• Happy palindrome day!

    From Keith F. Lynch@21:1/5 to All on Fri Dec 3 03:58:24 2021
    Today is (in American notation) 12/02/2021, a palindrome.

    The last such day was about a decade ago, 11/02/2011.

    When will the next such day be?
    --
    Keith F. Lynch - http://keithlynch.net/
    Please see http://keithlynch.net/email.html before emailing me.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Robert Woodward@21:1/5 to Keith F. Lynch on Thu Dec 2 21:51:25 2021
    In article <soc4l0$b30$1@reader1.panix.com>,
    "Keith F. Lynch" <kfl@KeithLynch.net> wrote:

    Today is (in American notation) 12/02/2021, a palindrome.

    The last such day was about a decade ago, 11/02/2011.

    When will the next such day be?

    I offer March 2, 2030 (03/02/2030)

    --
    "We have advanced to new and surprising levels of bafflement."
    Imperial Auditor Miles Vorkosigan describes progress in _Komarr_. -----------------------------------------------------
    Robert Woodward robertaw@drizzle.com

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Charles Packer@21:1/5 to Keith F. Lynch on Fri Dec 3 08:41:50 2021
    On Fri, 03 Dec 2021 03:58:24 +0000, Keith F. Lynch wrote:

    Today is (in American notation) 12/02/2021, a palindrome.

    The last such day was about a decade ago, 11/02/2011.

    When will the next such day be?

    Up until the turn of this century, the year was universally
    notated by two digits. To my knowledge, the calendar police
    haven't succeeded in getting the world to go four. Where is
    the pope when you really need one? So...2/2/22 still looms.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Andy Leighton@21:1/5 to Keith F. Lynch on Fri Dec 3 04:05:44 2021
    On Fri, 3 Dec 2021 03:58:24 -0000 (UTC),
    Keith F. Lynch <kfl@KeithLynch.net> wrote:
    Today is (in American notation) 12/02/2021, a palindrome.

    The last such day was about a decade ago, 11/02/2011.

    Also for us ISO date users. 2021-02-12.

    Also if you are still using 7 segment LCDs (are equivalent
    typeface) it is an ambigram (it is the same date if read
    upside-down).

    Probably still not as cool as the 2nd Feb 2020 - which was
    a palindrome in US, UK and ISO notations. The day of the
    year was a palindrome and the number of days left in the year
    was also a palindrome.

    --
    Andy Leighton => andyl@azaal.plus.com
    "We demand rigidly defined areas of doubt and uncertainty!"
    - Douglas Adams

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Paul Dormer@21:1/5 to Packer on Fri Dec 3 12:41:00 2021
    In article <iLkqJ.82154$aF1.16949@fx98.iad>, mailbox@cpacker.org (Charles Packer) wrote:


    Up until the turn of this century, the year was universally
    notated by two digits. To my knowledge, the calendar police
    haven't succeeded in getting the world to go four. Where is
    the pope when you really need one? So...2/2/22 still looms.

    In the UK, cheque books are printed with the first two digits of the year already there. OK, I think they stopped this for a while just before the millennium but I certainly have cheques with 20 in the date field.

    Of course, nobody uses cheques any more. :-)

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  • From Gary R. Schmidt@21:1/5 to Charles Packer on Sat Dec 4 00:33:52 2021
    On 03/12/2021 19:41, Charles Packer wrote:
    On Fri, 03 Dec 2021 03:58:24 +0000, Keith F. Lynch wrote:

    Today is (in American notation) 12/02/2021, a palindrome.

    The last such day was about a decade ago, 11/02/2011.

    When will the next such day be?

    Up until the turn of this century, the year was universally
    notated by two digits.
    Not "universal". Perhaps true where you live, but most definitely not universal.

    I have family documents that are hand-dated 18xx, and some forms which
    are printed with "18__", with the appropriate value filled-in over the "__".

    Cheers,
    Gary B-)

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  • From Keith F. Lynch@21:1/5 to Gary R. Schmidt on Sat Dec 4 21:36:57 2021
    Gary R. Schmidt <grschmidt@acm.org> wrote:
    Charles Packer wrote:
    Up until the turn of this century, the year was universally notated
    by two digits.

    Not "universal". Perhaps true where you live, but most definitely
    not universal.

    I have family documents that are hand-dated 18xx, and some forms
    which are printed with "18__", with the appropriate value filled-in
    over the "__".

    I have a book in which a previous owner wrote the current date in
    standard American form, with a two-digit year, 61. This is annoying,
    as I don't know whether that means 1861 or 1961. The book is old
    enough that it could be either. And the date is definitely not
    written with a ball-point or felt-tip pen, which would of course
    rule out the former.

    Some future owner may wonder if it was 2061. Or 2161.
    --
    Keith F. Lynch - http://keithlynch.net/
    Please see http://keithlynch.net/email.html before emailing me.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Keith F. Lynch@21:1/5 to Andy Leighton on Sat Dec 4 21:46:11 2021
    Andy Leighton <andyl@azaal.plus.com> wrote:
    Also for us ISO date users. 2021-02-12.

    Not a palindrome.

    Probably still not as cool as the 2nd Feb 2020 - which was a
    palindrome in US, UK and ISO notations. The day of the year was
    a palindrome and the number of days left in the year was also a
    palindrome.

    I don't count leading zeros.

    A few years ago, I searched for numbers that are palindromes in both
    binary and ternary, using an algorithm I invented which has since been
    used to find the majority of known dual palindromes. One I discovered
    was 8022581057533823761829436662099. The smallest (already known) are
    1 and 6643.

    It would be a much larger list if leading zeroes were allowed. For
    instance 6 is 0110 in binary and 020 in ternary.
    --
    Keith F. Lynch - http://keithlynch.net/
    Please see http://keithlynch.net/email.html before emailing me.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Keith F. Lynch@21:1/5 to Robert Woodward on Sat Dec 4 21:48:14 2021
    Robert Woodward <robertaw@drizzle.com> wrote:
    "Keith F. Lynch" <kfl@KeithLynch.net> wrote:
    Today is (in American notation) 12/02/2021, a palindrome.
    The last such day was about a decade ago, 11/02/2011.
    When will the next such day be?

    I offer March 2, 2030 (03/02/2030)

    When will the next such day be if leading zeroes aren't allowed?
    --
    Keith F. Lynch - http://keithlynch.net/
    Please see http://keithlynch.net/email.html before emailing me.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Andy Leighton@21:1/5 to Keith F. Lynch on Sat Dec 4 18:51:24 2021
    On Sat, 4 Dec 2021 21:46:11 -0000 (UTC),
    Keith F. Lynch <kfl@KeithLynch.net> wrote:
    Andy Leighton <andyl@azaal.plus.com> wrote:
    Also for us ISO date users. 2021-02-12.

    Not a palindrome.

    Because I messed up typing the date 2021-12-02 is the ISO format.

    --
    Andy Leighton => andyl@azaal.plus.com
    "We demand rigidly defined areas of doubt and uncertainty!"
    - Douglas Adams

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  • From Rink@21:1/5 to All on Fri Jan 7 17:57:55 2022
    Op 3-12-2021 om 4:58 schreef Keith F. Lynch:
    Today is (in American notation) 12/02/2021, a palindrome.

    The last such day was about a decade ago, 11/02/2011.

    When will the next such day be?


    I think the last one was :

    21/02/2012 ?

    (in your american notation)

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  • From Gary McGath@21:1/5 to Rink on Fri Jan 7 15:58:09 2022
    On 1/7/22 11:57 AM, Rink wrote:
    Op 3-12-2021 om 4:58 schreef Keith F. Lynch:
    Today is (in American notation) 12/02/2021, a palindrome.

    The last such day was about a decade ago, 11/02/2011.

    When will the next such day be?


    I think the last one was :

    21/02/2012  ?

    (in your american notation)

    American notation is MM/DD/YYYY. 21/02/2012 isn't a valid date in that notation.

    --
    Gary McGath http://www.mcgath.com

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  • From Tim Merrigan@21:1/5 to garym@REMOVEmcgathREMOVE.com on Fri Jan 7 14:03:18 2022
    On Fri, 7 Jan 2022 15:58:09 -0500, Gary McGath
    <garym@REMOVEmcgathREMOVE.com> wrote:

    On 1/7/22 11:57 AM, Rink wrote:
    Op 3-12-2021 om 4:58 schreef Keith F. Lynch:
    Today is (in American notation) 12/02/2021, a palindrome.

    The last such day was about a decade ago, 11/02/2011.

    When will the next such day be?


    I think the last one was :

    21/02/2012 ?

    (in your american notation)

    American notation is MM/DD/YYYY. 21/02/2012 isn't a valid date in that >notation.

    That would be European/British notation (21 February 2012).

    The next will be 22-02-2022 or 2-20-2022, depending on your notation
    style.
    --

    Qualified immuninity = virtual impunity.

    Tim Merrigan

    --
    This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
    https://www.avg.com

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  • From Keith F. Lynch@21:1/5 to Gary McGath on Sat Jan 8 21:16:26 2022
    Gary McGath <garym@REMOVEmcgathREMOVE.com> wrote:
    Rink wrote:
    I think the last one was :

    21/02/2012 ?

    (in your american notation)

    American notation is MM/DD/YYYY. 21/02/2012 isn't a valid date in
    that notation.

    Right. There was a recent XKCD about it. https://xkcd.com/2562/
    --
    Keith F. Lynch - http://keithlynch.net/
    Please see http://keithlynch.net/email.html before emailing me.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Rink@21:1/5 to All on Thu Jan 13 22:08:09 2022
    Op 8-1-2022 om 22:16 schreef Keith F. Lynch:
    Gary McGath <garym@REMOVEmcgathREMOVE.com> wrote:
    Rink wrote:
    I think the last one was :

    21/02/2012 ?

    (in your american notation)

    American notation is MM/DD/YYYY. 21/02/2012 isn't a valid date in
    that notation.

    Right. There was a recent XKCD about it. https://xkcd.com/2562/



    You're right.
    I make that mistake all the time.

    American notation is highly illogical.....

    Why do you first call the month, then the day and then the year?

    Are digital clocks by you the same?
    first the minutes then the seconds and then the hours ?

    Rink

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  • From Tim Merrigan@21:1/5 to All on Thu Jan 13 14:13:59 2022
    On Thu, 13 Jan 2022 14:06:30 -0800, Tim Merrigan <tppm@ca.rr.com>
    wrote:

    On Thu, 13 Jan 2022 22:08:09 +0100, Rink
    <rink.hof.haalditmaarweg@planet.nl> wrote:

    Op 8-1-2022 om 22:16 schreef Keith F. Lynch:
    Gary McGath <garym@REMOVEmcgathREMOVE.com> wrote:
    Rink wrote:
    I think the last one was :

    21/02/2012 ?

    (in your american notation)

    American notation is MM/DD/YYYY. 21/02/2012 isn't a valid date in
    that notation.

    Right. There was a recent XKCD about it. https://xkcd.com/2562/



    You're right.
    I make that mistake all the time.

    American notation is highly illogical.....

    Why do you first call the month, then the day and then the year?

    Are digital clocks by you the same?
    first the minutes then the seconds and then the hours ?

    Rink

    No, the logical notation is YYYY/MM/DD HH/MM/SS. And the next
    palindrome is 2030/03/02.
    --

    Oops, that's YYYY/MM/DD HH:MM:SS.
    --

    Qualified immuninity = virtual impunity.

    Tim Merrigan

    --
    This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
    https://www.avg.com

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  • From Tim Merrigan@21:1/5 to rink.hof.haalditmaarweg@planet.nl on Thu Jan 13 14:06:30 2022
    On Thu, 13 Jan 2022 22:08:09 +0100, Rink
    <rink.hof.haalditmaarweg@planet.nl> wrote:

    Op 8-1-2022 om 22:16 schreef Keith F. Lynch:
    Gary McGath <garym@REMOVEmcgathREMOVE.com> wrote:
    Rink wrote:
    I think the last one was :

    21/02/2012 ?

    (in your american notation)

    American notation is MM/DD/YYYY. 21/02/2012 isn't a valid date in
    that notation.

    Right. There was a recent XKCD about it. https://xkcd.com/2562/



    You're right.
    I make that mistake all the time.

    American notation is highly illogical.....

    Why do you first call the month, then the day and then the year?

    Are digital clocks by you the same?
    first the minutes then the seconds and then the hours ?

    Rink

    No, the logical notation is YYYY/MM/DD HH/MM/SS. And the next
    palindrome is 2030/03/02.
    --

    Qualified immuninity = virtual impunity.

    Tim Merrigan

    --
    This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
    https://www.avg.com

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  • From Dorothy J Heydt@21:1/5 to rink.hof.haalditmaarweg@planet.nl on Fri Jan 14 00:08:41 2022
    In article <srq4br$1l6$1@dont-email.me>,
    Rink <rink.hof.haalditmaarweg@planet.nl> wrote:
    Op 8-1-2022 om 22:16 schreef Keith F. Lynch:
    Gary McGath <garym@REMOVEmcgathREMOVE.com> wrote:
    Rink wrote:
    I think the last one was :

    21/02/2012 ?

    (in your american notation)

    American notation is MM/DD/YYYY. 21/02/2012 isn't a valid date in
    that notation.

    Right. There was a recent XKCD about it. https://xkcd.com/2562/



    You're right.
    I make that mistake all the time.

    American notation is highly illogical.....

    Why do you first call the month, then the day and then the year?

    Are digital clocks by you the same?
    first the minutes then the seconds and then the hours ?

    Nope; hours, minutes, then (optionally) seconds.


    --
    Dorothy J. Heydt
    Vallejo, California
    djheydt at gmail dot com
    Www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/

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  • From Gary McGath@21:1/5 to Rink on Fri Jan 14 07:55:27 2022
    On 1/13/22 4:08 PM, Rink wrote:

    American notation is highly illogical.....

    Why do you first call the month, then the day and then the year?

    I tried to figure out when the divergence started. The US Declaration of Independence is headed with the date July 4, 1776, though we commonly
    refer to the holiday European-style as the "Fourth of July."

    In some divergences between US and British uses, it's the British one
    which has changed since colonial days. I've been unable to find any good information in this case.

    In an unrelated bit of amusement, I saw a video today pointing out the
    error of another video that claimed to show how big "England" is by superimposing a map of the UK (including Scotland and Northern Ireland)
    on a map of the US.

    --
    Gary McGath http://www.mcgath.com

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Andy Leighton@21:1/5 to Gary McGath on Fri Jan 14 09:00:41 2022
    On Fri, 14 Jan 2022 07:55:27 -0500,
    Gary McGath <garym@REMOVEmcgathREMOVE.com> wrote:
    On 1/13/22 4:08 PM, Rink wrote:

    American notation is highly illogical.....

    Why do you first call the month, then the day and then the year?

    I tried to figure out when the divergence started. The US Declaration of Independence is headed with the date July 4, 1776, though we commonly
    refer to the holiday European-style as the "Fourth of July."

    In some divergences between US and British uses, it's the British one
    which has changed since colonial days. I've been unable to find any good information in this case.

    With the month as an English word usage has moved more to "nth of
    Month" rather than "Month nth". Although quite a lot of UK national
    newspapers still use "Month nth" on their front page, and I wouldn't
    be surprised to see it in more formal usage (eg. business letters,
    contracts) either.

    I am not aware that England has ever used mm/dd/yy where each component
    is numeric.

    --
    Andy Leighton => andyl@azaal.plus.com
    "We demand rigidly defined areas of doubt and uncertainty!"
    - Douglas Adams

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Kevrob@21:1/5 to Gary McGath on Fri Jan 14 07:55:08 2022
    On Friday, January 14, 2022 at 7:55:30 AM UTC-5, Gary McGath wrote:
    On 1/13/22 4:08 PM, Rink wrote:

    American notation is highly illogical.....

    Why do you first call the month, then the day and then the year?
    I tried to figure out when the divergence started. The US Declaration of Independence is headed with the date July 4, 1776, though we commonly
    refer to the holiday European-style as the "Fourth of July."

    In some divergences between US and British uses, it's the British one
    which has changed since colonial days. I've been unable to find any good information in this case.

    In an unrelated bit of amusement, I saw a video today pointing out the
    error of another video that claimed to show how big "England" is by superimposing a map of the UK (including Scotland and Northern Ireland)
    on a map of the US.
    --

    Did Wales get forgotten, again?

    --
    Kevin R

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Paul Dormer@21:1/5 to Gary McGath on Fri Jan 14 17:14:00 2022
    In article <srrrs0$lfq$1@dont-email.me>, garym@REMOVEmcgathREMOVE.com
    (Gary McGath) wrote:


    In some divergences between US and British uses, it's the British one
    which has changed since colonial days. I've been unable to find any
    good information in this case.

    I am reminded of a dramatised documentary the BBC did a few years ago
    about the execution on Charles I. In a dramatised scene you see the
    clerk of the Commons starting a new year - 1st January 1649. But all the actual documents they showed on screen had it as January 1648.

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  • From Tim Merrigan@21:1/5 to All on Fri Jan 14 13:27:32 2022
    On Fri, 14 Jan 2022 07:55:08 -0800 (PST), Kevrob <kevrob@my-deja.com>
    wrote:

    On Friday, January 14, 2022 at 7:55:30 AM UTC-5, Gary McGath wrote:
    On 1/13/22 4:08 PM, Rink wrote:

    American notation is highly illogical.....

    Why do you first call the month, then the day and then the year?
    I tried to figure out when the divergence started. The US Declaration of
    Independence is headed with the date July 4, 1776, though we commonly
    refer to the holiday European-style as the "Fourth of July."

    In some divergences between US and British uses, it's the British one
    which has changed since colonial days. I've been unable to find any good
    information in this case.

    In an unrelated bit of amusement, I saw a video today pointing out the
    error of another video that claimed to show how big "England" is by
    superimposing a map of the UK (including Scotland and Northern Ireland)
    on a map of the US.
    --

    Did Wales get forgotten, again?

    Well, a map that includes England, Scotland, and -Ulster- (Northern)
    Ireland would, perforce, include Wales, unless it was excised from the
    map.
    --

    Qualified immuninity = virtual impunity.

    Tim Merrigan

    --
    This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
    https://www.avg.com

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Kevrob@21:1/5 to merri...@gmail.com on Fri Jan 14 21:50:00 2022
    On Friday, January 14, 2022 at 4:27:34 PM UTC-5, merri...@gmail.com wrote:
    On Fri, 14 Jan 2022 07:55:08 -0800 (PST), Kevrob <kev...@my-deja.com>
    wrote:

    [snip]

    Did Wales get forgotten, again?

    Well, a map that includes England, Scotland, and -Ulster- (Northern)
    Ireland would, perforce, include Wales, unless it was excised from the
    map.
    --

    A map that included Ulster would also include the 3 counties of
    that province that the British concede are in the Republic.

    --
    Kevin R

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  • From Keith F. Lynch@21:1/5 to Gary McGath on Sat Jan 15 17:26:49 2022
    Gary McGath <garym@REMOVEmcgathREMOVE.com> wrote:
    In some divergences between US and British uses, it's the British
    one which has changed since colonial days.

    Especialy in pronunciation. "RP" came from one 18th century stage
    actor with a speech defect.

    In an unrelated bit of amusement, I saw a video today pointing out the
    error of another video that claimed to show how big "England" is by superimposing a map of the UK (including Scotland and Northern Ireland)
    on a map of the US.

    Mercator projection?
    --
    Keith F. Lynch - http://keithlynch.net/
    Please see http://keithlynch.net/email.html before emailing me.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Gary McGath@21:1/5 to Keith F. Lynch on Sat Jan 15 13:22:55 2022
    On 1/15/22 12:26 PM, Keith F. Lynch wrote:

    In an unrelated bit of amusement, I saw a video today pointing out the
    error of another video that claimed to show how big "England" is by
    superimposing a map of the UK (including Scotland and Northern Ireland)
    on a map of the US.

    Mercator projection?

    The video didn't say. If I've got it right, the distance from
    southernmost England to northern Scotland is around 550 miles, which is
    less than half the distance from Boston to Miami. My recollection is
    that Great Britain looked proportionally bigger than that in the video,
    so it may have been using an unadjusted Mercator projection.

    --
    Gary McGath http://www.mcgath.com

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Andy Leighton@21:1/5 to Keith F. Lynch on Sat Jan 15 13:35:36 2022
    On Sat, 15 Jan 2022 17:26:49 -0000 (UTC),
    Keith F. Lynch <kfl@KeithLynch.net> wrote:
    Gary McGath <garym@REMOVEmcgathREMOVE.com> wrote:
    In some divergences between US and British uses, it's the British
    one which has changed since colonial days.

    Especialy in pronunciation. "RP" came from one 18th century stage
    actor with a speech defect.

    Citation needed.

    Every single source (and some of them are a lot more authoritative
    than you) I have seen say the origins are murky but seem to come from
    the public schools at the end of the 18th century.

    Also as you may know RP is much different today than in the past, and
    may have fractured into 3 subtypes. Also it is spoken by a minority.
    We have plenty of regional accents which sound nothing like RP.

    --
    Andy Leighton => andyl@azaal.plus.com
    "We demand rigidly defined areas of doubt and uncertainty!"
    - Douglas Adams

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
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  • From Paul Dormer@21:1/5 to Andy Leighton on Sun Jan 16 15:15:00 2022
    In article <slrnsu68g8.367l7.andyl@azaal.plus.com>, andyl@azaal.plus.com
    (Andy Leighton) wrote:

    Also as you may know RP is much different today than in the past, and
    may have fractured into 3 subtypes.

    There was a news item a few years ago about how even the Queen's accent
    has changed over the years. I think she used to pronounce her daughter's
    name as 'en'.

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  • From Keith F. Lynch@21:1/5 to Rink on Sun Jan 16 19:30:23 2022
    Rink <rink.hof.haalditmaarweg@planet.nl> wrote:
    American notation is highly illogical.....
    Why do you first call the month, then the day and then the year?

    I agree that it's illogical. But it's what we're used to.

    Similarly with the "short scale," in which a billion means a thousand
    million rather than a million million. The US has always used it.
    Britain adopted it about half a century ago. Before that Britain used
    the more logical long scale, which I see that your country still uses.

    Are digital clocks by you the same?
    first the minutes then the seconds and then the hours ?

    No. It's hours, minutes, then seconds. But in the US it's mostly
    12-hour time, not 24-hour time, though that may be changing. Some
    say it's irrational to have 60-second minutes and 60-minute hours
    but express those numbers in base 10. For a few years the French
    used 100-second minutes, 100-minute hours, and 10-hour days.

    It's interesting that time below seconds is decimal. Or rather base
    1000. We use milliseconds, microseconds, nanoseconds, etc. (Nobody
    uses kiloseconds, megaseconds, gigaseconds, etc.) (Well, *I* do, but
    I'm weird.) But there's an older system, in which a 60th of a second
    is called a third, a 60th of a third is a fourth, etc. If you've read Copernicus, he even uses fifths, which is an impressively short time
    interval for the 16th century, which was before even the invention of
    the pendulum clock.
    --
    Keith F. Lynch - http://keithlynch.net/
    Please see http://keithlynch.net/email.html before emailing me.

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  • From Gary McGath@21:1/5 to Keith F. Lynch on Sun Jan 16 16:19:49 2022
    On 1/16/22 2:30 PM, Keith F. Lynch wrote:
    No. It's hours, minutes, then seconds. But in the US it's mostly
    12-hour time, not 24-hour time, though that may be changing.

    ObSF: "It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen." (First sentence of 1984)

    --
    Gary McGath http://www.mcgath.com

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  • From Dorothy J Heydt@21:1/5 to garym@REMOVEmcgathREMOVE.com on Mon Jan 17 00:59:56 2022
    In article <ss225m$sk$1@dont-email.me>,
    Gary McGath <garym@REMOVEmcgathREMOVE.com> wrote:
    On 1/16/22 2:30 PM, Keith F. Lynch wrote:
    No. It's hours, minutes, then seconds. But in the US it's mostly
    12-hour time, not 24-hour time, though that may be changing.

    ObSF: "It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking >thirteen." (First sentence of 1984)

    ISTR that some of the early town clocks were 24-hour.

    /google

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prague_astronomical_clock

    Meg got to visit Prague a few years ago (nursemaiding one of her
    lawyer boss's elderly clients. I'll ask her if she saw this,
    when she gets home. Odds are, she did.



    --
    Dorothy J. Heydt
    Vallejo, California
    djheydt at gmail dot com
    Www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Dorothy J Heydt@21:1/5 to Dorothy J Heydt on Mon Jan 17 02:05:39 2022
    In article <r5txFw.184H@kithrup.com>,
    Dorothy J Heydt <djheydt@kithrup.com> wrote:
    In article <ss225m$sk$1@dont-email.me>,
    Gary McGath <garym@REMOVEmcgathREMOVE.com> wrote:
    On 1/16/22 2:30 PM, Keith F. Lynch wrote:
    No. It's hours, minutes, then seconds. But in the US it's mostly
    12-hour time, not 24-hour time, though that may be changing.

    ObSF: "It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking >>thirteen." (First sentence of 1984)

    ISTR that some of the early town clocks were 24-hour.

    /google

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prague_astronomical_clock

    Meg got to visit Prague a few years ago (nursemaiding one of her
    lawyer boss's elderly clients). I'll ask her if she saw this,
    when she gets home. Odds are, she did.

    She did; but the clock was undergoing restoration at the time and
    the dials were covered. But she did get to go up in the tower
    and see all the machinery. And then she got to go through the
    town hall and observe all the additions that had been made to it
    over the centuries.

    --
    Dorothy J. Heydt
    Vallejo, California
    djheydt at gmail dot com
    Www.kithrup.com/~djheydt/

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Peter Trei@21:1/5 to Keith F. Lynch on Sun Jan 16 20:41:34 2022
    On Sunday, January 16, 2022 at 2:30:25 PM UTC-5, Keith F. Lynch wrote:
    Rink <rink.hof.ha...@planet.nl> wrote:
    American notation is highly illogical.....
    Why do you first call the month, then the day and then the year?
    I agree that it's illogical. But it's what we're used to.

    Similarly with the "short scale," in which a billion means a thousand
    million rather than a million million. The US has always used it.
    Britain adopted it about half a century ago. Before that Britain used
    the more logical long scale, which I see that your country still uses.
    Are digital clocks by you the same?
    first the minutes then the seconds and then the hours ?
    No. It's hours, minutes, then seconds. But in the US it's mostly
    12-hour time, not 24-hour time, though that may be changing. Some
    say it's irrational to have 60-second minutes and 60-minute hours
    but express those numbers in base 10. For a few years the French
    used 100-second minutes, 100-minute hours, and 10-hour days.

    It's interesting that time below seconds is decimal. Or rather base
    1000. We use milliseconds, microseconds, nanoseconds, etc. (Nobody
    uses kiloseconds, megaseconds, gigaseconds, etc.) (Well, *I* do, but
    I'm weird.) But there's an older system, in which a 60th of a second
    is called a third, a 60th of a third is a fourth, etc. If you've read Copernicus, he even uses fifths, which is an impressively short time
    interval for the 16th century, which was before even the invention of
    the pendulum clock.

    I did not know that about Copernicus.

    However, we use terms like ' a quarter of a second'. Just not very often.
    Most uses of sub second periods are fairly recent, and mostly in technical
    and scientific contexts, where the metric system dominates.

    Pt

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  • From Kerr-Mudd, John@21:1/5 to Dorothy J Heydt on Mon Jan 17 12:34:19 2022
    On Mon, 17 Jan 2022 02:05:39 GMT
    djheydt@kithrup.com (Dorothy J Heydt) wrote:

    In article <r5txFw.184H@kithrup.com>,
    Dorothy J Heydt <djheydt@kithrup.com> wrote:
    In article <ss225m$sk$1@dont-email.me>,
    Gary McGath <garym@REMOVEmcgathREMOVE.com> wrote:
    On 1/16/22 2:30 PM, Keith F. Lynch wrote:
    No. It's hours, minutes, then seconds. But in the US it's mostly
    12-hour time, not 24-hour time, though that may be changing.

    ObSF: "It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking >>thirteen." (First sentence of 1984)

    ISTR that some of the early town clocks were 24-hour.

    /google

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prague_astronomical_clock

    Meg got to visit Prague a few years ago (nursemaiding one of her
    lawyer boss's elderly clients). I'll ask her if she saw this,
    when she gets home. Odds are, she did.

    She did; but the clock was undergoing restoration at the time and
    the dials were covered. But she did get to go up in the tower
    and see all the machinery. And then she got to go through the
    town hall and observe all the additions that had been made to it
    over the centuries.

    It's still a bit out of date; the Earth orbits the Sun, not the other way around!

    --
    Bah, and indeed Humbug.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)