hadn't bought yellowcake uranium from
    there. Displeased, the US Administration suppressed the report.
    Undeterred, the diplomat published it in the "New York Times".
    Miffed, the administration exposed his wife as a CIA operative.
    Name either the diplomat or his wife.

    Plame


    2. Which US private was arrested in May 2010 for passing classified
    documents to Wikileaks?

    Manning


    3. A military analyst working with the US State Department,
    Daniel Ellsberg released classified documents to the "New York
    Times" in 1969, demonstrating that the Johnson administration
    had systematically lied to the public and to Congress about
    the Vietnam War. What are these documents called?

    Pentagon Papers


    4. In 2004, Sgt. Joe Darby provided a disk of photos and an
    anonymous note to Army Criminal Investigations, exposing
    violations of the Geneva Convention, including torture and
    abuse -- at *which Iraqi prison*?

    Abu Ghraib


    5. Mark Felt came out of the whistleblower's closet in 2005,
    30 years after leaking secrets about Nixon's involvement in
    the Watergate scandal. In that context, how was he better known?

    Deep Throat


    6. Mordechai Vanunu was a nuclear technician who revealed details
    of his country's clandestine nuclear weapons program in 1986.
    He was arrested and spent 18 years in prison, 11 of them in
    solitary. Which country did he tattle on?

    Israel


    7. He said he'd repeatedly informed senior officials of the
    potential torture of prisoners once they'd been handed over to
    Afghani authorities; the officials denied ever knowing about it.
    During an inquiry in 2007 into Canadian military actions,
    he was the only witness to come forward despite threatening
    letters from the Dept of Justice. What """is""" his name?

    8. She was Canada's first Integrity Commissioner, a position
    created by the Harper government to protect whistleblowers in the
    public sector -- they said. In 3 years, her office investigated
    a whopping 5 out of 228 complaints -- and remarkably, found
    no cases of wrongdoing. Amidst allegations of negligence,
    harassment, and retaliation against staff, she resigned """last
    fall""" with a $400,000 severance package. What """is"""
    her name?

    9. He was the first New York City cop to speak out about corruption
    in the department. In 1970, he contributed to a front-page story
    in the New York Times that led to a commission to investigate
    the allegations. He survived a gunshot wound to the face, and
    eventually retired to northern New York State. Who """is""" he?

    Serpico


    10. This union activist was a chemical technician in Oklahoma,
    making plutonium pellets for nuclear fuel rods. Before going
    public about dangerous mishandling of contaminants, she was
    killed in a collision. Name her.


    * Game 7, Round 6 - Science - Viniculture

    For each question, select from the following list the wine grape
    that best fits the clue. Answers will not repeat.

    | Aligot√© | Gew√ľrztraminer | Sauvignon Blanc
    | Cabernet Franc | Grenache | Sémillon
    | Cabernet Sauvignon | Merlot | Sylvaner
    | Chardonnay | Mourvèdre | Syrah
    | Chasselas | Muscadelle | Ugni Blanc
    | Chenin | Pinot Noir | Viognier
    | Gamay | Riesling

    1. The basic grape for Cognac and Armagnac. Also known as
    Trebbiano, and used under that name in many Italian white wines.

    Mourvèdre


    2. The white grape predominant in Bordeaux. Grown also in the
    Loire Valley, where, for example, it is used in Pouilly-Fumé.

    Chardonnay; Sauvignon Blanc


    3. White wine, Rhone Valley grape, used to make Condrieu.

    Chardonnay; Sauvignon Blanc


    4. Known as a temperamental grape, sensitive to many diseases.
    The dominant red-wine grape of Burgundy. Germany is its second
    home, where it is known as Spätburgunder.

    Merlot


    5. In France found almost exclusively in Alsace. Dominant in
    Rhine and Mosel wines; used to make ice wine as well. Known also
    as Johannisberg, after Schloss Johannisberg in Germany.

    Riesling


    6. Great white wine grape of Burgundy; used to make Pouilly-Fuissé;
    also used for Champagne.

    Chenin; Chardonnay


    7. In France, cultivated mainly in the northern Rhone area.
    Among competing theories of its origin: a crusader brought it
    back from Iran (Persia).

    Syrah


    8. Dominant grape used in Médoc; around the world, the most
    widespread red wine grape after Merlot.

    Cabernet Sauvignon


    9. This white wine grape goes by the name Fendant in Switzerland,
    where it covers 30% of the country's vineyards.

    Sylvaner


    10. The predominant grape in Ch√Ęteauneuf-du-Pape. Used also in
    Tavel Rosé. It ripens late, so it needs hot, dry conditions such
    as those found in Spain, the south of France, and California's
    San Joaquin Valley.

    Sauvignon Blanc



    Pete Gayde

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Mark Brader@21:1/5 to All on Mon Oct 11 00:34:27 2021
    Mark Brader:
    These questions were written to be asked in Toronto on 2011-06-27,
    and should be interpreted accordingly... For further information...
    see my 2021-07-20 companion posting on "Reposted Questions from
    the Canadian Inquisition (RQFTCI*)".


    * Game 7, Round 4 - History - Whistleblowers, or "You Can't Handle the Truth!"

    1. At the CIA's request, this diplomat went to Niger and discovered
    that Saddam Hussein likely hadn't bought yellowcake uranium from
    there. Displeased, the US Administration suppressed the report.
    Undeterred, the diplomat published it in the "New York Times".
    Miffed, the administration exposed his wife as a CIA operative.
    Name either the diplomat or his wife.

    Joseph Wilson, Valerie Plame. 4 for Dan Tilque, Dan Blum, and Pete.

    2. Which US private was arrested in May 2010 for passing classified
    documents to Wikileaks?

    2011 answer: Bradley Manning. 2021 answer: Chelsea Manning.
    4 for Joshua, Dan Blum, Erland, and Pete.

    3. A military analyst working with the US State Department,
    Daniel Ellsberg released classified documents to the "New York
    Times" in 1969, demonstrating that the Johnson administration
    had systematically lied to the public and to Congress about
    the Vietnam War. What are these documents called?

    The Pentagon Papers. 4 for everyone -- Joshua, Dan Tilque, Dan Blum,
    Erland, and Pete.

    4. In 2004, Sgt. Joe Darby provided a disk of photos and an
    anonymous note to Army Criminal Investigations, exposing
    violations of the Geneva Convention, including torture and
    abuse -- at *which Iraqi prison*?

    Abu Ghraib. 4 for Joshua, Dan Tilque, Dan Blum, and Pete.

    5. Mark Felt came out of the whistleblower's closet in 2005,
    30 years after leaking secrets about Nixon's involvement in
    the Watergate scandal. In that context, how was he better known?

    "Deep Throat". 4 for everyone.

    6. Mordechai Vanunu was a nuclear technician who revealed details
    of his country's clandestine nuclear weapons program in 1986.
    He was arrested and spent 18 years in prison, 11 of them in
    solitary. Which country did he tattle on?

    Israel. 4 for everyone.

    7. He said he'd repeatedly informed senior officials of the
    potential torture of prisoners once they'd been handed over to
    Afghani authorities; the officials denied ever knowing about it.
    During an inquiry in 2007 into Canadian military actions,
    he was the only witness to come forward despite threatening
    letters from the Dept of Justice. What """is""" his name?

    Richard Colvin. (Still alive.)

    8. She was Canada's first Integrity Commissioner, a position
    created by the Harper government to protect whistleblowers in the
    public sector -- they said. In 3 years, her office investigated
    a whopping 5 out of 228 complaints -- and remarkably, found
    no cases of wrongdoing. Amidst allegations of negligence,
    harassment, and retaliation against staff, she resigned """last
    fall""" with a $400,000 severance package. What """is"""
    her name?

    Christiane Ouimet. (Still alive as far as I can tell.)

    9. He was the first New York City cop to speak out about corruption
    in the department. In 1970, he contributed to a front-page story
    in the New York Times that led to a commission to investigate
    the allegations. He survived a gunshot wound to the face, and
    eventually retired to northern New York State. Who """is""" he?

    Frank Serpico. (Still alive.) 4 for Joshua, Dan Blum, and Pete.

    10. This union activist was a chemical technician in Oklahoma,
    making plutonium pellets for nuclear fuel rods. Before going
    public about dangerous mishandling of contaminants, she was
    killed in a collision. Name her.

    Karen Silkwood. 4 for Joshua and Dan Blum.


    * Game 7, Round 6 - Science - Viniculture

    For each question, select from the following list the wine grape
    that best fits the clue. Answers will not repeat.

    This was the hardest round in the original game.

    | Aligotť | GewŁrztraminer | Sauvignon Blanc
    | Cabernet Franc | Grenache | Sťmillon
    | Cabernet Sauvignon | Merlot | Sylvaner
    | Chardonnay | MourvŤdre | Syrah
    | Chasselas | Muscadelle | Ugni Blanc
    | Chenin | Pinot Noir | Viognier
    | Gamay | Riesling

    1. The basic grape for Cognac and Armagnac. Also known as
    Trebbiano, and used under that name in many Italian white wines.

    Ugni Blanc. 2 for Dan Blum.

    2. The white grape predominant in Bordeaux. Grown also in the
    Loire Valley, where, for example, it is used in Pouilly-Fumť.

    Sauvignon Blanc. 2 for Joshua, Dan Blum, and Pete.

    3. White wine, Rhone Valley grape, used to make Condrieu.

    Viognier.

    4. Known as a temperamental grape, sensitive to many diseases.
    The dominant red-wine grape of Burgundy. Germany is its second
    home, where it is known as Spštburgunder.

    Pinot Noir.

    5. In France found almost exclusively in Alsace. Dominant in
    Rhine and Mosel wines; used to make ice wine as well. Known also
    as Johannisberg, after Schloss Johannisberg in Germany.

    Riesling. 4 for Dan Tilque and Pete.

    6. Great white wine grape of Burgundy; used to make Pouilly-Fuissť;
    also used for Champagne.

    Chardonnay. 4 for Dan Tilque. 2 for Dan Blum and Pete.

    7. In France, cultivated mainly in the northern Rhone area.
    Among competing theories of its origin: a crusader brought it
    back from Iran (Persia).

    Syrah. 4 for Joshua, Dan Blum, and Pete.

    8. Dominant grape used in Mťdoc; around the world, the most
    widespread red wine grape after Merlot.

    Cabernet Sauvignon. 4 for Dan Tilque and Pete. 2 for Dan Blum.

    9. This white wine grape goes by the name Fendant in Switzerland,
    where it covers 30% of the country's vineyards.

    Chasselas.

    10. The predominant grape in Ch‚teauneuf-du-Pape. Used also in
    Tavel Rosť. It ripens late, so it needs hot, dry conditions such
    as those found in Spain, the south of France, and California's
    San Joaquin Valley.

    Grenache.


    Scores, if there are no errors:

    GAME 7 ROUNDS-> 2 3 4 6 TOTALS
    TOPICS-> Ent Geo His Sci
    Pete Gayde 11 34 28 16 89
    Joshua Kreitzer 32 22 28 6 88
    Dan Blum 12 21 32 12 77
    Dan Tilque 12 16 20 12 60
    Erland Sommarskog 0 36 16 0 52

    --
    Mark Brader, Toronto | "One thing that surprises you about this business msb@vex.net | is the surprises." -- Tim Baker

    My text in this article is in the public domain.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)