• ES Picture of the Day 04 2020

    From Black Panther@21:1/186 to All on Wed Nov 4 11:00:42 2020
    EPOD - a service of USRA

    The Earth Science Picture of the Day (EPOD) highlights the diverse processes and phenomena which shape our planet and our lives. EPOD will collect and archive photos, imagery, graphics, and artwork with short explanatory
    captions and links exemplifying features within the Earth system. The
    community is invited to contribute digital imagery, short captions and
    relevant links.


    Stonerose Eocene Fossil Site

    November 04, 2020

    STONEROSE

    Photographer: Beth Anderson
    Summary Author: Beth Anderson

    Seen above is the Stonerose Interpretive Center & Eocene Fossil
    Site in Republic, Washington. Here families can check for fossils
    in the shale that remains from the layers of volcanic ash built
    up at the bottom of an ancient Eocene lake. As the layers built up
    many ancient flora and fauna were stuck in the mud. Stonerose
    fossils tell the story of the geologic and biologic past of the
    Okanogan Highlands, and the area shows an unusual habitat for which
    there are no other fossil records of the era. Today, the public can
    visit the site, rent tools, and take a short walk to the site to see
    these ancient records for themselves. Photo taken June 19, 2019.
    Photo Details: Google Pixel 2, 12.2 MP, f/1.8, 27mm (wide), 1/2.55",
    1.4µm, dual pixel PDAF, Laser AF, OIS
    * Republic, Washington Coordinates: 48.64787, -118.73922

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    Geology Links

    * Earthquakes
    * Geologic Time
    * Geomagnetism
    * General Dictionary of Geology
    * Mineral and Locality Database
    * Mohs Scale of Mineral Hardness
    * This Dynamic Earth
    * USGS
    * USGS Ask a Geologist
    * USGS/NPS Geologic Glossary
    * USGS Volcano Hazards Program

    -
    Earth Science Picture of the Day is a service of the Universities
    Space Research Association.

    https://epod.usra.edu

    --- up 10 weeks, 1 day, 21 hours, 20 minutes
    * Origin: -=> Castle Rock BBS <=- Now Husky HPT Powered! (21:1/186)
  • From Black Panther@21:1/186 to All on Fri Dec 4 11:00:54 2020
    EPOD - a service of USRA

    The Earth Science Picture of the Day (EPOD) highlights the diverse processes and phenomena which shape our planet and our lives. EPOD will collect and archive photos, imagery, graphics, and artwork with short explanatory
    captions and links exemplifying features within the Earth system. The
    community is invited to contribute digital imagery, short captions and
    relevant links.


    What Does a Volcano Look Like?

    December 04, 2020

    Capture

    Photographer: Gabrielle Tepp
    Summary Author: Gabrielle Tepp

    What does a volcano look like? While you might expect a mountain with a
    large crater at the peak, that’s not always the case. This picture (two
    images combined into a panorama for a wider view) shows the summit of
    Bogoslof volcano in the central Aleutian Islands of Alaska.
    Most of the volcano is hidden beneath the Bering Sea (visible on
    right) with only the very top forming the small Bogoslof Island.

    The 2016-2017 eruption of the volcano drastically changed the
    landscape and morphology of the island, which increased in area
    from less than 74 acres (0.3 sq km) to nearly 321 acres (1.5 sq km).
    Near the center of the image is a lava dome produced during the
    eruption that is now the highest point of the island.

    The lava dome is mostly covered by pyroclastic deposits from the 70
    or so explosions that occurred over 8 months. It was still steaming a
    year after the eruption ended when this photo was taken on August 16,
    2018. The ground in front of the lava dome was covered by seawater
    during much of the eruption and may have been an explosion-producing
    vent. The oranges and yellows are hydrothermally-altered rocks.
    Bogoslof Island is not only an active volcano but an important
    breeding ground for tens of thousands of fur seals and sea
    birds.
    * Bogoslof Island, Alaska Coordinates: 53.93034, -168.03525

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    Geology Links

    * Earthquakes
    * Geologic Time
    * Geomagnetism
    * General Dictionary of Geology
    * Mineral and Locality Database
    * Mohs Scale of Mineral Hardness
    * This Dynamic Earth
    * USGS
    * USGS Ask a Geologist
    * USGS/NPS Geologic Glossary
    * USGS Volcano Hazards Program

    -
    Earth Science Picture of the Day is a service of the Universities
    Space Research Association.

    https://epod.usra.edu

    --- up 14 weeks, 3 days, 21 hours, 20 minutes
    * Origin: -=> Castle Rock BBS <=- Now Husky HPT Powered! (21:1/186)