• Glyphs

    From emf@21:1/5 to All on Sun Apr 23 00:00:42 2017
    I am looking for 6 glyphs: a circle, a triangle, and a square with a +
    or a - inside. I have found these 3 ⊕ ⊖ ⊞. They are OK though I'd prefer the + and - smaller. Is there any font that contains these glyphs?

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  • From Gwenni Veare@21:1/5 to emf on Sun Apr 23 07:14:23 2017
    emf wrote:

    I am looking for 6 glyphs: a circle, a triangle, and a square with a +
    or a - inside. I have found these 3 ⊕ ⊖ ⊞. They are OK though I'd prefer
    the + and - smaller. Is there any font that contains these glyphs?

    Cambria, Cambria Math, Segoe UI Symbol, and Symbola have all 6
    characters ⊕ ⊖ ⊞ ⊟ ⨹ ⨺.

    If you prefer the + and - smaller, then you may want to use DejaVu Sans
    for the 4 characters ⊕ ⊖ ⊞ ⊟.

    One way to find which fonts contain a character is to enter the
    character at "http://www.fileformat.info/info/unicode/char/search.htm",
    click the "Search" button, click on a search result, then click on
    "Fonts that support".

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  • From David E. Ross@21:1/5 to emf on Sat Apr 22 23:02:31 2017
    On 4/22/2017 9:00 PM, emf wrote:
    I am looking for 6 glyphs: a circle, a triangle, and a square with a +
    or a - inside. I have found these 3 ⊕ ⊖ ⊞. They are OK though I'd prefer
    the + and - smaller. Is there any font that contains these glyphs?


    For several variations of the circle and square with - and +, look at
    Symbola by George Douros or Microsoft's Segoe UI. Symbola appears to
    be a freeware font. If licensed to you, Segoe UI can be embedded in
    documents for others to view; but they cannot install the font without obtaining their own licenses.

    I have not seen any closed triangle with - or +.

    Just be careful if you intend to use these glyphs in an Internet medium
    (e.g., a Web page). Unless the font you use has the glyph at a standard Unicode code-point, the glyph might not appear to an end-user as you
    intended. Furthermore, you must indicate the correct "charset" property
    for the font. Even then, the glyph might still not be seen as you
    intended unless the end-user has the same font installed unless you use
    the HTML 5 specification for embedding fonts.

    --
    David E. Ross
    <http://www.rossde.com>

    Consider:
    * Most state mandate that drivers have liability insurance.
    * Employers are mandated to have worker's compensation insurance.
    * If you live in a flood zone, flood insurance is mandatory.
    * If your home has a mortgage, fire insurance is mandatory.

    Why then is mandatory health insurance so bad??

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  • From Peter Flynn@21:1/5 to emf on Sun Apr 23 23:03:48 2017
    On 04/23/2017 05:00 AM, emf wrote:
    I am looking for 6 glyphs: a circle, a triangle, and a square with a +
    or a - inside. I have found these 3 ⊕ ⊖ ⊞.

    You may be aware that these are the standard Unicode characters (search
    for them):

    Char Code­ UTF-8 Name
    ⊕ 2295 0xE28A95 Circled plus
    ⊖ 2296 0xE28A96 Circled minus
    ⊞ 229e 0xE28A9E Squared plus

    They are OK though I'd prefer the + and - smaller.

    Unicode doesn't define any fonts: it just assigns a codepoint to every
    symbol and leaves the design up to the font designers. So if you don't
    like them in the font your computer uses by default, you can go and find another font that displays them differently.

    Is there any font that contains these glyphs?

    Lots, possibly hundreds. David and Gwenni have given excellent pointers.
    But often they are not in the codepoint locations you might expect,
    especially if they are in an older font (eg Computer Modern Symbol) that
    had them before they were standardised by the ISO. These are math
    characters, usually, so it's also worth checking in Scott Pakin's vast Comprehensive LaTeX Symbol List at http://tug.ctan.org/info/symbols/comprehensive/symbols-a4.pdf

    On 04/23/2017 07:02 AM, David E. Ross wrote:
    [...]
    I have not seen any closed triangle with - or +.

    Those are also defined in Unicode.

    Char Code­ UTF-8 Name
    ⨹ 2a39 0xE2A8B9 Plus sign in triangle
    ⨺ 2a3a 0xE2A8BA Minus sign in triangle
    ⨻ 2a3b 0xE2A8BB Multiplication sign in triangle

    Just be careful if you intend to use these glyphs in an Internet
    medium (e.g., a Web page). Unless the font you use has the glyph at a standard Unicode code-point

    Yes, if they are standard UTF-8 Unicode characters that you use, they
    should work as-is in all modern browsers with no special markup. Most
    operating systems now come with at least one font containing ALL Unicode characters (eg Verdana on Windows) so that if the character isn't in the current font, the browser will have at least one font where it knows it
    will be found.

    Finding a specific Unicode glyph can be hard when you don't know what
    it's called, as is finding out what an actual character is called when
    you just have the character and nothing else. A colleague of mine, Lucy
    Lyons, set up a search for Unicode emoji for her thesis on Emoji Poetry,
    and has extended it to cover all Unicode characters (which is where I
    got the tables above). She hopes to keep it up to date with additional
    keywords and alternative uses for each character, which will add to the searchabilty. See http://research.ucc.ie/emojis/

    ///Peter
    ---
    XML FAQ: http://xml.silmaril.ie/
    LaTeX typesetting: http://latex.silmaril.ie/

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  • From Jukka K. Korpela@21:1/5 to Peter Flynn on Mon Apr 24 10:05:52 2017
    24.4.2017, 1.03, Peter Flynn wrote:

    Yes, if they are standard UTF-8 Unicode characters that you use, they
    should work as-is in all modern browsers with no special markup.

    They should, but they don’t. First, many programs use a single font
    defined in their settings (or maybe even hard-wired), and who knows what
    that font contains? Programs that should find a glyph for a character if
    any font in the system has one (e.g. web browsers) often fail to do
    that. Or they may find a font that has a wrong glyph, e.g. the
    LastResort font, which contains just generic fallback symbols.

    Most
    operating systems now come with at least one font containing ALL Unicode characters (eg Verdana on Windows)

    No font *can* contain all Unicode characters, due to limitations set by
    current font technologies. A font could theoretically contain all BMP
    (Basic Multilingual Plane) characters. Please tell me if you know one
    that does.

    Verdana is *very* far from that: according to Microsoft, it contains
    1,391 glyphs. Unicode currently (version 9) has 128,172 characters, with
    55,237 of them in the BMP. https://www.microsoft.com/typography/fonts/font.aspx?FMID=1957

    --
    Yucca, http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/

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  • From emf@21:1/5 to Gwenni Veare on Mon Apr 24 23:34:28 2017
    On 2017-04-23 03:14, Gwenni Veare wrote:
    emf wrote:

    I am looking for 6 glyphs: a circle, a triangle, and a square with a +
    or a - inside. I have found these 3 ⊕ ⊖ ⊞. They are OK though I'd prefer
    the + and - smaller. Is there any font that contains these glyphs?

    Cambria, Cambria Math, Segoe UI Symbol, and Symbola have all 6
    characters ⊕ ⊖ ⊞ ⊟ ⨹ ⨺.

    It was nice to see the triangles in your message! I can also copy and
    paste them in an OpenOffice document. So they are in a font that I have
    in my computer.

    If you prefer the + and - smaller, then you may want to use DejaVu Sans
    for the 4 characters ⊕ ⊖ ⊞ ⊟.

    One way to find which fonts contain a character is to enter the
    character at "http://www.fileformat.info/info/unicode/char/search.htm",
    click the "Search" button, click on a search result, then click on
    "Fonts that support".

    It says that also Symbol supports them, but I can't find them in the
    Character Map.in Symbol. I now downloaded and installed Symbola, and
    checked it but somehow I cannot see them there...

    emf

    --
    Natal Transits Calculator
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  • From emf@21:1/5 to David E. Ross on Mon Apr 24 23:25:36 2017
    On 2017-04-23 02:02, David E. Ross wrote:
    On 4/22/2017 9:00 PM, emf wrote:
    I am looking for 6 glyphs: a circle, a triangle, and a square with a +
    or a - inside. I have found these 3 ⊕ ⊖ ⊞. They are OK though I'd prefer
    the + and - smaller. Is there any font that contains these glyphs?


    For several variations of the circle and square with - and +, look at
    Symbola by George Douros or Microsoft's Segoe UI. Symbola appears to
    be a freeware font. If licensed to you, Segoe UI can be embedded in documents for others to view; but they cannot install the font without obtaining their own licenses.

    I have not seen any closed triangle with - or +.

    Just be careful if you intend to use these glyphs in an Internet medium (e.g., a Web page).

    Thanks. No, I do not intend to use them on the Internet, not at this
    point anyway.

    --
    It ain't me, babe - A radical reinterpretation http://emf.neocities.org/bd/itaintmebabe.html

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  • From Gwenni Veare@21:1/5 to emf on Tue Apr 25 07:08:20 2017
    emf wrote:

    I now downloaded and installed Symbola, and
    checked it but somehow I cannot see them there...

    These screen-shots show where I see them in Symbola.
    I am using Symbola version 9.00, the latest official release
    from George Douros ( http://users.teilar.gr/~g1951d/ ).

    ⊕⊖⊞⊟ http://tinypic.com/r/2nw07tc/9 (screen-shot)
    ⨹⨺ http://tinypic.com/r/5e5mix/9 (screen-shot)

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  • From Jukka K. Korpela@21:1/5 to emf on Tue Apr 25 11:14:49 2017
    25.4.2017, 6.34, emf wrote:
    On 2017-04-23 03:14, Gwenni Veare wrote:
    emf wrote:
    [...]
    Cambria, Cambria Math, Segoe UI Symbol, and Symbola have all 6
    characters ⊕ ⊖ ⊞ ⊟ ⨹ ⨺.
    [...]
    One way to find which fonts contain a character is to enter the
    character at "http://www.fileformat.info/info/unicode/char/search.htm",
    click the "Search" button, click on a search result, then click on
    "Fonts that support".

    It says that also Symbol supports them,

    No, the page
    http://www.fileformat.info/info/unicode/char/2295/fontsupport.htm
    does not mention Symbol at all. Symbol and Symbola are completele
    different beasts. Symbol is an old, privately encoded font that contains
    a small number of commonly used mathematical symbols, but not circled operators. Symbola is much newer, Unicode encoded free font with good
    coverage of mathematical symbols and other special characters. I have a relatively old version, 7.01, of it, and even it contains these characters.

    I now downloaded and installed Symbola, and
    checked it but somehow I cannot see them there...

    You must have tested it somehow wrong. If you open character viewer
    program such as Character Map (CharMap) on Windows, set font to Symbola,
    and look for U+2295 for example, it is there. If it isn’t something went wrong in installing Symbola.

    --
    Yucca, http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/

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  • From Peter Flynn@21:1/5 to Jukka K. Korpela on Wed Apr 26 21:06:11 2017
    On 04/24/2017 08:05 AM, Jukka K. Korpela wrote:
    24.4.2017, 1.03, Peter Flynn wrote:

    Yes, if they are standard UTF-8 Unicode characters that you use, they
    should work as-is in all modern browsers with no special markup.

    They should, but they don’t. First, many programs use a single font
    defined in their settings (or maybe even hard-wired), and who knows what
    that font contains?

    I was talking about modern web browsers. I think they all try to find a suitable glyph in the fonts they know are installed.

    Programs that should find a glyph for a character if
    any font in the system has one (e.g. web browsers) often fail to do
    that.

    In which case they display a little blank rectangle. Some software on
    Linux displays a rectangle with the hex UTF-8 representation of the
    character in it, so you can see what it's meant to be.

    Or they may find a font that has a wrong glyph, e.g. the
    LastResort font, which contains just generic fallback symbols.

    That too.

    Most
    operating systems now come with at least one font containing ALL Unicode
    characters (eg Verdana on Windows)

    No font *can* contain all Unicode characters, due to limitations set by current font technologies. A font could theoretically contain all BMP
    (Basic Multilingual Plane) characters. Please tell me if you know one
    that does.

    You're right, sorry...I was under the impression that Verdana had
    somehow been engineered as some kind of multi-font container to allow it
    to be used as the font of last resort.

    Verdana is *very* far from that: according to Microsoft, it contains
    1,391 glyphs. Unicode currently (version 9) has 128,172 characters, with 55,237 of them in the BMP.

    Has anyone ever counted the number of characters that do NOT display as
    a blank rectangle on the default installations of Windows, OS X, and
    Linux (say, Ubuntu)?

    ///Peter

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  • From emf@21:1/5 to Peter Flynn on Thu Apr 27 23:59:06 2017
    On 2017-04-23 18:03, Peter Flynn wrote:
    On 04/23/2017 05:00 AM, emf wrote:
    I am looking for 6 glyphs: a circle, a triangle, and a square with a +
    or a - inside. I have found these 3 ⊕ ⊖ ⊞.

    You may be aware that these are the standard Unicode characters (search
    for them):

    Char Code­ UTF-8 Name
    ⊕ 2295 0xE28A95 Circled plus
    ⊖ 2296 0xE28A96 Circled minus
    ⊞ 229e 0xE28A9E Squared plus

    They are OK though I'd prefer the + and - smaller.

    Unicode doesn't define any fonts: it just assigns a codepoint to every
    symbol and leaves the design up to the font designers. So if you don't
    like them in the font your computer uses by default, you can go and find another font that displays them differently.

    Is there any font that contains these glyphs?

    Lots, possibly hundreds. David and Gwenni have given excellent pointers.
    But often they are not in the codepoint locations you might expect, especially if they are in an older font (eg Computer Modern Symbol) that
    had them before they were standardised by the ISO. These are math
    characters, usually, so it's also worth checking in Scott Pakin's vast Comprehensive LaTeX Symbol List at http://tug.ctan.org/info/symbols/comprehensive/symbols-a4.pdf

    That's a little too much for what I need.

    On 04/23/2017 07:02 AM, David E. Ross wrote:
    [...]
    I have not seen any closed triangle with - or +.

    Those are also defined in Unicode.

    Char Code­ UTF-8 Name
    ⨹ 2a39 0xE2A8B9 Plus sign in triangle
    ⨺ 2a3a 0xE2A8BA Minus sign in triangle
    ⨻ 2a3b 0xE2A8BB Multiplication sign in triangle

    Great! But I'm wondering what's the easiest way to have access to them
    when I need them. I'm thinking of having them in a file from where I can
    copy them.


    Just be careful if you intend to use these glyphs in an Internet
    medium (e.g., a Web page). Unless the font you use has the glyph at a
    standard Unicode code-point

    Yes, if they are standard UTF-8 Unicode characters that you use, they
    should work as-is in all modern browsers with no special markup. Most operating systems now come with at least one font containing ALL Unicode characters (eg Verdana on Windows) so that if the character isn't in the current font, the browser will have at least one font where it knows it
    will be found.

    Finding a specific Unicode glyph can be hard when you don't know what
    it's called, as is finding out what an actual character is called when
    you just have the character and nothin\g else.

    It isn't that hard if someone posts to this newsgroup and gets advice
    from guys like you! And since we are here one more thing:

    I am also looking for an archaic Greek A, like this

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greek_alphabet#/media/File:Greek_Alpha_03.svg

    I have it the Athena Ruby font, "U+E101 Private Use". I'm wondering if
    it has a name in the Unicode list and another name...

    Thanks,

    Eustace

    PS. I intend to answer some other replies, but I am a little busy, and
    have to explore first some directions I've been given.

    --
    Natal Transits Calculator
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  • From emf@21:1/5 to Gwenni Veare on Mon May 1 23:56:31 2017
    On 2017-04-25 03:08, Gwenni Veare wrote:
    emf wrote:

    I now downloaded and installed Symbola, and
    checked it but somehow I cannot see them there...

    These screen-shots show where I see them in Symbola.
    I am using Symbola version 9.00, the latest official release
    from George Douros ( http://users.teilar.gr/~g1951d/ ).

    ⊕⊖⊞⊟ http://tinypic.com/r/2nw07tc/9 (screen-shot)\
    ⨹⨺ http://tinypic.com/r/5e5mix/9 (screen-shot)

    Thanks. I found them. Now my problem is that Symbola font is vertically
    bigger then DejaVu Sans Mono that I use. I'll check other fonts -- or
    find out how I can make them fit the line height in OO.

    Eustace

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  • From Jukka K. Korpela@21:1/5 to emf on Tue May 2 10:10:08 2017
    2.5.2017, 6.56, emf wrote:

    Now my problem is that Symbola font is vertically bigger then DejaVu
    Sans Mono that I use. I'll check other fonts -- or find out how I can
    make them fit the line height in OO.

    Vertically bigger? In what sense? And why do you use a monospace font?
    The circled operators have mainly been included for use in mathematical notations, and math is best written in a serif font.

    You might get help with the issue if you described what you are actually
    doing.

    --
    Yucca, http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/

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