• Convert Ethernet Printer To Wireless

    From Wade Garrett@21:1/5 to All on Mon Jul 5 09:37:39 2021
    XPost: comp.sys.mac.system

    I want to set up a Canon MF216n Ethernet printer as a wireless printer.

    I have a spare router to use-- though that router would not be able to
    be connected to the internet. That's because my gateway is several rooms
    away from where the printer is as that is where the internet cable comes
    into the house.

    So I connect the printer to the router-- then what?

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From nospam@21:1/5 to All on Mon Jul 5 10:28:23 2021
    XPost: comp.sys.mac.system

    In article <sbv1v4$3ac$1@dont-email.me>, Wade Garrett <wade@cooler.net>
    wrote:

    I want to set up a Canon MF216n Ethernet printer as a wireless printer.

    I have a spare router to use-- though that router would not be able to
    be connected to the internet. That's because my gateway is several rooms
    away from where the printer is as that is where the internet cable comes
    into the house.

    So I connect the printer to the router-- then what?

    the router needs to be able to act as a client bridge. not all can, but assuming it does, you have it join the existing wifi network with the
    printer connected to one of the lan ports. if it can't, you will need
    another router than can, a dedicated client bridge or a new printer
    with wifi. in general, travel routers can do it because it's common to
    join the hotel's wifi and relay it locally.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Wolffan@21:1/5 to Wade Garrett on Mon Jul 5 10:49:49 2021
    XPost: comp.sys.mac.system

    On 2021 Jul 05, Wade Garrett wrote
    (in article <sbv1v4$3ac$1@dont-email.me>):

    I want to set up a Canon MF216n Ethernet printer as a wireless printer.

    I have a spare router to use-- though that router would not be able to
    be connected to the internet. That's because my gateway is several rooms
    away from where the printer is as that is where the internet cable comes
    into the house.

    So I connect the printer to the router-- then what?

    If the printer is on the network, and if the router has wireless or there’s
    a wireless access point on the network, then the printer will be visible to wireless clients.

    1 put printer on Ethernet connection to main router. Typical twisted-pair Ethernet has a max segment length of 100 metres, that should be plenty for
    most houses. I have my main router downstairs near the AT&T demarc, and have run 1000baseT Ethernet to two 8-port switches, feeding various devices, including two printers, and have a wireless extender on the upper floor to
    feed wireless.

    2 connect the wireless clients to the network. The printer should show up.

    Do NOT use a second wireless-capable router unless the second router is connected in bridge mode, preferably by Ethernet. You’ll either have two wireless networks, one of which is not connected to the Internet, or possible DHCP issues. And problematic Internet connections.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From nospam@21:1/5 to Wolffan on Mon Jul 5 11:02:30 2021
    XPost: comp.sys.mac.system

    In article <0001HW.2693538D0CE0D5D470000E29138F@news.supernews.com>,
    Wolffan <akwolffan@zoho.com> wrote:

    I want to set up a Canon MF216n Ethernet printer as a wireless printer.

    I have a spare router to use-- though that router would not be able to
    be connected to the internet. That's because my gateway is several rooms away from where the printer is as that is where the internet cable comes into the house.

    So I connect the printer to the router-- then what?

    If the printer is on the network, and if the router has wireless or theres
    a wireless access point on the network, then the printer will be visible to wireless clients.

    i don't think he would be asking if it was already connected to the
    network.

    another option is use a pair of adapters that link ethernet to the
    mains wiring in the walls. put one where the gateway is and the other
    at the printer. they're more than fast enough for printing.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Wade Garrett@21:1/5 to Wolffan on Mon Jul 5 10:59:31 2021
    XPost: comp.sys.mac.system

    On 7/5/21 10:49 AM, Wolffan wrote:
    On 2021 Jul 05, Wade Garrett wrote
    (in article <sbv1v4$3ac$1@dont-email.me>):

    I want to set up a Canon MF216n Ethernet printer as a wireless printer.

    I have a spare router to use-- though that router would not be able to
    be connected to the internet. That's because my gateway is several rooms
    away from where the printer is as that is where the internet cable comes
    into the house.

    So I connect the printer to the router-- then what?

    If the printer is on the network, and if the router has wireless or there’s a wireless access point on the network, then the printer will be visible to wireless clients.

    1 put printer on Ethernet connection to main router. Typical twisted-pair Ethernet has a max segment length of 100 metres, that should be plenty for most houses. I have my main router downstairs near the AT&T demarc, and have run 1000baseT Ethernet to two 8-port switches, feeding various devices, including two printers, and have a wireless extender on the upper floor to feed wireless.

    2 connect the wireless clients to the network. The printer should show up.

    Do NOT use a second wireless-capable router unless the second router is connected in bridge mode, preferably by Ethernet. You’ll either have two wireless networks, one of which is not connected to the Internet, or possible DHCP issues. And problematic Internet connections.

    The printer is not on the network. It's connected directly to my desktop computer by a cable. The main router is several rooms away and
    connecting it to the printer by Ethernet cable is not feasible.

    I'll fool with setting the second router to bridge mode-- but won't be
    able to try that until tomorrow.


    Thanks for the tips.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From nospam@21:1/5 to All on Mon Jul 5 11:07:35 2021
    XPost: comp.sys.mac.system

    In article <sbv6ok$6tn$1@dont-email.me>, Wade Garrett <wade@cooler.net>
    wrote:

    I'll fool with setting the second router to bridge mode-- but won't be
    able to try that until tomorrow.

    it needs wifi client mode, otherwise it won't be able to join the
    existing wifi network, as a typical wifi client would.

    travel routers, which are small and sometimes have their own battery,
    can usually do that (but not all), while normal routers generally don't
    unless an alternate firmware is installed.

    as i mentioned in another post, it might be a lot easier to get a pair
    of ethernet over powerline adapters.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Bennett Price@21:1/5 to Wade Garrett on Mon Jul 5 09:57:38 2021
    XPost: comp.sys.mac.system

    On 7/5/2021 6:37 AM, Wade Garrett wrote:
    I want to set up a Canon MF216n Ethernet printer as a wireless printer.

    I have a spare router to use-- though that router would not be able to
    be connected to the internet. That's because my gateway is several rooms
    away from where the printer is as that is where the internet cable comes
    into the house.

    So I connect the printer to the router-- then what?



    since the printer has a usb port, consider getting a wifi-usb print
    server, e.g.,
    https://www.amazon.com/usb-print-server/s?k=usb+print+server

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Percival John Hackworth@21:1/5 to Wade Garrett on Mon Jul 5 16:20:11 2021
    XPost: comp.sys.mac.system

    On 05-Jul-2021 at 7:59:31AM PDT, "Wade Garrett" <wade@cooler.net> wrote:

    On 7/5/21 10:49 AM, Wolffan wrote:
    On 2021 Jul 05, Wade Garrett wrote
    (in article <sbv1v4$3ac$1@dont-email.me>):

    I want to set up a Canon MF216n Ethernet printer as a wireless printer.

    I have a spare router to use-- though that router would not be able to
    be connected to the internet. That's because my gateway is several rooms >>> away from where the printer is as that is where the internet cable comes >>> into the house.

    So I connect the printer to the router-- then what?

    If the printer is on the network, and if the router has wireless or there’s
    a wireless access point on the network, then the printer will be visible to >> wireless clients.

    1 put printer on Ethernet connection to main router. Typical twisted-pair
    Ethernet has a max segment length of 100 metres, that should be plenty for >> most houses. I have my main router downstairs near the AT&T demarc, and have >> run 1000baseT Ethernet to two 8-port switches, feeding various devices,
    including two printers, and have a wireless extender on the upper floor to >> feed wireless.

    2 connect the wireless clients to the network. The printer should show up. >>
    Do NOT use a second wireless-capable router unless the second router is
    connected in bridge mode, preferably by Ethernet. You’ll either have two >> wireless networks, one of which is not connected to the Internet, or possible
    DHCP issues. And problematic Internet connections.

    The printer is not on the network. It's connected directly to my desktop computer by a cable. The main router is several rooms away and
    connecting it to the printer by Ethernet cable is not feasible.

    I'll fool with setting the second router to bridge mode-- but won't be
    able to try that until tomorrow.


    Thanks for the tips.

    Since it's connected directly to your system, it lacks the ability to queue print jobs. Why not get a Rasberry Pi and set it up as a print server? This assumes that your printer isn't a Windows-only printer requiring Windows to print anything. If that's the case, toss it and buy a network capable printer. It will be cheaper than buying a Windows license for a Rasberry Pi, installing W10 on it, and using that as a print server.
    --
    DeeDee, don't press that button! DeeDee! NO! Dee...

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Wolffan@21:1/5 to Wade Garrett on Mon Jul 5 13:22:14 2021
    XPost: comp.sys.mac.system

    On 2021 Jul 05, Wade Garrett wrote
    (in article <sbv6ok$6tn$1@dont-email.me>):

    On 7/5/21 10:49 AM, Wolffan wrote:
    On 2021 Jul 05, Wade Garrett wrote
    (in article <sbv1v4$3ac$1@dont-email.me>):

    I want to set up a Canon MF216n Ethernet printer as a wireless printer.

    I have a spare router to use-- though that router would not be able to
    be connected to the internet. That's because my gateway is several rooms away from where the printer is as that is where the internet cable comes into the house.

    So I connect the printer to the router-- then what?

    If the printer is on the network, and if the router has wireless or there’s
    a wireless access point on the network, then the printer will be visible to wireless clients.

    1 put printer on Ethernet connection to main router. Typical twisted-pair Ethernet has a max segment length of 100 metres, that should be plenty for most houses. I have my main router downstairs near the AT&T demarc, and have
    run 1000baseT Ethernet to two 8-port switches, feeding various devices, including two printers, and have a wireless extender on the upper floor to feed wireless.

    2 connect the wireless clients to the network. The printer should show up.

    Do NOT use a second wireless-capable router unless the second router is connected in bridge mode, preferably by Ethernet. You’ll either have two wireless networks, one of which is not connected to the Internet, or possible
    DHCP issues. And problematic Internet connections.
    The printer is not on the network. It's connected directly to my desktop computer by a cable. The main router is several rooms away and
    connecting it to the printer by Ethernet cable is not feasible.

    turn on print/file sharing. Note that if the computer the printer’s
    connected to is off or asleep, the printer won’t be available. Note that
    all print jobs go via the computer, which might slow larger print jobs down.


    I'll fool with setting the second router to bridge mode-- but won't be
    able to try that until tomorrow.

    Thanks for the tips.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Andreas Kohlbach@21:1/5 to Wade Garrett on Mon Jul 5 15:35:44 2021
    XPost: comp.sys.mac.system

    On Mon, 5 Jul 2021 10:59:31 -0400, Wade Garrett wrote:

    On 7/5/21 10:49 AM, Wolffan wrote:

    So I connect the printer to the router-- then what?
    If the printer is on the network, and if the router has wireless or
    there’s
    a wireless access point on the network, then the printer will be visible to >> wireless clients.
    1 put printer on Ethernet connection to main router. Typical
    twisted-pair
    Ethernet has a max segment length of 100 metres, that should be plenty for >> most houses. I have my main router downstairs near the AT&T demarc, and have >> run 1000baseT Ethernet to two 8-port switches, feeding various devices,
    including two printers, and have a wireless extender on the upper floor to >> feed wireless.
    2 connect the wireless clients to the network. The printer should
    show up.
    Do NOT use a second wireless-capable router unless the second router
    is
    connected in bridge mode, preferably by Ethernet. You’ll either have two >> wireless networks, one of which is not connected to the Internet, or possible
    DHCP issues. And problematic Internet connections.

    The printer is not on the network. It's connected directly to my
    desktop computer by a cable. The main router is several rooms away and connecting it to the printer by Ethernet cable is not feasible.

    I'll fool with setting the second router to bridge mode-- but won't be
    able to try that until tomorrow.

    Substituting Ethernet with USB here, I connected the only USB capable
    printer to my (Linux) PC, which has otherwise access to my cable modem
    via Ethernet, and launched hostapd, to make the PC a WIFI master
    node. Using CUPS I shared the print service to devices connected to it.

    I suppose you can somehow do this with other operating systems
    too. Apparently you use a MAC (since also posting in a MAC group). CUPS
    is an Apple application (although it made it to the main print service in Linux), so from the MAC point of view CUPS should be the answer.
    --
    Andreas

    PGP fingerprint 952B0A9F12C2FD6C9F7E68DAA9C2EA89D1A370E0

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Lewis@21:1/5 to Percival John Hackworth on Mon Jul 5 22:37:14 2021
    XPost: comp.sys.mac.system

    In message <ikgpprFgvm7U1@mid.individual.net> Percival John Hackworth <pjh@nanoworks.com> wrote:
    Since it's connected directly to your system, it lacks the ability to queue print jobs.

    Nonsense.



    --
    But of course there were the rules. Everyone knew there were rules.
    They just had to hope like Hell that the gods knew the rules,
    too.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Dr Eberhard W Lisse@21:1/5 to Percival John Hackworth on Tue Jul 6 01:16:32 2021
    XPost: comp.sys.mac.system

    This is not correct, per se.

    You can of course queue from the system. And you can share it so that
    it's seen on the network.

    I have a Canon MF8200C, which is connected to my Mac which is on a
    different network than my WiFi, to which the printer also connects. On
    the WiFi it is seen via Airprint and printing works from those laptops
    that have found and installed Canon's driver.

    Google is your friend, by the way.

    el

    On 2021-07-05 18:20 , Percival John Hackworth wrote:
    [...]
    Since it's connected directly to your system, it lacks the ability to
    queue print jobs.
    [...]

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Percival John Hackworth@21:1/5 to All on Tue Jul 6 03:56:17 2021
    XPost: comp.sys.mac.system

    On 05-Jul-2021 at 4:16:32PM PDT, "Dr Eberhard W Lisse" <nospam@lisse.NA>
    wrote:

    This is not correct, per se.

    You can of course queue from the system. And you can share it so that
    it's seen on the network.

    I have a Canon MF8200C, which is connected to my Mac which is on a
    different network than my WiFi, to which the printer also connects. On
    the WiFi it is seen via Airprint and printing works from those laptops
    that have found and installed Canon's driver.

    Google is your friend, by the way.

    el

    On 2021-07-05 18:20 , Percival John Hackworth wrote:
    [...]
    Since it's connected directly to your system, it lacks the ability to
    queue print jobs.
    [...]

    When I wrote that, I was specifically thinking of a Windows-only USB printer. Does W10 allow you to share a connected printer so that others on the network can see it and print jobs to it? That'd be news to me.

    --
    DeeDee, don't press that button! DeeDee! NO! Dee...

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Alan Baker@21:1/5 to Percival John Hackworth on Mon Jul 5 21:41:56 2021
    XPost: comp.sys.mac.system

    On 2021-07-05 8:56 p.m., Percival John Hackworth wrote:
    On 05-Jul-2021 at 4:16:32PM PDT, "Dr Eberhard W Lisse" <nospam@lisse.NA> wrote:

    This is not correct, per se.

    You can of course queue from the system. And you can share it so that
    it's seen on the network.

    I have a Canon MF8200C, which is connected to my Mac which is on a
    different network than my WiFi, to which the printer also connects. On
    the WiFi it is seen via Airprint and printing works from those laptops
    that have found and installed Canon's driver.

    Google is your friend, by the way.

    el

    On 2021-07-05 18:20 , Percival John Hackworth wrote:
    [...]
    Since it's connected directly to your system, it lacks the ability to
    queue print jobs.
    [...]

    When I wrote that, I was specifically thinking of a Windows-only USB printer. Does W10 allow you to share a connected printer so that others on the network can see it and print jobs to it? That'd be news to me.


    Ummmm... ...yes.

    If that's news to you, that's very sad.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Lewis@21:1/5 to Alan Baker on Tue Jul 6 13:11:31 2021
    XPost: comp.sys.mac.system

    In message <sc0mul$agu$1@dont-email.me> Alan Baker <notonyourlife@no.no.no.no> wrote:
    On 2021-07-05 8:56 p.m., Percival John Hackworth wrote:
    On 05-Jul-2021 at 4:16:32PM PDT, "Dr Eberhard W Lisse" <nospam@lisse.NA>
    wrote:

    This is not correct, per se.

    You can of course queue from the system. And you can share it so that
    it's seen on the network.

    I have a Canon MF8200C, which is connected to my Mac which is on a
    different network than my WiFi, to which the printer also connects. On
    the WiFi it is seen via Airprint and printing works from those laptops
    that have found and installed Canon's driver.

    Google is your friend, by the way.

    el

    On 2021-07-05 18:20 , Percival John Hackworth wrote:
    [...]
    Since it's connected directly to your system, it lacks the ability to
    queue print jobs.
    [...]

    When I wrote that, I was specifically thinking of a Windows-only USB printer.
    Does W10 allow you to share a connected printer so that others on the network
    can see it and print jobs to it? That'd be news to me.


    Ummmm... ...yes.

    Sometimes. Other times you cannot even print to your directly connected printer. Because Windows. (My most frequent tech calls are "I can't
    access the network shares" and "I can't print". Everything was working a
    few minutes previous to the call, but now it's tuts up.

    If that's news to you, that's very sad.

    Not really, it just means you have lived a happy life of not having to
    deal with Winshit.

    --
    I went to a restaurant that serves "breakfast at any time". So I
    ordered French Toast during the Renaissance.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From paul@21:1/5 to nospam on Tue Jul 6 19:06:01 2021
    XPost: comp.sys.mac.system

    nospam wrote on 05.07.2021 10:02
    i don't think he would be asking if it was already connected to the
    network.

    The OP should be able to connect any computer's Ethernet output to a transceiver which can beam his signal literally for miles if he needs to.

    *Connecting to an access point only a few hundred feet away is child's play* https://groups.google.com/g/alt.internet.wireless/c/Dpk9EhVreJk/m/Oyb-fuORDQAJ

    A ng which has the most knowledge wouldn't likely be any Mac group though. https://groups.google.com/g/alt.internet.wireless
    --
    <https://i.postimg.cc/05S6CtNn/align03.jpg>
    <https://i.postimg.cc/0NYJn7mF/nanobridge-nanobeam.jpg>
    <https://i.postimg.cc/25NdBZ7f/horn-to-router.jpg>
    <https://i.postimg.cc/25v3FT6S/debug-on-android.jpg>
    <https://i.postimg.cc/6QJqK6Cj/desktop02.jpg>
    <https://i.postimg.cc/6QQ2Lt74/align02.jpg>
    <https://i.postimg.cc/905nFgxX/nanobeamnanobridge.jpg>
    <https://i.postimg.cc/bNMMZ0Nv/wifi-speed.jpg>
    <https://i.postimg.cc/Bv0wZbDh/pbe-m2-400-802-11-wifi-setting.jpg>
    <https://i.postimg.cc/BZrZpDyp/debug-apps.jpg>
    <https://i.postimg.cc/cHLndnbY/antenna.jpg>
    <https://i.postimg.cc/CLBXc080/antenna03.jpg>
    <https://i.postimg.cc/D0vfqM3p/horns.jpg>
    <https://i.postimg.cc/DfQJq437/mikrotikrouter.jpg>
    <https://i.postimg.cc/DZccY2YD/decibels.jpg>
    <https://i.postimg.cc/Dzq9Bsjs/pb-m2-400-nanobeam.jpg>
    <https://i.postimg.cc/FRqR6DSq/android-wifi-analyzer.jpg>
    <https://i.postimg.cc/gcBWpxnV/pbe-m2-400-bridge-router.jpg>
    <https://i.postimg.cc/Gh22Sb2N/desktop.jpg>
    <https://i.postimg.cc/GpCG1H3G/airviewneedsjava.jpg>
    <https://i.postimg.cc/Hs0NWSKr/laptopnanobeam.jpg>
    <https://i.postimg.cc/htQ469sQ/pbe-m2-400-ap-station.jpg>
    <https://i.postimg.cc/JhyCRT69/horn-to-switch.jpg>
    <https://i.postimg.cc/JzpthvTr/align04.jpg>
    <https://i.postimg.cc/kg5LKkz9/pbe-m2-400-airmax-setting.jpg>
    <https://i.postimg.cc/nrkz5mgs/antenna01.jpg>
    <https://i.postimg.cc/pLXCzFxC/powerbeam-nanobeam.jpg>
    <https://i.postimg.cc/QMNv5FBC/typical-range-ptp.jpg>
    <https://i.postimg.cc/s2c2L8Wd/mikrotik-router.jpg>
    <https://i.postimg.cc/sfkHW6WG/align.jpg>
    <https://i.postimg.cc/SK04C6zL/ubiquiti-bullet-M2-hp.jpg>
    <https://i.postimg.cc/tCxLW2ZN/align01.jpg>
    <https://i.postimg.cc/vT0Krpfc/laptop-nanobeam-horn.jpg>
    <https://i.postimg.cc/VvqLKQtQ/wifi.jpg>
    <https://i.postimg.cc/XJChDCPr/spare-access-points.jpg>
    <https://i.postimg.cc/yNXw0TZS/antenna02.jpg>
    <https://i.postimg.cc/YqTk0q1T/ap.jpg>
    <https://i.postimg.cc/yx4CgWYt/mikrotik-router-config.jpg>
    <https://dl.ubnt.com/datasheets/rocketdish/rd_ds_web.pdf
    <https://dl.ubnt.com/datasheets/rocketm/RocketM_DS.pdf

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Alan Baker@21:1/5 to Lewis on Tue Jul 6 10:11:42 2021
    XPost: comp.sys.mac.system

    On 2021-07-06 6:11 a.m., Lewis wrote:
    In message <sc0mul$agu$1@dont-email.me> Alan Baker <notonyourlife@no.no.no.no> wrote:
    On 2021-07-05 8:56 p.m., Percival John Hackworth wrote:
    On 05-Jul-2021 at 4:16:32PM PDT, "Dr Eberhard W Lisse" <nospam@lisse.NA> >>> wrote:

    This is not correct, per se.

    You can of course queue from the system. And you can share it so that >>>> it's seen on the network.

    I have a Canon MF8200C, which is connected to my Mac which is on a
    different network than my WiFi, to which the printer also connects. On >>>> the WiFi it is seen via Airprint and printing works from those laptops >>>> that have found and installed Canon's driver.

    Google is your friend, by the way.

    el

    On 2021-07-05 18:20 , Percival John Hackworth wrote:
    [...]
    Since it's connected directly to your system, it lacks the ability to >>>>> queue print jobs.
    [...]

    When I wrote that, I was specifically thinking of a Windows-only USB printer.
    Does W10 allow you to share a connected printer so that others on the network
    can see it and print jobs to it? That'd be news to me.


    Ummmm... ...yes.

    Sometimes. Other times you cannot even print to your directly connected printer. Because Windows. (My most frequent tech calls are "I can't
    access the network shares" and "I can't print". Everything was working a
    few minutes previous to the call, but now it's tuts up.

    Regardless of whether or not it's working properly, Windows 10 does
    ALLOW printer sharing.


    If that's news to you, that's very sad.

    Not really, it just means you have lived a happy life of not having to
    deal with Winshit.

    Not knowing that Windows has supported printer sharing since forever?

    Really?

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Andreas Kohlbach@21:1/5 to Percival John Hackworth on Tue Jul 6 13:49:23 2021
    XPost: comp.sys.mac.system

    On 6 Jul 2021 03:56:17 GMT, Percival John Hackworth wrote:

    Does W10 allow you to share a connected printer so that others on the network can see it and print jobs to it? That'd be news to me.

    Can't tell for Windows 10. But when I ran Windows 7 (even emulated in
    Linux) there was an option somewhere to share it to the network. CUPS
    running on the Linux host could also see it. Unless that was removed in subsequent Windows versions, Windows 10 can.
    --
    Andreas

    PGP fingerprint 952B0A9F12C2FD6C9F7E68DAA9C2EA89D1A370E0

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Stuart@21:1/5 to Andreas Kohlbach on Tue Jul 6 19:46:57 2021
    In article <875yxn1gf0.fsf@usenet.ankman.de>,
    Andreas Kohlbach <ank@spamfence.net> wrote:
    Can't tell for Windows 10. But when I ran Windows 7 (even emulated in
    Linux) there was an option somewhere to share it to the network. CUPS
    running on the Linux host could also see it. Unless that was removed in subsequent Windows versions, Windows 10 can.

    I've been running a shared printer on W7 pro (Dell Laser) for years.

    --
    Stuart Winsor

    Tools With A Mission
    sending tools across the world
    http://www.twam.co.uk/

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From nospam@21:1/5 to All on Tue Jul 6 15:54:42 2021
    XPost: comp.sys.mac.system

    In article <sc22he$fri$1@gioia.aioe.org>, paul <nospam@nospam.invalid>
    wrote:

    The OP should be able to connect any computer's Ethernet output to a transceiver which can beam his signal literally for miles if he needs to.

    that isn't even remotely close to what he asked.

    he wants to connect a *printer* to the router in the next *room*.

    there are several options available, none of which needs to beam
    anything for miles.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Lewis@21:1/5 to Alan Baker on Tue Jul 6 21:36:14 2021
    XPost: comp.sys.mac.system

    In message <sc22se$tlv$2@dont-email.me> Alan Baker <notonyourlife@no.no.no.no> wrote:
    On 2021-07-06 6:11 a.m., Lewis wrote:
    In message <sc0mul$agu$1@dont-email.me> Alan Baker <notonyourlife@no.no.no.no> wrote:
    On 2021-07-05 8:56 p.m., Percival John Hackworth wrote:
    On 05-Jul-2021 at 4:16:32PM PDT, "Dr Eberhard W Lisse" <nospam@lisse.NA> >>>> wrote:

    This is not correct, per se.

    You can of course queue from the system. And you can share it so that >>>>> it's seen on the network.

    I have a Canon MF8200C, which is connected to my Mac which is on a
    different network than my WiFi, to which the printer also connects. On >>>>> the WiFi it is seen via Airprint and printing works from those laptops >>>>> that have found and installed Canon's driver.

    Google is your friend, by the way.

    el

    On 2021-07-05 18:20 , Percival John Hackworth wrote:
    [...]
    Since it's connected directly to your system, it lacks the ability to >>>>>> queue print jobs.
    [...]

    When I wrote that, I was specifically thinking of a Windows-only USB printer.
    Does W10 allow you to share a connected printer so that others on the network
    can see it and print jobs to it? That'd be news to me.


    Ummmm... ...yes.

    Sometimes. Other times you cannot even print to your directly connected
    printer. Because Windows. (My most frequent tech calls are "I can't
    access the network shares" and "I can't print". Everything was working a
    few minutes previous to the call, but now it's tuts up.

    Regardless of whether or not it's working properly, Windows 10 does
    ALLOW printer sharing.

    True enough.

    If that's news to you, that's very sad.

    Not really, it just means you have lived a happy life of not having to
    deal with Winshit.

    Not knowing that Windows has supported printer sharing since forever?

    Why would anyone who has not use Windows need this knowledge? And I know
    plenty of people under 30 who do use Windows and would not know this
    because they have never printed anything.

    Really?

    Really.

    --
    'An appointment is an engagement to see someone, while a morningstar
    is a large lump of metal used for viciously crushing skulls. It
    is important not to confuse the two.'

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Alan Baker@21:1/5 to Lewis on Tue Jul 6 14:38:02 2021
    XPost: comp.sys.mac.system

    On 2021-07-06 2:36 p.m., Lewis wrote:
    In message <sc22se$tlv$2@dont-email.me> Alan Baker <notonyourlife@no.no.no.no> wrote:
    On 2021-07-06 6:11 a.m., Lewis wrote:
    In message <sc0mul$agu$1@dont-email.me> Alan Baker <notonyourlife@no.no.no.no> wrote:
    On 2021-07-05 8:56 p.m., Percival John Hackworth wrote:
    On 05-Jul-2021 at 4:16:32PM PDT, "Dr Eberhard W Lisse" <nospam@lisse.NA> >>>>> wrote:

    This is not correct, per se.

    You can of course queue from the system. And you can share it so that >>>>>> it's seen on the network.

    I have a Canon MF8200C, which is connected to my Mac which is on a >>>>>> different network than my WiFi, to which the printer also connects. On >>>>>> the WiFi it is seen via Airprint and printing works from those laptops >>>>>> that have found and installed Canon's driver.

    Google is your friend, by the way.

    el

    On 2021-07-05 18:20 , Percival John Hackworth wrote:
    [...]
    Since it's connected directly to your system, it lacks the ability to >>>>>>> queue print jobs.
    [...]

    When I wrote that, I was specifically thinking of a Windows-only USB printer.
    Does W10 allow you to share a connected printer so that others on the network
    can see it and print jobs to it? That'd be news to me.


    Ummmm... ...yes.

    Sometimes. Other times you cannot even print to your directly connected
    printer. Because Windows. (My most frequent tech calls are "I can't
    access the network shares" and "I can't print". Everything was working a >>> few minutes previous to the call, but now it's tuts up.

    Regardless of whether or not it's working properly, Windows 10 does
    ALLOW printer sharing.

    True enough.

    If that's news to you, that's very sad.

    Not really, it just means you have lived a happy life of not having to
    deal with Winshit.

    Not knowing that Windows has supported printer sharing since forever?

    Why would anyone who has not use Windows need this knowledge? And I know plenty of people under 30 who do use Windows and would not know this
    because they have never printed anything.

    How could anyone who has used computers long enough to understand that
    Windows 10 is not the only version of Windows NOT know it?


    Really?

    Really.


    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Andreas Kohlbach@21:1/5 to Stuart on Tue Jul 6 17:54:11 2021
    On Tue, 06 Jul 2021 19:46:57 +0100, Stuart wrote:

    In article <875yxn1gf0.fsf@usenet.ankman.de>,
    Andreas Kohlbach <ank@spamfence.net> wrote:
    Can't tell for Windows 10. But when I ran Windows 7 (even emulated in
    Linux) there was an option somewhere to share it to the network. CUPS
    running on the Linux host could also see it. Unless that was removed in
    subsequent Windows versions, Windows 10 can.

    Should had added "a not (WIFI) networked" printer. Back then it was
    connected via USB and had no WIFI or other ways to be connected to. [1]

    I've been running a shared printer on W7 pro (Dell Laser) for years.

    I found another working printer on the street (first was a HP 6600 Inkjet,
    not a HP 1005 Laserjet). It only knows USB. I plugged it into the Linux
    box here and shared it via CUPS to my smartphone. The eHP print app
    doesn't work because the smartphone is too old. But I found something
    called "Nano Print" which does. Cannot recommend the free version though because you have to tap yourself through a ton of ads. I think the
    printout even had a watermark with the name of the company added.

    [1] USB? Come back Centronix, everything is forgiven!
    --
    Andreas

    PGP fingerprint 952B0A9F12C2FD6C9F7E68DAA9C2EA89D1A370E0

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From paul@21:1/5 to nospam on Wed Jul 7 05:50:25 2021
    XPost: comp.sys.mac.system

    nospam wrote on 06.07.2021 21:54
    The OP should be able to connect any computer's Ethernet output to a
    transceiver which can beam his signal literally for miles if he needs to.

    that isn't even remotely close to what he asked.

    he wants to connect a *printer* to the router in the next *room*.

    there are several options available, none of which needs to beam
    anything for miles.

    The OP can simply substitute his printer for the computer in this example.
    <https://i.postimg.cc/Gh22Sb2N/desktop.jpg>

    The printer _is_ a computer, nospam, even as you don't realize that it is.
    <https://i.postimg.cc/6QJqK6Cj/desktop02.jpg>

    The OP already mentioned he had a spare router already handy by the way.
    <https://i.postimg.cc/25NdBZ7f/horn-to-router.jpg>

    What part of this simple equation do you _not_ understand, nospam?

    I realize I'm dealing with a Mac group, which means I need to even further
    dumb down the technical content of this suggestion, but I hope at least the
    OP owns the basic adult cognitive skills necessary to understand the
    resources I pointed the OP to have solved his problem _many_ times over.
    <https://i.postimg.cc/JhyCRT69/horn-to-sw-itch.jpg>

    If this was an Android newsgroup, they'd already _know_ all this stuff.
    <https://i.postimg.cc/25v3FT6S/debug-on-android.jpg>

    The printer has an Ethernet port which means the printer can be attached to
    an inexpensive transceiver which can transmit/receive for _miles_ nospam.
    <https://i.postimg.cc/QMNv5FBC/typical-range-ptp.jpg>

    The fact his router is not that far doesn't change that basic equation.
    <https://i.postimg.cc/s2c2L8Wd/mikrotik-router.jpg>

    At the risk of having to dumb this suggestion down to the very barest of
    bones for you Mac users, the computer connects to the router which connects
    to the printer, all of which can easily be done wirelessly (as long as the printer has a working Ethernet port, which the OP said it has).
    <https://i.postimg.cc/vT0Krpfc/laptop-nanobeam-horn.jpg>

    *Connecting an Ethernet-enabled printer over Wi-Fi to a router is child's play* https://groups.google.com/g/alt.internet.wireless/c/Dpk9EhVreJk/m/Oyb-fuORDQAJ
    <https://i.postimg.cc/XJChDCPr/spare-access-points.jpg>

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Lewis@21:1/5 to Alan Baker on Wed Jul 7 07:24:16 2021
    XPost: comp.sys.mac.system

    In message <sc2ifq$70a$1@dont-email.me> Alan Baker <notonyourlife@no.no.no.no> wrote:
    On 2021-07-06 2:36 p.m., Lewis wrote:
    In message <sc22se$tlv$2@dont-email.me> Alan Baker <notonyourlife@no.no.no.no> wrote:
    On 2021-07-06 6:11 a.m., Lewis wrote:
    In message <sc0mul$agu$1@dont-email.me> Alan Baker <notonyourlife@no.no.no.no> wrote:
    On 2021-07-05 8:56 p.m., Percival John Hackworth wrote:
    On 05-Jul-2021 at 4:16:32PM PDT, "Dr Eberhard W Lisse" <nospam@lisse.NA> >>>>>> wrote:

    This is not correct, per se.

    You can of course queue from the system. And you can share it so that >>>>>>> it's seen on the network.

    I have a Canon MF8200C, which is connected to my Mac which is on a >>>>>>> different network than my WiFi, to which the printer also connects. On >>>>>>> the WiFi it is seen via Airprint and printing works from those laptops >>>>>>> that have found and installed Canon's driver.

    Google is your friend, by the way.

    el

    On 2021-07-05 18:20 , Percival John Hackworth wrote:
    [...]
    Since it's connected directly to your system, it lacks the ability to >>>>>>>> queue print jobs.
    [...]

    When I wrote that, I was specifically thinking of a Windows-only USB printer.
    Does W10 allow you to share a connected printer so that others on the network
    can see it and print jobs to it? That'd be news to me.


    Ummmm... ...yes.

    Sometimes. Other times you cannot even print to your directly connected >>>> printer. Because Windows. (My most frequent tech calls are "I can't
    access the network shares" and "I can't print". Everything was working a >>>> few minutes previous to the call, but now it's tuts up.

    Regardless of whether or not it's working properly, Windows 10 does
    ALLOW printer sharing.

    True enough.

    If that's news to you, that's very sad.

    Not really, it just means you have lived a happy life of not having to >>>> deal with Winshit.

    Not knowing that Windows has supported printer sharing since forever?

    Why would anyone who has not use Windows need this knowledge? And I know
    plenty of people under 30 who do use Windows and would not know this
    because they have never printed anything.

    How could anyone who has used computers long enough to understand that Windows 10 is not the only version of Windows NOT know it?

    Very easily, as I explained.


    --
    Demons have existed on the Discworld for at least as long as the
    gods, who in many ways they closely resemble. The difference is
    basically the same as between terrorists and freedom fighters.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Wade Garrett@21:1/5 to Wade Garrett on Mon Jul 12 07:26:06 2021
    XPost: comp.sys.mac.system

    On 7/8/21 7:44 AM, Wade Garrett wrote:
    On 7/5/21 9:37 AM, Wade Garrett wrote:
    I want to set up a Canon MF216n Ethernet printer as a wireless printer.

    I have a spare router to use-- though that router would not be able to
    be connected to the internet. That's because my gateway is several
    rooms away from where the printer is as that is where the internet
    cable comes into the house.

    So I connect the printer to the router-- then what?

    I disconnected the printer from my iMac by removing the USB cable, then connected the printer to the spare router with an Ethernet cable, and
    changed the selected WiFi network on my iMac to that router's network.

    The good news:
    I was then able to add the printer to my iMac and print to it wirelessly.

    The bad news:
    I could not print wirelessly from a Chromebook, iPad, or iPhone...none
    of which could see the printer when connected to the spare router's
    network.

    A Dell Windows laptop could see the printer but I could not install a
    working printer driver to it so it would not print.

    OP here. Thanks again for all the suggestions.

    I tried pretty much all of them that fit the parameters of the original question- plus whatever ones I found online.

    Nothing worked- and while it looked like I bricked the spare router when
    I set it to bridge mode, I was able to restore it to factory defaults
    and manually restore its settings.

    I'm giving up on wireless printing from my Ethernet printer.

    If I have a real need for wireless, a new printer ain't all that
    expensive, especially if I offset some of the cost by selling my current
    one on Craigslist.

    --
    Why is it that the people who want more government control over your
    life are the same ones who want you to be disarmed?

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)
  • From Lewis@21:1/5 to Wade Garrett on Mon Jul 12 13:37:38 2021
    XPost: comp.sys.mac.system

    In message <sch8sg$fg5$1@dont-email.me> Wade Garrett <wade@cooler.net> wrote:
    I'm giving up on wireless printing from my Ethernet printer.

    It's very simple.

    1) Setup your printer
    2) Add the printer to a Mac
    System Preferences -> Printers & Scanners
    3) Click "Share this printer on the network
    4) Profit!

    And yes, even lesser computer will be able to print to the printer.

    If I have a real need for wireless, a new printer ain't all that
    expensive, especially if I offset some of the cost by selling my current
    one on Craigslist.

    I would not be too confident of being able to get any money for an old
    printer. It's hard to get any money for a NEW printer.

    --
    Eliot: Becoming me was the greatest creative project of my life.

    --- SoupGate-Win32 v1.05
    * Origin: fsxNet Usenet Gateway (21:1/5)