• ES Picture of the Day 05 2022

    From Black Panther@21:1/186 to All on Sat Feb 5 11:01:14 2022
    EPOD - a service of USRA

    The Earth Science Picture of the Day (EPOD) highlights the diverse processes and phenomena which shape our planet and our lives. EPOD will collect and archive photos, imagery, graphics, and artwork with short explanatory
    captions and links exemplifying features within the Earth system. The
    community is invited to contribute digital imagery, short captions and
    relevant links.


    Archive - Pancake Rocks, New Zealand

    February 05, 2022

    6a0105371bb32c970b015439070ae1970c

    Every weekend we present a notable item from our archives.

    This EPOD was originally published January 2, 2012.

    Photographer: Enver Murad
    Summary Author: Enver Murad
    Paparoa National Park on New Zealand’s west coast near the small
    town of Punakaiki is renowned for its limestone cliffs and
    karst phenomena such as caves and underground streams. Formation of
    the famous Pancake Rocks began during the Tertiary period when
    carbonate-rich fragments of marine plant and animal skeletons were
    deposited on the seabed some 30 million years ago. The resultant
    alternating layers of hard and soft limestone and mudstone were
    eventually solidified and raised above sea level. Wind, rain and acidic
    waters finally carved today’s spectacular formations out of the solid
    rock, giving the appearance of stacked pancakes.
    * Pancake Rocks, New Zealand Coordinates: -42.10833, 171.33611

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    Geology Links

    * Earthquakes
    * Geologic Time
    * Geomagnetism
    * General Dictionary of Geology
    * Mineral and Locality Database
    * Mohs Scale of Mineral Hardness
    * This Dynamic Earth
    * USGS
    * MyShake - University of California, Berkeley
    * USGS Ask a Geologist
    * USGS/NPS Geologic Glossary
    * USGS Volcano Hazards Program

    -
    Earth Science Picture of the Day is a service of the Universities
    Space Research Association.

    https://epod.usra.edu

    --- up 8 weeks, 6 days, 20 hours, 43 minutes
    * Origin: -=> Castle Rock BBS <=- Now Husky HPT Powered! (21:1/186)
  • From Black Panther@21:1/186 to All on Sat Mar 5 11:00:26 2022
    EPOD - a service of USRA

    The Earth Science Picture of the Day (EPOD) highlights the diverse processes and phenomena which shape our planet and our lives. EPOD will collect and archive photos, imagery, graphics, and artwork with short explanatory
    captions and links exemplifying features within the Earth system. The
    community is invited to contribute digital imagery, short captions and
    relevant links.


    Archive - Red Beach, Peru

    March 05, 2022

    6a0105371bb32c970b01a3fd108e02970b

    Every weekend we present a notable item from our archives.

    This EPOD was originally published on June 23, 2014.

    Photographer: Samuele Gasparini
    Summary Authors: Samuele Gasparini; Jim Foster

    Shown above is Red Beach, part of the Paracas National Reserve, on
    the barren shores of the Pacific Ocean in Peru. The red
    coloration of the beach is attributed to pink granodiorite that
    has eroded out of the nearby cliffs of Punta Santa Maria by wave
    action, forming a reddish pebble-sand mix. The carmine color of the
    beach contrasts with the tans and browns of the adjacent coastal
    cliffs. Over 200 migratory bird species and approximately 3 dozen
    species of land and marine mammals are found in the Paracas
    Reserve. Photo taken on August 9, 2011.

    Photo details: Camera Maker: FUJIFILM; Camera Model: FinePix S2000HD;
    Focal Length: 5.0mm; Aperture: f/7.0; Exposure Time: 0.0020 s (1/500);
    ISO equiv: 100; Software: Adobe Photoshop CS5 Windows.
    * Red Beach, Peru Coordinates: -13.8959, -76.296703

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    Geology Links

    * Earthquakes
    * Geologic Time
    * Geomagnetism
    * General Dictionary of Geology
    * Mineral and Locality Database
    * Mohs Scale of Mineral Hardness
    * This Dynamic Earth
    * USGS
    * MyShake - University of California, Berkeley
    * USGS Ask a Geologist
    * USGS/NPS Geologic Glossary
    * USGS Volcano Hazards Program

    -
    Earth Science Picture of the Day is a service of the Universities
    Space Research Association.

    https://epod.usra.edu

    --- up 5 days, 20 minutes
    * Origin: -=> Castle Rock BBS <=- Now Husky HPT Powered! (21:1/186)
  • From Black Panther@21:1/186 to All on Tue Apr 5 12:01:02 2022
    EPOD - a service of USRA

    The Earth Science Picture of the Day (EPOD) highlights the diverse processes and phenomena which shape our planet and our lives. EPOD will collect and archive photos, imagery, graphics, and artwork with short explanatory
    captions and links exemplifying features within the Earth system. The
    community is invited to contribute digital imagery, short captions and
    relevant links.


    Anticrepuscular Rays at the Winter Sunset

    April 05, 2022

    Raggi Anticrepuscolari Teresa Molinaro

    Photographer: Teresa Molinaro

    Summary Authors: Teresa Molinaro; Cadan Cummings

    The magical golden hour following sunset brings about many vistas
    including times when the eastern sky is filled with anticrepuscular
    rays. These sunbeams occur on the opposite horizon from the Sun and
    appear to converge towards the antisolar point. Anticrepuscular
    rays typically accompany crepuscular rays that appear on the
    opposite horizon. Both atmospheric ray phenomena are produced when
    incoming sunlight is partially blocked by clouds or a tall landform and
    are accentuated when dust, smoke or other particulates are in the air.
    Although the anticrepuscular rays appear to converge at the antisolar
    point, the sunbeams are actually parallel in the atmosphere and
    this optical effect is caused by the viewer’s perspective.

    The photo above was taken on December 22, 2021, at around 4:50PM local
    time. That evening, I found myself observing the sea just as the Sun
    had set behind me. To my surprise, these soft but unmistakable
    anticrepuscular rays radiated into the sky. In addition, an orange and
    pink hue produced by Belt of Venus is also faintly visible on the
    eastern horizon.

    Photo details: Nikon D3400, 1/160 second exposure, f/10, ISO-400
    * Bagheria, Sicily, Italy Coordinates: 38.083, 13.500

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    Cloud Links

    * Atmospheric Optics
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    * Color and Light in Nature

    -
    Earth Science Picture of the Day is a service of the Universities
    Space Research Association.

    https://epod.usra.edu

    --- up 5 weeks, 1 day, 21 minutes
    * Origin: -=> Castle Rock BBS <=- Now Husky HPT Powered! (21:1/186)
  • From Black Panther@21:1/186 to All on Thu May 5 12:01:26 2022
    EPOD - a service of USRA

    The Earth Science Picture of the Day (EPOD) highlights the diverse processes and phenomena which shape our planet and our lives. EPOD will collect and archive photos, imagery, graphics, and artwork with short explanatory
    captions and links exemplifying features within the Earth system. The
    community is invited to contribute digital imagery, short captions and
    relevant links.


    2022 Ice Out Dates for Sebago Lake, Maine

    May 05, 2022

    Ice after ice-out main pier 040422

    Ice out graphs Maine 1800-2000

    Photographer: John Stetson

    Summary Author: John Stetson

    This past winter the “Big Bay" of Sebago Lake in Maine did not
    freeze. The smaller bay, Jordan Bay, experienced ice-in on January
    16th. Ice-out from Standish to Raymond was listed as April 3rd.

    See the graphs (from the U.S. Geological Society) below the photo. The
    regression lines tell the tale of the trend. Ice-out on April 3rd is
    early for Sebago Lake.

    We did have a surprise on the afternoon of April 4th (top photo). One
    day after the official ice-out, wind carried a not-so-small amount of
    ice to our shore. However, the next morning not a trace of ice could be
    seen. Click here to see a record of ice out dates from 2000 through
    2020.
    * Sebago Lake, Maine Coordinates: 43.85, -70.56666

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    Cryosphere Links

    * Guide to Frost
    * What is the Cryosphere?
    * Bentley Snow Crystals
    * Glaciers of the World
    * Ice, Snow, and Glaciers: The Water Cycle
    * The National Snow and Ice Data Center Google Earth Images
    * Snow and Ice Crystals

    -
    Earth Science Picture of the Day is a service of the Universities
    Space Research Association.

    https://epod.usra.edu

    --- up 9 weeks, 3 days, 21 minutes
    * Origin: -=> Castle Rock BBS <=- Now Husky HPT Powered! (21:1/186)
  • From Black Panther@21:1/186 to All on Tue Jul 5 12:01:04 2022
    EPOD - a service of USRA

    The Earth Science Picture of the Day (EPOD) highlights the diverse processes and phenomena which shape our planet and our lives. EPOD will collect and archive photos, imagery, graphics, and artwork with short explanatory
    captions and links exemplifying features within the Earth system. The
    community is invited to contribute digital imagery, short captions and
    relevant links.


    The Castles of the Calchaquíes Valleys

    July 05, 2022

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    Photographer: Carlos Di Nallo

    Summary Authors: Carlos Di Nallo; Cadan Cummings

    Los Castillos is a geological formation located within Argentina’s
    Calchaquíes Valleys in the Salta province. Likely due to its
    steep-sided walls, the Los Castillos formation was given its unique
    name that translates “The Castles” in English. In addition to being an
    interesting area to visit, the reddish hued landform is also an
    important paleontology site that is comprised of geologic samples
    dating back the Cretaceous period.

    Adjacent to Los Castillos is a small ravine that represents a
    deeper look into the region's geologically history. The ravine was
    likely formed by tectonic movements that took place the last two
    million years. Similarly, the surrounding landscape was likely also
    formed and shaped from a combination of weathering and tectonic
    activities.

    * Salta Province, Argentina Coordinates: -26.001, -65.808

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    Geology Links

    * Earthquakes
    * Geologic Time
    * Geomagnetism
    * General Dictionary of Geology
    * Mineral and Locality Database
    * Mohs Scale of Mineral Hardness
    * This Dynamic Earth
    * USGS
    * MyShake - University of California, Berkeley
    * USGS Ask a Geologist
    * USGS/NPS Geologic Glossary
    * USGS Volcano Hazards Program

    -
    Earth Science Picture of the Day is a service of the Universities
    Space Research Association.

    https://epod.usra.edu

    --- up 18 weeks, 1 day, 21 minutes
    * Origin: -=> Castle Rock BBS <=- Now Husky HPT Powered! (21:1/186)
  • From Black Panther@21:1/186 to All on Fri Aug 5 12:00:32 2022
    EPOD - a service of USRA

    The Earth Science Picture of the Day (EPOD) highlights the diverse processes and phenomena which shape our planet and our lives. EPOD will collect and archive photos, imagery, graphics, and artwork with short explanatory
    captions and links exemplifying features within the Earth system. The
    community is invited to contribute digital imagery, short captions and
    relevant links.


    Mudcracks: Now and Then

    August 05, 2022


    Mudcracks

    Photographer: Marli Miller
    Summary Author: Marli Miller
    One of the wonderful things about sedimentary rocks is that they
    record the conditions at Earth's surface when they’re deposited -- and
    one of the most recognizable features are mudcracks. As we all can
    see, mudcracks form as wet, fine-grained sediment dries out, as shown
    by the top photo of a shoreline in the Amargosa Valley of
    southeastern California (taken in April 2022).

    The bottom photo shows mudcracks in the Proterozoic-age
    Snowslip Formation of Glacier National Park in Montana (taken
    in July 2013). These rocks, deposited in northern Montana's Belt
    Basin between about 1.4 and 1.5 billion years ago, likely formed near
    the shoreline of a shallow inland sea where the sediment was similarly
    periodically wet and dry.

    Amargosa Valley, California Coordinates: 36.58001, -116.44487

    Glacier National Park, Montana Coordinates: 48.7596, -113.7870


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    Geology Links

    * Earthquakes
    * Geologic Time
    * Geomagnetism
    * General Dictionary of Geology
    * Mineral and Locality Database
    * Mohs Scale of Mineral Hardness
    * This Dynamic Earth
    * USGS
    * MyShake - University of California, Berkeley
    * USGS Ask a Geologist
    * USGS/NPS Geologic Glossary
    * USGS Volcano Hazards Program

    -
    Earth Science Picture of the Day is a service of the Universities
    Space Research Association.

    https://epod.usra.edu

    --- up 22 weeks, 4 days, 20 minutes
    * Origin: -=> Castle Rock BBS <=- Now Husky HPT Powered! (21:1/186)
  • From Black Panther@21:1/186 to All on Mon Sep 5 12:01:04 2022
    EPOD - a service of USRA

    The Earth Science Picture of the Day (EPOD) highlights the diverse processes and phenomena which shape our planet and our lives. EPOD will collect and archive photos, imagery, graphics, and artwork with short explanatory
    captions and links exemplifying features within the Earth system. The
    community is invited to contribute digital imagery, short captions and
    relevant links.


    Wizard’s Hat and Milky Way

    September 05, 2022


    2022_05_04_Pano_35mm_Carodejuv_Klobouk_MW_1500px

    Photographer: Petr Horálek
    Summary Author: Petr Horálek
    The Chilean Atacama Desert is just full of magical creations. On
    this photo, I found a previously unnamed geological landform dozens of
    kilometers south of the famous Valle de la Luna National Park that
    I've named "Wizard's Hat." The curious formations in this park were
    formed by the sequential folding of an old salt lake that
    eventually dried and was forced upwards by the movement of tectonic
    plates. The Milky Way and Large Magellanic Cloud, near the
    horizon, glows overhead. Photo taken on May 4, 2022.
    San Pedro de Atacama, Chile Coordinates: -22.9087, -68.1997


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    -
    Earth Science Picture of the Day is a service of the Universities
    Space Research Association.

    https://epod.usra.edu

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    * Origin: -=> Castle Rock BBS <=- Now Husky HPT Powered! (21:1/186)